Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 27.408
Filtrar
1.
J Dent Hyg ; 94(5): 14-21, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008945

RESUMO

Purpose: Children of Hispanic seasonal or migrant farmworkers in the United States (US) experience high rates of Early Childhood Caries (ECC) and have high rates of untreated dental caries. The purpose of this study was to explore Hispanic seasonal farmworker caregivers' beliefs and/or perceptions regarding ECC their children's oral health.Methods: A qualitative explanatory model interview approach was used with a purposive sample of Hispanic parents/caregivers, working and residing in Orange and Ulster Counties, New York. The Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) was used as a guide to the semi-structured, recorded interviews conducted in locations selected by the participants. The texts were independently read and thematically analyzed by two researchers.Results: A total of 20 parents/caregivers consented to participate. Six themes were identified for the components of the EMIC and included: etiology: eating candy/sweets (65%); sign/symptoms of decay: tooth color change (50%); pathophysiology: not brushing daily (75%); course of disease/impact on daily life: appearance (40%); impact of caries on child's future health: affects child until adult teeth erupt (25%); treatment for pain: tooth brushing (55%). Over half of the respondents (55%) indicated that getting dental care for their children was a priority.Conclusion: Results from this study showed that Hispanic seasonal farmworkers have a desire to maintain their children's oral health. However, they lacked knowledge in some key concepts related to the disease process and prevention of ECC. Caregivers need additional oral health education with consideration for oral health literacy.


Assuntos
Cuidadores , Cárie Dentária , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Fazendeiros , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , New York , Estações do Ano
2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(40): 1437-1442, 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33031362

RESUMO

During 2018, estimated incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Hispanic and Latino (Hispanic/Latino) persons in the United States was four times that of non-Hispanic White persons (1). Hispanic/Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for 24% (138,023) of U.S. MSM living with diagnosed HIV infection at the end of 2018 (1). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence is crucial for viral suppression, which improves health outcomes and prevents HIV transmission (2). Barriers to ART adherence among Hispanic/Latino MSM have been explored in limited contexts (3); however, nationally representative analyses are lacking. The Medical Monitoring Project reports nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical experiences of U.S. adults with diagnosed HIV infection. This analysis used Medical Monitoring Project data collected during 2015-2019 to examine ART adherence and reasons for missing ART doses among HIV-positive Hispanic/Latino MSM (1,673). On a three-item ART adherence scale with 100 being perfect adherence, 77.3% had a score of ≥85. Younger age, poverty, recent drug use, depression, and unmet needs for ancillary services were predictors of lower ART adherence. The most common reason for missing an ART dose was forgetting; 63.9% of persons who missed ≥1 dose reported more than one reason. Interventions that support ART adherence and access to ancillary services among Hispanic/Latino MSM might help improve clinical outcomes and reduce transmission.


Assuntos
Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/etnologia , Adesão à Medicação/etnologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
3.
Natl Vital Stat Rep ; 69(9): 1-11, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33054916

RESUMO

Objective-This report presents 2017-2018 infant mortality rates in the United States by maternal prepregnancy body mass index, and by infant age at death, maternal age, and maternal race and Hispanic origin. Methods-Descriptive tabulations of infant deaths by maternal and infant characteristics are presented using the 2017-2018 linked period birth/infant death files; the linked period birth/infant death file is based on birth and death certificates registered in all states and the District of Columbia. The 2017 linked birth/infant death file is the first year that national data on maternal prepregnancy body mass index were available. Results-Total infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates were lowest for infants of women who were normal weight prepregnancy, and then rose with increasing prepregnancy body mass index. Total, neonatal, and postneonatal rates were higher for infants of women who were underweight prepregnancy compared with infants of women who were normal or overweight before pregnancy. Mortality rates for infants of underweight women were generally, but not exclusively, lower than those of infants born to women with obesity. Infants born to women of normal weight generally had lower mortality rates than infants born to women who had obesity prepregnancy for all maternal age and race and Hispanic-origin groups.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , Adulto , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Idade Materna , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
4.
Natl Vital Stat Rep ; 69(10): 1-12, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33054922

RESUMO

Objectives-This report describes the methodology used in the preparation of the 2009-2011 decennial life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex based on the age-specific death rates for the period 2009-2011, appearing in the report, "U.S. Decennial Life Tables for 2009-2011, United States Life Tables" (1). Methods-Data used to prepare these life tables include population data by age on the census date April 1, 2010; deaths occurring in the 3-year period 2009-2011 classified by age at death; births for each of the years 2007-2011; and Medicare data for ages 66-99 for the 3 years 2009-2011. The methods used differ from those applied to the 1999-2001 decennial life tables in the estimation of mortality for ages 66 and over. For the total, white, black, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black populations, the method developed for the U.S. annual life tables beginning with data year 2008 was used. It consists of the application of the Kannisto logistic model to smooth death rates in the age range 85-99 and predict death rates for ages 100-120 (2,3). For the Hispanic population, which is added to the decennial series for the first time with the 2009-2011 set, the method developed for the U.S. annual life tables beginning with data year 2006 was used. This method consists of using the Brass relational logit model to estimate mortality for ages 80-120 (4).


Assuntos
Tábuas de Vida , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Censos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Medicare , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
5.
Natl Vital Stat Rep ; 69(8): 1-73, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33054929

RESUMO

Objectives-This report presents period life tables for the United States, based on age-specific death rates for the period 2009-2011. These tables are the most recent in a 110-year series of decennial life tables for the United States. Methods-This report presents complete life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex, based on age- specific death rates during 2009-2011. This is the first set of life tables by Hispanic origin presented in the U.S. decennial life table series. Data used to prepare these life tables include population estimates based on the 2010 decennial census; deaths occurring in the United States to U.S. residents in the 3 years 2009 through 2011; counts of U.S. resident births in the years 2007 through 2011; and population and death counts from the Medicare program for years 2009 through 2011. The methodology used to estimate life tables for the Hispanic population is based on the method first implemented with the 2006 annual U.S. life tables by Hispanic origin. The methodology used to estimate the life tables for all other groups is based on the method first implemented with the 2008 annual U.S. life tables. Results-During 2009-2011, life expectancy at birth was 78.60 years for the total U.S. population, representing an increase of 29.36 years from a life expectancy of 49.24 years in 1900. Between 1900 and 2010, life expectancy increased by 42.88 years for black females (from 35.04 to 77.92), by 39.21 years for black males (from 32.54 to 71.75), by 30.15 years for white females (from 51.08 to 81.23), and by 28.26 years for white males (from 48.23 to 76.49). During 2009-2011, Hispanic females had the highest life expectancy at birth (84.05), followed by non-Hispanic white females (81.06), Hispanic males (78.83), non-Hispanic black females (77.62), non-Hispanic white males (76.30), and non-Hispanic black males (71.41).


Assuntos
Expectativa de Vida/etnologia , Tábuas de Vida , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Censos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Medicare , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e926886, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32999267

RESUMO

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which originated in Wuhan, China, in late 2019 and has led to an ongoing pandemic. COVID-19 typically affects the respiratory tract and mucous membranes, leading to pathological involvement of various organ systems. Although patients usually present with fever, cough, and fatigue, less common manifestations have been reported including symptoms arising from thrombosis and thromboembolism. A spectrum of dermatologic changes is becoming recognized in patients with COVID-19 who initially present with respiratory symptoms. The mechanism behind these manifestations remains unclear. This report presents the case of a 47-year-old Hispanic man who developed cutaneous vasculitic lesions and gangrene of the toes following admission to hospital with COVID-19 pneumonia. CASE REPORT COVID-19 has been associated with cardiovascular disease entities including stroke, acute coronary syndrome, venous thromboembolism, and peripheral vascular disease. We present a case in which a 47-year-old Hispanic man arrived at the Emergency Department with COVID-19 and was admitted for respiratory failure. Despite anticoagulation initiated on admission in the presence of an elevated D-dimer, the patient developed gangrene of all his toes, which required bilateral transmetatarsal amputation. CONCLUSIONS This case shows that dermatologic manifestations may develop in patients who initially present with COVID-19 pneumonia. These symptoms may be due to venous thrombosis following SARS-CoV-2 vasculitis, leading to challenging decisions regarding anticoagulation therapy. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of anticoagulation, to choose appropriate anticoagulants and dosing, and to assess bleeding risk.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Gangrena/etiologia , Gangrena/cirurgia , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/complicações , Dedos do Pé/cirurgia , Vasculite/etiologia , Amputação/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Seguimentos , Gangrena/fisiopatologia , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Masculino , Ossos do Metatarso/cirurgia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Multimorbidade , Pandemias , Admissão do Paciente , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Insuficiência Respiratória/diagnóstico , Insuficiência Respiratória/etnologia , Insuficiência Respiratória/etiologia , Medição de Risco , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/diagnóstico , Dedos do Pé/irrigação sanguínea , Dedos do Pé/fisiopatologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Vasculite/fisiopatologia
7.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(38): 1337-1342, 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32970045

RESUMO

During 2018, gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for 69.4% of all diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States (1). Moreover, in all 42 jurisdictions with complete laboratory reporting of CD4 and viral load results,* percentages of MSM linked to care within 1 month (80.8%) and virally suppressed (viral load <200 copies of HIV RNA/mL or interpreted as undetected) within 6 months (68.3%) of diagnosis were below target during 2018 (2). African American/Black (Black), Hispanic/Latino (Hispanic), and younger MSM disproportionately experience HIV diagnosis, not being linked to care, and not being virally suppressed. To characterize trends in these outcomes, CDC analyzed National HIV Surveillance System† data from 2014 to 2018. The number of diagnoses of HIV infection among all MSM decreased 2.3% per year (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-2.8). However, diagnoses did not significantly change among either Hispanic MSM or any MSM aged 13-19 years; increased 2.2% (95% CI = 1.0-3.4) and 2.0% (95% CI = 0.6-3.3) per year among Black and Hispanic MSM aged 25-34 years, respectively; and were highest in absolute count among Black MSM. Annual percentages of linkage to care within 1 month and viral suppression within 6 months of diagnosis among all MSM increased (2.9% [95% CI = 2.4-3.5] and 6.8% [95% CI = 6.2-7.4] per year, respectively). These findings, albeit promising, warrant intensified prevention efforts for Black, Hispanic, and younger MSM.


Assuntos
Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/etnologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Distribuição por Idade , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Carga Viral/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
10.
PLoS Med ; 17(9): e1003379, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960880

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is growing concern that racial and ethnic minority communities around the world are experiencing a disproportionate burden of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We investigated racial and ethnic disparities in patterns of COVID-19 testing (i.e., who received testing and who tested positive) and subsequent mortality in the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This retrospective cohort study included 5,834,543 individuals receiving care in the US Department of Veterans Affairs; most (91%) were men, 74% were non-Hispanic White (White), 19% were non-Hispanic Black (Black), and 7% were Hispanic. We evaluated associations between race/ethnicity and receipt of COVID-19 testing, a positive test result, and 30-day mortality, with multivariable adjustment for a wide range of demographic and clinical characteristics including comorbid conditions, health behaviors, medication history, site of care, and urban versus rural residence. Between February 8 and July 22, 2020, 254,595 individuals were tested for COVID-19, of whom 16,317 tested positive and 1,057 died. Black individuals were more likely to be tested (rate per 1,000 individuals: 60.0, 95% CI 59.6-60.5) than Hispanic (52.7, 95% CI 52.1-53.4) and White individuals (38.6, 95% CI 38.4-38.7). While individuals from minority backgrounds were more likely to test positive (Black versus White: odds ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% CI 1.85-2.01, p < 0.001; Hispanic versus White: OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.74-1.94, p < 0.001), 30-day mortality did not differ by race/ethnicity (Black versus White: OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.80-1.17, p = 0.74; Hispanic versus White: OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.73-1.34, p = 0.94). The disparity between Black and White individuals in testing positive for COVID-19 was stronger in the Midwest (OR 2.66, 95% CI 2.41-2.95, p < 0.001) than the West (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.11-1.39, p < 0.001). The disparity in testing positive for COVID-19 between Hispanic and White individuals was consistent across region, calendar time, and outbreak pattern. Study limitations include underrepresentation of women and a lack of detailed information on social determinants of health. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide study, we found that Black and Hispanic individuals are experiencing an excess burden of SARS-CoV-2 infection not entirely explained by underlying medical conditions or where they live or receive care. There is an urgent need to proactively tailor strategies to contain and prevent further outbreaks in racial and ethnic minority communities.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Veteranos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Betacoronavirus , Estudos de Coortes , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
11.
J Rural Health ; 36(4): 602-608, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894612

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study compared the average daily increase in COVID-19 mortality rates by county racial/ethnic composition (percent non-Hispanic Black and percent Hispanic) among US rural counties. METHODS: COVID-19 daily death counts for 1,976 US nonmetropolitan counties for the period March 2-July 26, 2020, were extracted from USAFacts and merged with county-level American Community Survey and Area Health Resource File data. Covariates included county percent poverty, age composition, adjacency to a metropolitan county, health care supply, and state fixed effects. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression with random intercepts to account for repeated observations within counties were used to predict differences in the average daily increase in the COVID-19 mortality rate across quartiles of percent Black and percent Hispanic. FINDINGS: Since early March, the average daily increase in the COVID-19 mortality rate has been significantly higher in rural counties with the highest percent Black and percent Hispanic populations. Compared to counties in the bottom quartile, counties in the top quartile of percent Black have an average daily increase that is 70% higher (IRR = 1.70, CI: 1.48-1.95, P < .001), and counties in the top quartile of percent Hispanic have an average daily increase that is 50% higher (IRR = 1.50, CI: 1.33-1.69, P < .001), net of covariates. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 mortality risk is not distributed equally across the rural United States, and the COVID-19 race penalty is not restricted to cities. Among rural counties, the average daily increase in COVID-19 mortality rates has been significantly higher in counties with the largest shares of Black and Hispanic residents.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
13.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883807

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To determine impact of a primary care-based child obesity prevention intervention beginning during pregnancy on early childhood weight outcomes in low-income Hispanic families. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial comparing mother-infant pairs receiving either standard care or the Starting Early Program providing prenatal and postpartum nutrition counseling and nutrition parenting support groups targeting key obesity-related feeding practices in low-income groups. Primary outcomes were reduction in weight-for-age z-scores (WFAzs) from clinical anthropometric measures, obesity prevalence (weight for age ≥95th percentile), and excess weight gain (WFAz trajectory) from birth to age 3 years. Secondary outcomes included dose effects. RESULTS: Pregnant women (n = 566) were enrolled in the third trimester; 533 randomized to intervention (n = 266) or control (n = 267). Also, 358 children had their weight measured at age 2 years; 285 children had weight measured at age 3 years. Intervention infants had lower mean WFAz at 18 months (0.49 vs 0.73, P = .04) and 2 years (0.56 vs 0.81, P = .03) but not at 3 years (0.63 vs 0.59, P = .76). No group differences in obesity prevalence were found. When generalized estimating equations were used, significant average treatment effects were detected between 10-26 months (B = -0.19, P = .047), although not through age 3 years. In within group dose analyses at 3 years, obesity rates (26.4%, 22.5%, 8.0%, P = .02) decreased as attendance increased with low, medium, and high attendance. CONCLUSIONS: Mean WFAz and growth trajectories were lower for the intervention group through age 2 years, but there were no group differences at age 3. Further study is needed to enhance sustainability of effects beyond age 2.


Assuntos
Hispano-Americanos , Obesidade Pediátrica/prevenção & controle , Cuidado Pós-Natal , Pobreza , Gestantes/educação , Cuidado Pré-Natal , Adulto , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Cidade de Nova Iorque , Obesidade Pediátrica/etnologia , Gravidez , Gestantes/etnologia , Ganho de Peso
14.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1327, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907569

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adversity experienced during childhood manifests deleteriously across the lifespan. This study provides updated frequency estimates of ACEs using the most comprehensive and geographically diverse sample to date. METHODS: ACEs data were collected via BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System). Data from a total of 211,376 adults across 34 states were analyzed. The ACEs survey is comprised of 8 domains: physical/emotional/sexual abuse, household mental illness, household substance use, household domestic violence, incarcerated household member, and parental separation/divorce. Frequencies were calculated for each domain and summed to derive mean ACE scores. Findings were weighted and stratified by demographic variables. Group differences were assessed by post-estimation F-tests. RESULTS: Most individuals experienced at least one ACE (57.8%) with 21.5% experiencing 3+ ACEs. F-tests showed females had significantly higher ACEs than males (1.64 to 1.46). Multiracial individuals had a significantly higher ACEs (2.39) than all other races/ethnicities, while White individuals had significantly lower mean ACE scores (1.53) than Black (1.66) or Hispanic (1.63) individuals. The 25-to-34 age group had a significantly higher mean ACE score than any other group (1.98). Generally, those with higher income/educational attainment had lower mean ACE scores than those with lower income/educational attainment. Sexual minority individuals had higher ACEs than straight individuals, with significantly higher ACEs in bisexual individuals (3.01). CONCLUSION: Findings highlight that childhood adversity is common across sociodemographic, yet higher in certain categories. Identifying at-risk populations for higher ACEs is essential to improving the health outcomes and attainment across the lifespan.


Assuntos
Experiências Adversas da Infância/estatística & dados numéricos , Divórcio , Características da Família , Transtornos Mentais , Prisões , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Violência , Adolescente , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Idoso , Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pais , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adulto Jovem
15.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2019795, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32975574

RESUMO

Importance: As of May 11, 2020, there have been more than 290 000 deaths worldwide from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Risk-adjusted differences in outcomes among patients of differing ethnicity and race categories are not well characterized. Objectives: To investigate whether presenting comorbidities in patients with COVID-19 in New York City differed by race/ethnicity and whether case fatality rates varied among different ethnic and racial groups, controlling for presenting comorbidities and other risk factors. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study included 5902 patients who presented for care to the Montefiore Medical Center, a large urban academic medical center in the Bronx, New York, between March 14 and April 15, 2020, and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 on reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Final data collection was April 27, 2020. Exposures: Patient characteristics, including self-identified ethnicity/race, age, sex, socioeconomic status, and medical comorbidities, were tabulated. Main Outcomes and Measures: Overall survival. Associations between patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and race/ethnicity were examined using χ2 tests, and the association with survival was assessed using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression, based on time from positive COVID-19 test. Results: Of 9268 patients who were tested, 5902 ethnically diverse patients (63.7%) had SARS-CoV-2. Of these, 3129 patients (53.0%) were women, and the median (interquartile range) age was 58 (44-71) years. A total of 918 patients (15.5%) died within the study time frame. Overall, 1905 patients (32.3%) identified as Hispanic; 1935 (32.8%), non-Hispanic Black; 509 (8.6%), non-Hispanic White; and 171 (2.9%), Asian; the death rates were 16.2% (309), 17.2% (333), 20.0% (102), and 17.0% (29), respectively (P = .25). Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black patients had a higher proportion of more than 2 medical comorbidities with 654 (34.3%) and 764 (39.5%), respectively, compared with 147 (28.9%) among non-Hispanic White patients (P < .001). Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black patients were also more likely to test positive for COVID-19 than White patients, with 1905 of 2919 Hispanic patients (65.3%), 1935 of 2823 non-Hispanic Black patients (68.5%), and 509 of 960 non-Hispanic White patients (53.0%) having positive test results for SARS-CoV-2 (P < .001). While controlling for age, sex, socioeconomic status and comorbidities, patients identifying as Hispanic (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.61-0.98; P = .03) or non-Hispanic Black (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.55-0.87; P = .002) had slightly improved survival compared with non-Hispanic White patients. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of patients with COVID-19 who presented for care at the same urban medical center, non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic patients did not experience worse risk-adjusted outcomes compared with their White counterparts. This finding is important for understanding the observed population differences in mortality by race/ethnicity reported elsewhere.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Causas de Morte , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Hispano-Americanos , Hospitalização , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Betacoronavirus , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Coronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Hospitais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , População Urbana
16.
Anticancer Res ; 40(10): 5727-5734, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32988898

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: To examine the impact of ACA and the association of socioeconomic factors on delay in initial treatment for multiple myeloma (MM). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with MM between 2004-2016 were identified in the National Cancer Database (NCDB). Time-to-initial treatment (TTI) was defined as the number of days from diagnosis to initial therapy. Patients were classified into quartiles and those belonging to the fourth quartile for TTI constituted the delayed treatment group. Study period was divided into pre-ACA and post-ACA using 2010 as the cut-off. RESULTS: A total of 65,723 patients met the eligibility criteria. Median TTI was 13 (IQR=5-27) days. Racial-ethnic minorities were associated with delayed-TTI. Delayed treatment was more likely for Hispanics pre-ACA but not post-ACA, while non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) were more likely to have delayed treatment both, pre- and post-ACA. CONCLUSION: While ACA has been shown to help mitigate healthcare disparities in certain cancer diagnoses, the study suggests that the effect is still limited among MM patients.


Assuntos
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/normas , Cobertura do Seguro/normas , Mieloma Múltiplo/epidemiologia , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , Idoso , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Grupos Étnicos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mieloma Múltiplo/patologia , Mieloma Múltiplo/terapia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
17.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2015470, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32876682

RESUMO

Importance: Home health care is one of the fastest growing postacute services in the US and is increasingly important in the era of coronavirus disease 2019 and payment reform, yet it is unknown whether patients who need home health care are receiving it. Objective: To examine how often patients referred to home health care at hospital discharge receive it and whether there is evidence of disparities. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study used Medicare data regarding the postacute home health care setting from October 1, 2015, through September 30, 2016. The participants were Medicare fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries who were discharged alive from a hospital with a referral to home health care (2 379 506 discharges). Statistical analysis was performed from July 2019 to June 2020. Exposures: Hospital referral to home health care. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes included whether discharges received their first home health care visit within 14 days of hospital discharge and the number of days between hospital discharge and the first home health visit. Differences in the likelihood of receiving home health care across patient, zip code, and hospital characteristics were also examined. Results: Among 2 379 506 discharges from the hospital with a home health care referral, 1 358 697 patients (57.1%) were female, 468 762 (19.7%) were non-White, and 466 383 (19.6%) were dually enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid; patients had a mean (SD) age of 73.9 (11.9) years and 4.1 (2.1) Elixhauser comorbidities. Only 1 284 300 patients (54.0%) discharged from the hospital with a home health referral received home health care services within 14 days of discharge. Of the remaining 1 095 206 patients (46.0%) discharged, 37.7% (896 660 discharges) never received any home health care, while 8.3% (198 546 discharges) were institutionalized or died within 14 days without a preceding home health care visit. Patients who were Black or Hispanic received home health at lower rates than did patients who were White (48.0% [95% CI, 47.8%-48.1%] of Black and 46.1% [95% CI, 45.7%-46.5%] of Hispanic discharges received home health within 14 days compared with 55.3% [95% CI, 55.2%-55.4%] of White discharges). In addition, disadvantaged patients waited longer for their first home health care visit. For example, patients living in high-unemployment zip codes waited a mean of 2.0 days (95% CI, 2.0-2.0 days), whereas those living in low-unemployment zip codes waited 1.8 days (95% CI, 1.8-1.8 days). Conclusions and Relevance: Disparities in the use of home health care remain an issue in the US. As home health care is increasingly presented as a safer alternative to institutional postacute care during coronavirus disease 2019, and payment reforms continue to pressure hospitals to discharge patients home, ensuring the availability of safe and equitable care will be crucial to maintaining high-quality care.


Assuntos
Assistência ao Convalescente/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar/estatística & dados numéricos , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Planos de Pagamento por Serviço Prestado , Feminino , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Medicaid/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicare , Medicare Part C , Alta do Paciente , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
19.
Ann Hematol ; 99(10): 2323-2328, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32808105

RESUMO

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) can cause prothrombotic complications. We aim to study the frequency of thrombotic complications and impact of anticoagulation on outcomes in hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 921 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital with COVID-19. Patients were divided into four groups depending on whether they were on anticoagulation prior to admission, started anticoagulation during the admission, received prophylactic anticoagulation, or did not receive any anticoagulation. At the time of analysis, 325 patients (35.3%) had died, while 544 patients (59%) had been discharged resulting in inpatient mortality of 37.3%. Male sex, age > 65 years, and high D-dimer at admission were associated with higher mortality. Sixteen patients (1.7%) had venous thromboembolism confirmed with imaging, 11 patients had a stroke, and 2 patients developed limb ischemia. Treatment with therapeutic anticoagulation was associated with improved inpatient mortality compared with prophylactic anticoagulation alone (63% vs 86.2%, p < 0.0001) in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Other outcomes such as rates of liberation from mechanical ventilation and duration of mechanical ventilation were not significantly impacted by the type of anticoagulation.


Assuntos
Anticoagulantes/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Trombose/prevenção & controle , Trombose/virologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano , Idoso , Anticoagulantes/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Feminino , Hemorragia/epidemiologia , Hispano-Americanos , Hospitais Comunitários , Hospitais Urbanos , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Respiração Artificial , Estudos Retrospectivos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Trombose/epidemiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Tromboembolia Venosa/epidemiologia
20.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32847947

RESUMO

Invasive mechanical has been associated with high mortality in COVID-19. Alternative therapy of high flow nasal therapy (HFNT) has been greatly debated around the world for use in COVID-19 pandemic due to concern for increased healthcare worker transmission.This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 10 March 2020 to 24 April 2020 with moderate-to-severe respiratory failure treated with HFNT. Primary outcome was prevention of intubation. Of the 445 patients with COVID-19, 104 met our inclusion criteria. The average age was 60.66 (+13.50) years, 49 (47.12 %) were female, 53 (50.96%) were African-American, 23 (22.12%) Hispanic. Forty-three patients (43.43%) were smokers. Saturation to fraction ratio and chest X-ray scores had a statistically significant improvement from day 1 to day 7. 67 of 104 (64.42%) were able to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation in our cohort. Incidence of hospital-associated/ventilator-associated pneumonia was 2.9%. Overall, mortality was 14.44% (n=15) in our cohort with 13 (34.4%) in the progressed to intubation group and 2 (2.9%) in the non-intubation group. Mortality and incidence of pneumonia was statistically higher in the progressed to intubation group. CONCLUSION: HFNT use is associated with a reduction in the rate of invasive mechanical ventilation and overall mortality in patients with COVID-19 infection.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Pneumonia Associada a Assistência à Saúde/epidemiologia , Hipóxia/terapia , Intubação Intratraqueal/estatística & dados numéricos , Oxigenoterapia/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia , Corticosteroides/uso terapêutico , Afro-Americanos , Idoso , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/uso terapêutico , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Azitromicina/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Cânula , Comorbidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Cardiopatias/epidemiologia , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Hidroxicloroquina/uso terapêutico , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Imunoglobulinas Intravenosas/uso terapêutico , Fatores Imunológicos/uso terapêutico , Pneumopatias/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Philadelphia/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Associada à Ventilação Mecânica/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pulsoterapia , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Fumar/epidemiologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA