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1.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 151-156, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043584

RESUMO

Early clinical exposure (ECE), defined as any interaction with patients prior to the portion of the curriculum when den- tal students spend most of their time at school as a primary provider, is a growing trend in curriculum reform across U.S. dental schools in the 21st century. The aims of this study were to characterize the types of ECE implementation in U.S. dental schools and determine if ECE correlated with earlier clinical competency assessments. In September 2018, the academic deans of all 66 U.S. dental schools were invited to respond to an eight-item electronic survey about ECE at their schools. Representatives of 40 schools submitted complete responses, for a response rate of 60.6%. Among the respondents, 85% reported their schools started their principal clinical experience (PCE), the portion of the curriculum when students spend most of their time as the primary provider for patients, during the last quarter of Year 2 or the first quarter of Year 3. Respondents at all 40 schools reported offering some form of ECE as part of the formal curriculum, with shadowing and performing dental prophylaxis the most commonly of- fered types. No statistically significant associations were found between specific types of ECE and related Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) clinical standards for both formative and summative assessments. Although U.S. dental schools have been incorporating more ECE into their curricula over the past decade, these findings suggest that it has not led to earlier clinical competency assessments.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Currículo , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
2.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 143-150, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043586

RESUMO

In the U.S., the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) requires that dental schools use competency-based assessments and standardized levels of proficiency to ensure that students are prepared for patient care after graduation. No such comprehensive standardized preclinical testing is required in the CODA standards. The aim of this study was to determine the use of preclinical competency assessments for students transitioning from preclinical to clinical education in North American dental schools and respondents' perceptions of the need for standardization in preclinical testing. An electronic survey was sent to the academic deans of all 76 U.S. and Canadian dental schools in July 2018 asking if the school used competency exams to assess preclinical students prior to entering patient care and, if so, about the type of tests and disciplines tested, student remediation, and reasons for revisions. The survey also asked for the respondents' perspectives on potential preclinical assessment standardization. Respondents from 28 U.S. and two Canadian schools participated in the survey, for a 39.5% response rate. The majority (92.3%) of respondents said their school considered preclinical competency assessments to be good indicators of students' readiness for transitioning into patient care, yet 40.0% reported their schools had no comprehensive preclinical testing, and 13.8% had no preclinical testing in endodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, or restorative dentistry. Regarding type of comprehensive preclinical assessment used, 71.4% reported using typodont-based exams, 46.4% used written comprehensive exams, and 42.9% used objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs); respondents could select all that applied on this item. Of the respondents whose schools had preclinical competency assessments, 72.4% had a review mechanism in place to evaluate its effectiveness. Overall, this study found that 60% of the participating schools had some form of preclinical testing, but there were no agreed-upon competencies to determine preclinical dental students' readiness for safe patient care in their clinical education.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Canadá , Currículo , Humanos , Estudantes de Odontologia , Estados Unidos
3.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 176-185, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043587

RESUMO

Dental education has seen increases in global health and international educational experiences in many dental schools' curricula. In response, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health's Global Oral Health Interest Group aims to develop readily available, open access resources for competency-based global oral health teaching and learning. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a Global Health Starter Kit (GHSK), an interdisciplinary, competency-based, open access curriculum for dental faculty members who wish to teach global oral health in their courses. Phase I (2012-17) evaluated longitudinal outcomes from two Harvard School of Dental Medicine pilot global health courses with 32 advanced and 34 predoctoral dental students. In Phase II (2018), the Phase I outcomes informed development, implementation, and evaluation of the open access GHSK (45 enrollees) written by an interdisciplinary, international team of 13 content experts and consisting of five modules: Global Trends, Global Goals, Back to Basics: Primary Care, Social Determinants and Risks, and Ethics and Sustainability. In Phase III (summer and fall 2018), five additional pilot institutions (two U.S. dental schools, one U.S. dental hygiene program, and two dental schools in low- and middle-income countries) participated in an early adoption of the GHSK curriculum. The increase in perceived knowledge scores of students enrolled in the pilot global health courses was similar to those enrolled in the GHSK, suggesting the kit educated students as well or better in nearly all categories than prior course materials. This study found the GHSK led to improvements in learning in the short term and may also contribute to long-term career planning and decision making by providing competency-based global health education.


Assuntos
Saúde Global , Saúde Bucal , Acesso à Informação , Currículo , Humanos , Faculdades de Odontologia
4.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 135-142, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043588

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended learning model with a flipped classroom approach in a clinical dental education setting based on student performance and perceptions. Comparisons were made between blended learning and traditional methods for all fourth-year dental students in two consecutive cohorts in a conservative dentistry course at a dental school in Jordan. The 2016-17 cohort (control group) consisted of 364 students taught with conventional methods. The 2017-18 cohort (study group) consisted of 253 students taught with blended learning using a flipped classroom method. Performance measures were two exams (online and written), two assignments, inclinic quizzes, and clinical assessment. The study also assessed the number of posts made by students in the study group on an online discussion forum. The results showed that the study group students had significantly better performance on all assessments than the control group students. The students' overall grades in the blended learning cohort were an average 7.25 points higher than in the control cohort. Students who participated in the online forum also had better performance in the course: one participation correlated with 0.697 standard deviations higher score. Overall, students' perceptions were positive and supported the adoption of a blended learning model in the course. These results showing improved student performance provide support for blended learning and use of an online discussion forum.


Assuntos
Satisfação Pessoal , Estudantes de Odontologia , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Faculdades de Odontologia
5.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 57-61, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977088

RESUMO

The aims of this study were to describe patient utilization of an urgent care clinic (UCC) in a dental school for one year and to assess dental students' perceptions of the benefits of training in this clinic. Aggregate clinic data from July 3, 2017, through July 6, 2018, were used to determine number of patients, number of new patients, number of new patients who elected to transfer their primary dental care to the university, number who were seen for a follow-up, and service/clinic to which each patient was referred. Student evaluations were used to determine the benefits students perceived in their training in the UCC. Results showed that 1,674 patients were seen in the UCC during the study period. Of these, 67% were new patients, and 53% of these new patients opted to transfer their primary dental care to the university. An average of 7.03 patients were treated per day, and 2.48 new patients per day were generated for the predoctoral student clinic. The most common referrals were to oral surgery (37%), endodontics (30%), and the predoctoral dental clinic (28%). Among these patients, 39% scheduled follow-up appointments, and the attendance rate was 69%. About 80% of eligible students (40/50) completed the questionnaire, and many provided optional comments. Over 80% of the responding students responded favorably regarding the learning experiences and assessments during the UCC rotation. This study found that establishment of the UCC increased the pool of patients and provided students the necessary experiences in triaging and treating dental emergencies.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos
6.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 13-21, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977095

RESUMO

This Point/Counterpoint article examines the idea of instituting term limits for dental school deans. Viewpoint 1 supports the use of term limits for dental school deans. According to evidence presented in this viewpoint, setting term limits for deans would foster new leadership development and utilization of skills, increase accountability and effectiveness, and promote diversity. Viewpoint 2 opposes the use of term limits for dental school deans. This viewpoint provides evidence about a steep learning curve for new deans, the need for leadership stability, potential loss of networking relationships, and the high cost of recruiting new deans.


Assuntos
Liderança , Faculdades de Odontologia , Estados Unidos
7.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 34-43, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977101

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dental students' faculty group leader in clinic, intended postgraduate training, and clinic schedule on their clinical performance. This retrospective study used de-identified transcript data from the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine Classes of 2013, 2014, and 2015, a total of 238 students. The impact factors analyzed were the assigned faculty member who served as clinical group leader and mentor; area of students' intended postgraduate training; and variations in timing of students' summer clinic assignments and vacations. Clinical performance, consistent with the school's graduation criteria, was measured with summative assessments (completion of competencies); completion of care for patients assigned (case completions); and overall patient encounter rate. The results showed that group leader assignment correlated with significant differences among students in completion of cases (p=0.001), competencies completed (p<0.001), and patient encounter rate (p=0.018). Students who intended to pursue general practice residencies and prosthodontics specialty training completed fewer cases than students pursuing other types of postgraduate training (p<0.001). Students who had full-time clinic in June and vacation later in the summer of their third- to fourth-year transition completed more cases (p<0.001), completed more competencies (p=0.008), and had more patient visits (p=0.012) than those who had full-time clinic later in the summer. There were significant correlations among case completions, completion of competencies, and patient encounter rate. Overall, this study found that the students' intended postgraduate training, clinic schedules, and faculty mentors influenced their progress in clinical training and should be taken into consideration in student evaluation and patient care.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Competência Clínica , Educação em Odontologia , Docentes de Odontologia , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos
8.
Spec Care Dentist ; 40(1): 106-112, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31867765

RESUMO

AIMS: Elder abuse, defined as emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, financial exploitation, or neglect, is a growing problem. Dental professionals have the unique opportunity to identify elder abuse. However, elder abuse awareness training, targeting dental students, is insufficient and research is limited. This knowledge gap prompted the research team at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) to develop, implement, and evaluate an online Elder Abuse Awareness Professional Education Training (EAAPET) program, designed to educate dental and other health professionals to recognize, respond to, and report elder abuse. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ninety-six dental students, attending the UTHSC College of Dentistry during the fall semester of 2018, were enrolled. Pre- and post-assessments, designed to assess changes in students' perceived and actual knowledge, were conducted. Paired sample t-test results indicate that the EAAPET program significantly improved students' perception of their abilities to identify, respond to, and report elder abuse. Improvement was also demonstrated within students' actual knowledge of how to appropriately interact with suspected elder abuse victims. Qualitative assessment suggested the training was well received by the students. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings, the authors recommend that dental schools integrate elder abuse awareness education into their curriculums.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos ao Idoso , Estudantes de Odontologia , Idoso , Currículo , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Faculdades de Odontologia
9.
Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal ; 25(1): e89-e95, 2020 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31880286

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Oral cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. Dental schools may play an important role in educating patients about oral cancer. This study aimed at evaluating the knowledge of patients attending clinics at two dental schools in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From March 2017 to April 2017, 251 patients who were attending clinics at two dental schools in Recife, Brazil, were included in the study. Patients were contacted in the waiting rooms of the clinic. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire, which consists of 21 questions, including socio-demographic and specific information on the disease. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and a chi-square test (with a 5% significance level) was used to assess the correlation between the variables, education and family income and other variables. RESULTS: Most participants were women (64.9%) with a mean age of 42.72 years. Most participants were knowledgeable about oral cancer and identified tobacco use (48.6%), alcohol consumption (25.1%), and solar radiation (12%) as the primary risk factors for the disease. Only 36.7% of the participants reported having received counselling on oral cancer, of which 18.3% received the information from a dentist. All patients with an income higher than six minimum wages were aware about oral cancer (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings emphasize the importance of educational programs in dental schools as well providing integrated services for patients seeking care at school clinics, including population's awareness on oral cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Bucais , Faculdades de Odontologia , Adulto , Brasil , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Instituições Acadêmicas , Inquéritos e Questionários
10.
Bull Tokyo Dent Coll ; 60(4): 297-302, 2019 Dec 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31761880

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the Communication Studies Program at Tokyo Dental College as a tool in behavioral education. The number of Patient Community members who had participated in multiple sets of the program for third-year students in the same year within the 3-year period spanning 2016 to 2018 (152, 148, and 129 students in 2016, 2017, and 2018 respectively), and the period during which they had participated in multiple sets were investigated. Comments on student behavior, including on hairstyle, clothes, and attitude, were also analyzed. The total number of members who had participated in multiple sets (1 set comprised 1 lecture and 2 training sessions) was 5; and their comments were more favorable during the second (sets 3 and 4) than the first half of the 1-month program (sets 1 and 2). During the first half, the students were criticized for speaking softly, having bad posture, not concentrating, and having an attitude inappropriate for a medical worker; but in the second half, they were praised for beginning to adopt the proper attitude for a medical worker, speaking louder, having better posture, and a very serious attitude. These findings suggest that the Communication Studies Program is effective in improving student behavior.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Odontologia , Humanos , Tóquio
11.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 126(11): 589-597, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31730136

RESUMO

Education in the field of quality and safety in oral care still needs further development, both for students and teachers. Based on the current development of clinical practice guidelines in the field of oral care in the Netherlands, this article describes a proposal for implementing this as a 'quality of oral care' learning line in the dental school curricula. Within clinical educational practice and scientific training, students should become familiar with the development, assessment and application of clinical practice guidelines. Some proposals for embedding this new learning line in the curriculum are given. In order to further shape the learning line, close cooperation between the three dental schools and the Kennisinstituut Mondzorg (Institute for Knowledge Translation in Oral Care) in the Netherlands is recommended.


Assuntos
Currículo , Odontologia/normas , Educação em Odontologia , Odontologia Baseada em Evidências , Faculdades de Odontologia , Odontólogos , Humanos , Países Baixos
12.
Acta Odontol Latinoam ; 32(2): 111-110, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31664302

RESUMO

Learning strategies are a set of organized, conscious, intentional tasks performed by a student to achieve a learning objective effectively in a given social context. The aim of the present study was to determine the type and frequency of use of different learning strategies among students taking the subject "Comprehensive Clinic II ", which corresponds to the 3rd year of the 6-year general syllabus of the undergraduate course at the School of Dentistry, Buenos Aires University, and to analyze the use of these learning strategies according to the number of years elapsed between each students admission to dental school and the time he/she took that subject. Dental students (n=189) filled in the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Seventy-five percent were female. The tool includes 10 dimensions, organized in 77 items. Responses to each question were recorded using a Likert type scale (5 choices). Total scores were obtained by assigning values to the responses. The students were grouped according to time elapsed from year of admission to dental school to the year in which they took the subject (Institutional Persistence, TI). Statistical analysis included mean and confidence intervals for scores (total and for each domain) and comparisons among TI groups using one-way ANOVA and Tukeys post hoc test. Total score for the sample was 275.3 (71.5% of maximum possible score). There were differences in the use of learning strategies reported by dental students in the tool. Students with shorter institutional persistence times scored higher in the following dimensions: attitude and interest, motivation, selfdiscipline, willingness, self-testing and reviewing.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Avaliação Educacional , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Adulto , Odontologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 22(10): 1365-1371, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31607725

RESUMO

Objective: Orofacial pain (OFP) is a unique group of dental conditions with focus on chronic nonodontogenic pain affecting mouth, jaws, and face. The aim of this study is to investigate the knowledge of dentists in Saudi Arabia toward OFP assessment. Materials and Methods: An English language questionnaire containing 20 close-ended questions was used to capture data. The questionnaire included diagnostic criteria and clinical symptoms and signs of various OFP conditions. It was distributed to general dental practitioners (GDP) and dental specialists in four major provinces in Saudi Arabia. Results: A total of 318 questionnaires were completed by 163 males and 155 females. Most participants were GDPs (193/318) and the remaining were specialists from different dental specialties. A majority of participants were not able to diagnose neuropathic OFP or neurovascular/vascular OFP conditions (33% and 28.6%, respectively). On the other hand, only 40.3% were confident enough to diagnose different types of temporomandibular disorders. The results also showed that graduates from non-Saudi programs had significantly higher self and knowledge assessment score (59.8% and 43.4%, respectively) compared with graduates from Saudi programs (39.9% and 22.6%, respectively). The dental specialists had higher self-assessment scores compared with GDPs (48% vs. 43.7%). Overall, there was a weak positive correlation between self-assessment and knowledge assessment (20.2%). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a higher OFP knowledge and confidence for dental specialists compared with GDPs. However, this difference does not necessarily translate into more competencies in clinical practice. Therefore, the implementation of OFP courses in dental schools' curricula may benefit future dentists and improve patients' care.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Odontólogos/psicologia , Educação em Odontologia , Dor Facial/diagnóstico , Odontologia Geral/educação , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Adulto , Currículo , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Dor Facial/etiologia , Dor Facial/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Neuralgia/diagnóstico , Medição da Dor , Arábia Saudita , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/complicações , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/diagnóstico
14.
Br Dent J ; 227(6): 512-517, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31562452

RESUMO

Aim This study investigated and evaluated the teaching of occlusion in undergraduate dental schools in the UK and Ireland, the thorough understanding of which would facilitate young graduates to become competent practitioners.Material and methods A mixed-methods approach was employed, with primary data generated and collected by using a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey which was followed-up by semi-structured interviews. The hard copy questionnaires enquired about: i) whether occlusion was taught; ii) how long was spent by schools teaching occlusion; iii) what teaching resources were employed; iv) tutors' perceptions of how well prepared for general practice new graduates were; and v) how was knowledge/skill assessed. Follow-up interviews were undertaken with volunteering respondents to triangulate responses. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were stored using the Framework Method and analysis using a thematic approach.Results One hundred percent (n = 18) of schools responded to the questionnaire and 66.67% (n = 12) of the schools participated in follow-up interviews. All schools reported that they taught occlusion in their curriculum. Total hours reported teaching occlusion varied from 11 to 310 hours. Twenty-eight percent (n = 5) of respondents reported insufficient time for the teaching of occlusion in the curriculum. There was a marked variation in: i) teaching methods; ii) resources employed; iii) assessment strategies to evaluate competency in occlusion; and iv) how well prepared students were. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data identified several themes: i) variations in teaching pedagogy; ii) use of different resources; iii) variable assessment techniques; iv) evaluation of teaching; and v) barriers to teaching occlusion.Conclusion Recommendations for a coordinated teaching strategy with dedicated oversight to facilitate better student exposure to occlusion and promote student understanding of this topic is suggested.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudos Transversais , Currículo , Humanos , Irlanda , Estudantes , Inquéritos e Questionários , Ensino , Reino Unido
15.
J Dent Educ ; 83(12): 1436-1444, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31548302

RESUMO

Dental students' ability to critique team performance in dental school team clinics is a key component of dental education. The aim of this study was to determine if students' perceptions of their team leaders' openness of communication, cooperative decision making, and well-defined goals were positively related to the students' improvement-oriented voice behavior and willingness to raise concerns in the clinical environment. This study used a voluntary 12-question survey, distributed via email to all 311 students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine after completion of the spring 2017 semester. Eighty-seven students responded, for a response rate of 28%. Responses were stratified by team, class year, and gender, and the quantitative distribution of answers to each question was correlated with each other. Team leader collaborative qualities, which included openness for communication, cooperative decision making, and well-defined goals, were found to have a significant positive relationship with students' willingness to both raise concerns and make suggestions. Additionally, when measured by class year and gender, team differences in voice behavior assessment by students across the teams were found to be independent of class year, and no significant differences were found by gender. These results suggested that, to maintain high levels of communication, proper reporting of concerns, and a high standard of care, dental schools should encourage team leaders to enhance their capacity to present active collaborative behaviors in the school's clinic. The study also highlighted potential opportunities for further study of faculty traits and development in the dental school team model.


Assuntos
Liderança , Faculdades de Odontologia , Clínicas Odontológicas , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Estudantes de Odontologia
16.
J Dent Educ ; 83(12): 1411-1419, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31501256

RESUMO

Changes in U.S. health care delivery systems and Commission on Dental Accreditation standards provide impetus for interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice, but roadmaps for engaging dental and dental hygiene faculty to incorporate IPE in a systematic manner are limited. The purpose of this report is to describe the process for creating a strategy and gathering a variety of baseline data to use for determining objectives and metrics and the subsequent development of an IPE strategic plan at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry (SOD). SOD IPE committee members included representation from the UNC Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Business. A three-phase framework was developed. Phase 1 (IPE assessment) was an internal environmental scan including a 2017 faculty survey, departmental mapping of IPE activities, comparison of UNC with national results on the IPE component of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) survey of dental school seniors (2016 graduating class), identification of faculty joint/adjunct appointments at other UNC schools, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats (SWOT) analysis. Phase 2 (visioning) consisted of development of IPE mission, vision, and priorities. In Phase 3 (implementation), priorities were developed. Data-gathering led to a strategic plan with three objectives: 1) increase faculty engagement and recognition, 2) develop predoctoral dentistry and dental hygiene IPE curricula, and 3) develop an infrastructure that supports IPE. Specific initiatives and activities, supporting metrics, and estimated costs were developed for each objective. The framework guided a systematic, transparent, and organized process for collecting and monitoring the evidence and directing activities. A three-year strategic plan for IPE was developed in 2017, and implementation is ongoing.


Assuntos
Relações Interprofissionais , Faculdades de Odontologia , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia , Docentes de Odontologia , Humanos
17.
J Dent Educ ; 83(9): 1057-1064, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31477584

RESUMO

Pipeline programs aim to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities in the dental profession. At New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD), two dental students initiated the development of a pipeline program for high school students called Saturday Academy. The purpose of the program is twofold: to mentor and coach underrepresented minority and low-income high school students through the college application process, and to expose them to the field of dentistry as a viable career option through both didactic and hands-on learning. The aim of this pilot study was to determine outcomes for the first five years (2013-17) of the Saturday Academy pipeline program at NYUCD with regard to the high school students' experience with the program and their career interests after high school graduation. Across five cohorts, a total of 82 students participated in Saturday Academy. A "where are you now?" survey sent to 72 participants who reported high school graduation years between 2013 and 2018 received a response rate of 76%. The survey results showed that all (100%) of the responding Saturday Academy participants had graduated from high school and were enrolled in college, and 71% were interested in health profession careers. Almost half (47%) of the students self-identified as being pre-dental, and 96% reported that Saturday Academy had increased their interest in the dental profession. These pilot results justified an expansion of Saturday Academy at NYUCD in both size and creation of an alumni outreach initiative. Other dental schools may benefit from the strategies used by this program in establishing or expanding their pipeline programs.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Odontologia , Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/psicologia , Feminino , Ocupações em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde das Minorias , New York , Projetos Piloto , Pobreza , Instituições Acadêmicas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades
18.
J Dent Hyg ; 93(4): 33-43, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31409722

RESUMO

Purpose: Relationships between patients and their health care provider can impact treatment acceptance and patient compliance. The purpose of this study was to explore whether dental hygienists' hairstyle, clinic attire, and accessories affected patients' and dental student providers' perceptions of professionalism and the role gender plays in these perceptions.Methods: Survey data were collected from adult patients and dental student providers from a dental school in the Midwestern United States. Study participants rated the professional qualities of male and female dental hygienists photographed with professional versus unprofessional/ less-traditional hairstyles, clinic attire, and accessories. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.Results: A total of 402 patients (n=402) and 318 first- and second-year dental students (n=318) consented to participate. Both male and female dental hygienists pictured with less-traditional hairstyles were rated as less professional than clinicians with professional hairstyles on a scale from 1="not at all professional" to 7="very professional (5.28 vs. 6.04; p<.001). Males with less-traditional hairstyles (mean=4.74; p<.001) received the most negative ratings. Dental student providers rated female clinicians with less-traditional hairstyles least positively, while the patients rated male providers with non-traditional hairstyles least positively.Conclusions: Hairstyle, in both male and female dental hygienists, was viewed as a physical characteristic influencing perceptions of professionalism among patients and dental students. Overall, male clinicians were evaluated more negatively than females. Gender was not shown to affect the study participants' perceptions of professionalism.


Assuntos
Higienistas Dentários , Estudantes de Odontologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
J Dent Educ ; 83(11): 1339-1344, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31406005

RESUMO

The aims of this study were to assess the perceptions of dental students, faculty members, and patients about the benefits and pitfalls of intraoral camera use and to compare the completion rate of treatment planned posterior crowns with and without intraoral camera use in a predoctoral dental clinic. From July 2016 to June 2017, all 60 fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were encouraged to use the intraoral camera in treatment planning with patients in the school clinic. Perceptions of the students, their patients, and the faculty members supervising the treatment planning were assessed with a survey at the end of the treatment planning appointment. The completion rate of treatment planned posterior crowns was determined by recalling all posterior teeth that were treatment planned for a single unit crown at a specific period of time compared to the number of the same crowns completed for the same patients at a specific period of time, using the electronic health record, with and without camera use. Of the 60 students, 51 completed 198 surveys (85% response rate); 35 faculty members completed 64 surveys, and 202 patients completed one survey each (response rates for those groups could not be calculated). The survey results suggested that the students, faculty, and patients viewed intraoral camera use in a positive way. However, faculty perceptions were a little lower than those of patients and students, and a significant number of faculty members were neutral. The completion rate of posterior planned crowns was significantly higher (p=0.0005) when intraoral cameras were used to present images to patients than when cameras were not used. In this study, intraoral camera use in a predoctoral clinic was perceived positively by students and patients but more neutrally by faculty, and it increased the completion rate of planned posterior crowns.


Assuntos
Clínicas Odontológicas , Faculdades de Odontologia , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação em Odontologia , Docentes de Odontologia , Humanos , Estudantes de Odontologia
20.
J Dent Educ ; 83(12): 1427-1435, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31406006

RESUMO

Dental students in North American dental schools are exposed to faculty members with various professional backgrounds. These faculty members may include dentists, dental hygienists, and scientists without clinical dental credentials. The practice of dental hygienists' educating predoctoral dental students has not been well documented. The aims of this two-part study were to investigate the parameters of didactic, preclinical, and clinical instruction of dental students by dental hygienist faculty members in North American dental schools and to explore dental students' perceptions of this form of teaching. In part one, a survey was sent electronically to the clinical or academic affairs deans of all 76 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) member dental schools in 2017. Twenty-nine responded, for a 38.2% response rate. In 76% of the responding schools, dental hygienists were teaching dental students. Most respondents reported that, in their schools, the minimum degree required to teach didactically was a master's, while a bachelor's degree was required for preclinical and clinical courses. There was no significant association between dental hygienists' instructing dental students and having a dental hygiene educational program at the institution. In part two of the study, a questionnaire was completed by 102 graduating dental students (85% response rate) at one U.S. university to evaluate the impact of dental hygienist educators. Among the respondents, 87% reported feeling that dental hygienists were very effective educators. There were no significant differences in responses between traditional and advanced standing international dental students. This study found that dental hygienists were educating dental students in many North American dental schools and were doing so in curricular content beyond periodontics and that their educational contributions at a sample school were valued by the dental students there.


Assuntos
Higienistas Dentários , Estudantes de Odontologia , Currículo , Odontólogos , Docentes de Odontologia , Humanos , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Ensino
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