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1.
J Dent Educ ; 83(3): 342-350, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30692191

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to discover how an active learning classroom (ALC) influenced the teaching and learning of dental radiology with dental hygiene students through a mixed-methods approach. A year-long observation of a dental hygiene professor who was teaching two consecutive courses in an ALC was conducted in 2015-16. Nineteen classes were recorded and transcribed, and observational notes on classroom activities were taken. Towards the end of the academic year, the professor was interviewed with use of a 13-question guide, and the students were surveyed with a 25-question survey. Moreover, five-year grades in the same two courses, including four-year historical grades earned in the traditional classrooms (TCs) and one year from the ALC, were collected along with demographic and prior academic performance data. Thirty-two of the 38 students responded to the survey, for a response rate of 84%. The results showed that 63% of the students preferred to take classes in the ALC rather than TC. They especially enjoyed the ALC's spaciousness, mobility, unobstructed views, and ease of information-sharing and engagement in class. However, the ALC presented both the faculty and students with sensory and technique challenges. The analysis of students' grades suggested that GPA was one of the strongest predictors for both courses' final grades in the TCs but had weaker predicting significance in the ALC setting. Overall, the majority of students enjoyed taking classes in the ALC due to its physical charm and dynamic collaboration. Sensory and technique challenges coexisted with benefits.


Assuntos
Higienistas Dentários/educação , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Ensino , Estudos de Coortes , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Avaliação Educacional , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Radiografia Dentária , Inquéritos e Questionários
2.
Gerodontology ; 36(1): 45-54, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30307049

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In order to adequately care for patients with dementia, it is necessary for dental hygienists to develop unprejudiced attitudes towards and obtain sufficient knowledge of dementia. The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of dementia among Japanese dental hygiene students and identify related factors to the attitude and the knowledge. We compared the attitude and the knowledge between dental hygiene students and practising dental hygienists. BACKGROUND: Dental hygienists are required to care for patients with dementia by developing appropriate attitudes towards dementia and gaining knowledge of dementia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between May 2016 and July 2016, 191 third-grade dental hygiene students and 64 registered dental hygienists were surveyed. We modified questionnaires to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of dementia. Ageism was assessed using the Fraboni Ageism scale. To determine potential dementia awareness factors, information regarding participants' experiences with dementia was collected. RESULTS: Factor analysis revealed four factors in the attitude scale (Cronbach's α, 0.652-0.820). All item-total correlation coefficients for the knowledge scale were above 0.3, and Cronbach's α was 0.827. All awareness factors for dementia were significantly different between students and registered dental hygienists. Total scores of attitude and knowledge were higher among registered dental hygienists, indicating better attitude and knowledge, but total scores of ageism were lower among registered dental hygienists, indicating worse ageism. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the attitudes towards dementia correlated with years of experience, ageism, interest in dementia and desire to work with patients with dementia. CONCLUSION: Registered dental hygienists had more positive and more knowledge compared to dental hygiene students. Attitudes towards dementia, but not knowledge of dementia, were significantly positively correlated with ageism.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Demência , Higienistas Dentários , Estudantes de Odontologia , Ageismo , Estudos Transversais , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Análise Fatorial , Humanos , Japão , Análise de Regressão , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
J Dent Educ ; 82(12): 1343-1350, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30504473

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate whether two aspects of resilience-acquired and innate resilience-were related to self-rated health status in registered dental hygienists and students. In May through July 2017, 405 students at three dental hygiene programs and 85 registered dental hygienists, all in Fukuoka prefecture in Japan, were invited to participate in a survey including three scales: the Bidimensional Resilience Scale (BRS) to assess innate and acquired resilience, the Stress Response Scale-18 (SRS-18) to assess daily stress responses, and the Sense of Coherence 13-item scale (SOC-13) to assess the sense of coherence. Information about self-rated health status and number of years of clinical experience was also collected. Respondents were 398 students (98.2% response rate) and all 85 dental hygienists (100% response rate). The cohort with a self-rated "healthy" status scored higher on total scale and each domain of the BRS, SRS-18, and SOC-13 scales than the cohort with other self-rated health statuses. These three scales and self-rated health status were significantly correlated with each other. When innate resilience increased by one point, average self-rated health was 1.14-fold higher. In contrast, when the depression/anxiety domain score of SRS-18 increased by one point, self-rated health was 0.84-fold lower. The number of years of clinical experience was also negatively correlated with self-rated health. For these participants, innate resilience was a significant predictor of better self-rated health. To maintain the health of dental hygienists and students, it is important to understand their innate resilience as well as stress responses related to depression/anxiety factors and length of clinical experience.


Assuntos
Higienistas Dentários , Nível de Saúde , Resiliência Psicológica , Estudantes de Odontologia , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Higienistas Dentários/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Testes Psicológicos , Autoavaliação , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Estudantes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos
4.
J Allied Health ; 47(4): 255-264, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30508836

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, the scope of dental hygiene practice was expanded in 2006. The objective of this study was to explore reasons among dentists and dental hygienists for supporting or opposing an extended scope of practice and to find explanatory factors. METHODS: A questionnaire containing pre-defined reasons and an open-ended question was distributed among 1,674 randomly selected members of two Dutch professional associations (874 dentists, 800 dental hygienists). Data were analyzed with binary logistic regression with Bayesian information criterion (BIC) model selection. RESULTS: Response were obtained from 541 practitioners (32.3%): i.e., 233 dentists (43.1%) and 308 dental hygienists (56.9%). Non-response analysis revealed no differences, and representativeness analysis showed similarities between samples and target populations. Most often, dentists reported flexible collaboration (50.2%) and dental hygienists indicated task variation (71.1%) as supportive reasons. As opposing reasons, dentists generally reported quality of care (41.2%) and dental hygienists' self-competence (22.7%). Reasons were explained by profession, gender, and new-style practitioners. CONCLUSION: Dentists and dental hygienists conveyed different reasons for supporting or opposing an extended scope of dental hygiene practice. Outcomes can be categorized as reasons related to economic, professional status, quality, job satisfaction, and flexible collaboration and are not only explained by profession.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Odontólogos/psicologia , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Satisfação no Emprego , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prática Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(5): 6-13, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30385596

RESUMO

Purpose: The aim of this mixed-methods longitudinal study was to assess student perceptions of technology use, and to examine the relationship between technology use and performance as reflected by self-reported student grade point averages.Methods: Students (n=351) enrolled in a dental hygiene program within a dental school located in the mid-western United States were surveyed in three courses from 2008 through 2012 to gather their perceptions regarding usage of a lecture recording system (LRS). Additionally, self-reported grade point averages were collected over the same period of time. Data were analyzed using a statistical software program (IBM SPSS; Armonk, NY).Results: The response rate was 82%. Descriptive statistics demonstrated that students believed that the LRS increased their success and satisfaction in the course and would be useful in other courses. Students also reported they would not choose to miss class sessions based on the availability of the recorded lectures. Correlation statistics found no relationship between student GPA and students' perceptions regarding the LRS.Conclusion: Students reported LRS use and availability did not impact their attendance. No relationship was found between students' self-reported GPA and evaluation of the LRS use within the limits of this study.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Instrução por Computador , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Percepção , Autorrelato , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
6.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(5): 14-21, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30385597

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to apply a quality improvement model in the application of an intraprofessional educational experience by improving student perceptions of collaboration and increasing the number of collaborative experiences within the dental hygiene curriculum.Methods: A quality improvement model, Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), was used to initiate an intraprofessional education experience for dental hygiene and dental students. Faculty members utilized the PDSA worksheet to plan, implement, and analyze the educational experience. Pre- and post-session surveys were used to measure dental hygiene student perceptions of their ability to perform four Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) sub-competencies. Statistical analysis was carried out on the pre and post session surveys. Students were also given the opportunity to discuss their learning and intraprofessional experiences in a reflection assignment.Results: Dental hygiene students demonstrated positive changes from pre- to post-session survey data in in all four targeted IPEC sub-competencies. Statistical significance was noted in three of the four IPEC sub-competency rating statements. Themes from the reflection assignments indicated student learning in the areas of teamwork and communication. Dental hygiene faculty applied the information gained from the assessments as part of the IHI PDSA cycle for improvement in health care to evaluate and plan for future learning experiences.Conclusion: Meaningful intraprofessional education experiences between dental hygiene and dental students support collaborative practice skills and should be integrated into dental and dental hygiene curricula. Applying a continuous quality improvement model, such as the IHI PDSA, can assist educators in planning, implementing, and evaluating curricular changes in order to improve student learning outcomes.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Higienistas Dentários/normas , Relações Interprofissionais , Modelos Educacionais , Melhoria de Qualidade , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Humanos , Percepção
7.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(5): 30-37, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30385599

RESUMO

Purpose: Fear of dental treatment is a significant problem in the United States, impacting patients as well as oral health care providers. The purpose of this study was to identify the already-acquired knowledge, attitudes, and level of confidence of practicing dental hygienists with respect to the treatment of patients with dental anxiety.Methods: A paper survey was developed, pilot tested, and administered at a state-wide annual dental hygiene continuing education (CE) course in North Carolina. The survey domains studied included demographics, practice setting, practice behaviors, dental anxiety awareness, and opinions and attitudes. Item responses included multiple choice, a Likert Scale ranging from "extremely frequent to never" and "strongly agree to strongly disagree," and free response questions. Results were tabulated and descriptive statistics were performed.Results: Of the 157 attendees, 153 met the inclusion criteria (n=153) for a participation rate of 97%. Dental anxiety questionnaires were used "often" or "always" by 20% of the respondents. Less than half (43%) of the respondents stated that they knew the common signs and symptoms of a patient suffering from dental anxiety. However, 92% of the respondents (n=140) indicated confidence in their ability to perceive whether a patient felt stressed. A little more than half (58%) believed their dental hygiene education prepared them for treating patients with mild dental anxiety, 38% with moderate dental anxiety, and 22% with severe dental anxiety.Conclusion: Although the majority of dental hygienists in this study felt confident in their abilities to perceive stress in patients seeking dental care, they were less knowledgeable in recognizing the full range of signs and symptoms of dental anxiety. Questionnaires designed to specifically identify this population were used infrequently. Dental hygiene curricula and continuing education programs should include content on anxiety management for patients exhibiting all levels of dental anxiety.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico/terapia , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Autoimagem , Estresse Psicológico/terapia , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
J Dent Educ ; 82(9): 968-973, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30173193

RESUMO

The aim of this pilot study was to measure and compare dental hygiene students' level of text anxiety and performance when being tested on an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) using camera supervision versus direct examiner observation. This randomized, controlled trial, conducted in October 2016, assessed students' anxiety levels and performance using the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and performance on an OSCE. All 32 first-year students in one U.S. dental hygiene program were invited to participate, and all 32 participated for a 100% response rate. Participants were randomly assigned to the direct observation (N=16) and camera-supervised (N=16) groups. The comparison of pre-OSCE anxiety levels and performance scores evaluated with direct observation (36.4 and 20.4) versus camera-supervised (37.5 and 20.9) found no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p=0.496, p=0.403). The difference in post-OSCE anxiety levels between the direct observation and camera-supervised groups (33.8 and 37.8) approached significance (p=0.051). This study found that student anxiety levels were similar between the two groups except for the post-OSCE direct observation anxiety levels, which were lower. No significant difference was found between the two groups' performance scores. Due to similar performance scores and anxiety levels for the direct examiner and camera-supervised methods, the camera-supervised OSCE warrants further exploration as an alternative approach to direct observation for evaluation of students' performance.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Higienistas Dentários/economia , Avaliação Educacional , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde/psicologia , Escala de Ansiedade Frente a Teste , Gravação em Vídeo , Adulto , Ansiedade/psicologia , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Projetos Piloto , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravação em Vídeo/métodos , Adulto Jovem
9.
J Dent Educ ; 82(8): 848-856, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30068773

RESUMO

The aims of this study were to explore career choice motivations of dental and dental hygiene students and whether their motivations differed from each other, whether their motivations changed from 2009 to 2017, and whether these motivations were affected by students' age when they decided on their career or by having a spouse/partner or family member in dentistry/dental hygiene. A total of 959 incoming dental students and 270 incoming dental hygiene students at one U.S. university in 2009-17 were invited to participate in the study. Of those invited, 783 dental students (response rate 82%) and 256 dental hygiene students (response rate 95%) completed the paper and pencil surveys. Two independent raters coded the open-ended responses concerning career choice motivations (88% consistency). Overall, the most frequent motivations for the two groups combined were wanting to help others (44%) and wanting a profession in the health care field (31%); the least frequent motivation was business-related reasons (9%). The dental students were more likely than the dental hygiene students to choose their profession because of wanting to help others (47% vs. 36%; p=0.001), human interaction aspects (23% vs. 11%; p<0.001), and hands-on aspects (22% vs. 4%; p<0.001). The dental hygiene students were more likely than the dental students to be motivated by wanting a profession in the health care field (46% vs. 26%; p<0.001) and own dental experiences (22% vs. 12%; p<0.001). The more recently the dental students enrolled, the more likely they were to be motivated by wanting to help others (r=0.15; p<0.001) and the less by being inspired by others (r=-0.15; p<0.001). Having a spouse/partner made dental students less motivated by wanting to help others and more by science-related motivations. These findings provided insights into the dental and hygiene students' career motivations and the factors that affect them. This information could contribute to more effective recruitment strategies.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Motivação , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Família , Humanos , Cônjuges
10.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(4): 35-42, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30143548

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess the knowledge, education, attitudes, confidence, and practice of dental hygienists providing dental care to adult patients with dental anxiety (DA).Methods: A purposive sample of dental hygienists, using a snowball sampling technique, were recruited through social media sites. Inclusion criteria were limited to actively practicing, registered dental hygienists in the United States (U.S.). The validated survey had 29 questions regarding dental hygienists' knowledge, education, attitudes, confidence, and practice in regards to patients with DA. Regression analysis and chi square tests were performed on the data with research outcomes represented through frequency tables and percentiles.Results: A total of 417 participants attempted the survey; 355 participants (n=355) completed the survey yielding a participation rate of 87%. A majority, 73%, of the respondents reported DA as a "somewhat serious" to "extremely serious" issue when treating patients. Forty-eight percent of the respondents indicated that their education had prepared them to address DA but also reported the need for additional education in this area. Dental hygienists indicating higher levels of confidence in addressing DA in their patients also allowed for extra time in their schedules to treat patients with DA.Conclusion: Increased DA education in the undergraduate dental hygiene curriculum as well as post-graduate education opportunities may increase dental hygienists' confidence and capability in the management of DA.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Higiene Bucal/psicologia , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Higiene Bucal/educação , Mídias Sociais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
11.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(4): 43-50, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30143549

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess dentists' and dental hygienists' current motivation, attitudes, and knowledge regarding volunteering in a non-profit dental setting and the opportunity for earning continuing education (CE) credits.Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed a convenience sample of dental and dental hygiene professionals from the state of Michigan. A 20-question paper survey was developed and pilot tested. The survey was disseminated to attendees at various component meetings of the dental and dental hygienists' associations in southeastern Michigan.Results: Out of the 274 surveys that were distributed, 182 (n=182) were completed, yielding a 66% response rate. Eighty percent of the participants were unaware of the opportunity for earning CE by volunteering and 79% were unaware of the volunteering site approval requirement by the Michigan Board of Dentistry. Thirty percent of participants were unable to determine how many unpaid days per year they were willing to volunteer and a similar percentage, (28%), were unable to determine how many paid days. The most common motivating factor to volunteer was to give back to the community (60%) while the greatest barrier was lack of time (62%).Conclusion: The opportunity to earn CE credit for volunteerism is seen as a benefit, however, it needs to be better promoted to potential volunteers, through dissemination of information by professional associations and in educational settings. Community-based clinics also need to be made aware of how to become a CE provider. Further research on the longitudinal impact of CE for volunteerism in community-based clinics is warranted.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde Comunitária , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Odontólogos/educação , Odontólogos/psicologia , Educação Continuada , Voluntários , Estudos Transversais , Assistência Odontológica , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Michigan , Motivação , Higiene Bucal , Percepção , Inquéritos e Questionários , Voluntários/psicologia
12.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(3): 6-13, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29976788

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the awareness of registered dental hygienists (RDHs), licensed in the state of Maine, regarding the midlevel dental hygiene therapist (DHT) provider model and to gather data regarding the degree of interest in enrolling in a DHT program.Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional study design with a non-probability purposive sampling of actively practicing RDHs in the state of Maine (n=1,284) was utilized for the web-based survey. Survey questions included awareness in the passage of DHT legislation, level of interest pursuing education and licensure in this midlevel provider model. Data was collected over a three-week period. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used for data analysis.Results: Response rate was 21% (n=268). Sixty-five percent of respondents expressed interest in enrolling in a DHT program and 40% of those respondents stated a willingness to enroll in a DHT program within the coming year. Although willing to travel 25-50 miles, a majority of respondents preferred programs incorporating online components combined with clinical training completed in nearby communities. Themes emerging from the open-ended question regarding DHT program feasibility and appeal included: convenience, flexibility, cost/affordability, and independent or collaborative practice.Conclusion: Study outcomes indicated interest exists among Maine RDHs regarding the DHT provider role and enrollment in a DHT program. Although there are no DHT programs currently being offered in the New England states, results suggest further investigation is warranted regarding the development of a DHT program in the Northeastern United States.


Assuntos
Conscientização , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Higienistas Dentários/legislação & jurisprudência , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/economia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/legislação & jurisprudência , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Maine , Masculino , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Adulto Jovem
13.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(3): 23-30, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29976790

RESUMO

Purpose: Research indicates clinicians face barriers when attempting to utilize evidence-based protocols for periodontal disease and periodontal disease diagnosis often varies between dental providers. The purpose of this study was to identify and better understand dental hygienists' perceived barriers and experiences during the process of diagnosing periodontal disease in clinical practice.Methods: This study used a qualitative design and a purposive sample of dental hygienists (n=20). Utilizing a virtual video-conferencing platform, participants logged into focus group sessions to discuss their experiences with diagnosing periodontal disease in clinical practice. Focus group sessions were recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis involved the use of inductive coding to draw themes from the data.Results: Dental hygienists reported being responsible for periodontal disease diagnosis, and that they utilized similar classification systems, and agreed with colleagues' periodontal disease diagnoses. However, participants reported the lack of a standardized periodontal classification system was confusing when communicating outside of their dental practice and described both intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to diagnosing disease. A common theme expressed by participants was that patients' lack of acceptance of their periodontal disease status and inability to fund treatment interfered with providing an evidence-based diagnosis and treatment plan. Newly licensed dental hygienists felt somewhat prepared to diagnose periodontal disease upon completion of their education but reported increased confidence in their skills and knowledge with years of practice and continuing education.Conclusion: Study data indicates dental hygienists feel the lack of a standardized periodontal classification system causes confusion and inconsistencies when communicating with other oral health care providers outside of their clinical practice setting, and dental hygienists face barriers when diagnosing periodontal disease. These findings may be instrumental in assisting educators in preparing students for clinical practice.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Percepção , Doenças Periodontais/diagnóstico , Barreiras de Comunicação , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Humanos , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Doenças Periodontais/classificação , Padrões de Prática Odontológica , Pesquisa Qualitativa
14.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(3): 31-39, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29976791

RESUMO

Purpose: This study examined the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of dental hygienists, licensed in the state of California, regarding polypharmacy and off-label drug use for purposes in dentistry.Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) related to off-label drug use and polypharmacy via an online survey tool. The study sample included licensed dental hygienists, who were members of the Long Beach and Tri-County Dental Hygienists' Associations located in Southern California (n=360). Descriptive statistics were used to assess the participant characteristics. ANOVA was used to assess differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices when compared to three key variables: highest academic/professional degree, experience and license type.Results: One hundred seven electronic surveys (n=107) were returned for a 34% response rate. Over half of respondents (53%) held an associates' degree for their license, most (72%) worked in a general dentistry setting and 46% had practiced 15 years or less. Regarding knowledge of polypharmacy and off-label drug use, the results demonstrated very low knowledge, with 25% of the respondents unable to answer any of the knowledge questions correctly. No significant differences in practices related to off-label drugs or polypharmacy were found based on type of licensure, highest degree achieved, or years of experience. However, participants holding a baccalaureate degree or higher were significantly more confident (p=.011) in discussing polypharmacy with patients and colleagues.Conclusion: Participants showed a general low-level of knowledge related to polypharmacy and off-label drug use in dentistry regardless of their level of education, years of experience, or type of dental hygiene licensure; indicating a need for increased pharmacology content in both entry-level dental hygiene programs and continuing education courses.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Uso Off-Label , Polimedicação , California , Estudos Transversais , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Humanos , Licenciamento em Odontologia
15.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(3): 47-55, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29976793

RESUMO

Purpose: Limited data document dental hygienists' preparedness for intimate partner violence (IPV) screening and response. The aim of this study was to assess dental hygienists' readiness to screen for IPV and provide baseline information for the realization of action toward addressing IPV.Methods: The Domestic Violence Healthcare Provider Survey (DVHPS) instrument was distributed online to all members of the Texas Dental Hygienists' Association (n=1100). Four hundred fifteen emails were opened and 114 (n=114) surveys were returned for 28% response rate. This validated survey measures six scales: perceived self-efficacy, fear of offending patients, victim personality/traits, professional role resistance, perceptions of victim disobedience causing IPV, and psychiatric support. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate mean scores for each scale. Specific criteria were applied to interpret the level of readiness based on the scale scores.Results: A little more than one quarter of the respondents (28%) reported having had course content related to IPV as students in their dental hygiene program curriculum, while 27% reported completing continuing education on IPV. A significant proportion of participants, 40%, were uncertain if routine IPV screening was within their professional role. They did not perceive self-efficacy in their screening capabilities (m=3.08 with 5.0 as the strongest), however they reported possessing a strong knowledge regarding IPV victims' personality/traits and did not blame the victims (m=1.92 and 1.48 respectively with 1.0 as the strongest).Conclusion: Results confirm earlier studies indicating the need for IPV training for oral health care professionals. Specifically, there is an evident need for training to increase dental hygienists' self-efficacy regarding IPV screening. Dental hygienists play a critical role in IPV screening and should be prepared to face the challenges presented by IPV and be available to meet the needs of IPV victims through referral to the appropriate support services.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Competência Clínica , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Violência por Parceiro Íntimo , Programas de Rastreamento , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Autoeficácia , Texas
16.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(2): 31-37, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29739845

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether current educational strategies at a dental institution in the United States made a difference in dental hygiene (DNHY) and dental students' (D3) learning outcomes in the four domains of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, attitude, accessing evidence, and confidence (KACE), following a 12-week research design course.Methods: All participants DNHY (n=19) and D3 (n=96) enrolled in the research design course at Loma Linda University completed a paper KACE survey distributed on the first day of class. Students completed the KACE survey once more at the end of the 12-week course. Pre- and post-survey results were compared both within and between the DNHY and D3 student groups to identify the learning outcomes in the four domains of EBP; knowledge, attitude, accessing evidence, and confidence in EBP. Descriptive statistics were conducted to profile all variables in the study; the level of significance was set at α=0.05.Results: All DNHY students (n=19) completed the pre and post KACE surveys; of the D3 (n=96) students enrolled in the course 82% (n=79) competed the post-survey. Comparison of the survey results showed that both DNHY and D3 students demonstrated statistically significant increases in their level of knowledge and attitude (p < 0.05) towards EBP. In the attitude domain, DNHY students indicated more positive attitudes towards EBP (p < 0.001) than their D3 student cohorts. Neither group demonstrated significant changes in confidence in applying EBP (p > 0.05).Conclusion: DNHY and D3 students increased their knowledge and developed more positive attitudes towards EBP following a 12-week research design course. Study results identify improvement areas for EBP knowledge acquisition including determining levels of evidence, analysis of study results, and evaluating the appropriateness of research study designs through the use of validated EBP survey instrument.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Odontologia Baseada em Evidências , Humanos , Autoimagem
17.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(2): 38-49, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29739846

RESUMO

Purpose: Increasing childhood obesity rates present a significant threat to public health. The purpose of this study was to explore dental hygienists' (DH) beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, current practices, and barriers for assessing and educating patients about childhood obesity.Methods: A random sample of DHs (n=13,357) was selected and emailed a link to the validated survey. Of the 1046 respondents who accessed the survey, 919 completed the survey for a completion rate of 89%.Results: A majority of the respondents understood the risk of chronic disease and obesity (99%), role sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) play as added sugar content in the diet (76%), and the amount of SSBs consumed by youth (91%). Participants felt current research showed an association between obesity and periodontal disease (62%), but were unsure of the association between obesity and dental caries (51%). Most respondents never measure height and weight (91%) or plot BMI (94%). Fifty-one percent always provide nutritional counseling to reduce consumption of SSBs, but only sometimes provide nutritional counseling for healthy eating (61%). Respondents had a slightly positive attitude (mean score=4.15, SD=14.58) about assessing and educating for childhood obesity. Major barriers reported were time constraints (63%), and fear of offending the patient or parent (47%). Regression showed attitudes towards patient's nutrition, exercise, and weight predicted the dental hygienist behavior.Conclusion: DHs have some understanding of the risks of obesity and general/oral health, but lack adequate training, knowledge, and confidence to provide obesity counseling in clinical practice settings. There is a need for further education to address the lack of knowledge about nutritional guidelines and practitioners' beliefs regarding addressing childhood obesity without offending the patient or parent.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Cárie Dentária/prevenção & controle , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Obesidade Pediátrica/complicações , Adulto , Criança , Aconselhamento , Cárie Dentária/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
18.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(2): 50-56, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29739847

RESUMO

Purpose: Dental hygiene professionals need to be prepared as part of their entry level education process, to treat the wide range of culturally diverse patients they may encounter in the United States. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of a cohort of senior dental hygiene students in regards to their preparedness to treat a culturally diverse patient.Methods: A purposeful sample of second year dental hygiene students (n=18) participated in semi-structured group interviews before and after the treatment of a culturally diverse patient. Data was gathered and analyzed using a thematic analysis. Demographics were enumerated using frequency percentiles, means, and summary statistics.Results: Prior to the dental hygiene care appointment, the participants reported feeling confident and prepared to treat culturally diverse patients. Following the dental hygiene care appointment, participants reported feeling that more education and an increased number of clinical experiences were needed with culturally diverse patients.Conclusion: Exposing dental hygiene students to diverse patients in a clinical setting as part of the curriculum was an effective method towards building cultural preparedness.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Percepção , Refugiados , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Diversidade Cultural , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos
19.
J Dent Hyg ; 92(2): 57-61, 2018 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29739848

RESUMO

Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether practicing with a cotton-tipped applicator as compared to a new training device had an effect on the anxiety levels of dental hygiene students prior to administering and receiving their first intraoral injection for local anesthesia.Methods: This pilot study used a convenience sample of senior dental hygiene students from an entry-level Bachelor degree dental hygiene program. Participants completed a pre-test survey after watching a video demonstrating the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) injection technique to determine anxiety levels regarding administering and receiving an intraoral injection. Test and control groups were randomly assigned; and participants either received a dental syringe with an attached training needle device (test) or a cotton tip applicator (control). Both groups completed a post-test survey following a 15 minute practice session. Descriptive statistics were performed and Chi-square tests were used to determine significance.Results: Pre-test results showed that 91% of the participants (n=23) reported having anxiety regarding administering or receiving an intraoral injection in one or multiple areas. Chi-square tests determined no statistical significance (p =0.125) between the test and control groups in the post-test surveys.Conclusion: Dental hygiene students demonstrated decreased anxiety levels regarding administering and receiving an intraoral injection regardless of the assigned practice device in this pilot study. While use of a training needle was not shown to be superior at reducing anxiety in novice student operators when compared to a cotton tipped applicator, it may be a useful device for teaching local anesthesia administration techniques.


Assuntos
Anestesia Dentária/instrumentação , Anestesia Local/instrumentação , Ansiedade , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Agulhas , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Injeções/instrumentação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Projetos Piloto , Adulto Jovem
20.
BMC Oral Health ; 18(1): 90, 2018 05 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29783966

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Currently, many risk assessment tools are available for clinicians to assess a patient's periodontal disease risk. Numerous studies demonstrate the potential of these tools to promote preventive management and reduce morbidity due to periodontal disease. Despite these promising results, solo and small group dental practices, where most people receive care, have not adopted risk assessment tools widely, primarily due to lack of studies in these settings. The objective of this study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of dental providers in these settings toward risk-based care through focus groups. METHODS: We conducted six focus group sessions with 52 dentists and dental hygienists practicing in solo and small group practices in Pittsburgh, PA and New York City (NYC), NY. An experienced moderator and a note-taker conducted the six sessions, each including 8-10 participants and lasting approximately 90 min. All sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers coded the focus group transcripts. Using a thematic analysis approach, they reviewed the coding results to identify important themes and selected representative excerpts that best described each theme. RESULTS: Providers strongly believed identifying risk factors could predict periodontal disease and use this information to change their patients' behavior. A successful risk assessment tool could assist them in educating and changing their patient's behaviors to adopt a healthy lifestyle, thus enabling them to play a major role in their patients' overall health. However, to achieve this goal, it is essential to educate all dental providers and not just dentists on performing risk assessment and translating the results into actionable recommendations for patients. According to study participants, the research community has focused more on translating research findings into a risk assessment tool, and less on how clinicians would use these tools during patient encounters and if it affects a patients' risk or outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Dental practitioners were open to performing risk assessment as routine care and playing a bigger role in their patients' overall health. Recommendations to overcome major barriers included educating dental providers at all levels, conducting more research about their adoption and use in real-world settings and developing appropriate reimbursement models.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Odontólogos/psicologia , Grupos Focais , Percepção , Doenças Periodontais/diagnóstico , Medição de Risco , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Padrões de Prática Odontológica , Fatores de Risco , Participação dos Interessados , Estudantes de Odontologia
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