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2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(42): 1517-1521, 2020 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33090984

RESUMO

During February 12-October 15, 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in approximately 7,900,000 aggregated reported cases and approximately 216,000 deaths in the United States.* Among COVID-19-associated deaths reported to national case surveillance during February 12-May 18, persons aged ≥65 years and members of racial and ethnic minority groups were disproportionately represented (1). This report describes demographic and geographic trends in COVID-19-associated deaths reported to the National Vital Statistics System† (NVSS) during May 1-August 31, 2020, by 50 states and the District of Columbia. During this period, 114,411 COVID-19-associated deaths were reported. Overall, 78.2% of decedents were aged ≥65 years, and 53.3% were male; 51.3% were non-Hispanic White (White), 24.2% were Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic), and 18.7% were non-Hispanic Black (Black). The number of COVID-19-associated deaths decreased from 37,940 in May to 17,718 in June; subsequently, counts increased to 30,401 in July and declined to 28,352 in August. From May to August, the percentage distribution of COVID-19-associated deaths by U.S. Census region increased from 23.4% to 62.7% in the South and from 10.6% to 21.4% in the West. Over the same period, the percentage distribution of decedents who were Hispanic increased from 16.3% to 26.4%. COVID-19 remains a major public health threat regardless of age or race and ethnicity. Deaths continued to occur disproportionately among older persons and certain racial and ethnic minorities, particularly among Hispanic persons. These results can inform public health messaging and mitigation efforts focused on prevention and early detection of infection among disproportionately affected groups.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Estatísticas Vitais , Adulto Jovem
3.
Am J Nephrol ; 51(10): 786-796, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011717

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although diffuse alveolar damage and respiratory failure are the key features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the involvement of other organs such as the kidney has also been reported. The reports of the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in COVID-19 patients vary widely. In this study, we report our unique experience with AKI in COVID-19 patients in a low socioeconomic and predominantly ethnic minority group and provide its incidence, risk factors, and prognosis to expand the current understanding of this complication. METHODS: In this single-center, retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the data of 469 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Brookdale University Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, from March 18 through April 23, 2020. Information regarding demographics, comorbidities, medications, clinical and laboratory data, and outcomes was collected from the electronic medical records. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of AKI with in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The median age was 66 years (interquartile range [IQR] 25-75; range 19-101 years), and 268 (57.14%) patients were male. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study Equation was low (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 207 (44.1%) patients. During hospitalization, 128 (27.3%) patients developed AKI, and the incidence was significantly higher in those patients presenting with a low eGFR (N = 81, 39.1%; p < 0.001). Male sex, hypertension, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, hemodynamic instability, mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and admission elevated ferritin, creatinine kinase, brain natriuretic peptide, and troponin 1 were identified as the risk factors for in-hospital AKI. Ninety-seven (28.45%) patients died in the non-AKI group versus 91 (71.1%) in the AKI group (p < 0.001). The Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for age, gender, comorbidities, hemodynamic status, and PF ratio (arterial oxygen partial pressure [PaO2]/fractional inspired oxygen [FiO2]) determined that on admission, an elevated blood urea nitrogen (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-2.48), a low eGFR (HR 1.43; CI 1.1-2.03), AKI stage 1 (HR 1.14; CI 0.64-2.03), AKI stage 2 (HR 1.86; CI 1.03-3.56), and AKI stage 3 (HR 2.1; CI 1.3-2.81) were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) did not improve survival in stage III AKI. CONCLUSION: AKI in our hospitalized COVID-19 patients was common and carried a high mortality, especially in patients with AKI stage 3. RRT did not improve survival. Policy changes and planning for this high incidence of AKI in COVID-19 patients and its associated high mortality are necessary at the local and national levels.


Assuntos
Lesão Renal Aguda/mortalidade , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Hospitais Urbanos/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Políticas , Lesão Renal Aguda/diagnóstico , Lesão Renal Aguda/terapia , Lesão Renal Aguda/virologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais Urbanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Prognóstico , Terapia de Substituição Renal/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
4.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 189, 2020 10 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33109197

RESUMO

There has been mounting evidence of the disproportionate involvement of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities by the Covid-19 pandemic. In the UK, this racial disparity was brought to the fore by the fact that the first 11 doctors to die in the UK from Covid-19 were of BAME background. The mortality rate from Covid-19 among people of black African descent in English hospitals has been shown to be 3.5 times higher when compared to rates among white British people. A Public Health England report revealed that Covid-19 was more likely to be diagnosed among black ethnic groups compared to white ethnic groups with the highest mortality occurring among BAME persons and persons living in the more deprived areas. People of BAME background account for 4.5% of the English population and make up 21% of the National Health Service (NHS) workforce. The UK poverty rate among BAME populations is twice as high as for white groups. Also, people of BAME backgrounds are more likely to be engaged in frontline roles. The disproportionate involvement of BAME communities by Covid-19 in the UK illuminates perennial inequalities within the society and reaffirms the strong association between ethnicity, race, socio-economic status and health outcomes. Potential reasons for the observed differences include the overrepresentation of BAME persons in frontline roles, unequal distribution of socio-economic resources, disproportionate risks to BAME staff within the NHS workspace and high ethnic predisposition to certain diseases which have been linked to poorer outcomes with Covid-19. The ethnoracialised differences in health outcomes from Covid-19 in the UK require urgent remedial measures. We provide intersectional approaches to tackle the complex racial disparities which though not entirely new in itself, have been often systematically ignored.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Medicina Estatal/organização & administração , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
5.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0240960, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33112892

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations are emerging as a vulnerable group in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. We investigated the relationship between ethnicity and health outcomes in SARS-CoV-2. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a retrospective, observational analysis of SARS-CoV-2 patients across two London teaching hospitals during March 1 -April 30, 2020. Routinely collected clinical data were extracted and analysed for 645 patients who met the study inclusion criteria. Within this hospitalised cohort, the BAME population were younger relative to the white population (61.70 years, 95% CI 59.70-63.73 versus 69.3 years, 95% CI 67.17-71.43, p<0.001). When adjusted for age, sex and comorbidity, ethnicity was not a predictor for ICU admission. The mean age at death was lower in the BAME population compared to the white population (71.44 years, 95% CI 69.90-72.90 versus, 77.40 years, 95% CI 76.1-78.70 respectively, p<0.001). When adjusted for age, sex and comorbidities, Asian patients had higher odds of death (OR 1.99: 95% CI 1.22-3.25, p<0.006). CONCLUSIONS: BAME patients were more likely to be admitted younger, and to die at a younger age with SARS-CoV-2. Within the BAME cohort, Asian patients were more likely to die but despite this, there was no difference in rates of admission to ICU. The reasons for these disparities are not fully understood and need to be addressed. Investigating ethnicity as a clinical risk factor remains a high public health priority. Studies that consider ethnicity as part of the wider socio-cultural determinant of health are urgently needed.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Feminino , Mortalidade Hospitalar , Hospitais de Ensino/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Londres/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Atenção Secundária à Saúde/etnologia , Atenção Secundária à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
6.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(9): 1522-1526, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33076611

RESUMO

Objective: To explore the current status of HBV infection before pregnancy among rural childbearing age people in Yunnan province, find out the population at high risk and areas with high incidence and provide evidence for promoting pre-pregnancy aristogenesis and medical interventions for prevention of HBV infection. Methods: The subjects in the study were rural childbearing age people aged 18-49 who received the national free pre pregnancy eugenic health examination in Yunnan province during 2013-2017. Descriptive analysis was conducted for HBsAg positive rate and its difference among various characteristics. The SPSS 22.0 software was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 2 180 841 rural childbearing age people were surveyed, the HBsAg positive rate before pregnancy was 3.13%(68 314/2 180 841) in Yunnan. And the HBsAg positive rate was 3.56% (37 694/1 057 376) in men, higher than that in women (2.73%, 30 620/1 123 465). The HBsAg positive rate was highest in age group 41-49 years (3.77%, 3 126/82 931). The HBsAg positive rate was higher in minority ethnic group (3.77%, 27 974/742 518) than in Han ethnicity group (2.81%, 40 024/1 425 870). Moreover, the highest HBsAg positive rate of was 8.20%(851/10 378) in Yao ethnic group. The people with education level of primary education had the highest HBsAg positive rate (3.97%, 17 294/435 219). The HBsAg positive rate was highest in Xishuangbanna Dai autonomous prefecture (6.65%, 3 875/58 232) in Yunnan. Moreover, the HBsAg positive population in severe poor area (3.32%, 19 755/595 665) was higher than those in less poor area (3.17%, 29 750/939 101) or normal areas (2.91%, 18 809/646 075). There was significant difference in HBsAg positive rate among populations in different age groups, ethnic groups, education level groups, areas and economic level groups (P<0.001). Conclusions: The HBsAg positive rate in rural childbearing age people in Yunnan was related to multi factors, including sex, age, ethnic group, education level, area and economic development level. The HBsAg positive rate was higher in men, older age and lower education level, minority ethnic group (especially in Yao ethnic group), from Xishuangbanna prefecture and the poor living conditions in childbearing age population.


Assuntos
Antígenos de Superfície da Hepatite B , Programas de Rastreamento , População Rural , Adolescente , Adulto , China , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Antígenos de Superfície da Hepatite B/análise , Humanos , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
8.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(7): e95-e112, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33000953

RESUMO

Background: There are well-documented disparities in lung cancer outcomes across populations. Lung cancer screening (LCS) has the potential to reduce lung cancer mortality, but for this benefit to be realized by all high-risk groups, there must be careful attention to ensuring equitable access to this lifesaving preventive health measure.Objectives: To outline current knowledge on disparities in eligibility criteria for, access to, and implementation of LCS, and to develop an official American Thoracic Society statement to propose strategies to optimize current screening guidelines and resource allocation for equitable LCS implementation and dissemination.Methods: A multidisciplinary panel with expertise in LCS, implementation science, primary care, pulmonology, health behavior, smoking cessation, epidemiology, and disparities research was convened. Participants reviewed available literature on historical disparities in cancer screening and emerging evidence of disparities in LCS.Results: Existing LCS guidelines do not consider racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and sex-based differences in smoking behaviors or lung cancer risk. Multiple barriers, including access to screening and cost, further contribute to the inequities in implementation and dissemination of LCS.Conclusions: This statement identifies the impact of LCS eligibility criteria on vulnerable populations who are at increased risk of lung cancer but do not meet eligibility criteria for screening, as well as multiple barriers that contribute to disparities in LCS implementation. Strategies to improve the selection and dissemination of LCS in vulnerable groups are described.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisão Compartilhada , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/diagnóstico , Fumar/etnologia , Definição da Elegibilidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Ciência da Implementação , Cobertura do Seguro , Marketing de Serviços de Saúde/métodos , Medicaid , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Encaminhamento e Consulta/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/epidemiologia , Fumar/terapia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Classe Social , Estados Unidos
10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33081120

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies of minority groups in times of emergency have tended to focus on risk reduction or on individual resilience, overlooking the community factors that could be bolstered to promote better health and safety outcomes. The current study aimed to examine the role of health-care services in the perceived community resilience of urban and suburban Arab communities in Israel during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHOD: The study included 196 adults age 17-76 years, who filled out on-line questionnaires in May 2020; 112 participants lived in an urban community and 84 lived in a suburban community. Community resilience was evaluated using the Conjoint Community Resiliency Assessment Measure (CCRAM), a validated five-factor multidimensional instrument. RESULTS: Residents of the suburban community reported higher community resilience than residents of the urban community. This difference was related to increased preparedness levels and strength of place attachment in the suburban community. Residents of suburban communities were also more satisfied and confident in health-care services than those of urban communities. Regression analysis showed that the satisfaction with primary health-care services, and not community type, significantly predicted community resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the pivotal role of primary health care in building community resilience of minority communities in times of emergency and routine.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Grupos Minoritários/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Humanos , Israel/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Satisfação do Paciente , Projetos Piloto , Adulto Jovem
11.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 154, 2020 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907581

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Arab ethnic minority makes up 21% of Israel's population, yet comprised just 8.8% of confirmed cases and 3.6% of deaths from COVID-19, despite their higher risk profile and greater burden of underlying illness. This paper presents differences in patterns of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 in the Arab, ultra-Orthodox and overall populations in Israel, and suggests possible reasons for the low rates of infection in the Arab population. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Israeli Ministry of Health's (MOH) open COVID-19 database, which includes information on 1270 localities and is updated daily. The database contains the number of COVID-19 diagnostic tests performed, the number of confirmed cases and deaths in Israel. RESULTS: In the first 4 months of Israel's COVID-19 outbreak, just 2060 cases were confirmed in the Arab population, comprising 8.8% of the 23,345 confirmed cases, or 2.38 times less than would be expected relative to the population size. In contrast, the ultra-Orthodox made up 30.1% of confirmed cases yet just 10.1% of the population. Confirmed case rate per 100,000 was twice as high in the general Jewish population compared to the Arab population. The Arab mortality rate was 0.57 per 100,000, compared to 3.37 in the overall population, and to 7.26 in the ultra-Orthodox community. We discuss possible reasons for this low morbidity and mortality including less use of nursing homes, and effective leadership which led to early closure of mosques and high adherence to social distancing measures, even during the month of Ramadan. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a disproportionate burden of underlying illness, the Arab population did not fulfil initial predictions during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak and maintained low numbers of infections and deaths. This contrasts with reports of increased mortality in ethnic minorities and economically disadvantaged populations in other countries, and with high rates of infection in the ultra-Orthodox sector in Israel. Effective leadership and cooperation between individuals and institutions, particularly engagement of community and religious leaders, can reduce a group's vulnerability and build resilience in an emergency situation such as the current pandemic.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Idoso , Árabes/psicologia , Árabes/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Israel/epidemiologia , Liderança , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários/psicologia , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Papel (figurativo)
12.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 153, 2020 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907584

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic hit Israel in late February 2020. The present study examines patterns of the first wave of Covid-19 morbidity in Israel at the macro level, during the period of late February to early June 2020, when the first wave has faded out. The analysis focuses on the significance of four sociodemographic variables: socioeconomic status, population density, rate of elderly population and minority status (Jewish / Arab identity) of the population in cities with 5000 residents or more. Additionally, we take a closer look into the association between morbidity rates and one SES component - home Internet access. METHODS: The article is a cross sectional study of morbidity rates, investigated on a residential community basis. Following the descriptive statistics, we move on to present multivariate analysis to explore associations between these variables and Covid-19 morbidity in Israel. RESULTS: Both the descriptive statistics and regressions show morbidity rates to be positively associated with population density. Socioeconomic status as well as the size of elderly population were both significantly related to morbidity, but only in Jewish communities. Interestingly, the association was inverse in both cases. i.e., the higher the SES the lower the morbidity and the larger the elderly population, the lower the community's morbidity. Another interesting result is that overall, morbidity rates in Jewish cities were consistently higher than in Arab communities. CONCLUSIONS: We attribute the low morbidity rates in communities with relatively small elderly populations to the exceptionally high fertility rates in ultra-orthodox communities that sustained increased rates of morbidity; the lower morbidity in Arab communities is attributed to several factors, including the spatial Jewish-Arab segregation.


Assuntos
Árabes/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Judeus/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Israel/epidemiologia , Morbidade/tendências , Densidade Demográfica , Classe Social
14.
Int J Psychol ; 55(5): 779-788, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940935

RESUMO

School belonging is pivotal in enabling sustained task engagement, yet minorities' belonging is contingent on the intergroup context. From a social identity approach, discrimination experiences elicit identity threat, undermining school belonging. Conversely, a positive diversity climate may shield belonging through protecting minority identities. This study addresses minority school belonging and task engagement from the interplay of identity threat and protection in diverse classrooms. We hypothesise that a positive diversity climate can buffer minority disengagement in response to discrimination by protecting school belonging. Drawing on Turkish and Moroccan minority samples (N = 1050) in 274 diverse classrooms in 52 Belgian secondary schools, we test multilevel models with school belonging as mediating process connecting minorities' engagement to the interplay of discrimination experiences with perceived diversity climate. Minority youth who experienced discrimination from teachers reported less school belonging, which in turn predicted lower task engagement. Conversely, minority perceptions of a positive diversity climate predicted more belonging. Moreover, perceived diversity climate buffered minority engagement against personal experiences of discrimination through protecting school belonging. Whereas discrimination experiences undermined minority school belonging and task engagement, minority perceptions of a positive diversity climate protected belonging and engagement against discrimination.


Assuntos
Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Identificação Social , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Racismo
15.
AIDS Patient Care STDS ; 34(9): 399-416, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32931317

RESUMO

HIV disproportionately impacts US racial and ethnic minorities but they participate in treatment and vaccine clinical trials at a lower rate than whites. To summarize barriers and facilitators to this participation we conducted a scoping review of the literature guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies published from January 2007 and September 2019 were reviewed. Thirty-one articles were identified from an initial pool of 325 records using three coders. All records were then assessed for barriers and facilitators and summarized. Results indicate that while racial and ethnic minority participation in these trials has increased over the past 10 years, rates still do not proportionately reflect their burden of HIV infection. While many of the barriers mirror those found in other disease clinical trials (e.g., cancer), HIV stigma is a unique and important barrier to participating in HIV clinical trials. Recommendations to improve recruitment and retention of racial and ethnic minorities include training health care providers on the importance of recruiting diverse participants, creating interdisciplinary research teams that better represent who is being recruited, and providing culturally competent trial designs. Despite the knowledge of how to better recruit racial and ethnic minorities, few interventions have been documented using these strategies. Based on the findings of this review, we recommend that future clinical trials engage community stakeholders in all stages of the research process through community-based participatory research approaches and promote culturally and linguistically appropriate recruitment and retention strategies for marginalized populations overly impacted by HIV.


Assuntos
Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Grupos Étnicos , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Grupos Minoritários , Participação do Paciente/psicologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Humanos , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Seleção de Pacientes/ética , Vacinas/administração & dosagem
16.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237026, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760109

RESUMO

The Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database has been used as a valuable source of occupational exposure information. Although good agreement between O*NET and self-reported measures has been reported, little attention has been paid to O*NET's utility in racially/ethnically diverse samples. Because O*NET offers job-level information, if different racial groups have different experiences under the same job title, O*NET measure would introduce systematic measurement error. Using the General Social Survey data (n = 7,041; 437 occupations), we compared self-report and O*NET-derived measures of job control in their associations with self-rated health (SRH) for non-Hispanic whites and racial/ethnic minorities. The correlation between self-report and O*NET job control measures were moderate for all gender-race groups (Pearson's r = .26 - .40). However, the logistic regression analysis showed that the association between O*NET job control and SRH was markedly weaker for racial/ethnic minorities than for non-Hispanic whites. The self-reported job control was associated with SRH in similar magnitudes for both groups, which precluded the possibility that job control was relevant only for non-Hispanic whites. O*NET may not capture job experience for racial/ethnic minorities, and thus its utility depends on the racial/ethnic composition of the sample.


Assuntos
Nível de Saúde , Ocupações , Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Bases de Dados Factuais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Exposição Ocupacional , Saúde do Trabalhador , Ocupações/estatística & dados numéricos , Autorrelato , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos
20.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235190, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32735593

RESUMO

To examine changes in U.S. medical school basic science faculty over the last 20 years (1998-2018), we undertook an observational study utilizing data from the American Association of Medical Colleges Faculty Roster. Rank (Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor), sex (Female), and race/ethnicity (Asian, Black or African American, Hispanic, Latino, Spanish Origin, or Multiple Race-Hispanic, and White) were analyzed; this reflected a population of 14,047 (1998) to 18,601 (2018) faculty. Summary percent of faculty in various gender, race/ethnicity origin categories were analyzed across years of the study using regression models. We found that females (24.47% to 35.32%) were underrepresented at all timepoints and a minority of faculty identified as Black or African American (1.57% to 1.99%), Hispanic, Latino, Spanish Origin, or Multiple Race-Hispanic (3.03% to 4.44%), or Asian (10.90% to 20.41%). The largest population at all time points was White Male Professors (30.53% to 20.85%), followed by White Male Associate Professors (15.67% to 9.34%), and White Male Assistant Professors (13.22% to 9.75%). Small statistically significant increases were observed among female faculty and faculty at multiple ranks who identified as Black or African American or Hispanic, Latino, Spanish Origin, or Multiple Race-Hispanic. We then completed secondary analyses looking at the interaction of race/ethnicity and Gender. We found: (1) a significant increase (p<0.0001) in both genders who identify as Asian although males had a higher rate of increase (6 point difference, p<0.0001); (2) a significant increase for Black or African American females (P<0.01) not found among males; (3) significant increases (p<0.0001) among both genders of faculty who identify as Hispanic, Latino, Spanish Origin, or Multiple Race-Hispanic although females had an approximately 1% higher rate of increase; and (4) among faculty who identify as White, males had a significant decrease (p<0.0001) while females demonstrated an increase (p<0.0001).


Assuntos
Diversidade Cultural , Docentes de Medicina/tendências , Faculdades de Medicina/tendências , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Faculdades de Medicina/organização & administração , Faculdades de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Estados Unidos
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