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1.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(12)2021 Jun 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34205808

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to model and evaluate the Specific Energy Absorption Rate (SAR) values in humans in proximity to fixed multi-antenna I-RFID readers of passive tags under various scenarios mimicking exposure when they are incorporated in Real-Time Location Systems (RTLS), or used to monitor Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). The sources of the electromagnetic field (EMF) in the modelled readers were rectangular microstrip antennas at a resonance frequency in free space of 866 MHz from the ultra-high frequency (UHF) RFID frequency range of 865-868 MHz. The obtained results of numerical modelling showed that the SAR values in the body 5 cm away from the UHF RFID readers need consideration with respect to exposure limits set by international guidelines to prevent adverse thermal effects of exposure to EMF: when the effective radiated power exceeds 5.5 W with respect to the general public/unrestricted environments exposure limits, and with respect to occupational/restricted environments exposure limits, when the effective radiated power exceeds 27.5 W.


Assuntos
Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Dispositivo de Identificação por Radiofrequência , Campos Eletromagnéticos , Humanos , Monitorização Fisiológica
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34205069

RESUMO

Pandemic diseases of this century have differentially targeted healthcare workers globally. These infections include Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome SARS, the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Ebola. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued this pattern, putting healthcare workers at extreme risk. Just as healthcare workers have historically been committed to the service of their patients, providing needed care, termed their "duty of care", so too do healthcare employers have a similar ethical duty to provide care toward their employees arising from historical common law requirements. This paper reports on results of a narrative review performed to assess COVID-19 exposure and disease development in healthcare workers as a function of employer duty of care program elements adopted in the workplace. Significant duty of care deficiencies reported early in the pandemic most commonly involved lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) availability. Beyond worker safety, we also provide evidence that an additional benefit of employer duty of care actions is a greater sense of employee well-being, thus aiding in the prevention of healthcare worker burnout.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Setor de Assistência à Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Oriente Médio , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34208462

RESUMO

Asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients produce a considerable amount of virus and transmit severe acute respiratory syndrome virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) through close contact. Preventing in-hospital transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is challenging, since symptom-based screening protocols may miss asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic patients. In particular, dental healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of exposure, as face-to-face contact and exposure to oral secretions is unavoidable. We report exposure of HCWs during dental procedures on a mild symptomatic COVID-19 patient. A 32-year-old male visited a dental clinic at a tertiary care hospital. He experienced mild cough, which started three days before the dental visit, but did not report his symptom during the entrance screening. He underwent several dental procedures and imaging for orthognathic surgery without wearing a mask. Seven HCWs were closely exposed to the patient during dental procedures that could have generated droplets and aerosols. One HCW had close contact with the patient during radiologic exams, and seven HCWs had casual contact. All HCWs wore particulate filtering respirators with 94% filter capacity and gloves, but none wore eye protection or gowns. The next day, the patient experienced dysgeusia and was diagnosed with COVID-19 with high viral load. All HCWs who had close contact with the patient were quarantined for 14 days, and polymerase chain reaction and antibody tests for SARS-CoV-2 were negative. This exposure event suggests the protective effect of particulate filtering respirators in dental clinics. The recommendations of different levels of personal protective equipment (PPE) for dental HCWs according to the procedure types should be established according to the planned procedure, the risk of COVID-19 infection of the patient, and the outbreak situation of the community.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Clínicas Odontológicas , Adulto , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa do Paciente para o Profissional/prevenção & controle , Masculino , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventiladores Mecânicos
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(27): e26526, 2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34232186

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Smartphone alerting systems (SAS) for first responders potentially shorten the resuscitation-free interval of patients with acute cardiac arrest. During the corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, many systems are suspended due to potential risks for the responders.Objective of the study was to establish a concept for SAS during the COVID-19 pandemic and to evaluate whether a SAS can safely be operated in pandemic conditions.A SAS had been implemented in Freiburg (Germany) in 2018 alerting nearby registered first responders in case of emergencies with suspected cardiac arrest. Due to the pandemic, SAS was stopped in March 2020. A concept for a safe restart was elaborated with provision of a set with ventilation bag/mask, airway filter, and personal protective equipment (PPE) for every volunteer. A standard operating procedure was elaborated following the COVID-19 guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council.Willingness of the participants to respond alarms during the pandemic was investigated using an online survey. The response rates of first responders were monitored before and after deactivation, and during the second wave of the pandemic.The system was restarted in May 2020. The willingness to respond to alarms was lower during the pandemic without PPE. It remained lower than before the pandemic when the volunteers had been equipped with PPE, but the alarm response rate remained at approximately 50% during the second wave of the pandemic.When volunteers are equipped with PPE, the operation of a SAS does not need to be paused, and the willingness to respond remains high among first responders.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa do Paciente para o Profissional/prevenção & controle , Pandemias , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Smartphone , Socorristas , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273426

RESUMO

Asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients produce a considerable amount of virus and transmit severe acute respiratory syndrome virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) through close contact. Preventing in-hospital transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is challenging, since symptom-based screening protocols may miss asymptomatic/mildly symptomatic patients. In particular, dental healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of exposure, as face-to-face contact and exposure to oral secretions is unavoidable. We report exposure of HCWs during dental procedures on a mild symptomatic COVID-19 patient. A 32-year-old male visited a dental clinic at a tertiary care hospital. He experienced mild cough, which started three days before the dental visit, but did not report his symptom during the entrance screening. He underwent several dental procedures and imaging for orthognathic surgery without wearing a mask. Seven HCWs were closely exposed to the patient during dental procedures that could have generated droplets and aerosols. One HCW had close contact with the patient during radiologic exams, and seven HCWs had casual contact. All HCWs wore particulate filtering respirators with 94% filter capacity and gloves, but none wore eye protection or gowns. The next day, the patient experienced dysgeusia and was diagnosed with COVID-19 with high viral load. All HCWs who had close contact with the patient were quarantined for 14 days, and polymerase chain reaction and antibody tests for SARS-CoV-2 were negative. This exposure event suggests the protective effect of particulate filtering respirators in dental clinics. The recommendations of different levels of personal protective equipment (PPE) for dental HCWs according to the procedure types should be established according to the planned procedure, the risk of COVID-19 infection of the patient, and the outbreak situation of the community.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Clínicas Odontológicas , Adulto , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa do Paciente para o Profissional/prevenção & controle , Masculino , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventiladores Mecânicos
6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259475

RESUMO

Pandemic diseases of this century have differentially targeted healthcare workers globally. These infections include Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome SARS, the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Ebola. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued this pattern, putting healthcare workers at extreme risk. Just as healthcare workers have historically been committed to the service of their patients, providing needed care, termed their "duty of care", so too do healthcare employers have a similar ethical duty to provide care toward their employees arising from historical common law requirements. This paper reports on results of a narrative review performed to assess COVID-19 exposure and disease development in healthcare workers as a function of employer duty of care program elements adopted in the workplace. Significant duty of care deficiencies reported early in the pandemic most commonly involved lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) availability. Beyond worker safety, we also provide evidence that an additional benefit of employer duty of care actions is a greater sense of employee well-being, thus aiding in the prevention of healthcare worker burnout.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Setor de Assistência à Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Oriente Médio , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 44, 2021 06 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34211830

RESUMO

During the COVI9-19 pandemic, Pakkred hospital in Thailand implemented innovative practices to ensure the continuation of essential medical services for non-communicable disease patients. These practices included decentralized care, telemedicine, home blood pressure monitoring, community delivery of medicines, and facility infrastructure changes. Despite the decrease in hospital visits by hypertension patients during the pandemic, our results suggest that this package of interventions may have contributed to sustained hypertension and diabetes control rates in Pakkred district.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Atenção à Saúde/organização & administração , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Hipertensão/terapia , Monitorização Ambulatorial da Pressão Arterial/métodos , Agentes Comunitários de Saúde , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Instalações de Saúde , Ambiente de Instituições de Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Doenças não Transmissíveis/terapia , Inovação Organizacional , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicina/organização & administração , Tailândia , Ventilação
8.
Farm Hosp ; 45(4): 193-197, 2021 05 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34218765

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to review the quality  equirements and recommended uses of the different types of face masks  with a view to helping optimize their use and facilitating identification of  nonconforming products. METHOD: A literature search was conducted in PubMed, the Spanish Official State Gazette and Eudralex. The websites of the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Tourism and of the Ministry of Health, as well as  the relevant UNE standards were also reviewed. RESULTS: The different types of face masks available on the market meet different regulatory requirements. Community masks are not  considered medical devices or personal protective equipment and do not  require marketing authorization. They do not carry a CE mark and need  not comply with the general regulations applicable to consumer products.  Surgical masks, for their part, must meet the quality criteria defined in  UNE-EN standard 14683: 2019. According to Regulation (EU) 745/2017  they are class I devices, subject to an EU declaration of conformity, and  must bear a CE mark. Filtering masks are considered category III personal protective equipment, regulated by Regulation (EU) 2016/425, and must  also bear a CE mark. In spite the abundant regulations in place, market  control instruments have detected counterfeit face masks, which means  that public authorities and users should ask manufacturers or suppliers for  additional information in case of doubt. CONCLUSIONS: The legal and quality requirements of the masks are  sufficient for their safe use. It is necessary for the general public to know  these requirements to avoid the fraudulent use of high consumption  products.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Máscaras/normas , Pandemias , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/normas , Humanos , Espanha
9.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 56, 2021 06 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34221909

RESUMO

Background: The adherence of medical laboratory technicians (MLT) to infection control guidelines is essential for reducing the risk of exposure to infectious agents. This study explored the adherence of MLT towards infection control practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: The study population consisted of MLT (n = 444) who worked in private and government health sectors in Jordan. A self-reported survey was used to collect data from participants. Findings: More than 87% of the participants reported adherence to hand-washing guidelines and using personal protective equipment (PPE) when interacting with patients (74.5%), and handling clinical samples (70.0%). Besides, 88.1%, 48.2%, and 7.7% reported wearing of lab coats, face masks, and goggles, at all times, respectively. The majority reported increased adherence to infection control practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes increased PPE use at the workplace (94.2%), increased frequency of disinfection of laboratory surfaces (92.4%) and laboratory equipment (86.7%), and increased frequency of handwashing/use of antiseptics (94.6%). Having a graduate degree was significantly associated with increased adherence of participants to the daily use of goggles/eye protection (p = 0.002), and the use of PPE while handling clinical samples (p = 0.011). Having work experience of >10 years was associated with increased adherence to the use of PPE while handling clinical samples (p = 0.001). Conclusion: MLT reported very good adherence with most assessed infection control practices. In addition, they reported increased conformity with infection control guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Fidelidade a Diretrizes , Controle de Infecções , Laboratórios , Pessoal de Laboratório Médico , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Fidelidade a Diretrizes/normas , Fidelidade a Diretrizes/estatística & dados numéricos , Desinfecção das Mãos/métodos , Desinfecção das Mãos/normas , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Controle de Infecções/instrumentação , Controle de Infecções/métodos , Controle de Infecções/normas , Jordânia/epidemiologia , Laboratórios/organização & administração , Laboratórios/normas , Masculino , Pessoal de Laboratório Médico/normas , Pessoal de Laboratório Médico/estatística & dados numéricos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/estatística & dados numéricos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/provisão & distribuição , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , SARS-CoV-2 , Autorrelato
11.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(26): e188, 2021 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34227264

RESUMO

The rapid increase of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic from mid-February 2020 has led the anatomy department of the Korea University College of Medicine to cease the dissection laboratory. However, the hands-on anatomy laboratory experience is paramount to maximizing learning outcomes. In this paper, we share the experiences and lessons learned through the face-to-face cadaveric dissection experience during this disruptive situation. To minimize infection risks, the following strategies were applied: first, students' on-campus attendance was reduced; second, body temperatures and symptoms were checked before entering the laboratory, and personal protective equipment was provided to all participants; and third, a negative pressure air circulation system was used in the dissection room. We suggest that conducting face-to-face cadaveric anatomy dissection is feasible when the daily count of newly infected cases stabilizes, and there is ample provision of safety measures to facilitate hands-on education.


Assuntos
Anatomia/educação , COVID-19/patologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Dissecação/métodos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Cadáver , Educação à Distância/métodos , Humanos , República da Coreia , SARS-CoV-2 , Faculdades de Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(7): e2115699, 2021 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34228126

RESUMO

Importance: Identifying health care settings and professionals at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial to defining appropriate strategies, resource allocation, and protocols to protect health care workers (HCWs) and patients. Moreover, such information is crucial to decrease the risk that HCWs and health care facilities become amplifiers for SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the community. Objective: To assess the association of different health care professional categories and operational units, including in-hospital wards, outpatient facilities, and territorial care departments, with seroprevalence and odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study was conducted using IgG serological tests collected from April 1 through May 26, 2020, in the Lombardy region in Italy. Voluntary serological screening was offered to all clinical and nonclinical staff providing any health care services or support to health care services in the region. Data were analyzed from June 2020 through April 2021. Exposures: Employment in the health care sector. Main Outcomes and Measures: Seroprevalence of positive IgG antibody tests for SARS-CoV-2 was collected, and odds ratios of experiencing infection were calculated. Results: A total of 140 782 professionals employed in the health sector were invited to participate in IgG serological screening, among whom 82 961 individuals (59.0% response rate) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, with median (interquartile range [IQR]; range) age, 50 (40-56; 19-83) years and 59 839 (72.1%) women. Among these individuals, 10 115 HCWs (12.2%; 95% CI, 12.0%-12.4%) had positive results (median [IQR; range] age, 50 [39-55; 20-80] years; 7298 [72.2%] women). Statistically significantly higher odds of infection were found among health assistants (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48; 95% CI, 1.33-1.65) and nurses (aOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.17-1.41) compared with administrative staff and among workers employed in internal medicine (aOR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.87-2.68), palliative care (aOR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.38-2.44), rehabilitation (aOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.33-1.91), and emergency departments (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.29-1.89) compared with those working as telephone operators. Statistically significantly lower odds of infection were found among individuals working in forensic medicine (aOR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.19-0.88), histology and anatomical pathology (aOR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52-0.97), and medical device sterilization (aOR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.35-0.84) compared with those working as telephone operators. The odds of infection for physicians and laboratory personnel were not statistically significantly different from those found among administrative staff. The odds of infection for workers employed in intensive care units and infectious disease wards were not statistically significantly different from those of telephone operators. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that professionals partially accustomed to managing infectious diseases had higher odds of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The findings further suggest that adequate organization of clinical wards and personnel, appropriate personal protective equipment supply, and training of all workers directly and repeatedly exposed to patients with clinical or subclinical COVID-19 should be prioritized to decrease the risk of infection in health care settings.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pessoal de Saúde , Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Pandemias , Adulto , COVID-19/sangue , COVID-19/virologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Imunoglobulina G/sangue , Controle de Infecções , Itália , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos
13.
N Z Med J ; 134(1538): 135-138, 2021 07 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34239153

RESUMO

Medical students from the University of Otago, Christchurch Department of Medicine were involved in their local COVID-19 response. A group of ten students helped with the assessment of individuals at community-based assessment centres or mobile testing units. They primarily helped assess and test individuals alongside experienced healthcare workers. The students gained valuable clinical and public health experience. Key learning points were the risks of pandemic involvement, identifying local barriers to healthcare and developing an appreciation for an evolving health response. Overall, students felt that preparation for future involvement could benefit further pandemic responses.


Assuntos
COVID-19/diagnóstico , Estudantes de Medicina , Teste para COVID-19 , Humanos , Anamnese , Nasofaringe/virologia , Nova Zelândia , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Gan To Kagaku Ryoho ; 48(7): 927-931, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Japonês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34267030

RESUMO

As a preventive measure for occupational exposure to anticancer drugs, the use of a closed system drug transfer device (CSTD)is not widespread. The main reason for this is the high cost of the equipment. For inpatient chemotherapy(Ⅳ)at our hospital, CSTD was used for the following 3 drugs, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and bendamustine; however, from Nov. 2018, CSTD was used for all chemotherapy drugs. Meanwhile, the personal protective equipment (PPE) for ward nurses was simplified. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased CSTD use and simplification of PPE on the cost of medical materials. Information collected between Apr. and Sep. 2019 was extracted from health records. The total number of inpatient chemotherapy treatments during the study period was 970. The increase in the cost of drug administration equipment due to expansion of CSTD use was ¥1.74 million per half a year. However, the cost savings from simplifying PPE was approximately ¥290,000 per half a year, which is about 16.8% of the increase in cost. We hope that the amount of reimbursement will increase and that device prices will decrease as CSTD use becomes more widespread.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos , Exposição Ocupacional , Preparações Farmacêuticas , Ciclofosfamida , Humanos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Equipamentos de Proteção
15.
Khirurgiia (Mosk) ; (7): 45-48, 2021.
Artigo em Russo | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34270193

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To report our experience in surgical treatment of patients with COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: There were 7815 patients with COVID-19 for the period from April 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. During this period, 172 operations were performed in this group. RESULTS: The most common procedures were tracheostomy (n=86, 50.0%), pleural puncture and drainage (n=20, 11.6%), caesarean section (n=22, 12.7%). There were 24 (14.0%) abdominal surgeries including 11 laparoscopies, 5 appendectomies, 3 bowel resections and others. Six lower limb amputations were carried out. We should emphasize common soft tissue hematomas and effusions. This complication is associated with anticoagulation recommended for patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Surgical interventions using personal protective equipment is a significant challenge. According to our experience, round-the-clock surgical care in a specialized hospital is required.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Cesárea , Feminino , Hospitais Urbanos , Humanos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Gravidez , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-48263

RESUMO

As máscaras se tornaram uma das maiores aliadas da população contra a transmissão do Coronavírus desde o início da pandemia. Especialistas alertam que a máscara ainda deve ser item obrigatório no vestuário, tanto para se proteger quanto para evitar a transmissão do vírus que já levou, até esta data (18 de junho de 2021), aproximadamente 496 mil brasileiros a óbito. É importante também saber diferenciar o grau de proteção das máscaras pois, dada material utilizado na fabricação possui uma trama capaz de impedir que parte das gotículas respiratórias que exalamos seja transferida para outra pessoa ou fique no ar.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/virologia
17.
Cutan Ocul Toxicol ; 40(2): 168-174, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34097555

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Skin lesions are either caused by COVID-19 disease or they can be due to other driving forces related to the COVID-19 pandemic. AIM: Considering the fact that the reported data in different articles for the type and prevalence of skin manifestations related to the COVID-19 pandemic are inconsistent, we have described the mechanism and type of skin lesions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this review article, we have searched the Medline database (PubMed) for the combination of the following key terms "Dermatological Manifestation", "cutaneous Manifestation", "Skin Manifestation", "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2". RESULTS: The prevalence of skin manifestations related to COVID-19 ranged from 0.2% to 20%. The majority of these skin lesions are maculopapular eruptions. The skin presentations related to the COVID-19 pandemic are described below. Traumatic skin conditions such as dermatitis in individuals, especially those with allergies, might initiate secondary to over-washing or rinsing with inappropriate detergents. Also, inappropriate use of personal protective equipment (mask-gloves-shield) can trigger skin lesions on the face and hands or aggravate the lesions of acne, seborrhoeic dermatitis, eczema, etc. Furthermore, cutaneous adverse drug reactions may occur during hospitalization or outpatient treatment of COVID-19 patients. Also, psychocutaneous disorders due to acute stress can trigger or deteriorate several skin manifestations. Moreover, COVID-19 prevalence and course may be changed in patients with autoimmune or chronic inflammatory underlying skin disorders such as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, pemphigus, scleroderma who are on immunosuppressive or biological medications to control their disorders. CONCLUSION: Due to the various dimensions of skin organ involvement and the large population affected, long-term skin conditions following this pandemic can be a lot more problematic than it appears. Serious preventive measures and medical supports are necessary to avoid skin disorders from becoming permanent or even chronic.


Assuntos
COVID-19/patologia , Pele/patologia , COVID-19/complicações , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Dermatite/etiologia , Desinfecção das Mãos , Humanos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/efeitos adversos
18.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(6): 266-270, 2021 Jun 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34105371

RESUMO

COVID-19 provided significant challenges for community services and care homes. Residential and nursing care patients are considered highly vulnerable to the coronavirus due to their physical needs and environmental factors. Significant concern was raised with personal protective equipment (PPE) availability and appropriate training and support in local care homes. Members of the district nursing team and community services formed a team to deliver face to face training and support to care home workers to improve PPE adherence and reduce risks of transmission. Visits were offered to all 46 care homes in the locality and over 55 visits for teaching were performed in the first month. Challenges were faced with managing and prioritising frontline clinical duties. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive and care staff benefited from face-to-face delivery of education to support best practice.


Assuntos
Pessoal Técnico de Saúde/educação , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Enfermagem em Saúde Comunitária/educação , Controle de Infecções/métodos , Casas de Saúde , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Humanos , Equipamento de Proteção Individual/provisão & distribuição , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , SARS-CoV-2 , Reino Unido
19.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 74(suppl 1): e20201219, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês, Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34133545

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Develop and validate a leaflet to guide health professionals in preventive measures related to injuries caused by the use of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: For the construction of the brochure, an integrative review was carried out in the main databases. The evaluation of the leaflet was made by 59 health professionals (nurses, physiotherapists, and doctors), using the Delphi technique. RESULTS: In the first evaluation cycle, the items in the brochure were considered by the judges to be "inadequate" to "adequate"; the Content Validity Index was 0.80-1.0. After the adjustments suggested by the judges were implemented, the leaflet was sent back to the second evaluation cycle, in which all items were considered "adequate", resulting in a Content Validity Index of 1.0. CONCLUSION: The developed brochure has content validity and can assist health professionals in preventing injuries caused by the use of personal protective equipment the developed brochure has content validity and can assist health professionals in preventing injuries caused by the use of personal protective equipment.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Traumatismos Faciais , Humanos , Pandemias , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2
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