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1.
J Vet Dent ; 37(1): 22-28, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627686

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to determine the clinical efficacy of a dental chew with mechanical and chemical properties in 2 toy dog breeds. Eight Yorkshire terriers and 9 Chihuahuas participated in a crossover design trial. Gingivitis, dental plaque, calculus, and volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) in the breath were assessed after 4 weeks and 9 weeks, respectively. When dogs were fed 1 dental chew per day they had significantly reduced gingivitis (-20%, P < .001), accumulation of plaque (-15%, P < .001), calculus (-35%, P = .001), and VSC concentration (-19%, P < .001) compared to when receiving no chew. A significant breed effect was observed on all the average dental indices and VSC concentration.


Assuntos
Cálculos/veterinária , Placa Dentária/veterinária , Doenças do Cão , Gengivite/veterinária , Halitose/veterinária , Animais , Cálculos Dentários/veterinária , Índice de Placa Dentária , Cães
2.
J Vet Dent ; 36(2): 129-134, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31564198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dental concerns are some of the most common health problems affecting companion animals. A variety of foods, treats, and chews comprising different mechanical and chemical technologies have been investigated as a means of promoting oral health. Here, we investigate the chemical technology, lactic acid added to a commercially available food, for its ability to inhibit dental plaque, calculus, and tooth stain accumulation in cats. METHODS: Two separate feeding trials assessed the utility of a nutritionally complete feline maintenance food supplemented with lactic acid to reduce oral substrate accumulation (dental plaque, calculus, and tooth stain) in cats. After a calibration study identified high and low dental plaque formers, 45 cats were randomized to 1 of 2 test groups (food with 1.2% lactic acid supplementation) or control (food without lactic acid supplementation) groups, stratified based on their calibration scores. Data were collected on a monthly basis for 3 months. The second study randomly assigned 24 cats to either the test or control groups for 1 year, with data collected at the 6- and 12-month time points. RESULTS: In the 3-month study, reductions in dental plaque, calculus, and tooth stain accumulations were observed at the 2-month assessment in both test groups compared with control (P < .05 for test group 2). The 1-year study showed that these reductions in oral substrate accumulation persisted through the 6- and 12-month time points (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these studies demonstrate that lactic acid supplemented at 1.2% in a feline maintenance food significantly inhibits oral substrate accumulation.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Placa Dentária/veterinária , Gengivite/veterinária , Ácido Láctico/farmacologia , Animais , Gatos , Corantes , Cálculos Dentários/prevenção & controle , Cálculos Dentários/veterinária , Placa Dentária/prevenção & controle , Índice de Placa Dentária , Suplementos Nutricionais , Gengivite/prevenção & controle
3.
J Vet Dent ; 36(2): 135-142, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31537147

RESUMO

Weissella (W.) cibaria strain Chonnam Medical University (CMU) has shown oral colonizing ability and inhibitory effects on the formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in vitro studies. The present study was conducted to analyze the effects of the W. cibaria CMU on canine oral health. Halitosis, calculus, plaque, gingivitis, and intraoral microbiota were assessed in 3 groups: control (maltodextrin), W. cibaria CMU low concentration (CMU-L, 2 × 107 colony forming unit [CFU]), and high-concentration (CMU-H, 2 × 109 CFU). Halitosis was analyzed using both organoleptic evaluation and measurement of VSCs. Intraoral microbiota were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. From week 4, the total VSC level in the CMU-H group (4.0 ± 1.30 ng/10 mL) was significantly lower than in the control group (6.3 ± 2.28 ng/10 mL). Significant reduction in methyl mercaptan in the CMU-treated groups was also observed. In addition, the plaque index in the CMU-treated groups was significantly decreased. The CMU-treated groups showed significant decreases in Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia and demonstrated the colonizing ability of W. cibaria CMU in the oral cavity. We demonstrated that W. cibaria CMU suppresses halitosis, colonizes the oral cavity, and inhibits the proliferation of malodor-causing oral bacteria in beagles. According to these results, we expect that W. cibaria CMU could be a new oral hygiene solution by reducing VSC production and inhibiting the growth of oral harmful bacteria in companion animals.


Assuntos
Cálculos/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Positivas/veterinária , Halitose/veterinária , Weissella , Animais , Cálculos/microbiologia , Cães , Gengivite/microbiologia , Halitose/microbiologia , Compostos de Enxofre , Weissella/patogenicidade
4.
Pesqui. vet. bras ; 39(7): 516-522, July 2019. tab, ilus
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1040716

RESUMO

Oral lesions are common problems in feline medicine worldwide, and may be associated with different causes, such as infectious agents. There are only a few studies reporting the chief oral diseases and the results for retrovirus tests in shelter cats in Brazil, especially in the South region. This study aimed to identify the main inflammatory oral lesions in shelter cats and verify the test results for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections. Forty-three felines from private shelters in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul state (RS) that presented clinically evident oral lesions, regardless of age, breed, sex, and neuter status, were used in this survey. Serological tests for FIV and FeLV were performed in all cats, and data regarding the rearing system were collected. Sixteen cats (37.2%) were reared in a free system, whereas 27 (62.8%) were kept under a restrict system. Of the 43 cats with oral lesions, 29 (67.44%) presented only one type of lesion, characterized as periodontitis (n=22, 51.16%), followed by gingivitis (n=6, 13.95%), and stomatitis (n=1, 2.32%). Concomitant stomatitis and periodontitis were found in the 14 remaining cats (100%). With respect to the test results for retrovirus infections, nine (20.93%) of the 43 felines were positive for FIV alone. Co-infection with both viruses was observed in seven cats (16.28%). No cat was seropositive for FeLV valone. None of the six cats that presented gingivitis was positive for FIV and FeLV; one cat with stomatitis was positive for FIV and FeLV; of the 22 cats with periodontitis, six (27.27%) were FIV positive and two (9.09%) were FIV/FeLV positive; and of the 14 cats that presented stomatitis and periodontitis, three (21.43%) were FIV positive and four (28.57%) were FIV/FeLV positive. As for diagnosis, 28 cats (65.1%) presented solely periodontal disease (PD), one cat (2.32%) had feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCG) alone, and 14 (32.5%) had both PD and FCG. The results obtained show that the main oral lesions found in shelter cats in the central region of RS were gingivitis, stomatitis, and periodontitis. Periodontitis, in association or not with stomatitis, was the most frequently observed oral cavity lesion in FIV- and/or FeLV-positive cats. Other factors may contribute to installation of inflammatory oral diseases in shelter cats because most cats with oral cavity lesions tested negative for retrovirus infections.(AU)


As afecções orais são problemas comuns em medicina felina em diferentes locais do mundo e podem estar relacionadas a diferentes causas, como agentes infecciosos. Poucos estudos foram encontrados no Brasil sobre o levantamento das principais doenças orais e dos resultados de testes para retrovírus em gatos de abrigos, principalmente na região Sul. Diante disso, o objetivo deste artigo foi identificar as principais afecções orais inflamatórias em gatos de abrigos e verificar os resultados dos testes para o vírus da imunodeficiência felina (FIV) e o vírus da leucemia felina (FeLV). Foram incluídos 43 felinos provenientes de abrigos privados localizados na região central do Rio Grande do Sul (RS) que apresentavam lesões orais clinicamente evidentes, independente de idade, raça, gênero e estado reprodutivo. Em todos os gatos foram realizados testes sorológicos para FIV e FeLV e obtidas informações referentes ao sistema de criação. Em 16 gatos (37,2%), o sistema de criação era livre, enquanto em 27 (62,8%) era restrito. Dos 43 gatos com lesões orais, em 29 (67,44%) foi verificado somente um tipo de lesão, caracterizado como periodontite (n=22, 51,16%), seguido de gengivite (n=6, 13,95%) e estomatite (n=1, 2,32%). Lesões concomitantes de estomatite e periodontite foram encontradas nos 14 gatos (100%) restantes. Quanto aos resultados dos testes para retrovírus, nove (20,93%) dos 43 felinos testados, foram positivos somente para FIV. Em sete gatos (16,28%) foi observada coinfecção pelos dois vírus. Em nenhum gato foi observado soropositividade somente para FeLV. Dos seis gatos com gengivite, nenhum foi positivo para FIV e FeLV; um gato com estomatite foi positivo para FIV e FeLV; dos 22 gatos com periodontite, seis (27,27%) foram FIV positivos e dois (9,09%) FIV/FeLV positivos; e dos 14 com estomatite e periodontite, três (21,43%) foram FIV positivos e quatro (28,57%) FIV/FeLV positivos. Quanto ao diagnóstico, em 28 gatos (65,1%) foi observada somente doença periodontal (DP), em um (2,32%) somente gengivoestomatite crônica felina (GECF) e em 14 gatos (32,5%) DP e GECF. Diante dos resultados obtidos, pode-se concluir que as principais lesões orais encontradas em gatos de abrigos da região central do RS foram gengivite, estomatite e periodontite; a periodontite associada ou não a estomatite foi a lesão oral mais frequente nos gatos positivos para FIV e/ou FeLV. Acredita-se que outros fatores possam contribuir na instalação de doenças orais em gatos de abrigos, já que houve predomínio de gatos com resultados negativos nos testes para os retrovírus.(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Gatos , Retroviridae/isolamento & purificação , Estomatite/veterinária , Leucemia/veterinária , Gengivite/veterinária , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Brasil/epidemiologia , Abrigo para Animais , Imunidade
5.
BMC Vet Res ; 15(1): 207, 2019 Jun 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31226991

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease of dogs and has been associated with systemic disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the extent of periodontal disease in a population of Yorkshire terrier dogs with and without a tooth brushing regimen. Each dog was assessed under general anaesthesia two to five times between 37 and 78 weeks of age. The extent of gingivitis and periodontitis was ascertained for every tooth in the mouth. Gingivitis was measured using time to bleeding on probing, and periodontitis was based on extent of clinical attachment loss (probing depth, gingival recession and furcation exposure). RESULTS: Of the 49 dogs assessed at 37 weeks of age, 98% had at least one tooth or aspect with early periodontitis (PD2, < 25% attachment loss). The average percentage of teeth with periodontitis in the mouth was 29.6% with 95% confidence interval (23.6, 36.4). The odds of early periodontitis was 2.74 (2.23, 3.37) times higher at 78 weeks of age compared to 37 weeks of age. The canine teeth had a significantly higher probability of periodontitis compared to all other tooth types at both 37 and 78 weeks of age (p < 0.001). In addition, at the same time points, the incisors had a significantly higher probability of periodontitis compared to the molars and premolars (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Breeds of dog that are susceptible to developing periodontitis, such as Yorkshire terriers, require effective treatments for the prevention of periodontal disease from a young age. Although tooth brushing is one of the most effective methods when it comes to preventative homecare, this is not always realistic, as was found in this study. Therefore alternative ways to retard or prevent plaque accumulation that are practical for both dogs and their owners are required.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Periodontite/veterinária , Escovação Dentária/veterinária , Fatores Etários , Animais , Estudos de Coortes , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , Feminino , Gengivite/epidemiologia , Gengivite/prevenção & controle , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Periodontite/prevenção & controle , Prevalência , Distribuição Aleatória , Especificidade da Espécie
6.
Pesqui. vet. bras ; 39(2): 112-122, Feb. 2019. tab, ilus
Artigo em Inglês | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-990243

RESUMO

Periodontal diseases are multifactorial infectious processes caused by complexes of microorganisms, with damage to health, production, and animal welfare. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of virginiamycin in the prevention and control of two early forms of periodontal disease: gingivitis and necrotizing gingivitis. Ten weaned calves, aged four to six months, were permanently kept in a single lot under the same rotational grazing regime in a newly reformed area of Panicum maximum. Five of the calves were orally administered 340mg of virginiamycin (Virginiamycin Group) daily for a period of 18 weeks, while the remaining five calves (Control Group) remained under the same food management but did not receive virginiamycin. During this period, animals underwent 18 weekly evaluations regarding periodontal health, with monitoring and recording of clinical parameters of the eight deciduous incisor teeth on the labial and lingual faces. At approximately two-week intervals, nine collections of subgingival sulcus material from five sites of the four right incisor teeth of each animal were performed and subjected to microbiological evaluation using polymerase chain reaction with primers of 25 microorganisms considered potentially pathogenic. After 1440 periodontal clinical evaluations of incisor teeth of the 10 calves, a total of 395 episodes of gingivitis were recorded, of which 267 occurred in the Control Group and 128 in the Virginiamycin Group. Similarly, 89 episodes of necrotizing gingivitis were recorded; 58 in the Control Group and 31 in the Virginiamycin Group. Comparison of between-group means found significant differences for teeth with gingivitis and necrotizing gingivitis (t test; p<0.05). The total number of teeth with gingivitis (p<0.01) and necrotizing gingivitis (p<0.01) in Control Group was significantly higher than that of gingivitis (p<0.01) and necrotizing gingivitis (p<0.05) in the Virginiamycin Group. There was a positive correlation between total occurrence of gingivitis and necrotizing gingivitis in the Virginiamycin Group by Pearson's test. Virginiamycin had a protective effect on treated animals compared with the Control Group (OR = 0.36: CI (95%) = 0.27-0.43). In the Control Group, Actinomyces israelli (4.74%), domain Archaea (1.58%), Eikenella corrodens (1.05%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (27.37%), class Mollicutes (5.26%); Porphyromonas endodontalis(5.26%); Porphyromonas gulae(0.53%), Prevotella buccae (6.32%), Prevotella loescheii (3.68%), Prevotella nigrescens (8.42%), Prevotella oralis (1.58%), Tannerella forsythia (0.53%), and Treponema denticola (4.21%) were detected at healthy sites, and gingivitis or necrotizing gingivitis samples. In the Virginiamycin Group, A. israelli (3.41%), domain Archaea (0.98%), F. nucleatum (9.27%), class Mollicutes(4.39%), P. endodontalis (4.39%), P. gulae (0.49%), P. buccae (8.29%), P. loescheii (6.83%), P. nigrescens (15.61%), P. oralis (1.46%), Selenomonas sputigena (0.49%), T. forsythia (0.49%), and T. denticola (2.44%) were detected. In conclusion, virginiamycin administered at a dosage of 340mg/animal/day significantly reduced the occurrence of gingivitis and necrotizing gingivitis in cattle maintained on reformed pastures, and was revealed to have action against periodontal bacterial microbiota considered to be potentially pathogenic.(AU)


As doenças periodontais são processos infecciosos multifatoriais causados por complexos de micro-organismos, que provocam danos à saúde, produção e ao bem-estar animal. O objetivo do presente estudo foi o de avaliar a eficácia da virginiamicina na prevenção e controle de duas formas de doença periodontal; a gengivite e a gengivite necrosante. Assim, dez bezerros desmamados, com idade entre 4 e 6 meses, foram mantidos permanentemente em lote único e sob o mesmo regime de pastejo rotacionado em área reformada de Panicum maximum. Cinco bezerros receberam via oral 340mg de virginiamicina (Grupo Virginiamicina) diariamente, por um período de dezoito semanas, enquanto o Grupo Controle permaneceu sob o mesmo manejo alimentar, mas sem receber a virginiamicina. No período, os animais passaram por 18 avaliações semanais quanto à saúde periodontal, com monitoramento e registro dos parâmetros clínicos dos oito dentes incisivos decíduos, nas suas faces labial e lingual. Em intervalos aproximadamente quinzenais foram realizadas nove coletas de material do sulco subgengival de cinco sítios de quatro dentes incisivos direitos de cada animal para avaliação microbiológica, com o emprego da reação em cadeia da polimerase e com iniciadores de 25 micro-organismos considerados potencialmente patogênicos. Ao final das 1440 avaliações clínicas periodontais dos dentes incisivos dos dez bezerros, pôde-se registrar um total de 395 episódios de dentes com gengivite, nos quais 267 foram registrados no Grupo Controle e 128 no Grupo Virginiamicina. De forma semelhante, do total de 89 registros de gengivite necrosante, 58 foram no Grupo Controle e 31 no Grupo Virginiamicina. Na comparação entre médias dos grupos as diferenças encontradas para dentes com gengivite e gengivite necrosante foram significativas pelo teste t (p<0,05). Assim, o total de dentes com gengivite (p<0,01) e gengivite necrosante (p<0,01) no Grupo Controle, foi significativamente superior ao de gengivite (p<0,01) e gengivite necrosante (p<0,05) do Grupo Virginiamicina. Houve correlação positiva entre o total de ocorrência de gengivite e gengivite necrosante no Grupo Virginiamicina pelo teste de Pearson. A virginiamicina possuiu um efeito protetor nos animais tratados em comparação com o controle (OR = 0,36: IC (95%) = 0,27-0,43). Na avaliação microbiológica do Grupo Controle foram detectados nas amostras de sítios sadios, com gengivite ou com gengivite necrosante Actinomyces israelli (4,74%), domínio Archaea (1,58%), Eikenella corrodens (1,05%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (27,37%), classe Mollicutes (5,26%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (5,26%), Porphyromonas gulae (0,53%), Prevotella buccae (6,32%), Prevotella loescheii (3,68%), Prevotella nigrescens (8,42%), Prevotella oralis (1,58%), Tannerella forsythia (0,53%) e Treponema denticola (4,21%). Enquanto no Grupo Virginiamicina foram detectados: A. israelli (3,41%), domínio Archaea (0,98%), F. nucleatum (9,27%), classe Mollicutes (4,39%), P. endodontalis (4,39%), P. gulae (0,49%), P. buccae (8,29%), P. loescheii (6,83%), P. nigrescens (15,61%), P. oralis (1,46%), Selenomonas sputigena (0,49%), T. forsythia (0,49%) e T. denticola (2,44%). Em conclusão, a virginiamicina administrada na dosagem de 340mg/animal/dia reduziu significativamente a ocorrência da gengivite e gengivite necrosante em bovinos mantidos em pastos reformados e revelou ter ação frente à microbiota bacteriana periodontal considerada potencialmente patogênica.(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Lactente , Bovinos , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Bovinos , Doenças dos Bovinos/tratamento farmacológico , Virginiamicina/uso terapêutico , Gengivite/veterinária
7.
J Vet Dent ; 36(3): 179-185, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31928398

RESUMO

Periodontal disease (PD) in pregnant women has been correlated with negative impacts on pregnancy outcomes including low birth weight, preterm labor, and increased neonatal mortality. This study aimed to explore similar associations in dogs. Medical, dental, and reproductive records of healthy female beagles producing one or more litters within a research breeding facility were evaluated over a 1.5-year period. Dental scoring (1-6) was based on a facility-developed, subjective assessment of gingivitis and calculus deposition following parturition. Assessment of periodontitis was not performed. Statistical analyses were performed to find correlations between the dam's dental score and pregnancy outcomes (length of gestation, litter size, stillborn, and failure to thrive puppies). Dam age, litter size, and perinatal mortalities were controlled in the statistical models. Data were collected from 808 dams, 1344 litters, and 7197 puppies; 75.3% of the 1344 dam scores were categorized as dental score 3 or less with a mean of 2.7. None of the evaluated pregnancy outcomes had any significant correlations with the severity of dental scores. The lack of a significant relationship between dental score and pregnancy outcomes may be the result of the low number of dogs with severe gingivitis and calculus deposition, the variability of dental score timing postparturition, and/or the subjective facility-generated dental scoring method that did not include universally accepted methods for gingivitis and periodontitis assessment. Studies involving more animals with severe PD utilizing objective, universally accepted methods for gingivitis and periodontitis assessment are warranted to say with confidence no association exists.


Assuntos
Gengivite/veterinária , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Periodontite/veterinária , Animais , Cães , Feminino , Gravidez
8.
Ars pharm ; 59(4): 235-250, oct.-dic. 2018. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-177739

RESUMO

Objetivos: La enfermedad periodontal es una de las enfermedades orales crónicas más comunes en todo el mundo y representa un importante problema de salud pública en muchos países. Las enfermedades periodontales incluyen periodontitis crónica y periodontitis agresiva que generalmente se debe a la inflamación de la encía causada por infecciones bacterianas. La nutrición podría ejercer un papel fundamental ya que participa en diferentes afecciones y enfermedades inflamatorias. Hasta ahora, solo algunos investigadores han investigado el papel de los nutrientes en el desarrollo y la progresión de la enfermedad periodontal, pero los resultados obtenidos a menudo son difíciles de comparar debido a la heterogeneidad de los estudios. Métodos: Este documento revisa sistemáticamente la literatura disponible en bases de datos hasta Febrero de 2018 sobre la relación entre macronutrientes y el desarrollo y progresión de enfermedades periodontales (periodontitis y gingivitis) en animales, con particular atención a los posibles mecanismos implicados en estas patologías. Resultados: Se encontraron un total de 5.484 publicaciones en la base de datos Pubmed. El análisis del título y resumen permitió seleccionar 88 artículos potenciales de acuerdo con los criterios de selección. No se encontraron artículos duplicados. La selección y lectura del texto complejo condujo a una cantidad final de 32 artículos. Conclusiones: Entre todos los macronutrientes analizados, aquellos que tienen algún efecto sobre el estrés oxidativo o el sistema inmune parecen ser importantes para la prevención de la enfermedad periodontal o la mejoría de la enfermedad periodontal. Por un lado, hay evidencia a favor de un papel positivo de la proporción de ácidos grasos n-3 en la dieta debido a sus efectos antioxidantes e inmunomoduladores. Por otro lado, las dietas ricas en grasas saturadas o hipercalóricas aumentan el estrés oxidativo o promueven la inflamación, por lo que deben evitarse


Objectives: Periodontal disease is one of the most common chronic oral diseases worldwide and represents a major public health problem in many countries. Periodontal diseases include chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis that are usually due to the inflammation of gingiva caused by bacterial infections. Nutrition could exert a pivotal role due to its involvement in a number of inflammatory condition and diseases. Up to now, only some researchers have investigated the role of nutrients on the development and progression of periodontal disease, but the results obtained are often difficult to compare because of the heterogeneity of the studies. Methods: This paper systemically reviews the literature available on databases up to February 2018 on the relationship between macronutrients and the development and progression of periodontal diseases (periodontitis and gingivitis) in animals, with particular attention to the possible mechanisms involved in these pathologies. Results: A total of 5,484 publications were found in the Pubmed database. Title and abstract screening left 88 potential articles according to the selection criteria. No duplicated articles were found. Full-text screening and reading led to a final number of 32 articles. Conclusions: Among all the analyzed macronutrients, those that have any effect on oxidative stress or immune system seem to be important for the prevention of periodontal disease or periodontal disease improvement. On the one hand, there is evidence in favor of a positive role of n-3 fatty acid proportion in diet due to its antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects. On the other hand, saturated fat-rich or hypercaloric diets increase oxidative stress or promote inflammation, so they must be avoided


Assuntos
Animais , Ratos , Nutrientes , Modelos Animais , Doenças Periodontais/terapia , Periodontite/terapia , Gengivite/terapia , Gengivite/veterinária , Saúde Pública , Infecções Bacterianas/terapia , Infecções Bacterianas/veterinária , Ratos Wistar
9.
Res Vet Sci ; 121: 53-58, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30359811

RESUMO

We investigated the clinical effectiveness of subcutaneous (SC) administration of recombinant feline interferon-omega (rFeIFN-ω) at a dose of 1 M unit (MU)/kg body weight (bw) for the treatment of feline chronic gingivitis-stomatitis (FCGS) in cats infected with feline calicivirus (FCV). Among the 17 cats used in this study, there were 13 FCV-positive cats (FCVI group), which were subcutaneously injected with rFeIFN-ω. The remaining four FCV-positive cats (FCVC group) were treated with SC corticosteroid. SC injection of rFeIFN-ω was given once daily on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 14, and 21. Corticosteroid was subcutaneously injected at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg bw, at the same intervals as rFeIFN-ω. Clinical symptoms (salivation, pain at opening the mouth, halitosis, mandibular lymphadenopathy, and all four symptoms combined [defined as "total clinical symptoms"]) and stomatitis (the degree and extent of inflammation, bleeding from the lesion, and all three items combined [defined as "total stomatitis"]) were scored on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. FCV RNAs was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and the percent increase in viral copy numbers was calculated using the values on days 0 and 28. In the FCVI group, significant differences were observed in the score for clinical symptom (salivation) score and in the total clinical symptom score within the group (P = 0.018 and 0.008, respectively). Significant differences within the group were also observed in the scores for the degree and extent of inflammation in stomatitis and in the total stomatitis score (P = 0.003, 0.007, and 0.003, respectively). The total score, defined as the clinical score plus the stomatitis score, was on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 than on day 0 (p = 0.006, .0003, 0.002 and 0.002, respectively). In the FCVI group, significant difference was observed between on days 0 and on 21 (p = 0.023). The percentage change in the number of polymerase chain reaction cycles required to amplify the viral RNA was positive (indicating viral reduction) in the FCVI group, but was negative in the FCVC group. These results demonstrate that SC administration of rFeIFN-ω under the current protocol improves stomatitis by inhibiting FCV proliferation in FCV-positive cats with FCGS.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gengivite/veterinária , Interferon Tipo I/uso terapêutico , Estomatite/veterinária , Animais , Infecções por Caliciviridae/veterinária , Infecções por Caliciviridae/virologia , Calicivirus Felino/fisiologia , Doenças do Gato/imunologia , Gatos , Feminino , Gengivite/imunologia , Gengivite/prevenção & controle , Inflamação/imunologia , Inflamação/prevenção & controle , Inflamação/veterinária , Injeções Subcutâneas/veterinária , Masculino , Distribuição Aleatória , Estomatite/imunologia , Estomatite/prevenção & controle
10.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 65: 159-173, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30316074

RESUMO

Gingivitis is evidenced by inflammation of the free gingiva, and still reversible. If left untreated, it may then progress to periodontitis. In the present study, the therapeutical effect of ketotifen fumarate on gingivitis was explored. Domestic cats with varying degrees of gingivitis naturally were enrolled in this study. Subgroups of animals were treated twice daily for one week with or without ketotifen fumarate (5 mg/kg). Effects of ketotifen fumarate were measured on gingival index, cells accumulation, mediators release, receptor-ligand interaction, oxidative stress, MAPK and NF-κB pathways, epithelial barrier and apoptosis. Ketotifen fumarate attenuated the initiation and progression of gingivitis, inhibited the infiltrations of mast cells, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils as well as the release of IgE, ß-hexosaminidase, tryptase, chymase, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-13, influenced endothelial cells, fibroblasts and epithelial cells proliferation and apoptosis, and induced Th2 cells polarization, where ketotifen fumarate also might affect their interactions. Ketotifen fumarate reduced the oxidative stress, and inhibited NF-κB and p38 MAPK related with mast cells and macrophages accumulation. Ketotifen fumarate improved the aberrant expression of ZO-1 and inhibits the following apoptosis. On the other hand, these cells and mediators augmented functional attributes of them involving SCF/c-Kit, α4ß7/VCAM-1 and IL-8/IL-8RB interactions, thus creating a positive feedback loop to perpetuate gingivitis, where an inflammation microenvironment was modeled. Our results showed a previously unexplored therapeutic potential of ketotifen fumarate for gingivitis and further suggest that, in addition to biofilms, targeting inflammation microenvironment could be new strategy for the treatment of gingivitis/periodontitis.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Gengivite/veterinária , Antagonistas dos Receptores Histamínicos H1/uso terapêutico , Cetotifeno/uso terapêutico , Animais , Linfócitos B/efeitos dos fármacos , Gatos , Citocinas/genética , Citocinas/metabolismo , Feminino , Regulação da Expressão Gênica/efeitos dos fármacos , Gengivite/tratamento farmacológico , Inflamação/metabolismo , Macrófagos/efeitos dos fármacos , Mastócitos/efeitos dos fármacos , Linfócitos T/efeitos dos fármacos
11.
J Small Anim Pract ; 59(9): 560-569, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30006940

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence and rates of progression of gingivitis and periodontitis in Labrador retrievers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-three dogs, aged 1·1 to 5·9 years, had their periodontal health assessed every 6 months for up to 2 years. The extent of gingivitis and periodontitis was measured around the whole gingival margin of every tooth under general anaesthesia. RESULTS: All dogs had gingivitis at the initial assessment. The majority (64·2%) of tooth aspects had very mild gingivitis. The palatal/lingual aspect of all tooth types was most likely to show bleeding when probed: 63·0% of these aspects had mild or moderate gingivitis. Over 2 years, 56·6% of dogs developed periodontitis and dogs as young as 1·9 years were affected. There was a significant positive correlation between the proportion of teeth with periodontitis and age. In total, 124 teeth (5·7%) developed periodontitis; 88 (71·0%) of these were incisors. The palatal/lingual aspect of the incisors developed the disease first (2·8% of incisor aspects). CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Periodontitis developed in regions that are difficult to see in conscious dogs implying that detection and treatment of disease requires periodic sedation or anaesthesia.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/patologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Periodontite/veterinária , Envelhecimento , Animais , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Cães , Feminino , Gengivite/epidemiologia , Gengivite/patologia , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Periodontite/patologia
12.
J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl) ; 102(5): 1382-1389, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29908038

RESUMO

The aim of this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate if downregulation of the inflammatory response due to ingestion of high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can slow down gingivitis development, and thus delay the progression of periodontal disease (PD) in dogs. To this aim, 44 client-owned adult dogs (>1 and <8 years old) with naturally occurring PD (stages 1 and 2) were submitted to a plaque, gingivitis and calculus scoring followed by a dental cleaning procedure and collection of blood samples. The animals were then fed a canine adult maintenance diet, supplemented with either corn oil (0.00 g EPA and 0.00 g DHA) or fish oil (1.53 g EPA and 0.86 g DHA, both per 1,000 kcal ME) over the following 5 months. At the end of this period, the PD scoring and the blood sampling were repeated. The animals consuming fish oil had higher plasma levels of the longer chain (C ≥ 20) omega 3 fatty acids (p < 0.01) and similar plasma levels of alpha-linolenic acid (p = 0.53), omega 6 fatty acids (p > 0.63) and C reactive protein (p = 0.28) then the ones consuming corn oil. There were no differences between fish oil and corn oil diet supplementation on plaque (18.2 vs. 17.8, p = 0.78), calculus (10.1 vs. 11.5, p = 0.18) or gingivitis (19.3 vs. 19.0, p = 0.77) indexes. The authors conclude that supplementation with EPA + DHA does not slow down progression of PD in dogs.


Assuntos
Óleo de Milho/farmacologia , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Óleos de Peixe/farmacologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Animais , Óleo de Milho/administração & dosagem , Placa Dentária/prevenção & controle , Placa Dentária/veterinária , Suplementos Nutricionais , Ácidos Docosa-Hexaenoicos/administração & dosagem , Ácidos Docosa-Hexaenoicos/farmacologia , Cães , Ácido Eicosapentaenoico/administração & dosagem , Ácido Eicosapentaenoico/farmacologia , Ácidos Graxos Ômega-3 , Óleos de Peixe/administração & dosagem , Gengivite/prevenção & controle , Distribuição Aleatória , Zea mays
13.
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc ; 54(3): 132-137, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29558213

RESUMO

Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Animais , Cães , Gengivite/diagnóstico , Gengivite/veterinária , Doenças Periodontais/diagnóstico , Compostos de Sulfidrila , Vigília
14.
Arq. bras. med. vet. zootec. (Online) ; 70(6): 1784-1792, nov.-dez. 2018. tab, ilus
Artigo em Português | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-970427

RESUMO

Foram incluídos 76 gatos domésticos com diferentes graus (I a IV) de lesões em cavidade oral, os quais foram avaliados clinicamente e tiveram coletadas amostras de sangue e suabes da cavidade oral. A maioria dos gatos portadores de CGE eram machos, castrados, adultos, sem raça definida e com estilo de vida confinado. Os sinais clínicos observados e associados à gravidade da inflamação na cavidade oral foram halitose (98,7%); ptialismo (22,4%); hemorragia bucal (9,2%) e úlcera na parte superior dos lábios (2,6%); desconforto à manipulação da cavidade oral (44,7%) e perda dentária (55,3%). A maioria dos gatos avaliados foi classificada no grau II (43,4%). Não se observou diferença significativa nos resultados do eritrograma dos gatos portadores de CGE, independentemente da gravidade das lesões e da sintomatologia clínica. Entretanto, observou-se neutrofilia (21,1%) e aumento de proteínas plasmáticas totais (47,3%), na maioria dos animais de grau II, sugerindo que esses parâmetros laboratoriais, quando aumentados, possam estar associados a graus menos graves de CGE. A análise das lâminas de citologia da cavidade oral dos gatos demonstrou que a presença de Simonsiella spp. foi mais frequente nos animais incluídos no grau IV, entretanto não é possível afirmar que essa bactéria esteja relacionada à gravidade das lesões.(AU)


Seventy six domestic cats classified with different scores (I to IV) of oral lesions have been included in the study, being clinically examined and having blood samples and oral cavity swabs collected. Most cats diagnosed with Gingivostomatitis Complex (GSC) were male, neutered, adult, DSH, and lived confined. Clinical signs observed and related to the severity of mouth inflammation were halitosis (98.7%), ptyalism (22.4%), oral hemorrhage (9.2%), and upper lip ulcers (2.6%); discomfort during mouth examination (44.7%) and tooth loss (55,3%). Most cats have been classified as score II (43.4%). The red blood cell count showed no significant statistical difference regardless the different scores of oral lesions and clinical symptoms. However, the leukogram showed neutrophilia (21.1%) and plasmatic proteins had an increased level (47.3%), in most of the animals classified as score II, suggesting that these parameters, when increased, may be associated to less severe GSC scores. Oral cavity microscope slides analysis showed that Simonsiella spp. have been more frequent in the cytology of the score IV animals, however, it does not allow us to correlate the presence of the bacteria with the severity lesions degree.(AU)


Seventy six domestic cats classified with different scores (I to IV) of oral lesions have been included in the study, being clinically examined and having blood samples and oral cavity swabs collected. Most cats diagnosed with Gingivostomatitis Complex (GSC) were male, neutered, adult, DSH, and lived confined. Clinical signs observed and related to the severity of mouth inflammation were halitosis (98.7%), ptyalism (22.4%), oral hemorrhage (9.2%), and upper lip ulcers (2.6%); discomfort during mouth examination (44.7%) and tooth loss (55,3%). Most cats have been classified as score II (43.4%). The red blood cell count showed no significant statistical difference regardless the different scores of oral lesions and clinical symptoms. However, the leukogram showed neutrophilia (21.1%) and plasmatic proteins had an increased level (47.3%), in most of the animals classified as score II, suggesting that these parameters, when increased, may be associated to less severe GSC scores. Oral cavity microscope slides analysis showed that Simonsiella spp. have been more frequent in the cytology of the score IV animals, however, it does not allow us to correlate the presence of the bacteria with the severity lesions degree.(AU)


Assuntos
Gatos/anormalidades , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Gengivite/veterinária
15.
J Vet Intern Med ; 31(6): 1673-1679, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28960466

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chronic gingivostomatitis in cats (FCG) is a debilitating disease with potentially deleterious effects on overall health. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the pathophysiology and overall impact of FCG. The aims of our study were to investigate whether gingivostomatitis occurs concurrently with esophagitis, if FCG treatment contributes to esophagitis and if esophagitis exacerbates signs of FCG. ANIMALS: Fifty-eight cats with clinical signs of FCG and 12 healthy control cats exhibiting no signs of oral disease, all client-owned. METHODS: Prospective study. Physical, oral and endoscopic examinations were performed on all cats. Measurements of salivary and esophageal lumen pH were obtained from both groups. Biopsies were acquired from sites of esophageal inflammation in cats with FCG and from normal-appearing esophageal mucosa in control cats. RESULTS: The majority of cats with clinical signs of FCG exhibited some degree of esophagitis especially in the proximal (44/58) and distal (53/58) parts (P < 0.001) with or without columnar metaplasia, compared to controls. All cats lacked signs related to gastrointestinal disease. Salivary and esophageal lumen pH were not statistically different compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Feline chronic gingivostomatitis seems to occur concurrently with esophagitis. Esophagitis also should be managed in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis because it may aggravate the existing condition.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/fisiopatologia , Esofagite/veterinária , Gengivite/veterinária , Estomatite/veterinária , Animais , Biópsia/veterinária , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Gatos , Esofagite/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Gengivite/fisiopatologia , Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Saliva/química , Estomatite/fisiopatologia
16.
Can J Vet Res ; 81(1): 46-52, 2017 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28154463

RESUMO

Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in cats. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationships between gingivitis and dental calculus thickness (DCT), or dental calculus coverage (DCC); determine the association of gingivitis scores and types of oral bacteria; and to evaluate bacterial co-infection in cats with periodontal disease. Twelve cats that were not infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency viruses were enrolled in the study. Gingivitis, DCT, and DCC were scored and recorded. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare scores among canine, 2nd premolar, 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth. The relationship between gingivitis and DCT or DCC scores was determined using the Spearman rank sum test (ρ). Subgingival bacteria were cultured and the association between bacterial species and gingivitis score was evaluated using a Fisher's exact test. The average gingivitis, DCT, and DCC scores for the caudal maxillary teeth were higher for the caudal mandibular teeth and more severe for the 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth than for the canine teeth. A strong relationship between average DCT or DCC score and average gingivitis score was found (ρ = 0.96 and 1, respectively). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infections were identified in a large number of cats with periodontal disease (71.1% and 28.9%, respectively). In conclusion, severe gingivitis scores were associated with anaerobic bacterial infection. The caudal teeth are affected with more severe gingivitis, DCT, and DCC than the other teeth. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be prescribed in cats with periodontal disease.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Cálculos Dentários/veterinária , Gengiva/microbiologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Vírus da Imunodeficiência Felina , Vírus da Leucemia Felina , Animais , Gatos , Cálculos Dentários/patologia , Feminino , Gengivite/microbiologia , Masculino
17.
J Feline Med Surg ; 19(4): 403-409, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26858258

RESUMO

Objectives This study presents the clinical, pathological, immunohistochemical and molecular characterization of 26 cats with feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCG). Methods Oral mucosal biopsies, blood and swabs were collected from cats presenting with oral lesions. The tissue sections were submitted for histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for feline calicivirus (FCV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The swabs were subjected to PCR analysis for FCV, and blood for FeLV and FIV. Results The main clinical findings were dysphagia (88.2%), halitosis (76.5%), sialorrhea (47.1%), weight loss (41.2%), intense oral discomfort (35.3%), oral hemorrhage (17.6%), and lackluster and fragile coat (11.8%). Gross inspection revealed bilateral lesions across the palatoglossal fold to the lateral tongue base. The lesions were diffuse, proliferative, intensely red and friable, and bled easily upon examination in 80.8% of cases. In 23.1% of cases, the lesions were multifocal to coalescent, at times forming multiple vesicles on a reddened, edematous palatoglossal fold. Microscopic examination showed that 15.4% of lesions had moderate (grade 2) and 84.6% had severe (grade 3) inflammation. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of FeLV antigens in the epithelium and the inflammatory infiltrate of 30.8% of the cats with FCG. FCV antigens were not detected in the FCG lesions. Conclusions and relevance The FCG cases analyzed could not be correlated with FCV. It is possible that FeLV plays a role as a causal agent of lesions in cases where the presence of the virus has been confirmed by immunohistochemistry in epithelial samples.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Gengivite/veterinária , Estomatite/veterinária , Animais , Caliciviridae/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/sangue , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Feminino , Gengivite/diagnóstico , Vírus da Imunodeficiência Felina/isolamento & purificação , Imuno-Histoquímica/veterinária , Vírus da Leucemia Felina/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Estomatite/diagnóstico
18.
J Eukaryot Microbiol ; 64(3): 286-292, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27570233

RESUMO

Periodontal disease is one of the most important health concerns for companion animals. Research into canine forms of periodontitis has focused on the identification and characterization of the bacterial communities present. However, other microorganisms are known to inhabit the oral cavity and could also influence the disease process. A novel, broad spectrum 18S PCR was developed and used, in conjunction with next-generation sequencing analyses to target the identification of protists. Trichomonas sp. and Entamoeba sp. were identified from 92 samples of canine plaque. The overall prevalence of trichomonads was 56.52% (52/92) and entamoebae was 4.34% (4/92). Next-generation sequencing of pooled healthy, gingivitis, early-stage periodontitis, and severe periodontitis samples revealed the proportion of trichomonad sequences to be 3.51% (health), 2.84% (gingivitis), 6.07% (early periodontitis), and 35.04% (severe periodontitis), respectively, and entamoebae to be 0.01% (health), 0.01% (gingivitis), 0.80% (early-stage periodontitis), and 7.91% (severe periodontitis) respectively. Both genera of protists were statistically associated with plaque from dogs with periodontal disease. These findings provide the first conclusive evidence for the presence of oral protozoa in dog plaque and suggest a possible role for protozoa in the periodontal disease process.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças Periodontais/epidemiologia , Doenças Periodontais/parasitologia , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Prevalência , Animais , Sequência de Bases , Placa Dentária/parasitologia , Placa Dentária/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/genética , Cães , Entamoeba/genética , Entamoeba/isolamento & purificação , Entamoeba/patogenicidade , Entamebíase/epidemiologia , Entamebíase/parasitologia , Entamebíase/veterinária , Gengivite/epidemiologia , Gengivite/parasitologia , Gengivite/veterinária , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Periodontite/parasitologia , Periodontite/veterinária , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Análise de Sequência/veterinária , Trichomonas/genética , Trichomonas/isolamento & purificação , Trichomonas/patogenicidade , Tricomoníase/epidemiologia , Tricomoníase/parasitologia , Tricomoníase/veterinária
19.
J Feline Med Surg ; 19(4): NP1, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26965677

RESUMO

Veronica Machado Rolim, Saulo Petinatti Pavarini, Fabrício Souza Campos, Viviam Pignone, Cláudia Faraco, Marcelo de Souza Muccillo, Paulo Michel Roehe, Fernanda Viera Amorim da Costa, and David Driemeier J Feline Med Surg. Epub ahead of print 8 February 2016. DOI: 10.1177/1098612X16628578.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Gengivite/veterinária , Animais , Caliciviridae/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , DNA Viral/análise , Feminino , Gengivite/diagnóstico , Imuno-Histoquímica/veterinária , Vírus da Leucemia Felina/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Estomatite/diagnóstico , Estomatite/veterinária
20.
PLoS One ; 11(2): e0148568, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26872054

RESUMO

Detrimental Th17 driven inflammatory and autoimmune disease such as Crohn's disease, graft versus host disease and multiple sclerosis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multipotent stromal/stem cell (MSC) inhibit Th17 polarization and activation in vitro and in rodent models. As such, MSC based therapeutic approaches are being investigated as novel therapeutic approaches to treat Th17 driven diseases in humans. The significance of naturally occurring diseases in dogs is increasingly recognized as a realistic platform to conduct pre-clinical testing of novel therapeutics. Full characterization of Th17 cells in dogs has not been completed. We have developed and validated a flow-cytometric method to detect Th17 cells in canine blood. We further demonstrate that Th17 and other IL17 producing cells are present in tissues of dogs with naturally occurring chronic inflammatory diseases. Finally, we have determined the kinetics of a canine specific Th17 polarization in vitro and demonstrate that canine MSC inhibit Th17 polarization in vitro, in a PGE2 independent mechanism. Our findings provide fundamental research tools and suggest that naturally occurring diseases in dogs, such as inflammatory bowel disease, may be harnessed to translate novel MSC based therapeutic strategies that target the Th17 pathway.


Assuntos
Diferenciação Celular/imunologia , Terapia Baseada em Transplante de Células e Tecidos/métodos , Doenças do Cão/imunologia , Linfócitos T Reguladores/imunologia , Células Th17/imunologia , Animais , Dermatite/imunologia , Dermatite/patologia , Dermatite/terapia , Dermatite/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/metabolismo , Doenças do Cão/patologia , Doenças do Cão/terapia , Cães , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Gengivite/imunologia , Gengivite/patologia , Gengivite/terapia , Gengivite/veterinária , Humanos , Imunofenotipagem , Inflamação , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/imunologia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/patologia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/terapia , Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais/veterinária , Interleucina-17/genética , Interleucina-17/imunologia , Meningoencefalite/imunologia , Meningoencefalite/patologia , Meningoencefalite/terapia , Meningoencefalite/veterinária , Transplante de Células-Tronco Mesenquimais , Células-Tronco Mesenquimais/citologia , Células-Tronco Mesenquimais/imunologia , Membro 1 do Grupo F da Subfamília 1 de Receptores Nucleares/genética , Membro 1 do Grupo F da Subfamília 1 de Receptores Nucleares/imunologia , Cultura Primária de Células , Receptores CCR6/genética , Receptores CCR6/imunologia , Receptores de Interleucina/genética , Receptores de Interleucina/imunologia , Linfócitos T Reguladores/citologia , Células Th17/citologia , Pesquisa Médica Translacional/métodos
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