Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 9.474
Filtrar
2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(46): 1717-1724, 2020 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33211683

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Life expectancy for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who receive recommended treatment can approach that of the general population, yet HIV remains among the 10 leading causes of death among certain populations. Using surveillance data, CDC assessed progress toward reducing deaths among persons with diagnosed HIV (PWDH). METHODS: CDC analyzed National HIV Surveillance System data for persons aged ≥13 years to determine age-adjusted death rates per 1,000 PWDH during 2010-2018. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, deaths with a nonmissing underlying cause were classified as HIV-related or non-HIV-related. Temporal changes in total deaths during 2010-2018 and deaths by cause during 2010-2017 (2018 excluded because of delays in reporting), by demographic characteristics, transmission category, and U.S. Census region of residence at time of death were calculated. RESULTS: During 2010-2018, rates of death decreased by 36.6% overall (from 19.4 to 12.3 per 1,000 PWDH). During 2010-2017, HIV-related death rates decreased 48.4% (from 9.1 to 4.7), whereas non-HIV-related death rates decreased 8.6% (from 9.3 to 8.5). Rates of HIV-related deaths during 2017 were highest by race/ethnicity among persons of multiple races (7.0) and Black/African American persons (5.6), followed by White persons (3.9) and Hispanic/Latino persons (3.9). The HIV-related death rate was highest in the South (6.0) and lowest in the Northeast (3.2). CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis, prompt treatment, and maintaining access to high-quality care and treatment have been successful in reducing HIV-related deaths and remain necessary for continuing reductions in HIV-related deaths.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(39): 1391-1397, 2020 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33001873

RESUMO

Vaccination of pregnant women with influenza vaccine and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) can decrease the risk for influenza and pertussis among pregnant women and their infants. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all women who are or might be pregnant during the influenza season receive influenza vaccine, which can be administered at any time during pregnancy (1). ACIP also recommends that women receive Tdap during each pregnancy, preferably during the early part of gestational weeks 27-36 (2,3). Despite these recommendations, vaccination coverage among pregnant women has been found to be suboptimal with racial/ethnic disparities persisting (4-6). To assess influenza and Tdap vaccination coverage among women pregnant during the 2019-20 influenza season, CDC analyzed data from an Internet panel survey conducted during April 2020. Among 1,841 survey respondents who were pregnant anytime during October 2019-January 2020, 61.2% reported receiving influenza vaccine before or during their pregnancy, an increase of 7.5 percentage points compared with the rate during the 2018-19 season. Among 463 respondents who had a live birth by their survey date, 56.6% reported receiving Tdap during pregnancy, similar to the 2018-19 season (4). Vaccination coverage was highest among women who reported receiving a provider offer or referral for vaccination (influenza = 75.2%; Tdap = 72.7%). Compared with the 2018-19 season, increases in influenza vaccination coverage were observed during the 2019-20 season for non-Hispanic Black (Black) women (14.7 percentage points, to 52.7%), Hispanic women (9.9 percentage points, to 67.2%), and women of other non-Hispanic (other) races (7.9 percentage points, to 69.6%), and did not change for non-Hispanic White (White) women (60.6%). As in the 2018-19 season, Hispanic and Black women had the lowest Tdap vaccination coverage (35.8% and 38.8%, respectively), compared with White women (65.5%) and women of other races (54.0%); in addition, a decrease in Tdap vaccination coverage was observed among Hispanic women in 2019-20 compared with the previous season. Racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination coverage decreased but persisted, even among women who received a provider offer or referral for vaccination. Consistent provider offers or referrals, in combination with conversations culturally and linguistically tailored for patients of all races/ethnicities, could increase vaccination coverage among pregnant women in all racial/ethnic groups and reduce disparities in coverage.


Assuntos
Vacinas contra Difteria, Tétano e Coqueluche Acelular/administração & dosagem , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Vacinas contra Influenza/administração & dosagem , Gestantes/etnologia , Cobertura Vacinal/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
5.
Am J Nephrol ; 51(10): 786-796, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011717

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although diffuse alveolar damage and respiratory failure are the key features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the involvement of other organs such as the kidney has also been reported. The reports of the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in COVID-19 patients vary widely. In this study, we report our unique experience with AKI in COVID-19 patients in a low socioeconomic and predominantly ethnic minority group and provide its incidence, risk factors, and prognosis to expand the current understanding of this complication. METHODS: In this single-center, retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the data of 469 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Brookdale University Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, from March 18 through April 23, 2020. Information regarding demographics, comorbidities, medications, clinical and laboratory data, and outcomes was collected from the electronic medical records. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of AKI with in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The median age was 66 years (interquartile range [IQR] 25-75; range 19-101 years), and 268 (57.14%) patients were male. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study Equation was low (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 207 (44.1%) patients. During hospitalization, 128 (27.3%) patients developed AKI, and the incidence was significantly higher in those patients presenting with a low eGFR (N = 81, 39.1%; p < 0.001). Male sex, hypertension, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, hemodynamic instability, mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and admission elevated ferritin, creatinine kinase, brain natriuretic peptide, and troponin 1 were identified as the risk factors for in-hospital AKI. Ninety-seven (28.45%) patients died in the non-AKI group versus 91 (71.1%) in the AKI group (p < 0.001). The Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for age, gender, comorbidities, hemodynamic status, and PF ratio (arterial oxygen partial pressure [PaO2]/fractional inspired oxygen [FiO2]) determined that on admission, an elevated blood urea nitrogen (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-2.48), a low eGFR (HR 1.43; CI 1.1-2.03), AKI stage 1 (HR 1.14; CI 0.64-2.03), AKI stage 2 (HR 1.86; CI 1.03-3.56), and AKI stage 3 (HR 2.1; CI 1.3-2.81) were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) did not improve survival in stage III AKI. CONCLUSION: AKI in our hospitalized COVID-19 patients was common and carried a high mortality, especially in patients with AKI stage 3. RRT did not improve survival. Policy changes and planning for this high incidence of AKI in COVID-19 patients and its associated high mortality are necessary at the local and national levels.


Assuntos
Lesão Renal Aguda/mortalidade , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Hospitais Urbanos/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Políticas , Lesão Renal Aguda/diagnóstico , Lesão Renal Aguda/terapia , Lesão Renal Aguda/virologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais Urbanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Prognóstico , Terapia de Substituição Renal/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
6.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0240960, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33112892

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations are emerging as a vulnerable group in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. We investigated the relationship between ethnicity and health outcomes in SARS-CoV-2. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective, observational analysis of SARS-CoV-2 patients across two London teaching hospitals during March 1 -April 30, 2020. Routinely collected clinical data were extracted and analysed for 645 patients who met the study inclusion criteria. Within this hospitalised cohort, the BAME population were younger relative to the white population (61.70 years, 95% CI 59.70-63.73 versus 69.3 years, 95% CI 67.17-71.43, p<0.001). When adjusted for age, sex and comorbidity, ethnicity was not a predictor for ICU admission. The mean age at death was lower in the BAME population compared to the white population (71.44 years, 95% CI 69.90-72.90 versus, 77.40 years, 95% CI 76.1-78.70 respectively, p<0.001). When adjusted for age, sex and comorbidities, Asian patients had higher odds of death (OR 1.99: 95% CI 1.22-3.25, p<0.006). CONCLUSIONS: BAME patients were more likely to be admitted younger, and to die at a younger age with SARS-CoV-2. Within the BAME cohort, Asian patients were more likely to die but despite this, there was no difference in rates of admission to ICU. The reasons for these disparities are not fully understood and need to be addressed. Investigating ethnicity as a clinical risk factor remains a high public health priority. Studies that consider ethnicity as part of the wider socio-cultural determinant of health are urgently needed.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais de Ensino/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Londres/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Atenção Secundária à Saúde/etnologia , Atenção Secundária à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
7.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239576, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33113548

RESUMO

In the global context, health and the quality of life of people are adversely affected by either one or more types of chronic diseases. This paper investigates the differences in the level of income and expenditure between chronically-ill people and non-chronic population. Data were gathered from a national level survey conducted namely, the Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) by the Department of Census and Statistics (DCS) of Sri Lanka. These data were statistically analysed with one-way and two-way ANOVA, to identify the factors that cause the differences among different groups. For the first time, this study makes an attempt using survey data, to examine the differences in the level of income and expenditure among chronically-ill people in Sri Lanka. Accordingly, the study discovered that married females who do not engage in any type of economic activity (being unemployed due to the disability associated with the respective chronic illness), in the age category of 40-65, having an educational level of tertiary education or below and living in the urban sector have a higher likelihood of suffering from chronic diseases. If workforce population is compelled to lose jobs, it can lead to income insecurity and impair their quality of lives. Under above findings, it is reasonable to assume that most health care expenses are out of pocket. Furthermore, the study infers that chronic illnesses have a statistically proven significant differences towards the income and expenditure level. This has caused due to the interaction of demographic and socio-economic characteristics associated with chronic illnesses. Considering private-public sector partnerships that enable affordable access to health care services for all as well as implementation of commercial insurance and community-based mutual services that help ease burden to the public, are vital when formulating effective policies and strategies related to the healthcare sector. Sri Lanka is making strong efforts to support its healthcare sector and public, which was affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) in early 2020. Therefore, findings of this paper will be useful to gain insights on the differences of chronic illnesses towards the income and expenditure of chronically-ill patients in Sri Lanka.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Gastos em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Análise de Variância , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Doença Crônica/economia , Comorbidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/economia , Países em Desenvolvimento/economia , Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Características da Família , Feminino , Alimentos/economia , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Indigência Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias/economia , Pneumonia Viral/economia , Pobreza , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Sri Lanka/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
8.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(7): e95-e112, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33000953

RESUMO

Background: There are well-documented disparities in lung cancer outcomes across populations. Lung cancer screening (LCS) has the potential to reduce lung cancer mortality, but for this benefit to be realized by all high-risk groups, there must be careful attention to ensuring equitable access to this lifesaving preventive health measure.Objectives: To outline current knowledge on disparities in eligibility criteria for, access to, and implementation of LCS, and to develop an official American Thoracic Society statement to propose strategies to optimize current screening guidelines and resource allocation for equitable LCS implementation and dissemination.Methods: A multidisciplinary panel with expertise in LCS, implementation science, primary care, pulmonology, health behavior, smoking cessation, epidemiology, and disparities research was convened. Participants reviewed available literature on historical disparities in cancer screening and emerging evidence of disparities in LCS.Results: Existing LCS guidelines do not consider racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and sex-based differences in smoking behaviors or lung cancer risk. Multiple barriers, including access to screening and cost, further contribute to the inequities in implementation and dissemination of LCS.Conclusions: This statement identifies the impact of LCS eligibility criteria on vulnerable populations who are at increased risk of lung cancer but do not meet eligibility criteria for screening, as well as multiple barriers that contribute to disparities in LCS implementation. Strategies to improve the selection and dissemination of LCS in vulnerable groups are described.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisão Compartilhada , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/diagnóstico , Fumar/etnologia , Definição da Elegibilidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Ciência da Implementação , Cobertura do Seguro , Marketing de Serviços de Saúde/métodos , Medicaid , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Encaminhamento e Consulta/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/epidemiologia , Fumar/terapia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Classe Social , Estados Unidos
9.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(41): 1485-1491, 2020 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33056951

RESUMO

Frequent hand hygiene, including handwashing with soap and water or using a hand sanitizer containing ≥60% alcohol when soap and water are not readily available, is one of several critical prevention measures recommended to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).* Previous studies identified demographic factors associated with handwashing among U.S. adults during the COVID-19 pandemic (1,2); however, demographic factors associated with hand sanitizing and experiences and beliefs associated with hand hygiene have not been well characterized. To evaluate these factors, an Internet-based survey was conducted among U.S. adults aged ≥18 years during June 24-30, 2020. Overall, 85.2% of respondents reported always or often engaging in hand hygiene following contact with high-touch public surfaces such as shopping carts, gas pumps, and automatic teller machines (ATMs).† Respondents who were male (versus female) and of younger age reported lower handwashing and hand sanitizing rates, as did respondents who reported lower concern about their own infection with SARS-CoV-2§ and respondents without personal experience with COVID-19. Focused health promotion efforts to increase hand hygiene adherence should include increasing visibility and accessibility of handwashing and hand sanitizing materials in public settings, along with targeted communication to males and younger adults with focused messages that address COVID-19 risk perception.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Higiene das Mãos/estatística & dados numéricos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Grupos de Populações Continentais/psicologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(41): 1481-1484, 2020 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33056954

RESUMO

Breast cancer among males in the United States is rare; approximately 2,300 new cases and 500 associated deaths were reported in 2017, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancers.* Risk for male breast cancer increases with increasing age (1), and compared with women, men receive diagnoses later in life and often at a later stage of disease (1). Gradual improvement in breast cancer survival from 1976-1985 to 1996-2005 has been more evident for women than for men (1). Studies examining survival differences among female breast cancer patients observed that non-Hispanic White (White) females had a higher survival than non-Hispanic Black (Black) females (2), but because of the rarity of breast cancer among males, few studies have examined survival differences by race or other factors such as age, stage, and geographic region. CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR)† data were used to examine relative survival of males with breast cancer diagnosed during 2007-2016 by race/ethnicity, age group, stage at diagnosis, and U.S. Census region. Among males who received a diagnosis of breast cancer during 2007-2016, 1-year relative survival was 96.1%, and 5-year relative survival was 84.7%. Among characteristics examined, relative survival varied most by stage at diagnosis: the 5-year relative survival for males was higher for cancers diagnosed at localized stage (98.7%) than for those diagnosed at distant stage (25.9%). Evaluation of 1-year and 5-year relative survival among males with breast cancer might help guide health care decisions regarding early detection of male breast cancer and establishing programs to support men at high risk for breast cancer and male breast cancer survivors.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama Masculina/mortalidade , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias da Mama Masculina/etnologia , Neoplasias da Mama Masculina/patologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Geografia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias/estatística & dados numéricos , Análise de Sobrevida , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(41): 1473-1480, 2020 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33056955

RESUMO

Among U.S. men, prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death (1). Past studies documented decreasing incidence of prostate cancer overall since 2000 but increasing incidence of distant stage prostate cancer (i.e., signifying spread to parts of the body remote from the primary tumor) starting in 2010 (2,3). Past studies described disparities in prostate cancer survival by stage, age, and race/ethnicity using data covering ≤80% of the U.S. population (4,5). To provide recent data on incidence and survival of prostate cancer in the United States, CDC analyzed data from population-based cancer registries that contribute to U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS).* Among 3.1 million new cases of prostate cancer recorded during 2003-2017, localized, regional, distant, and unknown stage prostate cancer accounted for 77%, 11%, 5%, and 7% of cases, respectively, but the incidence of distant stage prostate cancer significantly increased during 2010-2017. During 2001-2016, 10-year relative survival for localized stage prostate cancer was 100%. Overall, 5-year survival for distant stage prostate cancer improved from 28.7% during 2001-2005 to 32.3% during 2011-2016; for the period 2001-2016, 5-year survival was highest among Asian/Pacific Islanders (API) (42.0%), followed by Hispanics (37.2%), American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) (32.2%), Black men (31.6%), and White men (29.1%). Understanding incidence and survival differences by stage, race/ethnicity, and age can guide public health planning related to screening, treatment, and survivor care. Future research into differences by stage, race/ethnicity, and age could inform interventions aimed at improving disparities in outcomes.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Próstata/epidemiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias da Próstata/etnologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Análise de Sobrevida , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
12.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(42): 1522-1527, 2020 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33090978

RESUMO

As of October 15, 216,025 deaths from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been reported in the United States*; however, this number might underestimate the total impact of the pandemic on mortality. Measures of excess deaths have been used to estimate the impact of public health pandemics or disasters, particularly when there are questions about underascertainment of deaths directly attributable to a given event or cause (1-6).† Excess deaths are defined as the number of persons who have died from all causes, in excess of the expected number of deaths for a given place and time. This report describes trends and demographic patterns in excess deaths during January 26-October 3, 2020. Expected numbers of deaths were estimated using overdispersed Poisson regression models with spline terms to account for seasonal patterns, using provisional mortality data from CDC's National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) (7). Weekly numbers of deaths by age group and race/ethnicity were assessed to examine the difference between the weekly number of deaths occurring in 2020 and the average number occurring in the same week during 2015-2019 and the percentage change in 2020. Overall, an estimated 299,028 excess deaths have occurred in the United States from late January through October 3, 2020, with two thirds of these attributed to COVID-19. The largest percentage increases were seen among adults aged 25-44 years and among Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic) persons. These results provide information about the degree to which COVID-19 deaths might be underascertained and inform efforts to prevent mortality directly or indirectly associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, such as efforts to minimize disruptions to health care.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Estatísticas Vitais , Adulto Jovem
13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(42): 1517-1521, 2020 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33090984

RESUMO

During February 12-October 15, 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in approximately 7,900,000 aggregated reported cases and approximately 216,000 deaths in the United States.* Among COVID-19-associated deaths reported to national case surveillance during February 12-May 18, persons aged ≥65 years and members of racial and ethnic minority groups were disproportionately represented (1). This report describes demographic and geographic trends in COVID-19-associated deaths reported to the National Vital Statistics System† (NVSS) during May 1-August 31, 2020, by 50 states and the District of Columbia. During this period, 114,411 COVID-19-associated deaths were reported. Overall, 78.2% of decedents were aged ≥65 years, and 53.3% were male; 51.3% were non-Hispanic White (White), 24.2% were Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic), and 18.7% were non-Hispanic Black (Black). The number of COVID-19-associated deaths decreased from 37,940 in May to 17,718 in June; subsequently, counts increased to 30,401 in July and declined to 28,352 in August. From May to August, the percentage distribution of COVID-19-associated deaths by U.S. Census region increased from 23.4% to 62.7% in the South and from 10.6% to 21.4% in the West. Over the same period, the percentage distribution of decedents who were Hispanic increased from 16.3% to 26.4%. COVID-19 remains a major public health threat regardless of age or race and ethnicity. Deaths continued to occur disproportionately among older persons and certain racial and ethnic minorities, particularly among Hispanic persons. These results can inform public health messaging and mitigation efforts focused on prevention and early detection of infection among disproportionately affected groups.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Estatísticas Vitais , Adulto Jovem
14.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(9): 1522-1526, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33076611

RESUMO

Objective: To explore the current status of HBV infection before pregnancy among rural childbearing age people in Yunnan province, find out the population at high risk and areas with high incidence and provide evidence for promoting pre-pregnancy aristogenesis and medical interventions for prevention of HBV infection. Methods: The subjects in the study were rural childbearing age people aged 18-49 who received the national free pre pregnancy eugenic health examination in Yunnan province during 2013-2017. Descriptive analysis was conducted for HBsAg positive rate and its difference among various characteristics. The SPSS 22.0 software was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 2 180 841 rural childbearing age people were surveyed, the HBsAg positive rate before pregnancy was 3.13%(68 314/2 180 841) in Yunnan. And the HBsAg positive rate was 3.56% (37 694/1 057 376) in men, higher than that in women (2.73%, 30 620/1 123 465). The HBsAg positive rate was highest in age group 41-49 years (3.77%, 3 126/82 931). The HBsAg positive rate was higher in minority ethnic group (3.77%, 27 974/742 518) than in Han ethnicity group (2.81%, 40 024/1 425 870). Moreover, the highest HBsAg positive rate of was 8.20%(851/10 378) in Yao ethnic group. The people with education level of primary education had the highest HBsAg positive rate (3.97%, 17 294/435 219). The HBsAg positive rate was highest in Xishuangbanna Dai autonomous prefecture (6.65%, 3 875/58 232) in Yunnan. Moreover, the HBsAg positive population in severe poor area (3.32%, 19 755/595 665) was higher than those in less poor area (3.17%, 29 750/939 101) or normal areas (2.91%, 18 809/646 075). There was significant difference in HBsAg positive rate among populations in different age groups, ethnic groups, education level groups, areas and economic level groups (P<0.001). Conclusions: The HBsAg positive rate in rural childbearing age people in Yunnan was related to multi factors, including sex, age, ethnic group, education level, area and economic development level. The HBsAg positive rate was higher in men, older age and lower education level, minority ethnic group (especially in Yao ethnic group), from Xishuangbanna prefecture and the poor living conditions in childbearing age population.


Assuntos
Antígenos de Superfície da Hepatite B , Programas de Rastreamento , População Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , China , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Antígenos de Superfície da Hepatite B/análise , Humanos , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
17.
Anesth Analg ; 131(4): 1201-1209, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925341

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The critical question of racial and gender diversity in pediatric anesthesia training programs has not been previously explored. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate trends by race/ethnicity and gender in pediatric anesthesiology fellowship training programs in the United States for the years 2000 to 2018. METHODS: Demographic data on pediatric anesthesiology fellows and anesthesiology residents were obtained from the self-reported data collected for the Journal of the American Medical Association's annual report on Graduate Medical Education for the years 2000 to 2018. Diversity was assessed by calculating the proportions of trainees per year by gender and racial/ethnic groups in pediatric anesthesiology fellowship and anesthesiology residency programs. Logistic regression equations were developed to estimate the annual growth rate of each racial/ethnic groups. RESULTS: The number of pediatric anesthesiology fellows increased from 57 trainees in 2000-2001 to 202 in 2017-2018 at an average rate of 9 fellows per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 8-10). These increases were primarily due to white trainees (54.4%-63.4%) as the proportions of black (7.0%-4.5%), Asian (26.3%-21.3%), and other minority (12.3%-10.9%) trainees have remained low. The number of anesthesiology residents increased from 3950 trainees in 2000-2001 to 5940 in 2017-2018 at an average rate of 99 residents per year (95% CI, 88-111). Within all anesthesiology trainees, these increases were due to white trainees (55.7%-61.3%) as the proportion of black (5.0%-6.0%), Asian (25.8%-24.1%), and other minority trainees (8.2%-8.5%) has remained fairly constant over the time period. Despite the overall lower proportion of female anesthesiology residents (range: 27.0%-37.5%), a steady increase in the number of women in pediatric anesthesiology fellowship programs has reversed the gender imbalance in this population as of 2010. CONCLUSIONS: While historic gains have been made in gender diversity in pediatric anesthesiology, there is persistent underrepresentation of black and Hispanic trainees in pediatric anesthesiology. It appears that their low numbers in anesthesiology residency programs (the reservoir) may be partly responsible. Efforts to increase ethnic/racial diversity in pediatric anesthesiology fellowship and anesthesiology residency training programs are urgently needed.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/educação , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Bolsas de Estudo/estatística & dados numéricos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Pediatria/educação , Sexismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Americanos Asiáticos , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários , Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Recursos Humanos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
18.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239482, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32970711

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: I investigate the association of perceived discrimination based both on race and other attributes such as age, gender, and insurance status on self-reported health access and health outcomes in a diverse and densely populated metropolitan area. METHODS: Restricted data from the 2016 round of the New York City Community Health Survey was used to create prevalence estimates for both racial and non-racial discrimination. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of these discrimination measures with health access and health outcome variables. RESULTS: Among residents who perceived discrimination receiving health care during the previous year, 15% reported the reason behind such discrimination to race, while the rest chose other reasons. Among the non-race based categories, 34% reported the reason behind such discrimination to be insurance status, followed by other reasons (26.83%) and income (11.76%). Non-racial discrimination was significantly associated with the adjusted odds of not receiving care when needed (AOR = 6.96; CI: [5.00 9.70]), and seeking informal care (AOR = 2.24; CI: [1.13 4.48] respectively, after adjusting for insurance status, age, gender, marital status, race/ethnicity, nativity, and poverty. It was also associated with higher adjusted odds of reporting poor health (AOR = 2.49; CI: [1.65 3.75]) and being diagnosed with hypertension (AOR = 1.75; CI: [1.21 2.52]), and diabetes (AOR = 1.84; CI: [1.22 2.77]) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived discrimination in health care exists in multiple forms. Non-racial discrimination was strongly associated with worse health access and outcomes, and such experiences may contribute to health disparities between different socioeconomic groups.


Assuntos
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Cobertura do Seguro/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Autorrelato , Fatores Socioeconômicos
19.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e039886, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32873684

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To illustrate the intersections of, and intercounty variation in, individual, household and community factors that influence the impact of COVID-19 on US counties and their ability to respond. DESIGN: We identified key individual, household and community characteristics influencing COVID-19 risks of infection and survival, guided by international experiences and consideration of epidemiological parameters of importance. Using publicly available data, we developed an open-access online tool that allows county-specific querying and mapping of risk factors. As an illustrative example, we assess the pairwise intersections of age (individual level), poverty (household level) and prevalence of group homes (community-level) in US counties. We also examine how these factors intersect with the proportion of the population that is people of colour (ie, not non-Hispanic white), a metric that reflects histories of US race relations. We defined 'high' risk counties as those above the 75th percentile. This threshold can be changed using the online tool. SETTING: US counties. PARTICIPANTS: Analyses are based on publicly available county-level data from the Area Health Resources Files, American Community Survey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlas file, National Center for Health Statistic and RWJF Community Health Rankings. RESULTS: Our findings demonstrate significant intercounty variation in the distribution of individual, household and community characteristics that affect risks of infection, severe disease or mortality from COVID-19. About 9% of counties, affecting 10 million residents, are in higher risk categories for both age and group quarters. About 14% of counties, affecting 31 million residents, have both high levels of poverty and a high proportion of people of colour. CONCLUSION: Federal and state governments will benefit from recognising high intrastate, intercounty variation in population risks and response capacity. Equitable responses to the pandemic require strategies to protect those in counties at highest risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes and their social and economic impacts.


Assuntos
Fatores Etários , Infecções por Coronavirus , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Características da Família , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Pública , Análise de Sobrevida , Adulto , Idoso , Betacoronavirus , Análise por Conglomerados , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Saúde Pública/métodos , Saúde Pública/estatística & dados numéricos , Medição de Risco/métodos , Medição de Risco/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Estados Unidos
20.
Am J Mens Health ; 14(5): 1557988320957545, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32938298

RESUMO

While there is evidence of variations in the risk perceptions of COVID-19 and that they are linked to both engagement in health-protective behaviors and poor mental health outcomes, there has been a lack of attention to how individuals perceive the risk of COVID-19 relative to other infectious diseases. This paper examines the relative perceptions of the severity of COVID-19 and HIV among a sample of U.S. gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSMs). The "Love and Sex in the Time of COVID-19" survey was conducted online from April 2020 to May 2020. GBMSMs were recruited through paid banner advertisements featured on social networking platforms, resulting in a sample size of 696. The analysis considers differences in responses to two scales: the Perceived Severity of HIV Infection and the Perceived Severity of COVID-19 Infection. Participants perceived greater seriousness for HIV infection (mean 46.67, range 17-65) than for COVID-19 infection (mean 38.81, range 13-62). Some items reflecting more proximal impacts of infection (anxiety, loss of sleep, and impact on employment) were similar for HIV and COVID-19. Those aged over 25 and those who perceived higher prevalence of COVID-19 in the United States or their state were more likely to report COVID-19 as more severe than HIV. There is a need to develop nuanced public health messages for GBMSMs that convey the ongoing simultaneous health threats of both HIV and COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Assunção de Riscos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Bissexualidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Internet , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Medição de Risco , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Comportamento Sexual , Análise de Sobrevida , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA