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2.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235250, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730256

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To elicit citizen preferences for national budget resource allocation in Uganda, examine respondents' preferences for health vis-à-vis other sectors, and compare these preferences with actual government budget allocations. METHODS: We surveyed 432 households in urban and rural areas of Mukono district in central Uganda.We elicited citizens' preferences for resource allocation across all sectors using a best-worst scaling (BWS) survey. The BWS survey consisted of 16 sectors corresponding to the Uganda national budget line items. Respondents chose, from a subset of four sectors across 16 choice tasks, which sectors they thought were most and least important to allocate resources to. We utilized the relative best-minus-worst score method and a conditional logistic regression to obtain ranked preferences for resource allocation across sectors. We then compared the respondents' preferences with actual government budget allocations. RESULTS: The health sector was the top ranked sector where 82% of respondents selected health as the most important sector for the government to fund, but it was ranked sixth in national budget allocation, encompassing 6.4% of the total budget. Beyond health, water and environment, agriculture, and social development sectors were largely underfunded compared to respondents' preferences. Works and transport, education, security, and justice, law and order received a larger share of the national budget compared to respondents' preferences. CONCLUSIONS: Among respondents from Mukono district in Uganda, we found that citizens' preferences for resource allocation across sectors, including for the health sector, were fundamentally misaligned with current government budget allocations. Evidence of respondents' strong preferences for allocating resources to the health sector could help stakeholders make the case for increased health sector allocations. Greater investment in health is not only essential to satisfy citizens' needs and preferences, but also to meet the government's health goals to improve health, strengthen health systems, and achieve universal health coverage.


Assuntos
Orçamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento do Consumidor/estatística & dados numéricos , Alocação de Recursos para a Atenção à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Governo Local , Alocação de Recursos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Orçamentos/organização & administração , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Alocação de Recursos para a Atenção à Saúde/organização & administração , Habitação/economia , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Setor Público/economia , Setor Público/organização & administração , Alocação de Recursos/organização & administração , Participação dos Interessados , Transportes/economia , Uganda , Assistência de Saúde Universal , Reforma Urbana/economia , Reforma Urbana/organização & administração , Adulto Jovem
3.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 39(9): 1592-1596, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32673101

RESUMO

Addressing patients' social needs is key to helping them heal from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), preventing the spread of the virus, and reducing its disproportionate burden on low-income communities and communities of color. New York City Health + Hospitals is the city's single largest health care provider to Medicaid and uninsured patients. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, NYC Health + Hospitals staff developed and executed a strategy to meet patients' intensified social needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. NYC Health + Hospitals identified food, housing, and income support as patients' most pressing needs and built programming to quickly connect patients to these resources. Although NYC Health + Hospitals was able to build on its existing foundation of strong social work support of patients, all health systems must prioritize the social needs of patients and their families to mitigate the damage of COVID-19. National and local leaders should accelerate change by developing robust policy approaches to redesign the social and economic system that reinforces structural inequity and exacerbates crises such as COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Pandemias/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Quarentena/organização & administração , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/organização & administração , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Masculino , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Cidade de Nova Iorque , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pobreza/economia , Saúde Pública , Apoio Social
5.
Health Educ Behav ; 47(4): 519-524, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32408770

RESUMO

In this Perspective, we build on social justice and emancipatory traditions within the field of health education, and the field's long-standing commitment to building knowledge and shared power to promote health equity, to examine lessons and opportunities for health education emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic. Examining patterns that emerged as the pandemic unfolded in Metropolitan Detroit, with disproportionate impacts on African American and low-income communities, we consider conditions that contributed to excess exposure, mortality, and reduced access to critical health protective resources. Using a life course framework, we consider enduring impacts of the pandemic for health equity. Finally, we suggest several strategic actions in three focal areas-environment, occupation, and housing-that can be taken by health educators working in partnership with community members, researchers, and decision makers, using, for example, a community-based participatory research approach, to reduce adverse impacts of COVID-19 and promote long-term equity in health.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Equidade em Saúde/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Determinantes Sociais da Saúde/etnologia , Betacoronavirus , Meio Ambiente , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Michigan/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Fatores Socioeconômicos
8.
Am J Public Health ; 110(5): 650-654, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32191518

RESUMO

Transgender women (i.e., persons who were assigned male sex at birth but who live and identify as female) experience forms of discrimination that limit their access to stable housing and contribute to high rates of incarceration; once incarcerated, the approaches used to assign them housing within the jail or prison place them at risk for abuse, rape, and other outcomes. Yet, a paucity of studies explores the implications of carceral housing assignments for transgender women.Whether the approaches used to assign housing in jails and prisons violate the rights of incarcerated transgender persons has been argued before the US federal courts under Section 1983 of the US Constitution, which allows persons who were raped while incarcerated to claim a violation of their Eighth Amendment rights.Reforms and policy recommendations have been attempted; however, the results have been mixed and the public health implications have received limited attention.


Assuntos
Habitação/organização & administração , Prisões/organização & administração , Pessoas Transgênero , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Violência
9.
PLoS One ; 15(1): e0227298, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945092

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Substance use is disproportionately high among people who are homeless or vulnerably housed. We performed a systematic overview of reviews examining the effects of selected harm reduction and pharmacological interventions on the health and social well-being of people who use substances, with a focus on homeless populations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Joanna Briggs Institute EBP, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and DARE for systematic reviews from inception to August 2019. We conducted a grey literature search and hand searched reference lists. We selected reviews that synthesized evidence on supervised consumption facilities, managed alcohol programs and pharmacological interventions for opioid use disorders. We abstracted data specific to homeless or vulnerably housed populations. We assessed certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Our search identified 483 citations and 30 systematic reviews met all inclusion criteria, capturing the results from 442 primary studies. This included three reviews on supervised consumption facilities, 24 on pharmacological interventions, and three on managed alcohol programs. Supervised consumption facilities decreased lethal overdoses and other high risk behaviours without any significant harm, and improved access to care. Pharmaceutical interventions reduced mortality, morbidity, and substance use, but the impact on retention in treatment, mental illness and access to care was variable. Managed alcohol programs reduced or stabilized alcohol consumption. Few studies on managed alcohol programs reported deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Substance use is a common chronic condition impacting homeless populations. Supervised consumption facilities reduce overdose and improve access to care, while pharmacological interventions may play a role in reducing harms and addressing other morbidity. High quality evidence on managed alcohol programs is limited.


Assuntos
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/reabilitação , Overdose de Drogas/prevenção & controle , Pessoas em Situação de Rua/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/reabilitação , Populações Vulneráveis/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/epidemiologia , Overdose de Drogas/epidemiologia , Redução do Dano , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas em Situação de Rua/psicologia , Habitação/organização & administração , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Antagonistas de Entorpecentes/uso terapêutico , Estudos Observacionais como Assunto , Tratamento de Substituição de Opiáceos/métodos , Tratamento de Substituição de Opiáceos/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto , Resultado do Tratamento , Populações Vulneráveis/psicologia
10.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 15(1): e1719002, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31973667

RESUMO

Purpose: Self-managed institutional homeless programmes started as an alternative to regular shelters. Using institutional theory as a lens, we aim to explore the experiences of stakeholders with the institutional aspects of a self-managed programs.Method: The data we analysed (56 interviews, both open and semi-structured) were generated in a longitudinal participatory case-study into JES, a self-managed homeless shelter. In our analysis we went back and forth between our empirical data and theory, using a combination of systematic coding and interpretation. Participants were involved in all stages of the research.Results: Our analysis revealed similarities between JES and regular shelters, stemming from institutional similarities. Participants shared space and facilities with sixteen people, which caused an ongoing discussion on (enforcement of) rules. Participants loathed lack of private space. However, participants experienced freedom of choice over both their own life and management of JES and structures were experienced more fluid than in regular care. Some structures also appeared stimulated self-management.Conclusion: Our analysis showed how an institutional context influences self-management and suggested opportunities for introducing freedom and fluidity in institutional care.


Assuntos
Pessoas em Situação de Rua/psicologia , Habitação/organização & administração , Autogestão/métodos , Participação dos Interessados/psicologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Países Baixos
11.
Health Serv Res ; 55(3): 357-366, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31989595

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of transition challenges on the success and timeliness of transitions from institutions to community living for long-stay participants in the Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration and determine whether outcomes vary by age and disability. DATA SOURCE: Secondary data on transition challenges for individuals enrolled in Connecticut's MFP program between December 2008 and December 2017. STUDY DESIGN: Challenges were analyzed for older adults, people with mental health disability, and people with physical disability. Bivariate and multivariate analyses investigated which transition challenges and selected demographic variables predict transition versus closure and length of transition period for each group. DATA EXTRACTION METHODS: The sample includes 3506 persons who attempted transition from institutions to community living and whose case concluded with transition or closure from 2015 to 2017. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The association between most transition challenges and the ability of long-stay institutional residents to return to the community, and to do so in a timely manner, varies significantly among older adults and younger persons with physical or mental health disabilities. For all groups, however, consumer engagement challenges predicted closure without transition (OR: 1.3-3.9) and housing challenges predicted longer transition periods (84-132 days). Length of institutional stay was associated with both outcomes for older adults and persons with physical disability. Other challenges, such as issues with services and supports, differed among the three groups on both outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of the effects of transition challenges on success and timeliness of transition for each group allows program managers and health and service providers to focus resources on addressing the most serious challenges. Particular emphasis should be placed on consumer engagement and housing challenges, and on targeting persons for transition early in their institutional stay. Federal and state transition programs can benefit by individualizing supports for residents to yield successful outcomes.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Habitação/organização & administração , Instituições Residenciais/organização & administração , Serviço Social/organização & administração , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Connecticut , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Fatores de Tempo
12.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e042647, 2020 12 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33384398

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 outbreak in Singapore has largely centred around migrant worker dormitories, comprising over 90% of all cases in the country. Dormitories are home to a culturally and linguistically distinct, low-income population, without on-site healthcare after-hours. The primary objective of this study was to assess the engagement and utilisation of a simple, low-cost, accessible, mobile health solution for remote self-reporting of vital parameters in dormitory residents with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective review of medical care. SETTING: Two large migrant worker dormitories with a combined population of 31 546. PARTICIPANTS: All COVID-19-affected residents housed in dormitories during the study period. INTERVENTION: All residents were taught to use a chat assistant to self-report their temperature, heart rate and oxygen saturations. Results flowed into a dashboard, which alerted clinicians of abnormal results. OUTCOMES: The primary outcome measure was engagement rate. This was derived from the total number of residents who registered on the platform over the total number of COVID-19-affected residents in the dormitories during the study period. Secondary outcome measures included outcomes of the alerts and subsequent escalations of care. RESULTS: 800 of the 931 COVID-19-affected residents (85.9%) engaged with the platform to log a total of 12 511 discrete episodes of vital signs. Among 372 abnormal readings, 96 teleconsultations were initiated, of which 7 (1.8%) were escalated to emergency services and 18 (4.9%) were triaged to earlier physical medical review on-site. CONCLUSIONS: A chat-assistant-based self-reporting platform is an effective and safe community-based intervention to monitor marginalised populations with distinct cultural and linguistic backgrounds, living communally and affected by COVID-19. Lessons learnt from this approach may be applied to develop safe and cost-effective telemedicine solutions across similar settings.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Consulta Remota , Telemedicina , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , /epidemiologia , Análise Custo-Benefício , Autoavaliação Diagnóstica , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Intervenção Baseada em Internet , Masculino , Consulta Remota/economia , Consulta Remota/métodos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Singapura/epidemiologia , Marginalização Social , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/organização & administração
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31752269

RESUMO

The purpose of this study is to identify the willingness of pensioners to move from an apartment/house to an apartment/house located in a housing estate specifically designed for senior citizens. As such, this article forms part of the discussion of the housing needs of senior citizens, their preferences and willingness to change their place of residence. The research covers a group of post-working-age people residing in the region of Lower Silesia in south-western Poland. Various research methods were used in the study, including a written questionnaire and its statistical analysis. The research focuses on analysing both the preferences of potential buyers of apartments for seniors and seniors' willingness to change their place of residence in order to purchase an apartment adapted to their mobility needs (free from architectural and technical barriers), taking into account the respondent's age and housing situation. The research indicates that city residents are significantly more often willing to change their current place of residence for one adapted to the needs of persons with disabilities than residents of rural areas. In turn, those living with their husband or wife are significantly more likely to state that special offers for seniors do not need to be developed than those living alone or with other family members or in a social care home. No relationship was found between the age of a respondent and the desire to move to a new house. However, younger seniors are more open to moving to housing estates offering facilities for the elderly who require additional care.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/psicologia , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso Fragilizado/psicologia , Idoso Fragilizado/estatística & dados numéricos , Habitação/organização & administração , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polônia , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1071, 2019 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31395051

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Household smoke-free home rules cannot fully protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke (SHS) if they live in multi-unit housing (MUH). Instead, property-level smoke-free policies are needed to prevent SHS incursion into apartment units and to keep common areas smoke-free. Smoke-free policies are usually at the discretion of property management companies and owners within the context of market-rate and privately-owned affordable housing in the U.S. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews on the policy development, implementation and enforcement experiences of 21 different privately-owned affordable housing management companies were conducted with representatives from properties in North Carolina and Georgia who had established smoke-free policies before 2016. RESULTS: The decision to adopt was typically made by corporate leadership, board members, owners or property managers, with relatively little resident input. Policy details were influenced by property layout, perceptions of how best to facilitate compliance and enforcement, and cost of creating a designated smoking area. Policies were implemented through inclusion in leases, lease addenda or house rules with 6 months' notice most common. Participants thought having a written policy, the norms and culture of the housing community, public norms for smoke-free environments, and resident awareness of the rules and their consequences, aided with compliance. Violations were identified through routine inspections of units and resident reporting. Resident denial and efforts to hide smoking were shared as challenges to enforcement, along with a perception that concrete evidence would be needed in eviction court and that simply the smell of SHS was insufficient evidence of violation. Over half had terminated leases or evicted residents due to violations of the smoke-free policy. The most common benefits cited were reduced turnover cost and time, and lower vacancy rates. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the smoke-free policy process in privately-owned affordable housing can help practitioners encourage policies within subsidized housing contexts. The study identified salient benefits (e.g., reduced cost, time, and vacancies) that can be highlighted when encouraging MUH partners to adopt policies. Additionally, study findings provide guidance on what to consider when designing smoke-free policies (e.g., layout, costs), and provide insights into how to enhance compliance (e.g., resident awareness) and manage enforcement (e.g., routine inspections).


Assuntos
Habitação/organização & administração , Setor Privado , Política Antifumo , Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Custos e Análise de Custo , Feminino , Georgia , Habitação/economia , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , North Carolina , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Health Polit Policy Law ; 44(6): 919-935, 2019 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408877

RESUMO

States and policy makers have expressed a strong interest in using Medicaid to address social determinants of health (SDOH). While this approach holds promise for improving outcomes and reducing costs, using Medicaid to pay for services outside the medical system creates challenges. This article examines efforts to address SDOH in Oregon, which, as part of its 2012 Medicaid waiver, incorporated health-related services that lacked billing or encounter codes and were not included in Oregon's Medicaid state plan as a strategy to improve outcomes and control costs. We examine the varieties of health-related services that were used and describe the specific challenges in deploying and paying for these services. We conclude with lessons from Oregon that can help states and the federal government as they work to address SDOH.


Assuntos
Assistência Integral à Saúde/organização & administração , Medicaid/organização & administração , Determinantes Sociais da Saúde , Serviço Social/organização & administração , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Meio Ambiente , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Promoção da Saúde/organização & administração , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Oregon , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos
16.
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law ; 47(3): 299-306, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31186363

RESUMO

Homeless women veterans face unique vulnerability and significant mental health needs; it is important for their housing to include gender-specific safety measures. Providers of supportive housing for veterans can take important steps to accommodate the women they serve, including providing separate housing facilities or areas for women. More than half of all homeless women veterans were sexually assaulted during their military service, and many exhibit mental health disabilities as a result, which provides a strong legal basis for requiring gender-based accommodations. While significant progress has been made in addressing the needs of veterans who were sexually assaulted during their military service, the unique needs of homeless women veterans are still often overlooked. This oversight has consequences, particularly in the permanent supportive housing context, where male veterans significantly outnumber female veterans. Currently, there are no required minimum standards or safeguards for serving women veterans in these facilities, and most facilities provide no appropriate gender-specific accommodations. This failure persists despite the significant prior history of sexual assaults among this population and their extremely small number in veteran-only housing. Without basic gender-specific safeguards, permanent supportive housing facilities could worsen the mental health of homeless women veterans and expose them to further harm.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/legislação & jurisprudência , Pessoas em Situação de Rua/psicologia , Habitação/legislação & jurisprudência , Habitação/organização & administração , Transtornos Mentais/reabilitação , Veteranos/psicologia , Mulheres/psicologia , Feminino , Violência de Gênero/prevenção & controle , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Humanos , Legislação como Assunto , Instituições Residenciais/legislação & jurisprudência , Instituições Residenciais/organização & administração , Segurança , Delitos Sexuais/prevenção & controle , Assédio Sexual/prevenção & controle
17.
Health Soc Care Community ; 27(4): e246-e256, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30848020

RESUMO

This is a cross-sectional study of unmet needs of persons enrolled in Australia's Partners in Recovery (PIR) initiative. It aimed to explore the unmet needs reported by persons with a severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) and to examine the associations between unmet accommodation needs and other unmet needs. The study was undertaken in the Gippsland region of Victoria from February to May 2015. Data were collected from the administrative database for the PIR initiative in Gippsland, which was held by the Gippsland Primary Health Network. Data on unmet needs, as measured by the Camberwell Assessment of Needs Short Appraisal Schedule, were analysed using proportions and logistic regression. Psychological distress, daytime activities, company/someone to spend time with and employment and volunteering were the most commonly reported unmet needs. Participants with unmet accommodation needs were less likely to receive information on their condition or access other services. They also had unmet needs relating to food, money, transport, childcare, looking after home, physical health, psychological distress and self-care. Supported accommodation may not be enough for persons with SPMI who have poor functioning skills and are incapable of looking after themselves. Services such as Housing First that have shown promising results need to be part of a comprehensive strategy to care for persons with severe and enduring mental illness.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Adulto , Doença Crônica , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Nível de Saúde , Habitação/organização & administração , Humanos , Renda , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Autocuidado/métodos , Apoio Social , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Vitória
18.
Soc Work ; 64(2): 147-156, 2019 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30839086

RESUMO

Domestic violence (DV) shelters provide safety for survivors to consider their options and heal from abuse. Unfortunately, survivors have reported negative experiences associated with shelter rule enforcement. Rules, such as curfew, decreased access to community social networks; and staff's rule enforcement may trigger survivors' past experiences with abusive control and structural racism. Rule enforcement may deter safe, trusting relationships between staff and residents. Statewide DV coalitions have been innovation leaders in shelter rules reduction efforts over the past decade. Seven DV shelter directors and coalition trainers with expertise implementing reduced-rule shelter models were interviewed for this study. Interview data were then analyzed using modified constructivist grounded theory methods. A three-stage implementation process emerged from the data. The initial stage highlighted efforts to create an organizational vision rooted in shared values. Shelters then intentionally focused on enhancing organizational capacity through staff development and team building. Third, rule-reduction practices were enacted through specific shelter policies and staff practices. Findings have broader implications for social work organizations also implementing anti-oppressive, survivor-centered, trauma-informed approaches, as this process involves considerable intention, training, and resources beyond services as usual. Social workers can support these efforts through student training, program development, and research efforts.


Assuntos
Violência Doméstica , Habitação/organização & administração , Serviço Social , Sobreviventes , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Cultura Organizacional , Inovação Organizacional , Pesquisa Qualitativa
20.
Health Promot J Austr ; 30(3): 344-349, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30220094

RESUMO

ISSUE ADDRESSED: Housing renewal is a common urban housing and development strategy internationally. An intended result is increased social inclusion and well-being of residents through public housing de-concentration. In this study, we examined challenges encountered during the process of housing renewal from the perspectives of community-based staff and volunteers. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with housing and community workers, service managers and community volunteers who were working with residents experiencing housing renewal in an outer metropolitan estate in New South Wales. We analysed the data thematically. RESULTS: Seventeen participants were interviewed in a mix of individual and group interviews. Housing workers uncovered substantial resident health and social support needs during housing assessments. Promoting access to services and supporting the mental health and social connectedness of residents into the future were seen as key goals and challenges. However, lack of clarity on which services and community resources would exist in the new neighbourhood at the completion of the renewal project made this more difficult, particularly when supporting the social housing residents who were remaining in the changing community. CONCLUSIONS: Supporting the mental health and well-being of residents experiencing housing renewal is an important role of community-based workers, volunteers and service providers. This includes facilitating access to health care and other services and promoting social connectedness in the emerging community. Increased clarity on what community resources and services will be available subsequent to redevelopment will assist in these aims. SO WHAT?: Early knowledge of what community resources and services will be in place long term in communities undergoing housing renewal will allow staff and volunteers to better support the health and well-being of residents.


Assuntos
Habitação/organização & administração , Saúde Mental , Características de Residência , Reforma Urbana/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , New South Wales , Otimismo , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Meio Social , Facilitação Social , Apoio Social
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