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3.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 42(2): 364-368, 2021 Feb 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33626629

RESUMO

Medical care cascade, a population based method for tracking disease progression from diagnosis to cure, is a framework for monitoring gaps between current health service strategy and achievement of health goals. This paper summarizes the application of medical care cascade in hepatitis C prevention and treatment to facilitate the improvement in this field.


Assuntos
Hepatite C , Progressão da Doença , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Humanos
4.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-48035

RESUMO

Muitos países de baixa e renda reduziram o sofrimento causado pela hepatite C graças a um maior acesso a testes e tratamento


Assuntos
Hepatite C/diagnóstico , Organização Mundial da Saúde , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle
5.
Liver Int ; 41(4): 649-655, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33486885

RESUMO

The World Health Organization (WHO) targets for eliminating HCV by 2030 may be overambitious for many high-income countries. Recent analyses (ie, data from 2017 to 2019) show that only 11 countries are on track for meeting WHO's elimination targets. For a country to be truly on track, it is important that the majority of infected individuals be identified and treated. There is still a need for country and population-specific evaluations within the different HCV screening and treatment strategies available, in order to assess their cost-effectiveness and sustainability and support an evidence-based policy for HCV elimination. Any health policy model is affected by the diversity and quality of the available data and by gaps in data. Given the differences among countries, comparing progress based on fixed global targets will not necessarily be suitable in the same measure for each country. In a recent document, the European Collaborators of Polaris Observatory provide insight into the limitations of the current WHO targets. The absolute targets identified by each country in accordance with the measures set by WHO would be essential in reaching the HCV elimination. All analytic models to assess the progress towards HCV elimination are based on projections to 2030 not including the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on hepatitis-related services. With specific regard to the achievement of WHO hepatitis elimination goals, all measures that will be put in place during and after COVID-19 pandemic could be transferred in increasing diagnosis and linkage to care of people with hepatitis.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Organização Mundial da Saúde
7.
Recent Results Cancer Res ; 217: 107-140, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33200364

RESUMO

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most prevalent cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Hepatocelular , Hepatite C , Neoplasias Hepáticas , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/prevenção & controle , Hepacivirus , Hepatite C/complicações , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/prevenção & controle
9.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33326051

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a strategy to eliminate hepatitis B, C, and D and defined indicators to monitor the progress. The Robert Koch Institute organized an interdisciplinary working meeting in 2019 to identify data sources and gaps. OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to network, to create an overview of the data sources available in Germany on hepatitis B and C, and to discuss how to construct indicators. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We extracted the WHO indicators relevant for Germany and determined how they can be constructed on the basis of available data. Stakeholders from public health services, clinics, laboratories, health insurance companies, research institutes, data holders, and registries attended a workshop and discussed methods of constructing the indicators for which data are lacking. Data sources and data were evaluated and prioritized with regard to their quality and completeness. RESULTS: Indicators on prevalence, incidence, prevention, testing and diagnosis, treatment, cure, burden of sequelae, and mortality for the general population can be constructed using secondary data such as diagnosis, health service, and registry data, data from laboratories and hospitals as well as population-based studies. Data sources for vulnerable groups are limited to studies among drug users, men who have sex with men, and about HIV coinfected patients. Data for migrants, prisoners, and sex workers are largely lacking as well as data on burden of disease from chronic viral hepatitis in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: We identified data sources, their limitations, and methods for construction for all selected indicators. The next step is to convert the ideas developed into concrete projects with individual stakeholders.


Assuntos
Hepatite B , Hepatite C , Hepatite Viral Humana , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Hepatite B/diagnóstico , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/diagnóstico , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(12): e2030427, 2020 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33337496

RESUMO

Importance: In 2019, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection contributed to more deaths in the US than 60 other notifiable infectious diseases combined. The incidence of and mortality associated with HCV infection are highest among American Indian and Alaska Native individuals. Objective: To evaluate the association of the Cherokee Nation (CN) HCV elimination program with each element of the cascade of care: HCV screening, linkage to care, treatment, and cure. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used data from the CN Health Services (CNHS), which serves approximately 132 000 American Indian and Alaska Native individuals residing in the 14-county CN reservation in rural northeastern Oklahoma. Data from the first 22 months of implementation (November 1, 2015, to August 31, 2017) of an HCV elimination program were compared with those from the pre-elimination program period (October 1, 2012, to October 31, 2015). The analysis included American Indian and Alaska Native individuals aged 20 to 69 years who accessed care through the CNHS between October 1, 2012, and August 31, 2017. Cure data were recorded through April 15, 2018. Exposure: The CN HCV elimination program. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcomes were the proportions of the population screened for HCV, diagnosed with current HCV infection, linked to care, treated, and cured during the initial 22 months of the elimination program period and the pre-elimination program period. Data from electronic health records and an HCV treatment database were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of HCV infection in this population was estimated using bayesian analyses. Results: Among the 74 039 eligible individuals accessing care during the elimination program period, the mean (SD) age was 36.0 (13.5) years and 55.9% were women. From the pre-elimination program period to the elimination program period, first-time HCV screening coverage increased from 20.9% to 38.2%, and identification of current HCV infection and treatment in newly screened individuals increased from a mean (SD) of 170 (40) per year to 244 (4) per year and a mean of 95 (133) per year to 215 (9) per year, respectively. During the implementation period, of the 793 individuals with current HCV infection accessing the CNHS, 664 were evaluated (83.7%), 394 (59.3%) initiated treatment, and 335 (85.0%) had documented cure. In less than 2 years, the 85% 3-year goal was reached for cure (85.0%), and the goal for linkage to care was nearly reached (83.7%), whereas screening (44.1%) and treatment initiation (59.3%) required more time and resources. Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study found that after 22 months of implementation, the CNHS community-based HCV elimination program was associated with an improved cascade of care. The facilitators and lessons learned in this program may be useful to other organizations planning similar programs.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças , Hepatite C , Programas de Rastreamento , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Erradicação de Doenças/métodos , Erradicação de Doenças/organização & administração , Erradicação de Doenças/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hepatite C/etnologia , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Programas de Rastreamento/organização & administração , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/métodos , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 806, 2020 Oct 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129259

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of and risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among incarcerated people who inject drugs (PWID) in Iran in 2015-16. METHODS: The required data was collected from a database provided by Iranian national bio-behavioral surveillance surveys (BBSSs) on 11,988 prisoners selected from among 55 prisons in 19 provinces in 2015-16. The data on demographics and behavioral variables were collected through interviews and the status of exposure to HBV and HCV were determined using ELISA blood test. A total of 1387 individuals with a history of drug injection in their lifetime were enrolled into the study. Data were analyzed using the survey package in Stata/SE software, Version 14.0. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used to investigate the relationships between risk factors and outcomes. RESULTS: The mean age of the incarcerated PWID was 36.83 ± 8.13 years. Of all the studied subjects, 98.46% were male and 50.97% were married. The prevalence of HCV and HBV among the subjects were 40.52 and 2.46%, respectively. The prevalence of HCV was associated with age ≥ 30 years, being single, illiteracy and low level of education, prison term> 5 years, history of piercing, and extramarital sex in lifetime (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HCV is alarmingly high. In general, it is recommended to adopt measures to screen and treat patients with HCV and vaccinat incarcerated PWID without a history of vaccination against HBV.


Assuntos
Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Prisioneiros , Abuso de Substâncias por Via Intravenosa/complicações , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hepacivirus , Hepatite B/complicações , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Vírus da Hepatite B , Hepatite C/complicações , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Prevalência , Prisioneiros/estatística & dados numéricos , Prisões , Fatores de Risco , Vacinas contra Hepatite Viral/administração & dosagem
12.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs ; 81(5): 556-560, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33028465

RESUMO

People who use drugs (PWUD) face concurrent public health emergencies from overdoses, HIV, hepatitis C, and COVID-19, leading to an unprecedented syndemic. Responses to PWUD that go beyond treatment--such as decriminalization and providing a safe supply of pharmaceutical-grade drugs--could reduce impacts of this syndemic. Solutions already implemented for COVID-19, such as emergency safe-supply prescribing and providing housing to people experiencing homelessness, must be sustained once COVID-19 is contained. This pandemic is not only a public health crisis but also a chance to develop and maintain equitable and sustainable solutions to the harms associated with the criminalization of drug use.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Sindemia , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Criminosos , Overdose de Drogas/complicações , Overdose de Drogas/epidemiologia , Overdose de Drogas/prevenção & controle , Serviços Médicos de Emergência , Infecções por HIV/complicações , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/complicações , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Habitação , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Prescrições , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/prevenção & controle , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , United States Public Health Service
13.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1393, 2020 Sep 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32919467

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Seine-Saint-Denis is a deprived departement (French administrative unit) in the North-East of Paris, France, hosting the majority of South Asian migrants in France. In recent years, the number of migrants from Pakistan, which has a high prevalence of hepatitis C globally, increased. As a corollary, this study addressed the high proportion of Pakistani patients in the infectious diseases clinic of a local hospital, diagnosed with hepatitis C, but also hepatitis B and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). It explored genealogies and beliefs about hepatitis and HIV transmission, including community, sexual and blood risk behaviours. The aim was to understand the ways these risk factors reduce or intensify both en route and once in France, in order to devise specific forms of community health intervention. METHODS: The study took place at Avicenne University-Hospital in Seine-Saint-Denis, and its environs, between July and September 2018. The design of the study was qualitative, combining semi-structured interviews, a focus group discussion, and ethnographic observations. The sample of Pakistani participants was selected from those followed-up for chronic hepatitis C, B, and/or HIV at Avicenne, and who had arrived after 2010 in Seine-Saint-Denis. RESULTS: Thirteen semi-structured interviews were conducted, until saturation was reached. All participants were men from rural Punjab province. Most took the Eastern Mediterranean human smuggling route. Findings suggest that vulnerabilities to hepatitis and HIV transmission, originating in Pakistan, are intensified along the migration route and perpetuated in France. Taboo towards sexuality, promiscuity in cohabitation conditions, lack of knowledge about transmission were amongst the factors increasing vulnerabilities. Participants suggested a number of culturally-acceptable health promotion interventions in the community, such as outreach awareness and testing campaigns in workplaces, health promotion and education in mosques, as well as web-based sexual health promotion tools to preserve anonymity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the need to look at specific groups at risk, related to their countries of origin. In-depth understandings of such groups, using interdisciplinary approaches such as were employed here, can allow for culturally adapted, tailored interventions. However, French colour-blind policies do not easily permit such kinds of targeted approach and this limitation requires further debate.


Assuntos
Emigração e Imigração , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Promoção da Saúde , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Assunção de Riscos , Migrantes , Adulto , Cultura , Grupos Étnicos , França , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Hepacivirus , Hepatite B Crônica/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C Crônica/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Paquistão , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Fatores de Risco , Comportamento Sexual , População Suburbana , Adulto Jovem
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(34): 1161-1165, 2020 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32853186

RESUMO

In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) set hepatitis elimination targets of 90% reduction in incidence and 65% reduction in mortality worldwide by 2030 (1). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection prevalences are high in Uzbekistan, which lacks funding for meeting WHO's targets. In the absence of large financial donor programs for eliminating HBV and HCV infections, insufficient funding is an important barrier to achieving those targets in Uzbekistan and other low- and middle-income countries. A pilot program using a catalytic funding model, including simplified test-and-treat strategies, was launched in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, in December 2019. Catalytic funding is a mechanism by which the total cost of a program is paid for by multiple funding sources but is begun with upfront capital that is considerably less than the total program cost. Ongoing costs, including those for testing and treatment, are covered by payments from 80% of the enrolled patients, who purchase medications at a small premium that subsidizes the 20% who cannot afford treatment and therefore receive free medication. The 1-year pilot program set a target of testing 250,000 adults for HBV and HCV infection and treating all patients who have active infection, including those who had a positive test result for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and those who had a positive test result for HCV core antigen. During the first 3 months of the program, 24,821 persons were tested for HBV and HCV infections. Among those tested, 1,084 (4.4%) had positive test results for HBsAg, and 1,075 (4.3%) had positive test results for HCV antibody (anti-HCV). Among those infected, 275 (25.4%) initiated treatment for HBV, and 163 (15.2%) initiated treatment for HCV, of whom 86.5% paid for medications and 13.5% received medications at no cost. Early results demonstrate willingness of patients to pay for treatment if costs are low, which can offset elimination costs. However, improvements across the continuum of care are needed to recover the upfront investment. Lessons learned from this program, including the effectiveness of using simplified test-and-treat guidelines, general practitioners in lieu of specialist physicians, and innovative financing to reduce costs, can guide similar initiatives in other countries and help curb the global epidemic of viral hepatitis, especially among low- and middle-income countries.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças/economia , Saúde Global/economia , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Modelos Econométricos , Adulto , Feminino , Objetivos , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Prevalência , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Uzbequistão/epidemiologia , Organização Mundial da Saúde
15.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(10): 948-953, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730784

RESUMO

In 2019, a Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology Commission on accelerating the elimination of viral hepatitis reported on the status of 11 viral hepatitis policy indicators in 66 countries and territories with the heaviest burden by global region. Policies were reported as being either in place, in development, or not in place. This study uses the Commission findings to estimate hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) policy scores and rankings for these 66 countries and territories. We applied a multiple correspondence analysis technique to reduce data on policy indicators into a weighted summary for the HBV and HCV policies. We calculated HBV and HCV policy scores for each country. Countries and territories that received higher scores had more policies in place and in development than did countries with lower scores. The highest scoring country for HBV was Australia, whereas Somalia had the lowest score. For the HCV policy score, Australia and New Zealand had perfect scores, whereas Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen had the lowest scores, all having no policy indicators in place.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças/economia , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Austrália/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Erradicação de Doenças/legislação & jurisprudência , Carga Global da Doença/economia , Política de Saúde/economia , Política de Saúde/tendências , Hepacivirus/isolamento & purificação , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite B/virologia , Vírus da Hepatite B/isolamento & purificação , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/virologia , Humanos , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia , Somália/epidemiologia , Sudão/epidemiologia , Iêmen/epidemiologia
16.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(10): 940-947, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730785

RESUMO

Major gains in reducing the burden of hepatitis C are now possible because of the discovery of a cure. The prevention of premature deaths and increased workforce participation among people who are cured are likely to provide substantial indirect economic benefits. We developed an investment case for hepatitis C for the six WHO world regions, which, to our knowledge, is the first to consider both indirect and direct economic benefits in this context. Scaling up of testing and treatment to reach the 2030 WHO hepatitis C elimination targets was estimated to prevent 2·1 million (95% credible interval 1·3-3·2 million) hepatitis C-related deaths and 10 million (4-14 million) new hepatitis C virus infections globally between 2018 and 2030. This elimination strategy was estimated to cost US$41·5 billion (33·1-48·7 billion) in testing, treatment, and health care between 2018 and 2030 ($23·4 billion more than the status quo scenario of no testing or treatment scale up), with a global average of $885 (654-1189) per disability-adjusted life-year averted at 2030. Compared with the status quo scenario, the elimination scenario generated $46·1 billion (35·9-53·8 billion) in cumulative productivity gains by 2030. These indirect costs made elimination cost-saving by 2027, with a net economic benefit of $22·7 billion (17·1-27·9 billion) by 2030. This model shows that countries might be underestimating the true burden of hepatitis C and will benefit from investing in elimination.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças/economia , Saúde Global/economia , Hepatite C/tratamento farmacológico , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Análise Custo-Benefício , Erradicação de Doenças/métodos , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Hepacivirus/genética , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/transmissão , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Teóricos , Mortalidade Prematura/tendências , Prevalência , Vírus de RNA/genética , Recursos Humanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Organização Mundial da Saúde/organização & administração
17.
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 5(10): 927-939, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730786

RESUMO

WHO has set global targets for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C as a public health threat by 2030. However, investment in elimination programmes remains low. To help drive political commitment and catalyse domestic and international financing, we have developed a global investment framework for the elimination of hepatitis B and hepatitis C. The global investment framework presented in this Health Policy paper outlines national and international activities that will enable reductions in hepatitis C incidence and mortality, and identifies potential sources of funding and tools to help countries build the economic case for investing in national elimination activities. The goal of this framework is to provide a way for countries, particularly those with minimal resources, to gain the substantial economic benefit and cost savings that come from investing in hepatitis C elimination.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças/métodos , Saúde Global/economia , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Redução de Custos/economia , Erradicação de Doenças/economia , Feminino , Saúde Global/normas , Política de Saúde/economia , Política de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Período Periparto , Gravidez , Saúde Pública/economia , Saúde Pública/normas , Vacinação/normas , Organização Mundial da Saúde/organização & administração
18.
MMWR Recomm Rep ; 69(6): 1-8, 2020 07 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32701942

RESUMO

Exposure to hepatitis viruses is a recognized occupational risk for health care personnel (HCP). This report establishes new CDC guidance that includes recommendations for a testing algorithm and clinical management for HCP with potential occupational exposure to hepatitis C virus (HCV). Baseline testing of the source patient and HCP should be performed as soon as possible (preferably within 48 hours) after the exposure. A source patient refers to any person receiving health care services whose blood or other potentially infectious material is the source of the HCP's exposure. Two options are recommended for testing the source patient. The first option is to test the source patient with a nucleic acid test (NAT) for HCV RNA. This option is preferred, particularly if the source patient is known or suspected to have recent behaviors that increase risk for HCV acquisition (e.g., injection drug use within the previous 4 months) or if risk cannot be reliably assessed. The second option is to test the source patient for antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), then if positive, test for HCV RNA. For HCP, baseline testing for anti-HCV with reflex to a NAT for HCV RNA if positive should be conducted as soon as possible (preferably within 48 hours) after the exposure and may be simultaneous with source-patient testing. If follow-up testing is recommended based on the source patient's status (e.g., HCV RNA positive or anti-HCV positive with unavailable HCV RNA or if the HCV infection status is unknown), HCP should be tested with a NAT for HCV RNA at 3-6 weeks postexposure. If HCV RNA is negative at 3-6 weeks postexposure, a final test for anti-HCV at 4-6 months postexposure is recommended. A source patient or HCP found to be positive for HCV RNA should be referred to care. Postexposure prophylaxis of hepatitis C is not recommended for HCP who have occupational exposure to blood and other body fluids. This guidance was developed based on expert opinion (CDC. Updated U.S. Public Health Service guidelines for the management of occupational exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis. MMWR Recommend Rep 2001;50[No. RR-11]; Supplementary Figure, https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/90288) and reflects updated guidance from professional organizations that recommend treatment for acute HCV infection. Health care providers can use this guidance to update their procedures for postexposure testing and clinical management of HCP potentially exposed to hepatitis C virus.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa do Paciente para o Profissional/prevenção & controle , Exposição Ocupacional , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Hepacivirus/genética , Hepacivirus/isolamento & purificação , Hepatite C/transmissão , Humanos , Profilaxia Pós-Exposição , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , RNA Viral/análise , Estados Unidos , United States Public Health Service
19.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235715, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32722701

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: New hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments spurred the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2016 to adopt a strategy to eliminate HCV as a public health threat by 2030. To achieve this, key policies must be implemented. In the absence of monitoring mechanisms, this study aims to assess the extent of policy implementation from the perspective of liver patient groups. METHODS: Thirty liver patient organisations, each representing a country, were surveyed in October 2018 to assess implementation of HCV policies in practice. Respondents received two sets of questions based on: 1) WHO recommendations; and 2) validated data sources verifying an existing policy in their country. Academic experts selected key variables from each set for inclusion into policy scores. The similarity scores were calculated for each set with a multiple joint correspondence analysis. Proxy reference countries were included as the baseline to contextualize results. We extracted scores for each country and standardized them from 0 to 10 (best). RESULTS: Twenty-five countries responded. For the score based on WHO recommendations, Bulgaria had the lowest score whereas five countries (Cyprus, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia, and Sweden) had the highest scores. For the verified policy score, a two-dimensional solution was identified; first dimension scores pertained to whether verified policies were in place and second dimension scores pertained to the proportion of verified policies in-place that were implemented. Spain, UK, and Sweden had high scores for both dimensions. CONCLUSIONS: Patient groups reported that the European region is not on track to meet WHO 2030 HCV goals. More action should be taken to implement and monitor HCV policies.


Assuntos
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/normas , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Política de Saúde , Hepacivirus/isolamento & purificação , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Saúde Pública , Coleta de Dados , Hepatite C/virologia , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Organização Mundial da Saúde
20.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 485, 2020 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641006

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bhutan is committed to eliminating hepatitis B and hepatitis C, though recent baseline estimates of disease burden in the general population are unknown. In 2017, we carried out a biomarker survey in the general population to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) biomarkers to evaluate the impact of immunization and guide further efforts. METHODS: In 2017, a cross-sectional, population-based, three-stage cluster survey was undertaken of the general population (1-17 and 20+ years of age). We visited households, collected blood specimens and administered a standard questionnaire. Specimens were collected for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV) testing. We calculated prevalence of infection and selected characteristics, along with confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Of 1372 individuals approached, 1358 (99%) participated. Of those, 1321 (97%) had a specimen tested for HBsAg, and among 1173 enrolled individuals 5 years of age or older, 1150 (98%) individuals were tested for anti-HCV. The prevalence of HBsAg was 2.0% in 775 persons 20 years of age or older (95% CI: 1.0-4.0) and 0.5% in 546 persons 1-17 years of age (95% CI: 0.1-1.8). The prevalence of anti-HCV was 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) among persons ≥5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Universal hepatitis B immunization of infants has resulted in a low prevalence of chronic HBV infection in persons 1-17 years of age and the prevalence of anti-HCV is low among persons aged ≥5 years. Efforts should continue to reach high coverage of the timely birth dose along with completion of the hepatitis B vaccine series. To reduce the chronic liver disease burden among adults, HBV and HCV testing and treatment as indicated might be restricted to pregnant women, blood donors, individuals with chronic liver diseases, and other groups with history of high-risk exposures.


Assuntos
Hepacivirus/imunologia , Vírus da Hepatite B/imunologia , Hepatite B Crônica/epidemiologia , Hepatite B Crônica/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Vacinação , Adolescente , Adulto , Butão/epidemiologia , Biomarcadores/sangue , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Análise por Conglomerados , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Antígenos de Superfície da Hepatite B/sangue , Hepatite B Crônica/sangue , Hepatite B Crônica/transmissão , Hepatite C/sangue , Hepatite C/transmissão , Anticorpos Anti-Hepatite C/sangue , Humanos , Lactente , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/prevenção & controle , Masculino , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
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