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1.
Int J Biol Sci ; 16(15): 2828-2834, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33061799

RESUMO

During the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, traditional face-to-face psychological interventions have been suspended due to high risks of rapid transmission. Developing an effective online model of psychological intervention is deemed necessary to deal with the mental health challenges brought up by this disease. An integrated psychological intervention model coined 'COVID-19 Psychological Resilience Model' was developed in Chengdu, China including live media, 24-hour hotline consultations, online video intervention and on-site crisis intervention sessions to provide services to those in need. A total of 45 episodes of live media programs on COVID-19 outbreak-related psychological problems were broadcasted with over 10 million views. A total of 4,236 hotline consultations were completed. More than 50% of the clients had positive feedback about the hotline consultations. A total of 223 cases received online video intervention, of which 84.97% were redirected from the hotline consultation and 15.03% from COVID-19-designated hospital and community-based observation spots. Seventy one-on-one psychological interventions were conducted with 39 COVID-19 patients, and one-third were treated with medication. Additionally, 5 training sessions were conducted to 98 frontline medical staff. This 'COVID-19 Psychological Resilience Model' is proven effective to the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have greatly improved the overall mental health of our target population during the COVID-19 pandemic. This model could provide valuable experiences and serve as a reference guide for other countries to offer effective psychological intervention, and reduce detrimental negative mental health outcomes in public health emergency.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Serviços de Saúde Mental/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Resiliência Psicológica , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Telemedicina/métodos , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Linhas Diretas , Humanos , Internet , Modelos Organizacionais , Modelos Psicológicos , Pandemias , Psicoterapia/métodos , Estresse Psicológico/terapia
3.
Z Kinder Jugendpsychiatr Psychother ; 48(5): 369-379, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880227

RESUMO

Effectiveness of stabilization training for adolescent refugees with trauma-induced disorders: A randomized controlled trial Abstract. Unaccompanied minor refugees (UMR) are a group particularly vulnerable to mental illness. They pose a great challenge not only for child and youth psychiatric and psychotherapeutic care, but also for youth-welfare institutions. The study examines the effectiveness of Stabilization Training for Adolescent Refugees with Trauma Induced Disorders in inpatient youth-welfare facilities. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial with pre-post design in a naturalistic setting, randomly assigning 9 housing groups for UMRs to the intervention or waiting control condition. The mental stress of 46 UMRs was assessed by both self-report and educational staff-report. Two educational staff members conducted the Stabilization Training for Adolescent Refugees with Trauma Induced Disorders as an intervention in each of the respective residential groups. Results: Participation in training led to a reduction in subjective general psychological stress. At the end of the training, psychological stress in self-judgment was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the waiting control condition. The effectiveness of the training is apparently not reflected by educational staff assessments. Conclusions: Stabilization training is a suitable instrument for the preclinical care of UMR and thus an essential basis for further psychotherapy.


Assuntos
Psicoterapia , Refugiados/psicologia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/psicologia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/terapia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Adolescente , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21697, 2020 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871885

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a critical thinking intervention (CTI) on stress management among undergraduates of adult education and extramural studies programs. METHOD: A total of 44 undergraduates were randomly sorted into experimental and waitlist control groups. We used the Perceived Stress Scale for data collection at the pre-test, post-test, and follow-up stages. We used unpaired t and paired t-tests to analyze the data collected. SPSS version 22.0 was used for the data analyses (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). RESULTS: It was shown that the CTI was effective in reducing the mean stress of the participants compared to the control group both in the post-test (t[42] = -22.453, P < .001) and follow-up periods (t[42] = -34.292, P < .001). There were statistically significant changes in the mean stress of participants in the experimental group from the pre-test to post-test phases (t[23] = 26.30, P = .000, r = .08], and from pre-test to follow-up(t[23] = 37.10, P = .000, r = .30). The mean stress of the participants in the experimental group from post-test to follow-up signified the sustained positive influence of the CTI on the mean stress (t[23] = 2.41, P = .000, r = .46) of the undergraduates. CONCLUSION: This study adds to the literature by showing that a CTI is a valuable strategy for stress reduction in a university environment. Given that the CTI demonstrated the ability to reduce stress among undergraduates enrolled in adult education and extramural studies programs, we hope that similar interventions will be adopted to manage and prevent stress among students in other departments and disciplines.


Assuntos
Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Estudantes/psicologia , Pensamento , Universidades , Adulto , Estudos Controlados Antes e Depois , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica , Adulto Jovem
6.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 24(5): 472-474, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32945803

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic caused many hospitals and treatment centers to temporarily restrict or prohibit visitors to control viral spread. This article presents a case study of a patient receiving a bone marrow transplantation who experienced psychological distress during hospitalization because of social isolation. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for distress management are used as a framework to outline a nursing plan of care for managing social isolation-related psychological distress in patients who are hospitalized during a worldwide pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Hospitalização , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Isolamento Social , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/psicologia , Neoplasias/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Transplante de Células-Tronco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
7.
Pediatrics ; 146(Suppl 1): S66-S69, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32737235

RESUMO

In all of medicine, there is perhaps nothing so distressing as bearing witness to a patient's suffering, especially if that patient is a child. We want to do everything that we can to avoid or alleviate a child's suffering, yet what do clinicians, ethicists, lawyers, or family members mean when they use the term "suffering," and how should these claims of suffering factor into pediatric decision-making? This question of suffering and what to do about it has played a key role in several prominent pediatric cases over the past decade, including the cases of Charlie Gard, Alfie Evans, and Baby Joseph. These cases have become seminal cases precisely because there is no clear resolution, and the "suffering child" continues to challenge our moral ideals of what it means to live a good life. In this article, I explore the various ways in which the concept of suffering is used in these cases, and I offer new ways in which parents, providers, and all those who work with sick children can approach the suffering child.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisão Clínica/ética , Doença de Leigh , Encefalomiopatias Mitocondriais , Doenças Neurodegenerativas , Terminologia como Assunto , Suspensão de Tratamento/ética , História do Século XXI , Humanos , Lactente , Doença de Leigh/diagnóstico , Doença de Leigh/psicologia , Doença de Leigh/terapia , Masculino , Encefalomiopatias Mitocondriais/terapia , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/diagnóstico , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/psicologia , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/terapia , Ontário , Pais/psicologia , Estado Vegetativo Persistente/psicologia , Estado Vegetativo Persistente/terapia , Qualidade de Vida , Respiração Artificial/ética , Estresse Psicológico/diagnóstico , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Traqueostomia/psicologia , Reino Unido , Suspensão de Tratamento/legislação & jurisprudência
9.
BMJ Open ; 10(8): e039646, 2020 08 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32792455

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic poses immense challenges for national and international healthcare systems. Especially in times of social isolation and governmental restrictions, mental health should not be neglected. Innovative approaches are required to support psychologically burdened people. The e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' has been developed to offer manualised and evidence-based psychotherapeutic support adapted to COVID-19-related issues in order to overcome psychological distress. In our study, we aim to assess the efficacy of the e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' in terms of reducing distress (primary outcome), depression and anxiety symptoms as well as improving self-efficacy, quality of life and mindfulness (secondary outcomes). Furthermore, we want to evaluate the programme's usability, feasibility and participants' satisfaction with 'CoPE It' (tertiary outcome). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The e-mental health intervention 'CoPE It' consists of four 30 min modules, conducted every other day, involving psychotherapeutic techniques of mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive-behavioural therapy. The widely applied and previously established content has been adapted to the context of the COVID-19 pandemic by experts in psychosomatic medicine and stress prevention. In our longitudinal study, adult participants-with adequate German language and computer skills, and who have provided informed consent-will be recruited via emergency support hotlines in Germany. Flyers will be distributed, and online channels will be used. Participants will complete a baseline assessment (T0), a postintervention assessment (T1) and assessments 1 and 3 months later (T2 and T3, respectively). We will perform repeated measures analysis of covariance, mixed linear models, standard analyses of variance and regression, and correlation coefficients. In case of binary outcome variables, either mixed logistic regression or χ² tests will be used. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Ethics Committees of the University of Duisburg-Essen (20-9243-BO) and University of Tübingen (469/2020BO) approved the study. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00021301.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Aconselhamento à Distância/métodos , Atenção Plena/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Ansiedade/terapia , Betacoronavirus , Depressão/prevenção & controle , Depressão/terapia , Humanos , Pandemias , Satisfação do Paciente , Qualidade de Vida , Autoeficácia , Estresse Psicológico/prevenção & controle
10.
Med Care ; 58 Suppl 2 9S: S125-S132, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32826782

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Veterans Affairs is dedicated to providing a Whole Health approach to care, including offering complementary and integrative health (CIH) approaches to Veterans. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the association of CIH participation with Veterans' patient-reported outcomes over time. RESEARCH DESIGN: A survey of patient-reported outcomes at 5 timepoints: baseline, 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. SUBJECTS: Veterans participating in any type of CIH approach at 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers. MEASURES: Mixed hierarchical models with repeated variables were used to test the hypothesis that participating in any CIH approach would be associated with Veterans' overall physical/mental health [Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 28 (PROMIS 28)], pain intensity, perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), and engagement in their care (Patient Activation Measure-13), controlling for age, male sex, site, participation in other CIH approaches, and surveys completed. RESULTS: We received 401 surveys from 119 Veterans (72% male, age range: 29-85 y) across all timepoints. Yoga participation was related to decreases in perceived stress (P<0.001), while tai chi participation was associated with improvements in overall PROMIS 28 physical and mental health functioning (P<0.02). Specific types of CIH were associated with significant improvements in PROMIS 28 subscales: meditation participation with physical functioning at 2, 6, and 12 months; tai chi participation with anxiety at 2 and 6 months, and ability to participate in social role activities at 2 months. No CIH approach was associated with Veterans' pain or engagement in their care. CONCLUSION: As specific CIH approaches are associated with improvements in patient-reported outcomes, clinicians, Veterans, and family members may use this information in discussions of nonpharmacological options to address health and well-being.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Integrativa/estatística & dados numéricos , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Veteranos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Manejo da Dor , Medição da Dor , Participação do Paciente , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Saúde dos Veteranos
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32752228

RESUMO

This study evaluated the short-term efficacy of brief group cognitive behavioral therapy (BG-CBT) in reducing diabetes-related distress (DRD), lowering hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), improving food consumption behavior, increasing physical activity, and improving medication adherence behavior. A quasi-experimental pretest/post-test design with follow-up assessments was used with an experimental and a control group. Participants were patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and moderate or high diabetes-related distress recruited from the Diabetes Mellitus Clinic of Hang Dong Hospital, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Fifty-six eligible participants were purposively selected and enrolled, then randomly assigned to either the BG-CBT group or the control group. The BG-CBT group received six brief weekly sessions of cognitive behavioral group therapy, while the control group received conventional care. Baseline data were collected at week 0 (pretest) and at week 6 (post-test), including food consumption behavior, physical activity, and adherence to medication regimes, as well as a blood examination to determine levels of HbA1c at the week 12 follow-up. DRD was assessed using the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS-17) and analyzed using descriptive statistics, including pair t-test and independence t-test results. The BG-CBT had a significant effect on the amelioration of diabetes distress, improvement of food consumption behavior, and reduction of HbA1c levels, demonstrating the effectiveness of BG-CBT in maintaining diabetes control in people with T2DM-related distress.


Assuntos
Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Psicoterapia de Grupo , Estresse Psicológico , Idoso , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Feminino , Hemoglobina A Glicada , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Tailândia
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32842490

RESUMO

In this paper the scientific literature on the association between forests, stress relief and relaxation is reviewed with the purpose to understand common patterns of research, the main techniques used for analysis, findings relevant to forest-therapy-oriented management, and knowledge gaps. The database of studies was collected with a keyword search on the Web, which returned a set of 32 studies that were included in the analysis. The main findings and patterns were identified with a text mining analysis of the abstract to search for keyword patterns across studies. The analysis indicates that most studies compared rest and relaxation performances across urban and forest environments and used a combination of self-reported measure of stress or rest collected with validate scales, e.g., the Profile of Mood of States (POMS) and the Restoration Outcome Scale (ROS), and a minority-only set of these two groups of indicators. Results of this review indicate that primary studies identified a positive association between forest exposure and mental well-being, in particular when compared to urban environments, thus suggesting that forest are effective in lowering stress levels. This study found that, to date, the characteristics of forests and characteristics of the visit are little investigated in the literature. For this reason, more research with a focus on forest variables such as tree species composition, tree density and other variables affecting forest landscape should be further investigated to inform forest management. Similarly, the characteristics of the visits (e.g., length of visit and frequency) should be further explored to provide robust forest therapy guidelines.


Assuntos
Florestas , Terapia de Relaxamento , Relaxamento , Estresse Psicológico , Árvores , Saúde Mental , Recreação , Estresse Fisiológico , Estresse Psicológico/terapia
14.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235851, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32645063

RESUMO

Positive affect is associated with alleviating mental and physiological stress responses. As laughter is a common physiological operationalization of positive affect, we investigated whether the effects of experiencing a stressful event on stress symptoms is lessened by frequency and intensity of daily laughter. Using an intensive longitudinal design, we ambulatory assessed the self-reported experience of stressful events, stress symptoms and the frequency as well as the intensity of laughter in university students' daily lives. Our hierarchical ecological momentary assessment data were analyzed with multilevel models. The results support the stress-buffering model of positive affect: We found that the frequency of laughter attenuated the association between stressful events and subsequent stress symptoms. The level of intensity of laughter, however, was found to have no significant effect. Future studies should use additional psychophysiological indicators of stress and straighten out the differential contributions of frequency and intensity of daily laughter.


Assuntos
Terapia do Riso , Riso , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Adulto , Afeto , Avaliação Momentânea Ecológica , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(28): e20493, 2020 Jul 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32664060

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Psychological stress was an important mental health problem among the general population and warrant research to inform strategies for effective prevention. iMBIs provide a possibility to offer easily accessible, efficacious, convenient, and low-cost interventions on a wide scale. However, the efficacy of iMBIs in the general population remains unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the effects of iMBIs for stress reduction in the general population. METHODS: A systematic search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Medline, Cochrane Library, CNKI, and Wanfang Data databases was performed up to April 10, 2019. The overall effect sizes of the iMBIs on stress, depression, anxiety, and mindfulness were recorded by the metric of Hedges' g with 95% confidence interval (CI), Z-value, and P value. RESULTS: Sixteen eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall results indicated that iMBIs had small to moderate effects on stress (Hedges' g = -0.393) and mindfulness (Hedges' g = -0.316) compared with the control group. Results from subgroup analyses revealed that the type of sample and delivery mode had a greater impact on heterogeneity across the studies. Meta-regression found that the overall effect might be moderated by guidance for iMBIs. CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis suggested that iMBIs had small to moderate effects in reducing stress and improving mindfulness of the general population in comparison with the control group. Future research is needed to explore how iMBIs are remolded to improve adherence and suit specific individuals.


Assuntos
Atenção Plena , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Ansiedade/terapia , Depressão/terapia , Humanos , Internet
16.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD012527, 2020 07 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627860

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Resilience can be defined as the maintenance or quick recovery of mental health during or after periods of stressor exposure, which may result from a potentially traumatising event, challenging life circumstances, a critical life transition phase, or physical illness. Healthcare professionals, such as nurses, physicians, psychologists and social workers, are exposed to various work-related stressors (e.g. patient care, time pressure, administration) and are at increased risk of developing mental disorders. This population may benefit from resilience-promoting training programmes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions to foster resilience in healthcare professionals, that is, healthcare staff delivering direct medical care (e.g. nurses, physicians, hospital personnel) and allied healthcare staff (e.g. social workers, psychologists). SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, 11 other databases and three trial registries from 1990 to June 2019. We checked reference lists and contacted researchers in the field. We updated this search in four key databases in June 2020, but we have not yet incorporated these results. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults aged 18 years and older who are employed as healthcare professionals, comparing any form of psychological intervention to foster resilience, hardiness or post-traumatic growth versus no intervention, wait-list, usual care, active or attention control. Primary outcomes were resilience, anxiety, depression, stress or stress perception and well-being or quality of life. Secondary outcomes were resilience factors. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data, assessed risks of bias, and rated the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach (at post-test only). MAIN RESULTS: We included 44 RCTs (high-income countries: 36). Thirty-nine studies solely focused on healthcare professionals (6892 participants), including both healthcare staff delivering direct medical care and allied healthcare staff. Four studies investigated mixed samples (1000 participants) with healthcare professionals and participants working outside of the healthcare sector, and one study evaluated training for emergency personnel in general population volunteers (82 participants). The included studies were mainly conducted in a hospital setting and included physicians, nurses and different hospital personnel (37/44 studies). Participants mainly included women (68%) from young to middle adulthood (mean age range: 27 to 52.4 years). Most studies investigated group interventions (30 studies) of high training intensity (18 studies; > 12 hours/sessions), that were delivered face-to-face (29 studies). Of the included studies, 19 compared a resilience training based on combined theoretical foundation (e.g. mindfulness and cognitive-behavioural therapy) versus unspecific comparators (e.g. wait-list). The studies were funded by different sources (e.g. hospitals, universities), or a combination of different sources. Fifteen studies did not specify the source of their funding, and one study received no funding support. Risk of bias was high or unclear for most studies in performance, detection, and attrition bias domains. At post-intervention, very-low certainty evidence indicated that, compared to controls, healthcare professionals receiving resilience training may report higher levels of resilience (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.65; 12 studies, 690 participants), lower levels of depression (SMD -0.29, 95% CI -0.50 to -0.09; 14 studies, 788 participants), and lower levels of stress or stress perception (SMD -0.61, 95% CI -1.07 to -0.15; 17 studies, 997 participants). There was little or no evidence of any effect of resilience training on anxiety (SMD -0.06, 95% CI -0.35 to 0.23; 5 studies, 231 participants; very-low certainty evidence) or well-being or quality of life (SMD 0.14, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.30; 13 studies, 1494 participants; very-low certainty evidence). Effect sizes were small except for resilience and stress reduction (moderate). Data on adverse effects were available for three studies, with none reporting any adverse effects occurring during the study (very-low certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: For healthcare professionals, there is very-low certainty evidence that, compared to control, resilience training may result in higher levels of resilience, lower levels of depression, stress or stress perception, and higher levels of certain resilience factors at post-intervention. The paucity of medium- or long-term data, heterogeneous interventions and restricted geographical distribution limit the generalisability of our results. Conclusions should therefore be drawn cautiously. The findings suggest positive effects of resilience training for healthcare professionals, but the evidence is very uncertain. There is a clear need for high-quality replications and improved study designs.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Doenças Profissionais/terapia , Resiliência Psicológica , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Adulto , Pessoal Técnico de Saúde/psicologia , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Atenção Plena/educação , Doenças Profissionais/psicologia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(21): e20335, 2020 May 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-498538

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is novel coronavirus infection in 2019. Many reports suggested that psychological intervention is playing a positive role in COVID-19 treatment, but there is no high-quality evidence to prove its effects. This paper reports the protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify effectiveness of psychological intervention during the treatment of COVID-19. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The following electronic databases will be used by 2 independent reviewers: Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane Library, PubMed, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Wan fang Database, ClinicalTrials, WHO Trials, and Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. The randomised controlled trials of psychological intervention on COVID-19 will be searched in the databases by 2 researchers independently. Clinical recovery time and effective rate will be assessed as the primary outcomes. Changes of patients physical condition (1. Time until COVID-19 RT-PCR negative in upper respiratory tract specimen; 2. Time until cough reported as mild or absent; 3. Time until dyspnea reported as mild or absent; 4. Frequency of requiring supplemental oxygen or non-invasive ventilation; 5. Frequency of requiring respiratory; 6. Incidence of severe cases; 7. Proportion of re-hospitalization or admission to ICU; 8. All-cause mortality; 9. Frequency of seriously adverse events) and changes of psychological condition (such as: SRQ-20, PHQ-9, GAD-7, Hamilton Depression Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Scale) will be assessed as the secondary outcomes. For dichotomous outcomes, such as effective rate, data will be expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For continuous outcomes, weighted mean differences (WMD) or standardized mean differences (SMD) will be calculated. Fixed effect model will be used for evaluating efficiency. Considering clinical heterogeneity, random effect model will be used for continuous outcomes. RESULTS: Relevant studies will be used to evaluate whether psychological intervention is effective for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This study will provide reliable evidence for psychological intervention on COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020178699.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Metanálise como Assunto , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Psicoterapia , Projetos de Pesquisa , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto , Humanos , Pandemias
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