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3.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 81(9): 1-6, 2020 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32990069

RESUMO

Hands-on wet lab simulation training is a vital part of modern surgical training. Since 2010, surgical 'boot camps' have been run by many UK deaneries to teach core surgical trainees basic entry level skills. Training in advanced skills often requires attendance at national fee-paying courses. In the Wessex Deanery, multiple, free of charge, core surgical 'field camps' were developed to provide more advanced level teaching in the particular specialty preference of each core surgical trainee. After the COVID-19 pandemic, national hands-on courses will be challenging to provide and deanery-based advanced skills training may be the way forward for craft-based specialties. The experiences over 2 years of delivering the Wessex core surgical field camps are shared, giving a guide and advice for other trainers on how to run a field camp.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Treinamento por Simulação , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Educação/métodos , Educação/organização & administração , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Modelos Anatômicos , Modelos Educacionais , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Satisfação Pessoal , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Autoimagem , Treinamento por Simulação/métodos , Treinamento por Simulação/organização & administração , Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Recursos Humanos/métodos , Reino Unido
4.
South Med J ; 113(9): 462-465, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32885267

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically changed resident training in the United States. Here, we explore the early perceived effects of COVID-19 on dermatology residents through an electronic sample survey and identify possible areas for targeted improvement in lieu of a possible second wave of COVID-19 cases. METHODS: On April 3, 2020, a survey of link with 25 questions was sent to dermatology program coordinators to be disseminated among dermatology residents in the United States. The survey was closed on April 13, 2020. All of the questions were optional and no personal identifiers were collected. RESULTS: A total of 140 dermatology residents from 50 different residency programs across 26 states responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (85%) reported negative effects of COVID-19 on their overall wellness. Despite the majority of residents (92%) speculating that COVID-19 will have negative long-term effects on the US economy, only 33% agreed or strongly agreed that it will affect their job prospects. Teledermatology was widely implemented following the declaration of a national emergency (96% of represented residencies compared with only 30% before the pandemic), with heavy resident involvement. The majority of residents (99%) reported having virtual didactics and that they found them to be beneficial. Most residents were uncomfortable with the prospect of being reassigned to a nondermatology specialty during the pandemic. In addition, 22% of residents believed that their leadership were not transparent and prompt in addressing changes relating to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology residents were affected negatively by COVID-19 in regard to their well-being, clinical training, and education. Several areas of improvement were identified that could improve our preparedness for a second wave of the virus.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Dermatologia , Pandemias , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/tendências , Pneumonia Viral , Dermatopatias/terapia , Telemedicina , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Dermatologia/educação , Dermatologia/métodos , Educação/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Inovação Organizacional , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Percepção Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/tendências , Estados Unidos
5.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(9): e1007833, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32881872

RESUMO

Since 2015, we have run a free 9-week summer program that provides non-computer science (CS) undergraduates at San Francisco State University (SFSU) with experience in coding and doing research. Undergraduate research experiences remain very limited at SFSU and elsewhere, so the summer program provides opportunities for many more students beyond the mentoring capacity of our university laboratories. In addition, we were concerned that many students from historically underrepresented (HU) groups may be unable to take advantage of traditional summer research programs because these programs require students to relocate or be available full time, which is not feasible for students who have family, work, or housing commitments. Our program, which is local and part-time, serves about 5 times as many students as a typical National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program, on a smaller budget. Based on our experiences, we present 10 simple rules for busy faculty who want to create similar programs to engage non-CS HU undergraduates in computational research. Note that while some of the strategies we implement are based on evidence-based publications in the social sciences or education research literature, the original suggestions we make here are based on our trial-and-error experiences, rather than formal hypothesis testing.


Assuntos
Metodologias Computacionais , Educação/métodos , Universidades , Humanos , Ciência da Informação/educação , Ciência da Informação/organização & administração , Internet , Desenvolvimento de Programas , São Francisco , Estudantes
6.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237712, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32810180

RESUMO

This study presents the results of research focused on university teachers' perceptions of the implementation of ECO (Explore, Create, and Offer) methodology. Through teachers´ responses, the objective was to learn about the impact ECO has on both teaching and learning. The sample consists of 22 teachers from four academic fields; they implemented ECO methodology during the 2018-19 academic year with 1,350 undergraduate students and 175 Master's-level students. The participating teachers belong to five universities: Universidad de Sevilla (Spain), Universitat de Barcelona (Spain), Universidade de Vigo (Spain), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain) and Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). An exploratory and descriptive study was carried out, and the data were gathered from an online survey filled in by the teachers. Twenty-eight cases were obtained, one for each course that was involved in the project. The mean values were analysed by running a Kruskal-Wallis H test and ER2 for the effect size. In addition, the thematic analysis method was used to analyse the teachers' perceptions while representing their opinions faithfully. The results showed that ECO methodology has a very positive effect on the personal development of the teachers. ECO is a methodology that comes to have revolutionary effects, improving the relationship between teachers and students, who strengthen their commitment to their own learning. It is also an excellent means for connecting students with the social and professional world outside of academia.


Assuntos
Atitude , Educação/métodos , Docentes/psicologia , Modelos Educacionais , Universidades , Argentina , Docentes/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Espanha , Estudantes/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários/estatística & dados numéricos
8.
Z Gerontol Geriatr ; 53(5): 382-388, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32647990

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Even though the effects of cultural activities on active and positive ageing have been extensively examined, spatial aspects have hardly been considered by research in this field. OBJECTIVES: Instead of understanding active ageing as a result of cultural education, this article focuses on practices of (active) ageing in cultural education programs for older adults. We examined the meanings of space and spatial arrangements in which cultural education takes place and how these spatial aspects limit or enable active ageing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The article is based on six qualitative case studies of programs for cultural education for older adults. In programs, such as a yodel seminar or a theater workshop, data were collated by participatory observation and qualitative interviews with the participants and trainers of each program. All data were analyzed using situational analysis. RESULTS: We found that the spaces where the programs took place had a special meaning to the older participants. This was mainly because these spaces where not exclusively designed for target groups of older adults. The experience of the program was not only characterized by these meanings but also by how these spaces were used within the program. Active ageing was realized through the appropriation of new spaces and specific spatial arrangements. CONCLUSION: This article shows how spatial arrangements and the experience of (active) ageing are intertwined. To foster active ageing, cultural education programs need to provide spaces which can be used accordingly. For environmental gerontology, this paper highlights the necessity to consider the symbolic dimension of spaces and environments in research.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/psicologia , Educação/métodos , Meio Ambiente , Geriatria/educação , Vida Independente/psicologia , Comportamento Espacial , Humanos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Meio Social
9.
Acad Radiol ; 27(8): 1147-1153, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32507612

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Social distancing mandates due to COVID-19 have necessitated adaptations to radiology trainee workflow and educational practices, including the radiology "readout." We describe how a large academic radiology department achieved socially distant "remote readouts," provide trainee and attending perspectives on this early experience, and propose ways by which "remote readouts" can be used effectively by training programs beyond COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Beginning March 2020, radiologists were relocated to workspaces outside of conventional reading rooms. Information technologies were employed to allow for "remote readouts" between trainees and attendings. An optional anonymous open-ended survey regarding remote readouts was administered to radiology trainees and attendings as a quality improvement initiative. From the responses, response themes were abstracted using thematic analysis. Descriptive statistics of the qualitative data were calculated. RESULTS: Radiologist workstations from 14 traditional reading rooms were relocated to 36 workspaces across the hospital system. Two models of remote readouts, synchronous and asynchronous, were developed, facilitated by commercially available information technologies. Thirty-nine of 105 (37%) trainees and 42 of 90 (47%) attendings responded to the survey. Main response themes included: social distancing, technology, autonomy/competency, efficiency, education/feedback and atmosphere/professional relationship. One hundred and forty-eight positive versus 97 negative comments were reported. Social distancing, technology, and autonomy/competency were most positively rated. Trainees and attending perspectives differed regarding the efficiency of remote readouts. CONCLUSION: "Remote readouts," compliant with social distancing measures, are feasible in academic radiology practice settings. Perspectives from our initial experience provide insight into how this can be accomplished, opportunities for improvement and future application, beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação a Distância , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Radiografia/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Educação/métodos , Educação/organização & administração , Educação a Distância/métodos , Educação a Distância/tendências , Eficiência Organizacional , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
12.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232802, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32469875

RESUMO

The general objective of this study is to analyze student satisfaction with the use of virtual campuses in university teaching in order to discover the main variables influencing the overall online teaching-learning process that give quality to the virtual educational process. To this end, an ex-post-facto research methodology was applied to 1084 university students, who completed an ad hoc designed questionnaire, which allowed us to carry out descriptive analysis, classification trees and fuzzy inference systems using SPSS and Matlab software. The results suggest that four variables predominantly influence the quality of the teaching-learning processes in virtual campuses: satisfactory teacher responses to student questions and observations, the positive attitude of teachers towards the use of information and communication technologies, students having appropriate digital skills, and activities that encourage ideas and debate.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico/psicologia , Educação/métodos , Aprendizagem , Estudantes/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Software , Espanha , Inquéritos e Questionários , Ensino/psicologia , Telecomunicações , Universidades , Interface Usuário-Computador , Adulto Jovem
13.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(5): e1007754, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32379823

RESUMO

The current academic culture facing women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields in the United States has sparked the formation of grassroots advocacy groups to empower female scientists in training. However, the impact of these initiatives often goes unmeasured and underappreciated. Our Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) organization serves postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and research technicians (trainees) at a private research institute for biological sciences. Here we propose the following guidelines for cultivating a successful women-in-STEM-focused group based upon survey results from our own scientific community as well as the experience of our WiSE group leaders. We hope these recommendations can provide guidance to advocacy groups at other research and academic organizations that wish to strengthen their efforts. Whereas our own group specifically focuses on the underrepresented state of women in science, we hope these guidelines may be adapted and applied to groups that advocate for any minority group within the greater scientific community (i.e., those of gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, etc.).


Assuntos
Educação/métodos , Mulheres/educação , Sucesso Acadêmico , Adulto , Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/educação , Engenharia/educação , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Matemática/educação , Grupos Minoritários/educação , Ciência/educação , Estudantes , Tecnologia/educação , Estados Unidos
15.
Am J Kidney Dis ; 76(1): 109-120, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32414662

RESUMO

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects more than two-thirds of patients receiving hemodialysis and is the leading cause of death in this population, yet CVD outcomes are infrequently and inconsistently reported in trials in patients receiving hemodialysis. As part of the Standardised Outcomes in Nephrology-Haemodialysis (SONG-HD) initiative, we convened a consensus workshop to discuss the potential use of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death as core outcome measures for CVD for use in all trials in people receiving hemodialysis. Eight patients or caregivers and 46 health professionals from 15 countries discussed selection and implementation of the proposed core outcome measures. Five main themes were identified: capturing specific relevance to the hemodialysis population (acknowledging prevalence, risk, severity, unique symptomology, and pathophysiology), the dilemmas in using composite outcomes, addressing challenges in outcome definitions (establishing a common definition and addressing uncertainty in the utility of biomarkers in hemodialysis), selecting a meaningful metric for decision making (to facilitate comparison across trials), and enabling and incentivizing implementation (by ensuring that cardiologists are involved in the development and integration of the outcome measure into registries, trial design, and reporting guidelines). Based on these themes, participants supported the use of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death as core outcome measures of CVD to be reported in all hemodialysis trials.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto/normas , Consenso , Educação/normas , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/normas , Diálise Renal/normas , Doenças Cardiovasculares/diagnóstico , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto/métodos , Educação/métodos , Pessoal de Saúde/normas , Humanos , Internacionalidade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/métodos , Participação do Paciente/métodos , Diálise Renal/métodos , Sociedades Médicas/normas
17.
Infant Ment Health J ; 41(3): 393-410, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32281127

RESUMO

This study sought to understand how practitioners perceive and experience the Circle of Security-Parenting (COS-P) training, and further, how they integrate and implement it into practice, and how these experiences influence their use and understanding of the program and its underlying model. A thematic analysis of semistructured interviews at two time points (shortly after training and 3-6 months after training) was used to explore 12 practitioners' experiences of COS-P training and subsequent implementation. Three main themes were identified; clinical salience, personal salience, and partial use of the program. The findings reflected participants' common perception that the model is relevant and generalizable to a wide variety of contexts. It also highlighted potential barriers to implementation, particularly practitioners' experiences using only components of the COS-P program in isolation. The results suggest practitioners' assumptions about client complexities, vulnerabilities, and/or incapacities, can prompt practitioners to withhold the use of COS-P (in part or whole), thereby potentially neglecting key components required for client change. The only participants who implemented the COS-P training in full had additional training in Circle of Security.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação não Profissionalizante/métodos , Relações Pais-Filho , Poder Familiar/psicologia , Adulto , Educação/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Apego ao Objeto , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/métodos
18.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0229773, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32196509

RESUMO

Creative thinking is among the most sought-after life and work skills in the 21st century. The demand for creativity, however, exceeds the degree to which it is available and developed. The current project aimed to test the effectiveness of a one-year creativity training program for higher education. The creativity of students following the training was measured before, halfway, and after the training. In addition to the within-subjects comparison across time, performance was compared to a matched control group. At each of the measurement points, different versions of seven well-validated creativity tasks (capturing divergent and convergent creative thinking skills) were employed. The creativity training increased students' ideation skills and, more importantly their cognitive flexibility. However, no difference in originality was observed. Finally, an increase in performance was observed for one of the convergent creativity tasks, the Remote Associate Test. Implications for educational settings and directions for future research are discussed.


Assuntos
Criatividade , Educação/métodos , Cuidados no Lar de Adoção/métodos , Estudantes/psicologia , Pensamento , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(3): e17167, 2020 03 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32159519

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cognitive and behavioral symptoms are the clinical hallmarks of neurocognitive disorders. Cognitive training may be offered to reduce the risks of cognitive decline and dementia and to reduce behavioral symptoms, such as apathy. Information and communication technology approaches, including serious games, can be useful in improving the playful aspect of computerized cognitive training and providing motivating solutions in elderly patients. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of employing the MeMo (Memory Motivation) Web app with regard to cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with neurocognitive disorders. METHODS: MeMo is a Web app that can be used on any Web browser (computer or tablet). The training activities proposed in MeMo are divided into the following two parts: memory and mental flexibility/attention. The study included 46 individuals (mean age 79.4 years) with a diagnosis of neurocognitive disorders at the Institut Claude Pompidou Memory Center in Nice. This randomized controlled study compared the evolution of cognition and behavior between patients not using MeMo (control group) and patients using MeMo (MeMo group) for 12 weeks (four sessions per week). Patients underwent memory and attention tests, as well as an apathy assessment at baseline, week 12 (end of the training period), and week 24 (12 weeks after the end of the training sessions). In addition, to assess the impact of high and low game uses, the MeMo group was divided into patients who used MeMo according to the instructions (about once every 2 days; active MeMo group) and those who used it less (nonactive MeMo group). RESULTS: When comparing cognitive and behavioral scores among baseline, week 12, and week 24, mixed model analysis for each cognitive and behavioral score indicated no significant interaction between testing time and group. On comparing the active MeMo group (n=9) and nonactive MeMo group (n=13), there were significant differences in two attention tests (Trial Making Test A [P=.045] and correct Digit Symbol Substitution Test items [P=.045]) and in the Apathy Inventory (AI) (P=.02). Mixed analysis (time: baseline, week 12, and week 24 × number of active days) indicated only one significant interaction for the AI score (P=.01), with a significant increase in apathy in the nonactive MeMo group. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the cognitive and behavioral efficacies of MeMo, a Web-based training app, can be observed only with regular use of the app. Improvements were observed in attention and motivation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04142801; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04142801.


Assuntos
Cognição/fisiologia , Educação/métodos , Aplicativos Móveis/normas , Transtornos Neurocognitivos/diagnóstico , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos de Pesquisa
20.
J Athl Train ; 55(4): 359-364, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32160059

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Neuromuscular training programs can reduce the rate of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, particularly in female athletes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the awareness of, experience with, and factors associated with participation in preventive training programs (PTPs) among female collegiate athletes and their knowledge of ACL injuries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports programs. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: A total of 440 female NCAA athletes (age = 20 ± 1 years) representing 20 sports during the 2017-2018 academic year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): We used a 12-item survey to collect data on each participant's age, sport, position, college, NCAA division, and awareness of and experience with PTPs. We performed descriptive statistics and used odds ratios (ORs) to assess relationships between demographic data and awareness of or interest in PTPs. RESULTS: Of the 440 respondents, 85% (n = 373) knew that female athletes were at higher risk for sustaining ACL injuries than male athletes, and 89% (n = 391) knew that ACL injuries were preventable. Thirty-three percent (n = 143) were familiar with the concept of ACL PTPs. Only 15% (n = 64) had ever performed PTPs, but 89% (n = 391) reported they would perform a daily PTP if it could prevent ACL injuries. Fifty-two of the 64 respondents (81%) who had performed PTPs said athletic trainers or coaches oversaw the PTPs. Participants were more likely to be familiar with ACL PTPs if they (OR = 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0, 5.8) or a teammate (OR = 4.6; 95% CI = 2.1, 9.8) had sustained an ACL injury. Respondents were more willing to perform PTPs if they (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 0.80, 6.6) or a teammate (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.8, 6.6) had sustained an ACL injury. CONCLUSIONS: Although 89% of respondents expressed interest in performing daily ACL PTPs, only 15% had performed such programs, and only 33% were familiar with the concept of ACL PTPs.


Assuntos
Lesões do Ligamento Cruzado Anterior/prevenção & controle , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Educação , Medicina Esportiva , Atletas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Educação/métodos , Educação/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Serviços Preventivos de Saúde , Medicina Esportiva/métodos , Medicina Esportiva/normas , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
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