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1.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 19(9): 889-892, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33026746

RESUMO

Early December 2019 witnessed an international outbreak of a novel coronavirus (COVID 19) designated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2). Since then, a number of therapeutic molecules have been explored to have potential efficacy against the SARS-Cov-2 per se or its sequelae. There are no Food and Drug Administration specific therapies approved so far; however, numerous drugs based on varying levels of evidence, in vitro studies and compassionate drug trials are being established as therapeutic agents, especially drugs approved for previous emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-Cov). Numerous active clinical trials for COVID-19 with more than 150 drugs and products are under study. Needless to say, many dermatological drugs are being employed to mitigate this pandemic threat. We aim to review drugs with potential against SARS-Cov-2 widely used in dermatology practice. Additionally, rampant and overzealous use of these drugs as well as introduction of new molecules might lead to emergence of adverse effects associated with these agents. Dermatologists must be on lookout for any cutaneous adverse effects of these drugs. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(9):889-892. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5323.


Assuntos
Antivirais/efeitos adversos , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Fármacos Dermatológicos/efeitos adversos , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/tratamento farmacológico , Monofosfato de Adenosina/administração & dosagem , Monofosfato de Adenosina/efeitos adversos , Monofosfato de Adenosina/análogos & derivados , Alanina/administração & dosagem , Alanina/efeitos adversos , Alanina/análogos & derivados , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Produtos Biológicos/administração & dosagem , Produtos Biológicos/efeitos adversos , Fármacos Dermatológicos/uso terapêutico , Erupção por Droga/epidemiologia , Erupção por Droga/fisiopatologia , Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pandemias , Prognóstico , Medição de Risco , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/diagnóstico , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(37): e22159, 2020 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925777

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Long-term use of corticosteroid ointment for external using or skin management products and cosmetics containing corticosteroid will produce a hormone-dependent effect on facial skin and destroy the barrier function of the skin. It is easy to cause repeated attacks of facial skin inflammation after drug withdrawal because corticosteroid hormones can cause the expression of inflammatory factors in the body, which has a serious impact on patients. The general treatment method is to stop using hormone drugs for psychotherapy and inform patients of the basic knowledge of hormone-dependent dermatitis and daily facial care, but the effect is not good. At present, non-steroidal ointment tacrolimus (a calcineurin inhibitor) is widely used in the treatment of hormone-dependent dermatitis. Tacrolimus ointment is effective for corticosteroid-dependent dermatitis, but adverse events can also occur. METHODS: We plan to searched all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) fortacrolimus ointment therapy of hormone-dependent dermatitis in: MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Springer and Web of Science, China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China Science Journal Database (VIP database) and Wanfang Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), without the limitation of publication status and language until September 1, 2020. The systematic review will also search will also search for identify publications, meeting minutes, and grey literature (including unpublished meeting articles). DISCUSSION: The systematic review mainly to access the safety and efficacy of tacrolimus ointment for hormone-dependent dermatitis (facial corticosteroid addiction dermatitis and facial steroid dermatitis). The results of our research will facilitate evidence-based management of patients with facial corticosteroid-dependent dermatitis and provide clinical advice on their treatment options. REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020171813.


Assuntos
Corticosteroides/efeitos adversos , Inibidores de Calcineurina/uso terapêutico , Erupção por Droga/tratamento farmacológico , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Tacrolimo/uso terapêutico , Administração Cutânea , Corticosteroides/administração & dosagem , Inibidores de Calcineurina/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Pomadas , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Projetos de Pesquisa , Tacrolimo/administração & dosagem
5.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD007783, 2020 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609387

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2010; it includes one additional study. Primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures are a type of generalised seizure. Other types of seizures include: absence, myoclonic, and atonic seizures. Effective control of tonic-clonic seizures reduces the risk of injury and death, and improves quality of life. While most people achieve seizure control with one antiepileptic drug, around 30% do not, and require a combination of antiepileptic drugs. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and tolerability of add-on lamotrigine for drug-resistant primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures. SEARCH METHODS: For the latest update, we searched these databases on 19 March 2019: Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS) Web, MEDLINE Ovid, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). The CRS includes records from the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, Embase, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We imposed no language restrictions. We also contacted GlaxoSmithKline, manufacturers of lamotrigine. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled parallel or cross-over trials of add-on lamotrigine for people of any age with drug-resistant primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed standard Cochrane methodology; two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, evaluated risk of bias, extracted relevant data, and GRADE-assessed evidence. We investigated these outcomes: (1) 50% or greater reduction in primary generalised tonic-clonic seizure frequency; (2) seizure freedom; (3) treatment withdrawal; (4) adverse effects; (5) cognitive effects; and (6) quality of life. We used an intention-to-treat (ITT) population for all analyses, and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs); for adverse effects, we used 99% CIs to compensate for multiple hypothesis testing. MAIN RESULTS: We included three studies (total 300 participants): two parallel-group studies and one cross-over study. We assessed varied risks of bias across studies; most limitations arose from the poor reporting of methodological details. We meta-analysed data extracted from the two parallel-group studies, and conducted a narrative synthesis for data from the cross-over study. Both parallel-group studies (270 participants) reported all dichotomous outcomes. Participants taking lamotrigine were almost twice as likely to attain a 50% or greater reduction in primary generalised tonic-clonic seizure frequency than those taking a placebo (RR 1.88, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.45; low-certainty evidence). The results between groups were inconclusive for the likelihood of seizure freedom (RR 1.55, 95% CI 0.89 to 2.72; very low-certainty evidence); treatment withdrawal (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.99; very low-certainty evidence); and individual adverse effects: ataxia (RR 3.05, 99% CI 0.05 to 199.36); dizziness (RR 0.91, 99% CI 0.29 to 2.86; very low-certainty evidence); fatigue (RR 1.02, 99% CI 0.13 to 8.14; very low-certainty evidence); nausea (RR 1.60, 99% CI 0.48 to 5.32; very low-certainty evidence); and somnolence (RR 3.73, 99% CI 0.36 to 38.90; low-certainty evidence). The cross-over trial (26 participants) reported that 7/14 participants with generalised tonic-clonic seizures experienced a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency with add-on lamotrigine compared to placebo. The authors reported four treatment withdrawals, but did not specify during which treatment allocation they occurred. Rash (seven lamotrigine participants; zero placebo participants) and fatigue (five lamotrigine participants; zero placebo participants) were the most frequently reported adverse effects. None of the included studies measured cognition. One parallel-group study (N = 153) evaluated quality of life. They reported inconclusive results for the overall quality of life score between groups (P = 0.74). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This review provides insufficient information to inform clinical practice. Low-certainty evidence suggests that lamotrigine reduces the rate of generalised tonic-clonic seizures by 50% or more. Very low-certainty evidence found inconclusive results between groups for all other outcomes. Therefore, we are uncertain to very uncertain that the results reported are accurate, and suggest that the true effect could be grossly different. More trials, recruiting larger populations, over longer periods, are necessary to determine lamotrigine's clinical use.


Assuntos
Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia Tônico-Clônica/tratamento farmacológico , Lamotrigina/uso terapêutico , Anticonvulsivantes/efeitos adversos , Quimioterapia Adjuvante/métodos , Tontura/induzido quimicamente , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Exantema/induzido quimicamente , Fadiga/induzido quimicamente , Humanos , Lamotrigina/efeitos adversos , Náusea/induzido quimicamente , Pacientes Desistentes do Tratamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Sonolência
6.
Dermatol Online J ; 26(3)2020 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609449

RESUMO

Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is an uncommon skin condition that can be inherited or may occur sporadically with multiple red-brown, thin plaques in a photodistribution. The condition more often affects middle-aged women and is often recalcitrant to therapy. In rare literature reports, systemic medications can trigger exacerbation or promote inflammation in pre-existing lesions of DSAP. We present a novel case of chemotherapy-associated DSAP inflammation in a 66-year-old woman after triple therapy with durvalumab (PD-L1 inhibitor), olaparib (PARP inhibitor) and paclitaxel, showing similarities to primary lichen planus-like eruption from immune checkpoint inhibitors.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais/efeitos adversos , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efeitos adversos , Inflamação/diagnóstico , Erupções Liquenoides/diagnóstico , Paclitaxel/efeitos adversos , Ftalazinas/efeitos adversos , Piperazinas/efeitos adversos , Poroceratose/patologia , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/complicações , Neoplasias da Mama/tratamento farmacológico , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Erupção por Droga , Feminino , Humanos , Inflamação/induzido quimicamente , Poroceratose/complicações , Pele/patologia
7.
Adv Rheumatol ; 60(1): 32, 2020 06 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591986

RESUMO

Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, also known as antimalarial drugs, are widely used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases and have recently become the focus of attention because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Rheumatologists have been using antimalarials to manage patients with chronic immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases for decades. It is an appropriate time to review their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms impact on disease activity and survival of systemic lupus erythematosus patient, including antiplatelet effect, metabolic and lipid benefits. We also discuss possible adverse effects, adding a practical and comprehensive approach to monitoring rheumatic patients during treatment with these drugs.


Assuntos
Antimaláricos/farmacologia , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Cloroquina/farmacologia , Hidroxicloroquina/farmacologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome Antifosfolipídica/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome Antifosfolipídica/imunologia , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Interações Medicamentosas , Feminino , Glucose/metabolismo , Cardiopatias/induzido quimicamente , Humanos , Lipídeos/sangue , Lúpus Eritematoso Cutâneo/tratamento farmacológico , Lúpus Eritematoso Cutâneo/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/mortalidade , Masculino , Pandemias , Agregação Plaquetária/efeitos dos fármacos , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Gravidez , Insuficiência Renal/prevenção & controle , Doenças Retinianas/induzido quimicamente , Síndrome de Sjogren/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome de Sjogren/imunologia
8.
Adv Rheumatol ; 60(1): 32, 2020 06 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32517786

RESUMO

Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, also known as antimalarial drugs, are widely used in the treatment of rheumatic diseases and have recently become the focus of attention because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Rheumatologists have been using antimalarials to manage patients with chronic immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases for decades. It is an appropriate time to review their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms impact on disease activity and survival of systemic lupus erythematosus patient, including antiplatelet effect, metabolic and lipid benefits. We also discuss possible adverse effects, adding a practical and comprehensive approach to monitoring rheumatic patients during treatment with these drugs.


Assuntos
Antimaláricos/farmacologia , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Cloroquina/farmacologia , Hidroxicloroquina/farmacologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome Antifosfolipídica/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome Antifosfolipídica/imunologia , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Interações Medicamentosas , Feminino , Glucose/metabolismo , Cardiopatias/induzido quimicamente , Humanos , Lipídeos/sangue , Lúpus Eritematoso Cutâneo/tratamento farmacológico , Lúpus Eritematoso Cutâneo/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/mortalidade , Masculino , Pandemias , Agregação Plaquetária/efeitos dos fármacos , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Gravidez , Insuficiência Renal/prevenção & controle , Doenças Retinianas/induzido quimicamente , Síndrome de Sjogren/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome de Sjogren/imunologia
12.
Clin Dermatol ; 38(2): 193-207, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513399

RESUMO

Drug eruptions are among the great masqueraders that sometimes cause diagnostic challenges in clinical practice. Pharmacologic agents may induce skin changes, sharing the same pathophysiologic mechanisms of specific dermatoses, or inducing drug eruptions with different pathologic mechanisms that have similar clinical presentations. The former conditions are usually called drug-induced skin diseases, whereas the latter conditions are termed "dermatosis-like drug eruptions." Both types are great imitators in dermatologic practice and can be easily misdiagnosed as other diseases or lead to unrecognized causative agents.


Assuntos
Erupção por Droga/diagnóstico , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Pele/patologia , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Erupção por Droga/patologia , Humanos
13.
Clin Dermatol ; 38(2): 208-215, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513400

RESUMO

Many studies have investigated cutaneous reactions to antitumor drugs and found them to be quite numerous. We describe drug eruptions that may be associated with different therapies by class: antimetabolite chemotherapeutics, genotoxic agents, spindle inhibitors, signal transduction inhibitors, and immunotherapies. Methotrexate is most often associated with mucocutaneous reactions, alkylating antimetabolite agents with hyperpigmentation, and platinum antimetabolite agents with type I IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. Anthracycline derivatives can induce the hand-foot syndrome in patients, and bleomycin is associated with a bleomycin-induced flagellate erythema. Taxane spindle inhibitors can result in acneiform eruptions, which may also be seen with use of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Imatinib and its derivatives can cause a truncal maculopapular eruption, whereas multikinase inhibitors can produce a hand-foot-skin reaction. Vemurafenib can result in squamous cell carcinomas and photosensitivity. First-generation mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors may cause a maculopapular eruption initially involving the face and neck. Programmed death (PD)-1-ligand and receptor inhibitors are associated with bullous pemphigoid. Ipilimumab, targeting Cytotoxic -T- Lymphocyte- associated (CTLA-4) receptors, can cause a morbilliform reaction, whereas Interleukin -2 (IL-2) analogs can create the capillary leak syndrome. Chemotherapeutic drug eruptions classically can manifest in the aforementioned ways; however, it is important to understand that they are associated with myriad cutaneous adverse effects, which may be mistaken for organic skin disease. Oncologists prescribing these medications should be familiar with the cutaneous side effects of these medications, and so they may counsel patients to be on the lookout for them.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/efeitos adversos , Erupção por Droga/diagnóstico , Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Pele/patologia , Antimetabólitos Antineoplásicos/efeitos adversos , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Erupção por Droga/patologia , Humanos , Mutagênicos/efeitos adversos
15.
Support Care Cancer ; 28(9): 3991-3993, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32514616

RESUMO

Stringent measures have been taken to contain COVID-19 spread, limiting access only for urgent visits, surgery procedures, or hospitalizations and using teledermatology services for non-urgent cases. Management of oncological patients affected by chemo-, immune-, and radiotherapy-related cutaneous and mucosal adverse events is a challenge. Firstly because of the differential diagnosis of cutaneous rash (e.g., drug-related rash or paraviral exanthema). Secondly, oncological patients can suffer from xerosis, pruritus, and mucositis that contribute to cutaneous and mucosal barrier lesions, thus becoming vulnerable site for viral or bacterial colonization. These lesions can also be aggravated by the use of protective mask and gloves. Here, we report also our results of a teledermatological survey on 87 oncological patients, where the health status of oncological patients referred to our dedicated clinic was assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, it is fundamental that oncological patients are followed up by their dermatologists even if the clinics are closed. Teledermatology represents a crucial means of communication. Patients can contact the dermatological staff by emails and telephone, 24 h a day, 7 days a week, for video calls and dermatological consultations.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Membrana Mucosa/patologia , Neoplasias/terapia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pele/patologia , Distância Social , Administração Cutânea , Betacoronavirus , Erupção por Droga/diagnóstico , Exantema/patologia , Exantema/virologia , Humanos , Itália , Masculino , Prurido/patologia , Prurido/virologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/métodos
16.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(695): 1086-1091, 2020 May 27.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32462836

RESUMO

Dermatologic toxicities appear to be the most prevalent immunotherapy related adverse effects, both with anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 agents, as well as with the newly developed anti-PD-L1. They occur in more than one-third of the patients treated with immune check point inhibitors, regardless of the cancer being treated. They mainly manifest in the form of self-limiting maculopapular rashes and pruritus. Early recognition and management are essential in order to mitigate the severity of the lesions. A multidisciplinary team is crucial for optimal management.


Assuntos
Erupção por Droga/etiologia , Imunoterapia/efeitos adversos , Imunoterapia/métodos , Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Neoplasias/imunologia , Neoplasias/patologia
19.
Dermatol Online J ; 26(2)2020 Feb 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32239886

RESUMO

A morbilliform drug eruption is the most common condition leading to a dermatology consultation for a patient in the hospital. Timing is an important diagnostic tool since the onset of a skin rash usually takes place within days-to-weeks of the start of the implicated drug. A comprehensive, thorough, and reliable drug history by the clinician is essential. Therefore, to assist in the task of determining the causative medication of a new skin rash in a hospitalized patient, the creation of a drug calendar is recommended. The development of an electronic version of the drug calendar offers several benefits over the manual version. As the use of electronic medical records continues to become the standard in medicine, the electronic drug calendar will serve as an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity.


Assuntos
Erupção por Droga/diagnóstico , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Anamnese/métodos , Esquema de Medicação , Erupção por Droga/fisiopatologia , Exantema/etiologia , Humanos , Fatores de Tempo
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