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1.
Annu Rev Entomol ; 65: 1-16, 2020 01 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31600455

RESUMO

This autobiographical article describes the research career of Lynn M. Riddiford from its early beginnings in a summer program for high school students at Jackson Laboratory to the present "retirement" at the Friday Harbor Laboratories. The emphasis is on her forays into many areas of insect endocrinology, supported by her graduate students and postdoctoral associates. The main theme is the hormonal regulation of metamorphosis, especially the roles of juvenile hormone (JH). The article describes the work of her laboratory first in the elucidation of the endocrinology of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, and later in the molecular aspects of the regulation of cuticular and pigment proteins and of the ecdysone-induced transcription factor cascade during molting and metamorphosis. Later studies utilized Drosophila melanogaster to answer further questions about the actions of JH.


Assuntos
Endocrinologia/história , Entomologia/história , Metamorfose Biológica , Universidades/história , Animais , Evolução Biológica , Drosophila/fisiologia , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Hormônios Juvenis/metabolismo , Larva/fisiologia , Manduca/fisiologia , Olfato
2.
J Am Mosq Control Assoc ; 35(3): 238-240, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31647714

RESUMO

Since 1979 more than 40 individuals have been recognized for their lifetime achievements in the AMCA Memorial Lecture. These individuals have included luminaries such as Carlos Finlay, Leland Osian Howard, William Herms, Andy Spielman, and, most recently, Fred Knapp (2018). Only one of these individuals recognized, Harold Gray in 1987, was an engineer. Engineers are problem solvers, and mosquito control is, most assuredly, an enterprise fraught with problems. Thus, the selection of William R. Opp as the 2019 honoree is both timely and well deserved. Bill Opp's career is a testament to an individual who made a difference in the lives of countless individuals.


Assuntos
Entomologia/história , Controle de Mosquitos/história , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Estados Unidos
3.
Biomedica ; 39: 172-198, 2019 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31529859

RESUMO

The study of mosquitoes is important in the prevention of vector-borne diseases. In Ecuador, the study of local mosquito biodiversity was pioneered by two entomologists whose contributions span through the first half of the 20th century, Francisco Campos-Rivadeneira and Roberto Levi-Castillo. Both of them contributed to general aspects of Entomology and to particular insights in mosquito taxonomy. Their publications and discoveries were recognized by the international scientific community but went unnoticed in South America during their time. Today, very few citizens remember the names and contributions of these two scientists. Here, we provide an overview of their lives, a summary of their contributions, and we conclude with a broader outlook on the practice of science in Latin America during their time.


Assuntos
Culicidae , Entomologia/história , Agricultura/história , Animais , Culicidae/classificação , Equador , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , Medicina Militar/história , Filatelia/história , Pesquisa/história
6.
Annu Rev Entomol ; 64: 1-13, 2019 01 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30629895

RESUMO

Elizabeth A. Bernays grew up in Australia and studied at the University of Queensland before traveling in Europe and teaching high school in London. She later obtained a PhD in entomology at London University. Then, as a British government scientist, she worked in England and in developing countries on a variety of projects concerned with feeding by herbivorous insects and their physiology and behavior. In 1983, she was appointed professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where her research expanded to a variety of topics, all related to the physiology, behavior, and ecology of feeding in insects. She was awarded a DSc from the University of London, and at about the same time became head of the Department of Entomology and regents' professor at the University of Arizona. In Arizona, most of her research involved multiple approaches to the understanding of diet breadth in a variety of phytophagous insect species.


Assuntos
Entomologia/história , Gafanhotos/fisiologia , Herbivoria , Universidades/história , Animais , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Controle de Insetos/história
7.
Asclepio ; 70(1): 0-0, ene.-jun. 2018. ilus
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-173505

RESUMO

José María Dusmet (1869-1960) fue un reconocido entomólogo español, especialista en macrohimenópteros, que desarrolló su labor vinculado al Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales aun sin ocupar oficialmente puesto alguno. En 1925 un joven universitario de Valencia, Modesto Quilis (1904-1938), contactó con él para solicitarle consejo para progresar en su afición por los insectos. A partir de ese momento, y durante más de diez años, Dusmet fue iniciando a Quilis en la práctica entomológica profesional. Así, le asesoraba en la adquisición de ejemplares y bibliografía, al tiempo que le facilitaba contactos entre especialistas nacionales y extranjeros y le resolvía dudas de nomenclatura y taxonomía. Además, le inició en un cierto ethos caballeresco de la práctica naturalista. Con el tiempo, Quilis logró una inserción profesional como entomólogo especialista en microhimenópteros y control biológico de las plagas del campo, iniciando una prometedora carrera que frustró su temprana muerte. Las cartas que ambos intercambiaron, conservadas en el Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, ponen de relieve los detalles de un magisterio en la distancia intensamente cargado de admiración mutua y cultivo de la amistad


José María Dusmet (1869-1960) was a renowned Spanish entomologist. He specialized in big Hymenoptera, developing his tasks at the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid, despite the fact he never occupied an official position. In 1925, Modesto Quilis (1904-1938), a student from Valencia, wrote Dusmet in order to obtain advice on how to make progress in entomological studies. From that moment and for more than a decade, Dusmet gave Quilis guidance to the practice of professional entomology in a diversity of aspects, e.g., acquisition of specimens and bibliography, contacts with other colleagues in Spain and other countries, or questions on taxonomy and nomenclature. He also introduced his young disciple in a certain kind of scientific ethos, based on a chivalric sense of the relationship between natural history practitioners. Some years went by and Quilis obtained an official job as entomologist specialized in microhymenoptera and pest control. His promising career was cut short by his premature death. Exchange letters between both naturalists have been consulted at the Archive of the National Museum of Natural History. This correspondence highlights the details of a sort of teaching-in-distance, pervaded by friendship and mutual admiration


Assuntos
Humanos , Insetos/ultraestrutura , Entomologia/história , História Natural/educação , Disciplinas das Ciências Naturais/história , Correspondência como Assunto/história
9.
Annu Rev Entomol ; 63: 1-13, 2018 01 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29324038

RESUMO

This article presents an overview of the development of techniques for analyzing cuticular proteins (CPs), their transcripts, and their genes over the past 50 years based primarily on experience in the laboratory of J.H. Willis. It emphasizes changes in the kind of data that can be gathered and how such data provided insights into the molecular underpinnings of insect metamorphosis and cuticle structure. It describes the techniques that allowed visualization of the location of CPs at both the anatomical and intracuticular levels and measurement of the appearance and deployment of transcripts from CP genes as well as what was learned from genomic and transcriptomic data. Most of the early work was done with the cecropia silkmoth, Hyalophora cecropia, and later work was with Anopheles gambiae.


Assuntos
Entomologia/história , Proteínas de Insetos/análise , Insetos/metabolismo , Metamorfose Biológica , Proteômica/história , Animais , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Proteínas de Insetos/genética , Proteínas de Insetos/metabolismo , Insetos/genética
11.
Ticks Tick Borne Dis ; 8(6): 813-820, 2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28526419

RESUMO

Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the etiological agent of a severe human disease transmitted by hard ticks. It occurs in large parts of eastern, central, and western Asia and in Europe with thousands of human cases each year. Here, the discovery of the virus by Soviet scientists in the late 1930s in the Far East is described. The pioneering work involved with this discovery, which resulted in great scientific and epidemiological achievement, was undertaken under the most difficult conditions, and some of the scientists and their technical assistants paid for it with their health and even their lives. This paper briefly outlines the steps on the way that elucidated the basic etiology and eco-epidemiology of the disease, and does not omit that, as one result of the expeditions and the political situation in the former Soviet Union at that time, some scientists were sent to prison.


Assuntos
Vírus da Encefalite Transmitidos por Carrapatos/fisiologia , Encefalite Transmitida por Carrapatos/história , Entomologia/história , Expedições/história , Ixodes/virologia , Virologia/história , Animais , Encefalite Transmitida por Carrapatos/transmissão , História do Século XX , Humanos , Sibéria , U.R.S.S.
12.
Annu Rev Entomol ; 62: 1-13, 2017 01 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28141963

RESUMO

Charles Calisher was fascinated by microorganisms from the time he was in high school. He attended Stuyvesant High School in New York City, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science (now University of the Sciences) (BS), then University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana (MS), and finally Georgetown University, in Washington, DC (PhD), the latter while employed at a commercial biological house. He was hired by the US Communicable Disease Center (now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in Atlanta, Georgia, was transferred to its Fort Collins laboratories in 1973, and retired from there in 1992. After traveling the world a bit, Calisher joined the faculty of Colorado State University in 1993, then semiretired as professor emeritus in 2010. During all those years, he developed from a would-be virologist to an arbovirologist-epidemiologist, identifying scores of newly recognized viruses from throughout the world and helping to investigate disease outbreaks and epidemics. His interests (always primarily arboviruses but now also rodent-borne viruses and bat-borne viruses) continue to expand, and he continues to be involved in various aspects of virology and to assist and annoy journal editors and others in regard to viral taxonomy.


Assuntos
Arbovirus/fisiologia , Entomologia/história , Virologia/história , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Estados Unidos
14.
Protein Cell ; 8(6): 395-397, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27815823
15.
J Invertebr Pathol ; 143: 83-89, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27871814

RESUMO

Dr. Rer. Nat. Alois M. Huger had a long and distinguished career at the Institut für biologische Schädlingsbekämpfung (Institute for Biological Pest Control) Darmstadt, Germany, where he became one of the world's leading insect pathologists. He applied his experience and understanding of insect tissues and specialist skills in microscopy to diagnosis and elucidation of the pathology of insect diseases. During his career he discovered the Oryctes nudivirus and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis, and was a member of teams unravelling amber disease in scarab beetles and the role of bacteria in parthenogenesis of parasitoids. He researched and described the life cycles of microsporidian and rickettsial pathogens of insects and was the first to describe the ultrastructure of a microsporidian spore. Dr. Huger carried out diagnosis of diseased insects over a period of 55years and has left us with many publications and a database containing thousands of records for ongoing investigation. Working with multiple pathogens in different systems, Dr. Huger obtained an overview second to none in the complexities of insect/pathogen relationships and has been at the forefront of making these discoveries benefit humanity. He is a worthy recipient of the Founders' Lecture Honoree Award, the highest honour of the Society for Invertebrate Pathology.


Assuntos
Entomologia/história , Patologia/história , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI
16.
Zootaxa ; 4193(3): zootaxa.4193.3.1, 2016 Nov 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27988688

RESUMO

A total of 27 male sciarid types described by Skuse (1888 and 1890), held in the Australian National Insect Collection, Canberra, and the Australian Museum, Sydney, were remounted and examined microscopically. Of these, 25 species were described as Sciara Meigen, one as Zygoneura Meigen and one as Trichosia Winnertz. Revision of these species revealed the following: 13 species belong to the genus Bradysia Winnertz (B. amabilis, B. conjuncta, B. crassicornis, B. exsequialis, B. frequens, B. froggatti, B. luctifica, B. maesta, B. mastersi, B. ornatula, B. pernitida, B. pictipes, B. unica), 1 species to the genus Corynoptera Winnertz (C. minutela), 4 species to the genus Austrosciara Schmitz & Mjöberg (Aus. infrequens, Aus. montivaga, Aus. spectabilis, Aus. winnertzi), 2 species to the genus Pseudolycoriella Menzel & Mohrig (Psl. cavatica, Psl. ignobilis), 1 species to the genus Pseudozygomma Mohrig (Pseudoz. maculipennis), 1 species to the genus Sciara Meigen (Sc. tryoni), and 1 species to the genus Scythropochroa Enderlein (Scyth. macleayi). In total 26 species were new combinations. Eight species names were declared as new synonyms: Bradysia pictipes (Skuse, 1888) = Sciara notata Skuse, 1888 syn. n. and = Bradysia seticornis Vilkamaa, Hippa & Mohrig, 2012 (from New Caledonia) syn. n.; Bradysia conjuncta (Skuse, 1890) = Sciara serenipennis Skuse, 1890 syn. n.; Pseudolycoriella cavatica (Skuse, 1888) = Sciara familiaris Skuse, 1888 syn. n. and = Sciara festiva Skuse, 1888 syn. n.; Bradysia luctifica (Skuse, 1888) = Bradysia planistylata Vilkamaa, Hippa & Mohrig, 2012 syn. n.; Sciara tryoni Skuse, 1890 = Sciara insulana Vilkamaa, Hippa & Mohrig, 2015 syn. n. (both species are from New Caledonia); Austrosciara winnertzi (Skuse, 1888) = Sciara rufulenta Edwards, 1927 syn. n. (from New Zealand). Lectotype specimens were designated for 17 species in order to fix the names.


Assuntos
Dípteros/classificação , Distribuição Animal , Estruturas Animais/anatomia & histologia , Estruturas Animais/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Animais , Austrália , Tamanho Corporal , Dípteros/anatomia & histologia , Dípteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Ecossistema , Entomologia/história , Feminino , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , Masculino , Nova Caledônia , Nova Zelândia , Tamanho do Órgão
17.
Zootaxa ; 4189(3): zootaxa.4189.3.4, 2016 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27988746

RESUMO

Erebidae is one of the most diverse families within the order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), with nearly 25,000 described species. The nominal subfamily Erebinae is among the most species rich and taxonomically complex. It reaches its highest diversity in the tropics, where much of the fauna remains undescribed. Species in this subfamily feed on a broad range of host plants, with associated radiations on grasses and legumes, and some species are pests of agriculture and forestry. The Erebinae, as defined today, comprises a large portion of the former noctuid subfamily Catocalinae. However, many lineages have tenuous or uncertain systematic placement. Here, we review the complex historical classification of Erebinae, and discuss the possible placement of some of these lineages in light of traditional morphological groupings and recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. We present an updated list of named erebine tribes and their relationships, and identify morphological traits from literature used to group genera within these tribes.


Assuntos
Mariposas/classificação , Distribuição Animal , Estruturas Animais/anatomia & histologia , Estruturas Animais/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Animais , Tamanho Corporal , Entomologia/história , Feminino , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Masculino , Mariposas/anatomia & histologia , Mariposas/genética , Mariposas/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Tamanho do Órgão , Filogenia
18.
Zootaxa ; 4172(1): 1-211, 2016 Sep 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27701208

RESUMO

The Diptera genus-group names of Pierre-Justin-Marie Macquart are reviewed and annotated. A total of 399 available genus-group names in 69 families of Diptera are listed alphabetically, for each name giving author, year and page of original publication, originally included species, type species and method of fixation, current status of the name, family placement, and a list of any emendations of it that have been found in the literature. Remarks are given to clarify nomenclatural or taxonomic information. In addition, an index to all the species-group names of Diptera proposed by Macquart (3,611, of which 3,543 are available) is given with bibliographic reference (year and page) to each original citation.        The following type species are designated herein: Agculocera nigra Macquart, 1855 for Onuxicera Macquart, 1855, present designation [Tachinidae]; Trixa imhoffi Macquart, 1834, for Semiomyia Macquart, 1848, present designation [Tachinidae].        The following type species are designated herein with fixation under ICZN Code Art. 70.3.2: Azelia nebulosa Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 for Atomogaster Macquart, 1835, present designation [Muscidae]; Tachydromia vocatoria Fallén, 1816 for Chelipoda Macquart, 1835, present designation [Empididae]; Eriocera macquarti Enderlein, 1912 for Eriocera Macquart, 1838, present designation [Limoniidae]; Limosina acutangula Zetterstedt, 1847 for Heteroptera Macquart, 1835, present designation [Sphaeroceridae]; Phryxe pavoniae Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 for Masicera Macquart, 1834, present designation [Tachinidae]; Pachymyia macquartii Townsend, 1916 for Pachymyia Macquart, 1844, present designation [Tachinidae].        Earlier valid subsequent type-species designations have been found in this study for the following: Anisophysa Macquart, 1835 [Sepsidae]; Diphysa Macquart, 1838 [Stratiomyidae]; Pachyrhina Macquart, 1834 [Tipulidae]; Silbomyia Macquart, 1844 [Calliphoridae].        One name is raised from synonymy: Czernyola Bezzi, 1907, n. stat. [Clusiidae].        Names previously treated as available but found in this work to be unavailable include the following: Genus-group names-Anodontina Macquart, 1838, n. stat. [Empididae]; Athricia Macquart, 1834, n. stat. [Tachinidae]; Blepharis Macquart, 1838, n. stat. [Asilidae]; Dichelocera Enderlein, 1922, n. stat. [Tabanidae]; Lepidoselaga Loew, 1869, n. stat. [Tabanidae]; Lemptopeza Macquart, 1828, n. stat. [Hybotidae]; Microphora Zetterstedt, 1842, n. stat. [Dolichopodidae]; Microphorus Macquart, 1834, n. stat. [Dolichopodidae]; Plagiocephala Macquart, 1844, n. stat. [Ulidiidae]; Stratiomyia Macquart, 1838, n. stat. [Stratiomyidae]; Taenioptera Agassiz, 1846, n. stat. [Micropezidae]; Tapigaster Bezzi, 1923, n. stat. [Heleomyzidae]; Trizota Macquart, 1829, n. stat. [Syrphidae]. Species-group names-Microstylum sinense Macquart, 1838, n. stat. [Asilidae].        Corrected or clarified included species and/or corrected or clarified type-species and methods of typification are given for: Anabarhynchus Macquart, 1848 [Therevidae]; Anacanthella Macquart, 1855 [Stratiomyidae]; Apeilesis Macquart, 1846 [Tipulidae]; Aplomera Macquart, 1838 [Empididae]; Aprotheca Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Ardoptera Macquart, 1828 [Empididae]; Blepharella Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Brachystylum Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Cadicera Macquart, 1855 [Tabanidae]; Calobatemyia Macquart, 1855 [Calliphoridae]; Catapicephala Macquart, 1851 [Calliphoridae]; Ceroptera Macquart, 1835 [Sphaeroceridae]; Cheligaster Macquart, 1835 [Sepsidae]; Chetogaster Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Chlorogaster Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Cleitamia Macquart, 1835 [Platystomatidae]; Craspedia Macquart, 1838 [Asilidae]; Craspedochoeta Macquart, 1851 [Anthomyiidae]; Crumomyia Macquart, 1835 [Sphaeroceridae]; Dasyomma Macquart, 1840 [Athericidae]; Demoticus Macquart, 1854 [Tachinidae]; Epicerella Macquart, 1851 [Pyrgotidae]; Epicerina Macquart, 1850 [Acroceridae]; Euprosopia Macquart, 1847 [Platystomatidae]; Grapholostylum Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Graphomyzina Macquart, 1835 [Sciomyzidae]; Gymnostylina Macquart, 1835 [Tachinidae]; Heterometopia Macquart, 1846 [Tachinidae]; Laxenecera Macquart, 1838 [Asilidae]; Leptomyza Macquart, 1835 [Anthomyzidae]; Megistogaster Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Microtrichodes Macquart, 1846 [Tachinidae]; Microtropesa Macquart, 1846 [Tachinidae]; Ogcodocera Macquart, 1840 [Bombyliidae]; Onuxicera Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Ozodicera Macquart, 1834 [Tipulidae]; Pachymerina Macquart, 1834 [Empididae]; Pachyrhina Macquart, 1834 [Tipulidae]; Pachystylum Macquart, 1848 [Tachinidae]; Physegaster Macquart, 1847 [Acroceridae]; Plesionevra Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Rhopalia Macquart, 1838 [Mydidae]; Semiomyia Macquart, 1848 [Tachinidae]; Senostoma Macquart, 1847 [Tachinidae]; Silbomyia Macquart, 1844 [Calliphoridae]; Sumpigaster Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Tapinocera Macquart, 1838 [Apioceridae]; Teretrophora Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Toxocnemis Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Toxotarsus Macquart, 1851 [Calliphoridae]; Trichostylum Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Trigonometopus Macquart, 1835 [Lauxaniidae]; Tritaxys Macquart, 1847 [Tachinidae]; Vermileo Macquart, 1834 [Vermileonidae].        Acting as First Reviser, the following correct original spellings for multiple original spellings are selected by us-(for genus-group names): Choeteprosopa Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Dichoetometopia Macquart, 1855 [Sarcophagidae]; Discocerina Macquart, 1835 [Ephydridae]; Dolichocephala Macquart, 1823 [Empididae]; Dolichomerus Macquart, 1850 [Syrphidae]; Graphalostylum Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Hemilampra Macquart, 1850 [Syrphidae]; Leptomyza Macquart, 1835 [Anthomyzidae]; Microcheilosia Macquart, 1855 [Tachinidae]; Phrissopodia Macquart, 1835 [Sarcophagidae]; Platytainia Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Polychaeta Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Stachynia Macquart, 1835 [Conopidae]-(for species-group names): Cadicera rubramarginata Macquart, 1855 [Tabanidae].        Previous First Reviser actions for multiple original spellings that were missed by other workers are given for the following: Amethysa Macquart, 1835 [Ulidiidae]; Anabarhynchus Macquart, 1848 [Therevidae]; Anacanthella Macquart, 1855 [Stratiomyidae]; Aulacigaster Macquart, 1835 [Aulacigastridae]; Cardiacera Macquart, 1847 [Pyrgotidae]; Comptosia Macquart, 1840 [Bombyliidae]; Craspedia Macquart, 1838 [Asilidae]; Cyclorhynchus Macquart, 1840 [Bombyliidae]; Ectinorhynchus Macquart, 1850 [Therevidae]; Euthinevra Macquart, 1836 [Hybotidae]; Gonistylum Macquart, 1851 [Tachinidae]; Heterostylum Macquart, 1848 [Bombyliidae]; Hoplistomera Macquart, 1838 [Asilidae]; Hystricephala Macquart, 1846 [Tachinidae]; Leptoxyda Macquart, 1835 [Tephritidae]; Nemopalpus Macquart, 1838 [Psychodidae]; Senotainia Macquart, 1846 [Sarcophagidae]; Spilogaster Macquart, 1835 [Muscidae]; Spogostylum Macquart, 1840 [Bombyliidae]; Stachynia Macquart, 1835 [Conopidae].        Invoking ICZN Code Article 33.3.1, the following is here considered a correct original spelling by being in prevailing usage: Leptopeza Macquart, 1828 [Empididae].        Reversal of Precedence (ICZN Code Article 23.9) is invoked to promote stability in nomenclature for the following cases of subjective synonymy: Atherigona Rondani, 1856, nomen protectum and Orthostylum Macquart, 1851, nomen oblitum [in Muscidae]; Clusiodes Coquillett, 1904, nomen protectum and Heteronevra Macquart, 1835, nomen oblitum [in Clusiidae]; Senotainia Macquart, 1846, nomen protectum and Megoera Macquart, 1834, nomen oblitum [in Sarcophagidae].        The following genus-group names, not listed in current regional catalogs, are treated here: Diasema Macquart, 1835 [Chloropidae]; Dichromyia Macquart, 1844 [Heleomyzidae]; Elomyia Macquart, 1834 [Tachinidae]; Eriosoma Macquart, 1838 [Acroceridae]; Eurypalpus Macquart, 1835 [Platystomatidae]; Notacanthina Macquart, 1835 [Ephydridae]; Pleurocerina Macquart, 1851[Conopidae]; Pteropexus Macquart, 1846 [Acroceridae]; Semiomyia Macquart, 1848 [Tachinidae]; Teremyia Macquart, 1835 [Lonchaeidae].        The following names are new synonymies of their respective senior synonyms: -genus-group names: Acemyia Macquart, 1834 of Acemya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Acrochoeta Macquart, 1835 of Acrochaeta Wiedemann, 1830, n. syn. [Stratiomyidae]; Atractea Agassiz, 1846 of Atractia Macquart, 1838, n. syn. [Asilidae]; Aulacocephala Brauer, 1863 of Aulacephala Macquart, 1851, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Beckeriella Williston, 1897 of Notacanthina Macquart, 1834, n. syn. [Ephydridae]; Caenosia Macquart, 1835 of Coenosia Meigen, 1826, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Ceromyia Macquart, 1834 of Ceromya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Chiromysa Macquart, 1835 of Chiromyza Wiedemann, 1820, n. syn. [Stratiomyidae]; Chrisochlora Macquart, 1835 of Chrysochlora Latreille, 1829, n. syn. [Stratiomyidae]; Chrysopyla Macquart, 1840 of Chrysopilus Macquart, 1826, n. syn. [Rhagionidae]; Cleigaster Macquart, 1844 of Cleigastra Macquart, 1835, n. syn. [Scathophagidae]; Clyto Macquart, 1835 of Clytho Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Cordylura Macquart, 1835 of Cordilura Fallén, 1810, n. syn. [Scathophagidae]; Craspedochaeta Marschall, 1873 of Anthomyia Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Anthomyiidae]; Cyrtonevra Agassiz, 1846 of Graphomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Diaphora Macquart, 1834 of Diaphorus Meigen, 1824, n. syn. [Dolichopodidae]; Dichoeta Macquart, 1835 of Dichaeta Meigen, 1830, n. syn. [Ephydridae]; Dichromyia Macquart, 1844 of Dichromya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Heleomyzidae]; Diphysa Macquart, 1838 of Archistratiomys Enderlein, 1913, n. syn. [Stratiomyidae]; Echinomyia Fischer von Waldheim, 1808 of Tachina Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Egina Macquart, 1835 of Eginia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Hematobia Macquart, 1850 of Haematobia Le Peletier & Audinet-Serville, 1828, n. syn.[Muscidae]; Hemerodromyia Macquart, 1823 of Hemerodromia Meigen, 1822, n. syn. [Empididae]; Heteronevra Macquart, 1835 of Clusiodes Coquillett, 1904, n. syn. [Clusiidae]; Himastima Agassiz, 1846 of Mallota Meigen, 1822, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Hoematopota Macquart, 1826 of Haematopota Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tabanidae]; Homalocephala Agassiz, 1846 of Setellia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Sciomyzidae]; Hydrotoea Macquart, 1844 of Hydrotaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Linnemyia Macquart, 1834 of Linnaemya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Lonchoea Macquart, 1835 of Lonchaea Fallén, 1820b, n. syn. [Lonchaeidae]; Macromyia Macquart, 1835 of Macromya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Megarhina Macquart, 1838 of Lynchiella Lahille, 1904, n. syn. [Culicidae]; Meriana Macquart, 1835 of Panzeria Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Microphorus Lundbeck, 1907 of Microphor Macquart, 1834, n. syn. [Dolichopodidae]; Nemoroea Macquart, 1844 of Nemoraea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Ochthiphila Macquart, 1850 of Chamaemyia Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Chamaemyiidae]; Ocydromyia Macquart, 1823 of Ocydromia Meigen, 1820, n. syn. [Hybotidae]; Oliviera Macquart, 1835 of Eriothrix Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Ophilia Macquart, 1850 of Metopia Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Sarcophagidae]; Ornithomyia Fischer von Waldheim, 1808 of Ornithomya Latreille, 1802, n. syn. [Hippoboscidae]; Orthochile Westwood, 1840 of Ortochile Latreille, 1809, n. syn. [Dolichopodidae]; Osmoea Macquart, 1834 of Triarthria Stephens, 1829, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Pachyrrhina Osten Sacken, 1878 of Pachyrhina Macquart, 1834, n. syn. [Tipulidae]; Palis Macquart, 1850 of Pales Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Phanemia Macquart, 1835 of Clairvillia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Phrissopoda Macquart, 1851 of Peckia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Sarcophagidae]; Phyllomyia Macquart, 1834 of Phyllomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Physogenia Loew, 1862 of Physegenua Macquart, 1848, n. syn. [Lauxaniidae]; Physogenua Giglio-Tos, 1895 of Physegenua Macquart, 1848, n. syn. [Lauxaniidae]; Phytomiza Macquart, 1835 of Phytomyza Fallén, 1810, n. syn. [Agromyzidae]; Platipalpus Macquart, 1850 of Platypalpus Macquart, 1828, n. syn. [Hybotidae]; Platipeza Macquart, 1850 of Platypeza Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Platypezidae]; Platynochoetus Macquart, 1834 of Platynochaetus Wiedemann, 1830 [Syrphidae]; Porphirops Macquart, 1838 of Porphyrops Meigen, 1824, n. syn [Dolichopodidae]; Rhinomyia Macquart, 1835 of Rhinomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Rhynomyia Macquart, 1834 of Rhinomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Scathopse Guérin-Méneville, 1839 of Scatopse Geoffroy, 1762, n. syn. [Scatopsidae]; Spherophoria Macquart, 1850 of Sphaerophoria Le Peletier & Audinet-Serville, 1828, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Sphoerophoria Macquart, 1829 of Sphaerophoria Le Peletier & Audinet-Serville, 1828, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Stenopteryx Schiner, 1864 of Stenepteryx Leach, 1817, n. syn. [Hippoboscidae]; Stenostoma Mik, 1890 of Senostoma Macquart, 1847, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Tachydromyia Macquart, 1823 of Tachydromia Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Hybotidae]; Taenioptera Mik, 1898 of Taeniaptera Macquart, 1835, n. syn. [Micropezidae]; Trinevra Macquart, 1835 of Phora Latreille, 1797, n. syn. [Phoridae]; Uramyia Macquart, 1844 of Uramya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Xestomysa Macquart, 1851 of Xestomyza Wiedemann, 1820, n. syn. [Therevidae]; Zygonevra Macquart, 1834 of Zygoneura Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Sciaridae]. -Species-group names: Calobatemyia nigra Macquart, 1855 of Musca doronici Scopoli, 1763, n. syn. [Calliphoridae]; Cyrtonevra protorum Macquart, 1850 of Musca pratorum Meigen, 1826, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Eumerus oeneus Macquart, 1850 of Eumerus aeneus Macquart, 1829, n. syn. [Syrphidae]; Lucilia ceserion Macquart, 1850 of Musca caesarion Scharfenberg, 1805, n. syn. [Calliphoridae]; Masicera sylvatica Macquart, 1850 of Tachina silvatica Fallén, 1810, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Ophyra anolis Macquart, 1850 of Ophyra analis Macquart, 1846, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Pegomyia hyosciami Macquart, 1850 of Musca hyoscyami Panzer, 1798, n. syn. [Anthomyiidae]; Prosena syberita Macquart, 1850 of Stomoxys siberita Fabricius, 1775, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Taxigramma heteronevra Macquart, 1850 of Miltogramma heteroneura Meigen, 1830, n. syn. [Sarcophagidae].


Assuntos
Dípteros/classificação , Animais , Entomologia/história , História do Século XVIII , História do Século XIX
19.
Zootaxa ; 4158(3): 325-51, 2016 Aug 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27615889

RESUMO

Larvae, pupae and adults of Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) were collected during fieldwork in Chilean Patagonia, December 2013 and January 2014. Eggs were obtained from females that oviposited in captivity. Association of all life stages is based on co-occurrence and rearing of individual larvae to adults. A diagnosis for the genus and species is provided. Descriptions of the egg, larva and pupa and redescriptions of the male and female are completed. Eggs of A. gloriosus are the first described for Tanyderidae. Natural history characteristics for this species, including microhabitat, copulatory behavior and oviposition, are discussed.


Assuntos
Dípteros/classificação , Dípteros/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Distribuição Animal , Estruturas Animais/anatomia & histologia , Estruturas Animais/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Animais , Tamanho Corporal , Chile , Dípteros/anatomia & histologia , Dípteros/fisiologia , Ecossistema , Entomologia/história , Feminino , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Larva/anatomia & histologia , Larva/classificação , Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Masculino , Tamanho do Órgão , Oviposição , Óvulo/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Pupa/anatomia & histologia , Pupa/classificação , Pupa/crescimento & desenvolvimento
20.
J Hist Ideas ; 77(3): 489-507, 2016 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27477347

RESUMO

The case of William Morton Wheeler and Alfred North Whitehead represents a striking example of how biologists and philosophers engaged in a common enterprise in the early twentieth century. Both challenge the notion that the living world is composed of distinct organisms. Based on his studies of the behavior of social insects, Wheeler developed a concept of superorganisms that paved the way for a theory of emergent evolution. This paper argues that Whitehead, whose relation to academic biology has been largely ignored, drew on Wheeler's findings and integrated them into a universal philosophical cosmology.


Assuntos
Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/história , Filosofia/história , Animais , Comportamento Animal , Entomologia/história , História do Século XX , Insetos , Inteligência , Estados Unidos , Zoologia/história
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