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3.
Br J Radiol ; 93(1105): 20190328, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31661305

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Exposure to sex hormones is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and inability to tolerate such exposure may be reflected in increased asymmetrical growth of the breasts. This study aims to characterize, for the first time, asymmetry in breast volume (BV) and radiodense volume (DV) in a large ethnically diverse population. METHODS: Automated measurements from digital raw mammographic images of 54,591 cancer-free participants (aged 47-73) in a UK breast screening programme were used to calculate absolute (cm3) and relative asymmetry in BV and DV. Logistic regression models were fitted to assess asymmetry associations with age and ethnicity. RESULTS: BV and DV absolute asymmetry were positively correlated with the corresponding volumetric dimension (BV or DV). BV absolute asymmetry increased, whilst DV absolute asymmetry decreased, with increasing age (P-for-linear-trend <0.001 for both). Relative to Whites, Blacks had statistically significantly higher, and Chinese lower, BV and DV absolute asymmetries. However, after adjustment for the corresponding underlying volumetric dimension the age and ethnic differences were greatly attenuated. Median relative (fluctuating) BV and DV asymmetry were 2.34 and 3.28% respectively. CONCLUSION: After adjusting for the relevant volumetric dimension (BV or DV), age and ethnic differences in absolute breast asymmetry were largely resolved. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: Previous small studies have reported breast asymmetry-breast cancer associations. Automated measurements of asymmetry allow the conduct of large-scale studies to further investigate these associations.


Assuntos
Densidade da Mama/etnologia , Mama/anormalidades , Mama/diagnóstico por imagem , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Mamografia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
4.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 40(11): 1461-1469, 2019 Nov 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31838822

RESUMO

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the survival rate and its prognostic factors for patients with biliary tract cancer, and then a prognostic risk prediction model was constructed to predict the survival probability of patients. Methods: A total of 14 005 patients with biliary tract cancer (including gallbladder cancer, extrahepatic bile duct cancer, and ampulla of Vater cancer), who were diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 in the US National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) were included in the development cohort. The prognostic risk factors of biliary tract cancer were investigated using multivariate Cox regression models. The predictive nomograms were then constructed to predict the overall survival probability of 1, 3, and 5 years, and the predictive discrimination and calibration ability of the nomograms were further evaluated. Meanwhile, 11 953 patients who were diagnosed during 2004 to 2009 from SEER Program were then selected to validate the external predictive accuracy of the prediction models. Results: The 1, 3 and 5-year cumulative survival rates of patients with biliary tract cancer were 41.9%, 20.4% and 15.3%, respectively, in the development cohort. Age greater than 50 years, African Americans and Native Americans and Alaska Natives, higher T, N and M stage and poor histological differentiation grade were risk factors for death, while married status, Asia-Pacific Islanders, insured status and surgery on primary site were protective factors. Gender was not significantly associated with the overall survival. The C statistic of the prediction model was 0.73 (95%CI: 0.72-0.74), and the calibration curve showed that the interaction curves of predictive and actual survival rates of 1, 3 and 5 years were close to the 45 degree diagonal. Results in the validation cohort were similar with those in the construction cohort, with a C statistic of 0.70 (95%CI: 0.69-0.72), indicating high external applicability of the prediction model. Findings from gallbladder cancer, extrahepatic bile duct cancer, and ampulla of Vater cancer are in consistent with the overall biliary tract cancer. Conclusions: The survival rate of patients with biliary tract cancer is relatively poor, and the survival prediction model based on prognostic factors has high prediction accuracy. In the future, this prognostic prediction model could be applied to clinical practice to guide individualized treatment for patients with biliary tract cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Sistema Biliar/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/diagnóstico , Nomogramas , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias do Sistema Biliar/mortalidade , Neoplasias do Sistema Biliar/terapia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/terapia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prognóstico , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Programa de SEER , Taxa de Sobrevida , Fatores de Tempo , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
5.
JAMA ; 322(24): 2389-2398, 2019 12 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31860047

RESUMO

Importance: The prevalence of diabetes among Hispanic and Asian American subpopulations in the United States is unknown. Objective: To estimate racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of diabetes among US adults 20 years or older by major race/ethnicity groups and selected Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian subpopulations. Design, Setting, and Participants: National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2011-2016, cross-sectional samples representing the noninstitutionalized, civilian, US population. The sample included adults 20 years or older who had self-reported diagnosed diabetes during the interview or measurements of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG). Exposures: Race/ethnicity groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic and Hispanic subgroups (Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban/Dominican, Central American, and South American), non-Hispanic Asian and non-Hispanic Asian subgroups (East, South, and Southeast Asian), and non-Hispanic other. Main Outcomes and Measures: Diagnosed diabetes was based on self-reported prior diagnosis. Undiagnosed diabetes was defined as HbA1c 6.5% or greater, FPG 126 mg/dL or greater, or 2hPG 200 mg/dL or greater in participants without diagnosed diabetes. Total diabetes was defined as diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes. Results: The study sample included 7575 US adults (mean age, 47.5 years; 52% women; 2866 [65%] non-Hispanic white, 1636 [11%] non-Hispanic black, 1952 [15%] Hispanic, 909 [6%] non-Hispanic Asian, and 212 [3%] non-Hispanic other). A total of 2266 individuals had diagnosed diabetes; 377 had undiagnosed diabetes. Weighted age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of total diabetes was 12.1% (95% CI, 11.0%-13.4%) for non-Hispanic white, 20.4% (95% CI, 18.8%-22.1%) for non-Hispanic black, 22.1% (95% CI, 19.6%-24.7%) for Hispanic, and 19.1% (95% CI, 16.0%-22.1%) for non-Hispanic Asian adults (overall P < .001). Among Hispanic adults, the prevalence of total diabetes was 24.6% (95% CI, 21.6%-27.6%) for Mexican, 21.7% (95% CI, 14.6%-28.8%) for Puerto Rican, 20.5% (95% CI, 13.7%-27.3%) for Cuban/Dominican, 19.3% (95% CI, 12.4%-26.1%) for Central American, and 12.3% (95% CI, 8.5%-16.2%) for South American subgroups (overall P < .001). Among non-Hispanic Asian adults, the prevalence of total diabetes was 14.0% (95% CI, 9.5%-18.4%) for East Asian, 23.3% (95% CI, 15.6%-30.9%) for South Asian, and 22.4% (95% CI, 15.9%-28.9%) for Southeast Asian subgroups (overall P = .02). The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 3.9% (95% CI, 3.0%-4.8%) for non-Hispanic white, 5.2% (95% CI, 3.9%-6.4%) for non-Hispanic black, 7.5% (95% CI, 5.9%-9.1%) for Hispanic, and 7.5% (95% CI, 4.9%-10.0%) for non-Hispanic Asian adults (overall P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this nationally representative survey of US adults from 2011 to 2016, the prevalence of diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes varied by race/ethnicity and among subgroups identified within the Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian populations.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Diabetes Mellitus/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Americanos Asiáticos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Prevalência , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(52): e18566, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31876759

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is an identified carcinogenic pathogen of human gastric cancer. China is not only one of the countries with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer, but also a high infection area of Hp. As a multi-ethnic country, China may have a diverse prevalence of Hp infection among ethnics. This meta-analysis tends to compare the prevalence of Hp infection between Tibetan and Han ethnics, the results may provide evidence for targeted screening and eradication of Hp in China. METHODS: The following databases will be searched: PubMed, Web of Science, Technology Periodical Database (VIP), China National Knowledge infrastructure (CNKI), and WanFang databases. Studies which reported the prevalence of Hp infection between Tibetans and Hans in China are eligible. Two reviewers will independently screen studies, extract data and assess the risk of bias of included studies. The prevalence of Hp infection between Tibetan and Han ethnics will be compared by meta-analysis. Heterogeneity tests and meta-analyses will be conducted using RevMan 5.3 and Stata 12.0 softwares. Meanwhile, subgroup analysis, publication bias and sensitivity analysis evaluation will be performed where applicable. RESULTS: This study will be reported in compliance with the PRISMA statement.This systematic review will not be submitted for any ethical approval since no privacy health information will be included. The findings will be published through peer-reviewed publications or conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42019121192. CONCLUSIONS: Our study will provide us evidence for tailored strategy and robustness of Hp screening and eradication among Tibetans.


Assuntos
Infecções por Helicobacter/epidemiologia , Helicobacter pylori , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , China/epidemiologia , China/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Helicobacter/etnologia , Humanos , Prevalência , Tibet/epidemiologia , Tibet/etnologia
7.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(46): 1050-1056, 2019 Nov 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31751321

RESUMO

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the lives of millions of Americans each year (1). To describe the trends in TBI-related deaths among different racial/ethnic groups and by sex, CDC analyzed death data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) over an 18-year period (2000-2017). Injuries were also categorized by intent, and unintentional injuries were further categorized by mechanism of injury. In 2017, TBI contributed to 61,131 deaths in the United States, representing 2.2% of approximately 2.8 million deaths that year. From 2015 to 2017, 44% of TBI-related deaths were categorized as intentional injuries (i.e., homicides or suicides). The leading category of TBI-related death varied over time and by race/ethnicity. For example, during the last 10 years of the study period, suicide surpassed unintentional motor vehicle crashes as the leading category of TBI-related death. This shift was in part driven by a 32% increase in TBI-related suicide deaths among non-Hispanic whites. Firearm injury was the underlying mechanism of injury in nearly all (97%) TBI-related suicides among all groups. An analysis of TBI-related death rates by sex and race/ethnicity found that TBI-related deaths were significantly higher among males and persons who were American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) than among all other groups across all years. Other leading categories of TBI-related deaths included unintentional motor vehicle crashes, unintentional falls, and homicide. Understanding the leading contributors to TBI-related death and identifying groups at increased risk is important in preventing this injury. Broader implementation of evidence-based TBI prevention efforts for the leading categories of injury, such as those aimed at stemming the significant increase in TBI-related deaths from suicide, are warranted.


Assuntos
Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/mortalidade , Acidentes de Trânsito/estatística & dados numéricos , Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/etnologia , Lesões Encefálicas Traumáticas/etiologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Armas de Fogo/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Intenção , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Distribuição por Sexo , Suicídio/etnologia , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(43): 967-973, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31671083

RESUMO

Among the 47,600 opioid-involved overdose deaths in the United States in 2017, 59.8% (28,466) involved synthetic opioids (1). Since 2013, synthetic opioids, particularly illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF), including fentanyl analogs, have been fueling the U.S. overdose epidemic (1,2). Although initially mixed with heroin, IMF is increasingly being found in supplies of cocaine, methamphetamine, and counterfeit prescription pills, which increases the number of populations at risk for an opioid-involved overdose (3,4). With the proliferation of IMF, opioid-involved overdose deaths have increased among minority populations including non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and Hispanics, groups that have historically had low opioid-involved overdose death rates (5). In addition, metropolitan areas have experienced sharp increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths since 2013 (6,7). This study analyzed changes in overdose death rates involving any opioid and synthetic opioids among persons aged ≥18 years during 2015-2017, by age and race/ethnicity across metropolitan areas. Nearly all racial/ethnic groups and age groups experienced increases in opioid-involved and synthetic opioid-involved overdose death rates, particularly blacks aged 45-54 years (from 19.3 to 41.9 per 100,000) and 55-64 years (from 21.8 to 42.7) in large central metro areas and non-Hispanic whites (whites) aged 25-34 years (from 36.9 to 58.3) in large fringe metro areas. Comprehensive and culturally tailored interventions are needed to address the rise in drug overdose deaths in all populations, including prevention strategies that address the risk factors for substance use across each racial/ethnic group, public health messaging to increase awareness about synthetic opioids in the drug supply, expansion of naloxone distribution for overdose reversal, and increased access to medication-assisted treatment.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/envenenamento , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Overdose de Drogas/etnologia , Overdose de Drogas/mortalidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicamentos Sintéticos/envenenamento , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(46): e17964, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31725658

RESUMO

Despite evidence suggesting race and ethnicity are important factors in responses to environmental exposures, drug therapies, and disease risk, few studies focus on the health needs of racially- and ethnically-diverse aging adults.The objective of this study was to determine the burden of 10 health conditions across race and ethnicity for a nationally-representative sample of aging Americans.Data from the 1998 to 2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, an ongoing longitudinal-panel study, were analyzed.Those aged over 50 years who identified as Black, Hispanic, or White were included. There were 5510 Blacks, 3423 Hispanics, and 21,168 Whites in the study.At each wave, participants reported if they had cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, back pain, hypertension, a fractured hip, myocardial infarction, rheumatism or arthritis, and a stroke. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were calculated for each health condition by race and ethnicity. Ranked DALYs determined how race and ethnicity was differentially impacted by the burden of each health condition. Sample weights were utilized to make DALY estimates nationally-representative.Weighted DALY estimates (in thousands) ranged from 1405 to 55,631 for Blacks, 931 to 28,442 for Hispanics, and 15,313 to 295,623 for Whites. Although the health conditions affected each race and ethnicity differently, hypertension had the largest number of DALYs, and hip fractures had the fewest across race and ethnicity. In total, there were an estimated 198,621, 101,462, and 1,187,725 DALYs for older Black, Hispanic, and White aging adults.Our findings indicate that race and ethnicity may be influential on health and disease for aging adults in the United States. Monitoring DALYs may help guide the flow of health-related expenditures, improve the impact of health interventions, advance inclusive health care for diverse aging adult populations, and prepare healthcare providers for serving the health needs of aging adults.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/etnologia , Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Nível de Saúde , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doença Crônica/mortalidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Anos de Vida Ajustados por Qualidade de Vida , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos
11.
Int J Equity Health ; 18(1): 153, 2019 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31615512

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Social inequalities in obesity have been observed not only by gender but also between ethnic groups. Evidence on combined dimensions of inequality in health, and specifically including indigenous populations, is however scarce, and presents a particularly daunting challenge for successful prevention and control of obesity in Bolivia, as well as worldwide. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were i) to examine intersectional inequalities in obesity and ii) to identify the factors underlying the observed intersectional inequalities. METHODS: An intersectional approach study was employed, using the information collected in a cross-sectional community-based survey. The sample consisted of youth and adults with permanent residence in Cochabamba department (N = 5758), selected through a multistage sampling technique. An adapted version of the WHO-STEPS survey was used to collect information about Abdominal obesity and risk factors associated. Four intersectional positions were constructed from gender (woman vs. men) and ethnic group (indigenous vs. mestizo). Joint and excess intersectional disparities in obesity were estimated as absolute prevalence differences between binary groups, using binomial regression models. The Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition was applied to estimate the contributions of explanatory factors underlying the observed intersectional disparities, using Oaxaca command in Stata software v15.1. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal obesity had a higher prevalence in mestizos (men 35.01% and women 30.71%) as compared to indigenous (men 25.38% and women 27.75%). The joint disparity was estimated at 7.26 percentage points higher prevalence in the doubly advantaged mestizo men than in the doubly disadvantaged indigenous women. The gender referent disparity showed that mestizo-women had a higher prevalence than indigenous-women. The ethnic referent disparity showed that mestizo-men had a higher prevalence than indigenous men. The behavioural risk factors were the most important to explain the observed inequalities, while differences in socioeconomic and demographic factors played a less important role. CONCLUSION: Our study illustrates that abdominal obesity is not distributed according to expected patterns of structural disadvantage in the intersectional space of ethnicity and gender in Bolivia. In the Cochabamba case, a high social advantage was related to higher rates of abdominal obesity, as well as the behavioural risk factors associated with them.


Assuntos
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adolescente , Adulto , Bolívia , Estudos Transversais , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade Abdominal/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
12.
Health Serv Res ; 54 Suppl 2: 1389-1398, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31657001

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe survey methods used to examine reported experiences of discrimination against African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, women, and LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) adults. DATA SOURCE AND STUDY DESIGN: Data came from a nationally representative, probability-based telephone survey of 3453 US adults, conducted January-April 2017. METHODS: We examined the survey instrument, sampling design, and weighting of the survey, and present selected survey findings. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Examining reported discrimination experienced by multiple groups in a telephone survey requires attention to details of sampling and weighting. In health care settings, 32 percent of African Americans reported discrimination, as did 23 percent of Native Americans, 20 percent of Latinos, 18 percent of women, 16 percent of LGBTQ adults, and 13 percent of Asian Americans. Also, 51 percent of LGBTQ adults, 42 percent of African Americans, and 38 percent of Native Americans reported identity-based violence against themselves or family members; 57 percent of African Americans and 41 percent of women reported discrimination in pay or promotions; 50 percent of African Americans, 29 percent of Native Americans, and 27 percent of Latinos reported being discriminated against in interactions with police. CONCLUSIONS: Even the small selection of results presented in this article as examples of survey measures show a pattern of substantial reported discrimination against all six groups studied.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde , Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Sexismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Idoso , Americanos Asiáticos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Índios Norte-Americanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Determinantes Sociais da Saúde/etnologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telefone , Estados Unidos
13.
Br J Nurs ; 28(18): S4-S10, 2019 Oct 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31597062

RESUMO

Prostate cancer is a complex disease which is more prevalent among men of black and minority ethnic (BME) background than their Caucasian counterparts, with men of African-Caribbean background experiencing higher levels of incidence and mortality than any other ethnic group. The reasons behind this health inequality are poorly understood and likely to be multifactorial. Several theories have been posited, including genetic disposition, poorer access to health care, a lack of understanding of the risks posed by prostate cancer and an unwillingness to access mainstream health care. There is, however, a notable disparity between the amount of literature focusing on prostate cancer as it affects those with a BME background and on prostate cancer in general. This further compounds the difficulties encountered by BME men, who rely on health professionals being aware of the greater risk they face. More knowledge and understanding is required by both the general population and medical practitioners to address this health inequality.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Neoplasias da Próstata/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(39): e17376, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31574887

RESUMO

This study aimed to compare the catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) and impoverishment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients between 2 ethnic groups and explore the contribution of associated factors to ethnic differences in CHE and impoverishment in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China.A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 public hospitals from October 2016 to June 2017. Data were collected by interviewing eligible Hui and Han T2DM inpatients and reviewing the hospital electronic records. Both CHE and impoverishment were measured by headcount and gap. The contributions of associated factors to ethnic differences were analyzed by the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition technique.Both the CHE and impoverishment of Hui patients before and after reimbursement were significantly higher than those of Han patients. The ethnic differences in CHE and impoverishment headcount after reimbursement were 11.9% and 9.8%, respectively. The different distributions of associated factors between Hui and Han patients contributed to 60.5% and 35.7% of ethnic differences in CHE and impoverishment, respectively. Household income, occupation, and region were significant contributing factors.Hui T2DM patients suffered greater CHE and impoverishment than Han patients regardless of reimbursements from health insurance. Differences in socioeconomic status between Hui and Han patients were the main factors behind the ethnic differences.


Assuntos
Doença Catastrófica/economia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/economia , Gastos em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguro Saúde/economia , Pobreza/economia , Idoso , China , Estudos Transversais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Socioeconômicos
15.
J Youth Adolesc ; 48(10): 2023-2037, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31541372

RESUMO

Drawing from Race-Based Traumatic Stress theory, the present study examined whether traumatic stress and depressive symptoms differentially help explain the relation between racial/ethnic discrimination and suicidal ideation across gender and racial/ethnic groups. A racially/ethnically diverse group of emerging adults (N = 1344; Mage = 19.88, SD = 2.25; 72% female; 46% Hispanic) completed a battery of self-report measures. A cross-sectional design was employed with a series of hierarchical linear regression models and bootstrapping procedures to examine the direct and indirect relation between racial/ethnic discrimination and suicidal ideation through traumatic stress and depressive symptoms across gender and race/ethnicity. The findings suggest an indirect relation through depressive symptoms, but not traumatic stress, and a serial indirect relation through traumatic stress to depressive symptoms in young women and young men, the latter of which was stronger in young women. The indirect relations did not vary by racial/ethnic group. Cumulative experiences of racial/ethnic discrimination may impact suicide-related risk via increases in psychiatric symptomology (i.e., traumatic stress and depressive symptoms), particularly in young women. Racial/ethnic discrimination experiences should be accounted for as a potential source of psychological distress in the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of suicidal thoughts and behavior, especially among young women endorsing traumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Further research is warranted to better understand the gender difference in the relation between racial/ethnic discrimination and suicide-related risk.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Racismo/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Ideação Suicida , Adolescente , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores Sexuais , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 21(9): 589-594, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31542902

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidium is a major threat to water supplies worldwide. Various biases and obstacles in case identification are recognized. In Israel, Cryptosporidiosis was included among notifiable diseases in 2001 in order to determine the burden of parasite-inflicted morbidity and to justify budgeting a central drinking water filtration plant. OBJECTIVES: To summarize the epidemiologic features of 14 years of Cryptosporidium surveillance and to assess the effects of advanced water purification treatment on the burden of disease. METHODS: From 2001 to 2014, a passive surveillance system was used. Cases were identified based on microscopic detection in stool samples. Confirmed cases were reported electronically to the Israeli Ministry of Health. Overall rates as well as age, gender, ethnicity and specific annual incidence were calculated per 100,000 population in five age groups: 0-4, 5-14, 15-44, 45-64, > 65 years. RESULTS: A total of 522 Cryptosporidium cases were reported in all six public health districts. More cases were detected among Jews and among males, and mainly in young children, with a seasonal peak during summer. The Haifa sub-district reported 69% of the cases. Most were linked to an outbreak from the summer of 2008, which was attributed to recreational swimming pool activity. Cases decreased after installation of a central filtration plant in 2007. CONCLUSIONS: As drinking water in Israel is treated to maximal international standards, the rationale for further inclusion of Cryptosporidium among mandatory notifiable diseases should be reconsidered. Future surveillance efforts should focus on timely detection of outbreaks using molecular high-throughput testing.


Assuntos
Criptosporidiose/epidemiologia , Cryptosporidium/isolamento & purificação , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Política de Saúde , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Israel/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População/métodos , Estações do Ano , Fatores Sexuais , Purificação da Água/estatística & dados numéricos , Abastecimento de Água/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31546681

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although other mechanisms are also involved, at least one reason high educational attainment (EA) is associated with better health is lower employment stress in individuals with high EA. Minorities' Diminished Returns, however, refer to the smaller protective health effects of EA for racial- and ethnic-minority individuals, particularly African Americans (AAs) and Hispanics, as compared to Whites. We are, however, not aware of many studies that have explored differential associations between EA and work-related stress across racial and ethnic groups. AIMS: We aimed to compare racial and ethnic groups for the association between EA and occupational stress in a national sample of American adults. METHODS: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS 2015), a cross-sectional survey, included 15,726 employed adults. Educational attainment was the dependent variable. Occupational stress was the outcome. Race and ethnicity were the moderators. Age, gender, number of jobs, and years in the job were the covariates. RESULTS: Overall, higher EA was associated with lower levels of occupational stress. Race and ethnicity both interacted with EA, suggesting that the association between high EA and reduced occupational stress is systemically smaller for AAs and Hispanics than it is for Whites. CONCLUSIONS: In the United States, race and ethnicity limit the health gains that follow EA. While EA helps individuals avoid environmental risk factors, such as occupational stress, this is more valid for non-Hispanic Whites than AAs and Hispanics. The result is additional physical and mental health risks in highly educated AAs and Hispanics. The results are important, given racial and ethnic minorities are the largest growing section of the US population. We should not assume that EA is similarly protective across all racial and ethnic groups. In this context, EA may increase, rather than reduce, health disparities.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Estresse Ocupacional , Sucesso Acadêmico , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Emprego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
18.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1271, 2019 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31533692

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interpersonal discrimination experience has been associated with adverse birth outcomes. Limited research has evaluated this relationship within multicultural contexts outside the United States where the nature and salience of discrimination experiences may differ. Such research is important in order to help identify protective and risk factors that may mediate the relationship between discrimination experience and adverse birth outcomes. METHODS: Evaluated the relationship between perceived discrimination, as measured in pregnancy, with birth weight and gestation length among Maori, Pacific, and Asian women from Aotearoa New Zealand (N = 1653). RESULTS: Thirty percent of the sample reported some type of unfair treatment that they attributed to their ethnicity. For Maori women specifically, unfair treatment at work (ß = - 243 g) and in acquiring housing (ß = - 146 g) were associated with lower birth weight when compared to Maori women not experiencing these types of discrimination, while an ethnically motivated physical attack (ß = - 1.06 week), and unfair treatment in the workplace (ß = - 0.95 week), in the criminal justice system (ß = - 0.55 week), or in banking (ß = - 0.73 week) were associated with significantly shorter gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high prevalence of discrimination experience among women from all ethnic groups, discrimination experience was a strong predictor of lower birth weight and shorter gestation length among indigenous Maori women only. Additional research is needed to better understand the risk and protective factors that may moderate the relationship between discrimination experience and adverse birth outcomes among women from different ethnic groups.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Resultado da Gravidez/epidemiologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevalência , Racismo/psicologia , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
19.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 19(1): 668, 2019 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31533716

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In England, people of Black Caribbean (BC) ethnicity are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections (STI). We examined whether differences in sexual healthcare behaviours contribute to these inequalities. METHODS: We purposively selected 16 sexual health clinics across England with high proportions of attendees of BC ethnicity. During May-September 2016, attendees at these clinics (of all ethnicities) completed an online survey that collected data on health service use and sexual behaviour. We individually linked these data to routinely-collected surveillance data. We then used multivariable logistic regression to compare reported behaviours among BC and White British/Irish (WBI) attendees (n = 627, n = 1411 respectively) separately for women and men, and to make comparisons by gender within these ethnic groups. RESULTS: BC women's sexual health clinic attendances were more commonly related to recent bacterial STI diagnoses, compared to WBI women's attendances (adjusted odds ratio, AOR 3.54, 95% CI 1.45-8.64, p = 0.009; no gender difference among BC attendees), while BC men were more likely than WBI men (and BC women) to report attending because of a partner's symptoms or diagnosis (AOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14-2.90; AOR BC men compared with BC women: 4.36, 95% CI 1.42-13.34, p = 0.014). Among symptomatic attendees, BC women were less likely than WBI women to report care-seeking elsewhere before attending the sexual health clinic (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.38-0.97, p = 0.039). No ethnic differences, or gender differences among BC attendees, were observed in symptom duration, or reporting sex whilst symptomatic. Among those reporting previous diagnoses with or treatment for bacterial STI, no differences were observed in partner notification. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in STI diagnosis rates observed between BC and WBI ethnic groups were not explained by the few ethnic differences which we identified in sexual healthcare-seeking and use. As changes take place in service delivery, prompt clinic access must be maintained - and indeed facilitated - for those at greatest risk of STI, regardless of ethnicity.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Sexual , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/etnologia , Idoso , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Região do Caribe/etnologia , Estudos Transversais , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Utilização de Instalações e Serviços , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Assunção de Riscos , Fatores Sexuais , Comportamento Sexual/etnologia , Parceiros Sexuais , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/diagnóstico , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/etnologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
20.
Matern Child Health J ; 23(12): 1648-1657, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31535257

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Intimate partner violence (IPV) around the time of pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. The supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children (WIC), available to low income pregnant women, may provide an opportunity to identify victims of IPV and refer them to services. This cross-sectional study aims to determine whether WIC participants are more likely than non-WIC participants to have reported IPV before or during pregnancy in the United States. METHODS: The 2004-2011 National Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey (n = 319,689) was analyzed in 2015. Self-reported WIC participation, pre-pregnancy IPV, and IPV during pregnancy were examined. The associations between IPV and WIC participation were analyzed using multiple logistic regression and adjusted odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Subpopulation analysis was conducted, stratified by race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Nearly half of the study sample received WIC (48.1%), approximately 4% of women reported physical abuse 12 months before their most recent pregnancy, and 3% reported abuse during pregnancy. After adjusting for confounders, women who reported IPV before and during pregnancy had significantly higher odds of WIC utilization compared to women who did not report IPV. However, when stratified by race, the association was only significant for non-Hispanic White women (pre-pregnancy AOR 1.47, 95% CI [1.17, 1.85]; during pregnancy AOR 1.47, 95% CI [1.14, 1.88]). CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: There is an association between IPV before and during pregnancy and utilization of WIC. Public health professionals and policy makers should be aware of this association and use this opportunity to screen and address the needs of WIC recipients.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Alimentar/estatística & dados numéricos , Violência por Parceiro Íntimo/estatística & dados numéricos , Gestantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Violência por Parceiro Íntimo/etnologia , Gravidez , Cuidado Pré-Natal , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
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