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1.
AANA J ; 89(4): 319-324, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34342569

RESUMO

Anesthesia providers are regularly responsible for assessing, diagnosing, and determining pharmacologic treatment of a problem. This critical workflow often includes medication preparation. Decision making in anesthesia frequently requires rapid intervention, and caring for the pediatric population poses additional challenges, such as needing to quickly calculate the weight-based dosing of medications. The objective of this review article was to identify and describe themes related to pediatric medication errors associated with anesthesia. Additional goals of the review consisted of identifying and comparing various error reduction strategies with a primary goal of communicating the most effective methods to reduce medication errors in the pediatric population. Screening criteria were set, and 17 published scholarly articles meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using a systematic process. Common themes found leading to medication errors were incorrect dosing, incorrect medication, syringe swap, wrong patient, and wrong dosing interval. The most valuable and sustainable error reduction strategies found were standardized labeling, prefilled syringes, and 2-person medication checks. It is believed that this review will expound on the factors that can be controlled or minimized to decrease the incidence of anesthesia-related pediatric medication errors and facilitate implementation of risk mitigation strategies immediately into clinical practice.


Assuntos
Anestesia/normas , Relação Dose-Resposta a Droga , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Erros de Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pediatria/normas , Período Perioperatório/normas , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Adolescente , Anestesia/estatística & dados numéricos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Período Perioperatório/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
2.
Farm Hosp ; 45(4): 204-209, 2021 05 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34218767

RESUMO

It has been known, for decades, that the use of injectable medicines in European hospitals has been associated with frequent medication errors, some of which cause preventable severe harms and deaths. There  have been national and European inquiries and reports concerning  improving patient safety by recommending greater use of pharmacy  aseptic preparation services and provision of ready-to administer  injectables, which have not been widely implemented.In England experience of treating patients with COVID-19 infections has  brought into focus other benefits of significantly extending pharmacy aseptic preparation services. These benefits include saving  nursing time, having systems in place which have resilience and capacity,  reducing variation in practice, improving clinical staff and patient  experience, and enabling more injectable medicines to be administered to  patients at home. It has also been recognised that more action is required  to standardise policies and procedures for injectable medicines and  mplement the use of smart infusion devices with dose error reduction  software, to help minimise drug administration errors.Hospital pharmacists have a key role in developing these services to bring  European hospitals more in line with those provided by hospital pharmacies in North America.


Assuntos
Composição de Medicamentos/normas , Hospitais , Serviço de Farmácia Hospitalar/normas , COVID-19 , Inglaterra , Europa (Continente) , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar , Humanos , Bombas de Infusão , Injeções , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Segurança do Paciente , Preparações Farmacêuticas/administração & dosagem , Serviço de Farmácia Hospitalar/organização & administração
3.
Ceska Slov Farm ; 70(2): 43-50, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34237943

RESUMO

A medication error is one of the most common causes of patients complications or death in healthcare facilities. In the United States, 7,000 out of 9,000 patients die because of medication errors each year. Known factors are generally divided into four groups - human factor, intervention, technical factor, and system. Our study includes 17 studies from the OVID, Web of Science, Scopus, and EBSCO databases, in the range of 2015-2020. After a selection of professional publications, 2 categories were created - factors leading to medication errors and interventions to reduce medication error and testing their effectiveness. It has been found that human factor always plays a role, often supported by a poorly set-up system. The most mistakes are made in documentation, administration technique or accidental interchange of patients. The most frequently mentioned factors include nurses overload, high number of critically ill patients, interruptions in the preparation or in the administration of medications, absence of the adverse event reporting system, non-compliance with guidelines, fear, and anxiety. Another evidence of medication error is in the application of intravenous drugs, where an interchange of drugs or patients due to interruption occurs as well. Sufficient education of nurses and an adequate system of preparation and administration of drugs, for example using bar codes, are considered as an appropriate intervention.


Assuntos
Erros de Medicação , Preparações Farmacêuticas , Estado Terminal , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle
5.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 47(7): 438-451, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34103267

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the impact of in-hospital electronic/enhanced medication reconciliation compared to basic medication reconciliation on medication errors, discrepancies, and adverse drug events (ADEs). METHODS: The study team searched for peer-reviewed English-language articles in EMBASE, OVID, and Scopus databases up to October 2019. Included were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), pre-post, or interrupted time series designs with medication errors, discrepancies, or ADEs as an outcome, and medication reconciliation applied at hospital discharge. Basic medication reconciliation was defined as using a paper-based format, electronic medication reconciliation as using an electronic format, and enhanced medication reconciliation as incorporating additional interventions to reduce medication errors. RESULTS: Ten studies (three RCTs, one retrospective cohort study, two interrupted time series studies, three pre-post studies, and one longitudinal study) were identified, with six and four studies comparing basic medication reconciliation to electronic and enhanced medication reconciliation, respectively. The overall risk of bias of the included studies was low (three), unclear (two), moderate (three), and serious/high (two). In general, studies demonstrated that electronic medication reconciliation reduced the odds of a medication discrepancy or ADE and may reduce the mean number of medication discrepancies. Enhanced medication reconciliation was more equivocal, with some studies showing improvement; however, risk of bias was generally significant. CONCLUSION: Electronic medication reconciliation tends to reduce the risk of ADE; however, these conclusions were limited due to a lack of consistency in study settings, interventions, and outcome definitions. Future studies with more rigorous designs and standardized outcome definitions would provide clarity on this topic.


Assuntos
Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos , Reconciliação de Medicamentos , Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos/epidemiologia , Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos/prevenção & controle , Hospitais , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Alta do Paciente
8.
N Z Med J ; 134(1536): 12-24, 2021 06 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34140710

RESUMO

The last decade (2010-2019) has seen calls to action to improve the prescribing practice of junior doctors. An in-depth investigation into the causes of prescribing errors by foundation trainees in relation to their medical education (the EQUIP study) in the UK reported a prescription error rate of 8.9% for all prescribed medicines, and although that is a UK study, there are similarities with New Zealand prevocational training programmes. The EQUIP study revealed that existing teaching strategies are not working. To believe a single intervention will prevent most prescribing errors is simplistic, and for improvement to occur, new prescribers need to learn from their mistakes. Traditionally, the education of junior doctors has focused on their competence and professional registration requirements. Working in healthcare is collective and multidisciplinary, and errors occur through human and system factors.


Assuntos
Relações Interprofissionais , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar , Padrões de Prática Médica , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Prática Clínica Baseada em Evidências , Humanos , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar/educação , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar/normas , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Erros de Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Nova Zelândia
9.
Int J Pharm Compd ; 25(3): 222-229, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34125713

RESUMO

Intravenous admixture compounding is common practice in most hospitals throughout the world, regardless of the country in which one is practicing. Compounding intravenous medications involves risk, as there is a high potential for error due to their complexity in compounding and working in an aseptic environment, which itself poses issues for the compounder. Part 1 of this 2-part series discussed the: â€¢ Background â€¢ Types of Errors â€¢ Where Errors can Occur â€¢ Automated Parenteral Nutrition Compounding Systems â€¢ Accuracy and Strength Issues â€¢ Medication Error Prevention This Part 2 discusses: â€¢ Standardization of Compounded Sterile Preparations â€¢ Personnel Competency â€¢ Compliance issues â€¢ Sources of Error and Considerations for Prevention.


Assuntos
Erros de Medicação , Nutrição Parenteral , Administração Intravenosa , Composição de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle
10.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 21(1): 195, 2021 06 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34154570

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prescribing error represent a significant source of preventable harm to patients. Prescribing errors at discharge, including omission of pre-admission medications (PAM), are particularly harmful as they frequently propagate following discharge. This study assesses the impact of an educational intervention and introduction of an electronic patient record (EPR) in the same centre on omission of PAM at discharge using a pragmatic design. A survey of newly qualified doctors is used to contextualise findings. METHODS: Discharge prescriptions and discharge summaries were reviewed at discharge, and compared to admission medicine lists, using a paper-based chart system. Discrepancies were noted, using Health Information and Quality Authority guidelines for discharge prescribing. An educational intervention was conducted. Further review of discharge prescriptions and discharge summaries took place. Following introduction of an EPR, review of discharge summaries and discharge prescriptions was repeated. A survey was administered to recently qualified doctors (interns), and analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. RESULTS: Omission of PAM as prescribed or discontinued items at discharge occurs frequently. An educational intervention did not significantly change prescribing error rates (U = 1255.5, p = 0.206). EPR introduction did significantly reduce omission of PAM on discharge prescribing (U = 694, p < 0.001), however there was also a reduction in the rate of deliberate discontinuation of PAM at discharge (U = 1237.5, p = 0.007). Survey results demonstrated that multiple sources are required to develop a discharge prescription. Time pressure, access to documentation and lack of admission medicine reconciliation are frequently cited causes of discharge prescribing error. CONCLUSION: This study verified passive educational interventions alone do not improve discharge prescribing. Introduction of EPR improved discharge prescribing, but negatively impacted deliberate discontinuation of PAM at discharge. This is attributable to reduced access to key sources of information used in formulating discharge prescriptions, and separation of the discontinuation function from the prescribing function on the EPR discharge application.


Assuntos
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Prescrição Eletrônica , Documentação , Prescrições de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Alta do Paciente , Centros de Atenção Terciária
11.
Int J Med Inform ; 153: 104509, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34153901

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Wrong medication and wrong dosage are major risks in the pharmaceutical industry, as many medication errors occur when dispensing medication. The dispensing process in its current form is limited in verifying the patient's identity before dispensing the medication. Furthermore, this process does not offer a robust method for providing accurate medication intake instructions. Therefore, we have developed a framework to accurately and securely overcome issues associated with transferring patient credentials and prescription information. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a framework to mitigate medication dispensing errors. One of the framework components is the mobile application that uses near-field communication (NFC) to transfer information. Therefore, in this paper, we designed a user study to assess the proposed NFC-based mobile application in terms of usefulness and ease of use compared with the traditional method of picking up a prescribed medication. METHODS: We conducted a usability study with 21 participants to perform four tasks to simulate the process of picking up a prescribed medication using the proposed NFC application method and the traditional method of picking up medication. Then, we asked the participants to complete two post-questionnaires after using each method to evaluate the participants' experience of the process. Next, we asked the participants to complete an additional questionnaire about the usefulness of the NFC application method. Finally, we conducted semi-structured interviews with the participants to get more evidence to back up the questionnaire answers. RESULTS: Our findings show that 91% of the participants believe using the NFC application method will improve patient safety during the medication pickup process. Nearly 97% of participants found the NFC application method easy to use. Our findings show that the participants scored lower when using the NFC application method compared with the traditional method when trying to identify the wrong medication after dispensing. In addition, 90% of the participants successfully identified the wrong medication when using the NFC application method, compared to only 38% when using the traditional method. Finally, the results show that the participants preferred using the NFC application method in terms of information availability, security, and privacy. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings show that the proposed NFC application for managing patients' prescriptions and picking up medication might improve patient safety. The results show that the participants believe the NFC application will mitigate medication dispensing errors, at least from their end. The participants believe the application will provide a fast and accurate method of verifying dispensed medication from the patient end. Moreover, the application will help the patient to track their current prescription, which also helps them remember the medication intake instructions. Finally, the study indicates that the application will provide a secure, private, and accurate method to help verify the patient's identity, thus minimizing medication errors during the medication dispensing process.


Assuntos
Aplicativos Móveis , Prescrições de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Segurança do Paciente , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(6): 1388-1390, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34011706

RESUMO

Purpose: To assess the use of routine Braille prescription in reducing medication errors in visually impaired patients. Methods: This observational, questionnaire-based study was conducted in 100 blind or visually impaired patients who were Braille literate (aged ≥18 years). We initiated our Braille prescription from January 2017 to March 2018. The questionnaire consisted of 8 items that captured patient details on the medication management process in addition to a face-to-face interview with them. It was administered twice to each patient at baseline and at the end. Braille prescription included details regarding all medicines, their dosages, instructions, expiry dates, and major side effects. The prescription was developed easily and quickly with an average turnaround time of 1 hour. Results: It was seen that most of the study patients aged between 30-40 years (n = 80) and majority were men (78%). At baseline, 73% of our respondents faced challenges when self-administering medications as compared to 17.5% at endline. After using Braille prescription, only 5% reported of taking a wrong dosage compared to 46.2% at baseline. Patients missing a dosage significantly reduced after using routine Braille prescription (43.7% vs. 7.5% respectively, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our study successfully has rolled out Braille prescription as an efficacious method in addressing the key issues to medication safety with the visually impaired.


Assuntos
Leitura , Pessoas com Deficiência Visual , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Poder Psicológico , Prescrições
13.
Int Ophthalmol ; 41(9): 3041-3046, 2021 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33950418

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The aim of this quality improvement project was to look into the hospital prescriptions and to identify and record the type and number of errors, to implement measures to reduce the risk of these errors and then to reaudit to assess the impact of changes implemented. METHODS: The initial audit was conducted prospectively over a eleven-week period. Prescriptions written by doctors of all grades and members of the staff, such as optometrists and nurses, were analysed. A glaucoma prescription guide along with more training at prescribing for doctors was introduced with a view to reducing these errors. A reaudit later demonstrated a significant reduction in these errors. RESULTS: After the introduction of a glaucoma prescription guide and more training for all grades of staff members, prescription errors reduced to 73/2342 (3.1%). Reaudit showed a reduction in both prescription writing errors 50/73(68.4%) and drug-related errors 23/73(31.6%). CONCLUSION: Prescription errors are avoidable. This audit demonstrated that providing an accessible, easy to read and understand glaucoma prescription guide in the outpatient department along with targeted training for medical staff in prescribing can help in minimising these errors and can lead to safer practice.


Assuntos
Oftalmologia , Melhoria de Qualidade , Prescrições de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Centros de Atenção Terciária
14.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 281: 590-594, 2021 May 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34042644

RESUMO

The Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine (Montreal, Canada) is a pediatric academic tertiary hospital that has begun the implementation of a commercial computerized provider order entry system (CPOE) in October 2019. The objectives of this paper are 1) to estimate the impact of the CPOE system on medication errors, and 2) to identify vulnerability issues related to the configuration of the CPOE system's design. Using a pre-post implementation methodology measuring medication errors captured by clinical pharmacists revealed that the implementation of a CPOE has eliminated all prescription conformity (e.g., missing fields) and legibility errors. Pharmacists have continued to detect medication errors, especially inappropriate dosing instructions, and to intervene in similar clinical situations (medication reconciliation, deprescribing, adjusting orders). Additionally, the vulnerability analysis, based on typical clinical order test cases in an inpatient pediatric setting, highlighted the need to configure a clinical decision support system that can identify inappropriate dosing instructions for pediatric patients.


Assuntos
Sistemas de Apoio a Decisões Clínicas , Sistemas de Registro de Ordens Médicas , Canadá , Criança , Hospitais Pediátricos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle
15.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 281: 814-815, 2021 May 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34042691

RESUMO

We evaluated medication reconciliation processes of a qualitative case study at a 1000-bed public hospital. Lean tools were applied to identify factors contributing to prescribing errors and propose process improvement. Errors were attributed to the prescriber's skills, high workload, staff shortage, poor user attitude and rigid system function. Continuous evaluation of medication reconciliation efficiency is imperative to identify and mitigate errors and increase patient safety.


Assuntos
Erros de Medicação , Reconciliação de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Segurança do Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Carga de Trabalho
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e26125, 2021 May 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34032758

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of a patient engagement and medication safety management (PE-MSM) program on medication errors, self-efficacy for appropriate medication and activation among older patients suffering cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Chinese communities. METHODS: A patient engagement and medication safety management (PE-MSM) program intervention study was performed. Older patients suffering CVD in the intervention group (n = 62) received PE-MSM program, while the control group (n = 58) took a 12-week medication safety education alone. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, patients having undergone the individualized PE-MSM program achieved lower incidence of medication errors (P < .001), and a statistically significant interaction was identified between treatment groups and assessment time points in terms of the total score of self-efficacy for appropriate medication use scale and the number of patients with different activation levels (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The PE-MSM program is demonstrated to be feasible. Compared with single medication safety education, the PE-MSM program is capable of decreasing the incidence of common medication errors, enhancing the self-efficacy of appropriate medication and the activation of older patients with CVD in a community. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The PE-MSM program is likely to act as a promising medication management model for the routine health care of older patients suffering CVD in communities.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/tratamento farmacológico , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Autoeficácia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , China , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 432, 2021 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33957900

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prescribing errors (PEs) are a common cause of morbidity and mortality, both in community practice and in hospitals. Pharmacists have an essential role in minimizing and preventing PEs, thus, there is a need to document the nature of pharmacists' interventions to prevent PEs. The purpose of this study was to describe reported interventions conducted by pharmacists to prevent or minimize PEs in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the electronic medical records data was conducted to identify pharmacists' interventions related to reported PEs. The PE-related data was extracted for a period of six-month (April to September 2017) and comprised of patient demographics, medication-related information, and the different interventions conducted by the pharmacists. The study was carried in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh region. The study was ethically reviewed and approved by the hospital IRB committee. Descriptive analyses were appropriately conducted using the IBM SPSS Statistics. RESULTS: A total of 2,564 pharmacists' interventions related to PEs were recorded. These interventions were reported in 1,565 patients. Wrong dose (54.3 %) and unauthorized prescription (21.9 %) were the most commonly encountered PEs. Anti-infectives for systemic use (49.2 %) and alimentary tract and metabolism medications (18.2 %) were the most common classes involved with PEs. The most commonly reported pharmacists' interventions were dose adjustments (44.0 %), restricted medication approvals (21.9 %), and therapeutic duplications (11 %). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PEs occurred commonly and pharmacists' interventions were critical in preventing possible medication related harm to patients. Care coordination and prioritizing patient safety through quality improvement initiatives at all levels of the health care system can play a key role in this quality improvement drive. Future studies should evaluate the impact of pharmacists' interventions on patient outcomes.


Assuntos
Farmacêuticos , Serviço de Farmácia Hospitalar , Estudos Transversais , Hospitais , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Papel Profissional , Estudos Retrospectivos
18.
Int J Pharm Compd ; 25(2): 131-139, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33798113

RESUMO

Intravenous admixture compounding is common practice in most hospitals throughout the world, regardless of the country. Compounding intravenous medications involves risk, as there is a high potential for error due to their complexity in compounding, and working in an aseptic environment itself poses issues for the compounder. Part 9-A of this series of articles on the topic of intravenous admixture preparation considerations discusses 1) the background, 2) types of errors, 3) where errors can occur, 4) automated parenteral nutrition compounding systems, 5) accuracy and strength issues, and 6) medication error prevention. Part 9-B of this series of articles will include 1) a discussion on standardization (of both formulas and procedures), 2) competency, 3) compliance, 4) a detailed table on the sources of errors, and 5) the considerations for the prevention of errors.


Assuntos
Erros de Medicação , Nutrição Parenteral , Administração Intravenosa , Composição de Medicamentos , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle
19.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 47(6): 394-397, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33895116

RESUMO

Editor's Note: For over two decades, The Joint Commission has developed and disseminated Sentinel Event Alerts (SEAs). SEAs identify specific types of adverse events and high-risk conditions, describe their underlying causes, and recommend steps to reduce risk and prevent future occurrences. Health care organizations should consider the information in SEAs when designing or redesigning processes, including specific suggestions contained in the alerts to mitigate risks. Recently, The Joint Commission decided that co-publishing SEAs in the Journal would help expand dissemination efforts by reaching beyond health care organizations to the broader quality and safety community, including researchers and policymakers. In this issue, we are proud to publish Sentinel Event Alert 63: Optimizing Smart Infusion Pump Safety with DERS (dose error reduction software). The SEA describes actions health care organizations can take to reduce the risk of errors caused by the misuse of smart infusion pumps, especially errors that can be avoided by the optimal use of DERS. We will co-publish future SEAs that we think would be of interest to the Journal's audience. We hope you enjoy this new addition to the Journal.


Assuntos
Bombas de Infusão , Erros de Medicação , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , Software
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33924431

RESUMO

The multiplicity of dosing frequencies that are attached to medication orders poses a challenge to patients regarding adhering to their medication regimens and healthcare professionals in maximizing the efficiencies of health care service delivery. A multidisciplinary team project was performed to simplify medication regimens to improve the computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system to reduce the dosing frequencies for patients who were discharged from the hospital. A 36-month pre-test-post-test study was performed, including 12-month pre-intervention, 12-month intervention, and 12-month post-intervention periods. Two-pronged strategies, including regimen standardization and prioritization, were devised to evaluate the dosing frequencies and prescribing efficiency. The results showed that the standardized menu reduced the dosing frequencies from 4.3 ± 2.2 per day in the pre-intervention period to 3.5 ± 1.8 per day in the post-intervention period (p < 0.001). In addition, the proportion of patients taking medications five or more times per day decreased from 40.8% to 20.7% (p < 0.001). After prioritizing the CPOE dosing regimen, the number of pull-down options that were available reflected an improvement in the prescribing efficiency. Our findings indicate that concerted efforts in improving even a simple change on the CPOE screen via standardization and prioritization simplified the dosing frequencies for patients and improved the physicians' prescribing process.


Assuntos
Sistemas de Registro de Ordens Médicas , Preparações Farmacêuticas , Hospitais , Humanos , Erros de Medicação/prevenção & controle , República da Coreia
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