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1.
AIDS Educ Prev ; 34(5): 427-439, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36181498

RESUMO

HIV risk behaviors and psychological well-being among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (n = 140), were quantitatively described in relation to demographic and psychosocial factors. Most participants were tested for HIV and 41.4% reported living with HIV. Malay participants had significantly higher levels of depression (p < .05), homophobia (p < .01), and needs for social support (p < .01) than Chinese. More Chinese participants reported suicidal thoughts than Malaysians (p < .05). A multivariate analysis revealed that participants with gay/MSM-identified or had lower levels of self-esteem showed significantly higher levels of depression. Future intervention projects should address depression and mental health issues among MSM and strengthen self-esteem and social support through culturally competent support and individual counseling programs (e.g., addressing MSM's conflicts with religious beliefs and norms). Structural changes must be made incrementally to reduce homophobia against MSM in Malaysia while advocating human rights.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Malásia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Assunção de Riscos
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 954674, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36148342

RESUMO

Background: Adolescence and emerging adulthood are critical periods for an individual's sexual identity development. The internet has become a primary avenue for gay identity exploration. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the internet in Chinese young gay male's sexual identity development. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 37 gay males aged 16 to 29. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Results: Three categories of identity development in relation to use of the internet were identified: (1) Gay identity confirming, which includes verifying same-sex attraction and connecting the attraction feeling to gay identity through consumption of pornography, Tanbi (boy's love) materials, and searching for information online. (2) Gay identity practicing, includes interacting with the gay community to gain understandings of gay subcultures and make close gay friends, engaging in same-sex sexual and romantic relationship development through online group and interpersonal interactions. The internet practice impact on an individual's cognition and behavior by presenting same-sex sexual contact is normal and common, facilitating longing for a romantic relationship, and facilitating relationship development; and (3) Gay identity coping, includes increasing self-acceptance of gay identity, gaining a sense of belonging in the gay community, increasing autonomy in sexual and romantic relationship development, and growing consideration of coming out to parents. Young gay males' coping efficacy was gained through the lessons learned from identity practice. Conclusion: The findings indicate that an individual's internet practice facilitates gay identity confirmation, enriches identity practice, and promotes the transition from self-identification to identity disclosure and integration. Internet practice also threatens to young gay males' sexual risk behavior, emotional hurts from failed romantic relationships. Interventions including sexual identity education and healthy internet use strategies need to be developed tailored to the developmental characteristics.


Assuntos
Uso da Internet , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Adulto , China , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(9): e2231853, 2022 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36129712

RESUMO

Importance: HIV transmission rates in the United States have increased among men who have sex with men. However, there are no published randomized trials examining interventions to reduce sexual risk for HIV acquisition in males younger than 18 years. Objective: To determine the efficacy of MyPEEPS Mobile, a mobile-delivered HIV prevention intervention, to reduce sexual risk behavior in same-sex attracted young males. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a national randomized clinical trial of the efficacy MyPEEPS Mobile vs a delayed intervention among males aged 13 to 18 years to prevent or reduce sexual risk for HIV acquisition. Study activities were completed through 4 study sites in Birmingham, Alabama; New York, New York; Seattle, Washington; and Chicago, Illinois. Study staff at each site met with participants in person or via video conferencing. Data were collected from June 1, 2018, to April 7, 2020, and analyzed from July to October 2021. Interventions: The MyPEEPS Mobile intervention contains 21 online psychoeducational and skill-building modules, which participants completed over a 3-month period. Participants randomized to the intervention group received access to MyPEEPS Mobile for the first 3 months, while those randomized to the delayed intervention group received access at their 9-month visit after data for the primary efficacy analysis had been collected. Main Outcomes and Measures: The self-reported primary outcome was change in the number of condomless anal sex acts between study conditions. Secondary outcomes were change in the number of sex partners, number of condomless anal sex partners, the number of sex acts while under the influence of substances, preexposure prophylactic uptake, nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis use, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection testing. Results: In the analytic sample of 763 racially and ethnically diverse study participants, the mean (SD) age was 16.2 (1.4) years; 736 participants (97%) were male, 13 (2%) nonbinary; and 6 (1%) genderqueer; 158 (21%) were Black or African American, 311 (41%) were Hispanic or Latino, and 284 (37%) were White. Overall, 382 were randomized to the intervention group and 381 to the delayed intervention group. At 3-month follow-up, there was a significant reduction in the number of condomless anal sex acts in the intervention group compared with the delayed intervention group (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32-0.99); however, there was no significant difference between groups at 6 or 9 months. In subgroup analyses, the intervention effect was pronounced among Black non-Hispanic participants at 3-month follow-up (IRR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.94) and 6-month follow-up (IRR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.03-0.78) compared with the delayed intervention group. There were no significant differences in the change in the number of sex partners, number of condomless anal sex partners, the number of sex acts while under the influence of substances, preexposure prophylactic uptake, nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis use, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection testing between the intervention and delayed intervention groups. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, the MyPEEPS Mobile intervention demonstrated a 44% overall reduction in condomless anal sex at 3-month follow-up compared with the delayed intervention group, but not at 6 or 9 months. To our knowledge, MyPEEPS Mobile is the first intervention to demonstrate evidence of short-term efficacy for reducing sexual risk among same-sex attracted young males. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03167606.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Homossexualidade Masculina , Aplicativos Móveis , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Adolescente , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
4.
AIDS Patient Care STDS ; 36(S1): S74-S85, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36178383

RESUMO

Black gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (BMSM) in the US South are disproportionately impacted by HIV. We adapted Project Strength Through Youth Livin' Empowered (STYLE) to create STYLE 2.0 to assist young BMSM link and remain engaged in HIV care. The multi-component intervention included (1) health care navigators to facilitate linkage and engagement activities, (2) motivational interviewing by a behavioral health provider, and (3) a mobile app to reduce stigma and social isolation. We enrolled 66 BMSM from North and South Carolina in the 12-month intervention and analyzed longitudinal data to assess service utilization, dose, and delivery characteristics while also examining changes in HIV care continuum outcomes. We examined associations between intervention characteristics and HIV care continuum outcomes using logistic regression. We found that all HIV outcomes improved from baseline to 12-month follow-up, including receipt of HIV care (78.8-84.9%), retention in HIV care (75.9-87.7%), being prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) (96.8-98.5%), and achieving viral suppression (82.3-90.8%), although none were statistically significant. In multi-variable analyses, participants with more encounters categorized as food bank were more likely to report being prescribed ART [odds ratio (OR): 41.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.72-637.74]. Clients with more referral to care encounters were less likely to have been prescribed ART (OR: 0.02; 95% CI: <0.001-0.42) and be virally suppressed (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.18-0.84). Findings suggest that an integrated approach to HIV and behavioral health services may help BMSM living with HIV overcome structural and social barriers to HIV care.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Bissexualidade , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino
5.
AIDS Patient Care STDS ; 36(S1): S54-S64, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36178384

RESUMO

Young black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) with HIV experience disproportionate rates of trauma, incarceration, poverty, racial discrimination, and homophobia. The synergistic effects of these adverse experiences, along with increased rates of mental health disorders, increase their risk for poor health. To address this need, the study authors adapted a current HIV service model to include a peer-health navigation intervention (WITH U) to attend to behavioral health, health literacy, linkage to services, and psychosocial support for YBMSM with HIV. This longitudinal, mixed-methods, nonexperimental study reports on the mental health burden among participants and the association between participation in WITH U and mental wellness outcomes. Participants (N = 65) were an average age of 25-26 years (mean = 25.48, standard deviation = 2.51). Over 25% of participants reported clinically significant depression and/or anxiety symptoms and nearly half the participants reported experiencing post-traumatic stress symptoms that were at least moderately difficult to handle. Quantitative analyses indicated no significant positive association between intervention engagement and mental health symptoms; however, reporting a greater number of depression symptoms was associated with attending fewer intervention sessions. Qualitative data analysis revealed that participants' mental wellness was positively impacted by participating in the intervention and that participants preferred to receive mental wellness support from peer health navigators (HNs) rather than licensed mental health professionals. Yet, peer HNs did not feel adequately prepared to address participants' mental wellness concerns. Increased training for peer HNs and development of a linkage process to more formalized mental health services with community input may strengthen mental wellness support.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Grupo Associado
6.
AIDS Patient Care STDS ; 36(S1): S3-S20, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36178388

RESUMO

The Black Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) Initiative was implemented at eight sites to engage and retain Black MSM in HIV medical care and supportive services (SS) by addressing their behavioral health (BH) care needs. Using a pre-post design and generalized logistic mixed-effects models adjusting for patient-level random effects, site, baseline age, and baseline mental health status, we evaluated whether participants experienced increased postintervention attainment of (1) Awareness of HIV medical care, BH care, and SS; (2) Screening, referral, linkage, receipt, and engagement in HIV care, BH care, and SS; and (3) Retention, antiretroviral therapy prescription, and suppressed viral load. Among 758 evaluated participants, the proportion of participants who were aware of, screened for, screened positive for, and referred to BH and SS, retention in care (72% to 79%), and viral load suppression (68% to 75%) increased between baseline and postintervention. Among participants who screened positive and received BH services were statistically more likely to be linked to [OR, 1.34 (95% CI: 1.08-1.66)] and retained in [OR, 1.36 (95% CI: 1.00-1.83)] care. Among those who screened positive and received SS were statistically more likely to be retained in care [OR, 1.54 (95% CI: 1.07-2.22)]. Measures of linkage to care declined significantly during the study period, perhaps because of COVID-19 that delayed in-person care. This study suggests that interventions designed to increase utilization of BH services and SS can be effective at improving retention in care and viral load suppression among Black MSM, at least among those currently using HIV services.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida , COVID-19 , Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino
7.
Am J Mens Health ; 16(5): 15579883221120985, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36082415

RESUMO

Older adults' mental health and suicidal tendencies have garnered much attention because of their vulnerability. Few studies have examined the impact of psychological well-being and suicide attempts among older men who have sex with men (OMSM). This study examines the levels of depression and suicidal tendencies among OMSM, factors impacting their mental health, and their likelihood of committing suicide. Descriptive statistics are used to analyze the correlation between depression and suicidal tendencies among OMSM in the United States. We constructed a regression model using relevant data, and scales were selected based on a literature review. The validity and relevance of the control variables were considered. Depression and suicidal tendencies were dependent variables. Data were obtained from the U.S. General Social Survey and analyzed with an ordinary least squares model. There were significant differences between MSM and general groups in depression and suicidal tendency scores (t = 67.084, 58.193, p < .01). Compared with general groups, MSM scored significantly higher on depression and suicidal tendencies. The regression analysis revealed that sex with men was associated with depression and suicidal tendencies (p < .01) among older men. This indicates that OMSM generally have higher levels of depression and suicidal tendencies than the general population. Finally, in the intermediary test, the level of depression had a significant mediating effect on the relationship between homosexuality and suicidal tendencies (p < .01). This suggests that depression intervention can help reduce suicidal tendencies among OMSM.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Tentativa de Suicídio , Idoso , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Estados Unidos
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 956217, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36117593

RESUMO

Background: Most men who have sex with men (MSM), especially those with HIV infection, do not disclose their same-sex behaviors in China due to Chinese family values and fear of stigmatization, rejection, or prejudice. However, disclosure of same-sex behaviors to healthcare providers (HCPs) can be beneficial for reducing viral transmission and promoting their physical and mental health. In this study, by combining phylogenetic analysis with traditional epidemiological approaches, we tried to identify the MSM who do not disclose to HCPs in transmission networks and explored the factors related to the non-disclosed behaviors. Method: Phylogenetic analysis was conducted using HIV pol sequences obtained from the drug-resistant surveillance program, which was collected as part of routine clinical care since 2012. Sequences were linked to the demographic data collected in the Chinese HIV/AIDS Comprehensive Response Information Management System (CRIMS). First, male patients in whom genetic sequences were within the molecular transmission clusters involving self-reported MSM were identified as potential MSM (pMSM). Then, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to supplement behavioral information and attitudes toward MSM. Results: Our sample consisted of 190 pMSM patients. In total, 43.16% of the patients were likely to conceal same-sex behaviors during the first-self-report, and 14.73% of patients might continue to conceal a history of same-sex behaviors even after receiving medical care. The pMSM who concealed their same-sex behaviors were reluctant to accept medical services such as Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) and had a lower likelihood of condom use. In addition, the related factors for non-disclosed behavior were associated with current address, income before diagnosis, and attitudes toward MSM. Conclusion: Non-disclosure of same-sex behaviors to HCPs may be a major obstacle for certain medical services for MSM who exhibit risky sexual behaviors. The pMSM from developing areas, with high monthly income, and with neutral or un-supportive attitudes toward MSM may represent non-disclosure of their same-sex behaviors. Thus, policies facilitating MSM to disclose their same-sex behaviors are recommended, such as legislations protecting homosexual rights on employment, education, marriage, and so on.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , HIV-1 , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Estudos Transversais , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , HIV-1/genética , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Filogenia
9.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0264680, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35947604

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: HIV-focused organizations, care providers and research programs often hire Black gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) in their efforts to reach highly affected communities. Due to their unique social position within and outside of organizations, Black GBMSM are ideally situated to contribute to HIV care and prevention programming targeting their own communities, but may also be at risk for stress and burnout in these settings. Despite this critical role for Black GBMSM in efforts to end the epidemic, little is known about subjective experiences of Black GBMSM who work in the HIV field. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews with 19 Black GBMSM who were identified as key informants. All were working in community-based organizations, clinical or academic settings in the area of HIV prevention and treatment in Atlanta, Georgia. We used a thematic analysis approach to identify salient themes with respect to the workplace experiences of Black GBMSM as well as the role of their identities in their work in the field. RESULTS: Participants discussed: (1) Shared experiences and growth; (2) Work-related stressors; (3) Worker burnout; and (4) Commitment to continue working in the HIV field. On the whole, Black GBMSM derived meaning from their work, and found their intersectional identities to be a strength in fulfilling job duties. At the same time, Black GBMSM described multiple stresses faced as they balanced their personal and professional connections to this work, while also dealing with their own challenges related to discrimination, socioeconomic status, and health. Participants repeatedly described sacrificing their own well-being for the greater good of their communities, highlighting contributors to burnout within and outside of the workplace. CONCLUSIONS: Our participants derived meaning from their work in the HIV field and were affirmed by professional interactions with other Black GBMSM. At the same time, they also faced work-related and other psychosocial stressors that predisposed them to frustration and burnout. To promote workplace equity and wellness for Black GBMSM, we share recommendations for HIV-focused organizations that employ and serve men in this demographic.


Assuntos
Bissexualidade , Esgotamento Psicológico , Infecções por HIV , Homossexualidade Masculina , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Comportamento Sexual , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero
10.
J Psychiatr Res ; 154: 198-202, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35952518

RESUMO

Population-based measures and public health response to stem the spread of the coronavirus may have caused unintended isolation and increased the risk of psychiatric illnesses. The objective of this study is to assess psychological distress among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in China during the COVID-19 pandemic and examine whether these mental health outcomes differ by HIV status. Data were derived from a cross-sectional survey on the impact of COVID-19 on users of Blued, the largest gay social networking app in July 2020. All active users on Blued were invited to complete a survey regarding sexual behaviors, HIV prevention and treatment service utilization, and various health and mental health outcomes. Among all participants (n = 1205), over half (53.2%) of the participants screened mild to severe psychological distress: 34.9% screened mild, 11.6% screened moderate, and 6.6% screened severe psychological distress. Of all participants, 20.9% met the criteria for anxiety and 19.6% for depression. Psychological distress was associated with younger age having a degree below college, being unemployed, and having lower income. MSM with HIV were more likely to report depression or anxiety compared to HIV negative/unknown status MSM after adjusting for study covariates (AOR = 1.80, 95%CI 1.01-3.26; AOR = 2.04, 95%CI 1.11-3.67, respectively). MSM in China experience a high burden of psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Integrated HIV treatment and mental health services are needed to provide adequate and timely mental health support to MSM living with HIV.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , COVID-19/epidemiologia , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pandemias , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia
11.
AIDS Patient Care STDS ; 36(9): 356-363, 2022 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36037013

RESUMO

Optimization of mental health service use is critical to HIV care engagement among young Black gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YB-GBMSM). Clinic-level interventions to integrate HIV and mental health services have been proposed; however, patient perspectives on such care models are often lacking. We conducted a mixed-methods study consisting of surveys (N = 100) and qualitative in-depth interviews (n = 15) with YB-GBMSM recruited from two Ryan White-funded HIV clinics in Atlanta, Georgia. Most participants (70%) agreed that integration of HIV and mental health services was beneficial to them. Thirty-six percent (36%) desired a higher level of integration than what they perceived was currently available in their clinic setting, 51% believed their clinic was already optimally integrated, and 13% preferred less integration. In the qualitative interviews, participants discussed their support for potential integration strategies such as training HIV providers to prescribe antidepressants, closer in-clinic proximity of HIV and mental health providers, and use of patient navigators to help patients access mental health care and remind them of appointments. Perceived benefits of care integration included easier access to mental health services, enhanced overall well-being, and improved HIV care engagement. In summary, YB-GBMSM were supportive of integrating HIV and mental health services, with varying individual preferences regarding the degree and operationalization of this integration. Improving integration of mental health and HIV services, and tailoring modes of service delivery to individual preferences, has the potential to improve both general well-being and HIV care engagement in this high priority population.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental
12.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270649, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35839245

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peer-led interventions are central to the global HIV response for gay and bisexual men who have sex with men [GBMSM]. Since the year 2000, technological advancements in HIV and an increased response to the health disparities faced by GBMSM outside of HIV, have contributed to the expanding scope of their content and delivery. This review sets out to characterise the evidence base for individual level peer interventions for GBMSM, overview approaches to implementing and evaluating them and identify future priorities for their delivery and evaluation. METHODS: A scoping review methodology was applied and evaluations of peer programs for GBMSM published in peer reviewed journals were identified via subject heading and keyword searches across five electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were reviewed, and full texts were assessed against eligibility criteria. A coding framework was used to extract data from included studies against intervention implementation and evaluation components. RESULTS: A total of 38 studies evaluating peer led interventions against effectiveness outcomes were deemed eligible for inclusion and coded into four intervention modalities; peer counselling [n = 6], groupwork programs [n = 15], peer navigation [n = 7] and peer education [n = 10]. Most addressed HIV [n = 32] and across intervention modalities, evaluations demonstrated compelling evidence of significant effect. Intervention effects on broader indicators of psychosocial wellbeing were not extensively evaluated. Expertise regarding the implementation and evaluation of peer interventions addressing HIV among GBMSM ought to be leveraged to expand the scope of peer intervention to meet the diverse health and wellbeing needs of GBMSM.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e33990, 2022 Jul 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35849442

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The HIV epidemic has revealed considerable disparities in health among sexual and gender minorities of color within the Unites States, disproportionately affecting cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) and trans women. Social inequities further disadvantage those with intersectional identities through homophobia, antitrans discrimination, and racism, shaping not only those at risk for HIV infection but also HIV prevention and care outcomes. Digital interventions have great potential to address barriers and improve HIV care among cisgender MSM and trans women; however, efficacy of digital HIV care interventions vary and need further examination. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the 12-month efficacy of a 6-month digital HIV care navigation intervention among young people living with HIV in San Francisco, California. We examined dose-response relationships among intervention exposure (eg, text messaging), viral suppression, and mental health. Health electronic navigation (eNav) is a 6-month, text message-based, digital HIV care navigation intervention, in which young people living with HIV are connected to their own HIV care navigator through text messaging to improve engagement in HIV primary care. METHODS: This study had a single-arm, prospective, pre-post design. Eligibility criteria for the study included the following: identifying as cisgender MSM or trans women, being between the ages of 18 and 34 years, being newly diagnosed with HIV, or not being engaged or retained in HIV care or having a detectable viral load. We assessed and analyzed sociodemographics, intervention exposure, and HIV care and mental health outcome data for participants who completed the 6-month Health eNav intervention. We assessed all outcomes using generalized estimating equations to account for within-subjects correlation, and marginal effects of texting engagement on all outcomes were calculated over the entire 12-month study period. Finally, we specified an interaction between texting engagement and time to evaluate the effects of texting engagement on outcomes. RESULTS: Over the entire 12-month period, this study shows that every one-text increase in engagement was associated with an increased odds of undetectable viral load (adjusted odds ratio 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02; P=.03). Mean negative mental health experiences decreased significantly at 12 months compared to baseline for every one-text increase in engagement (coefficient on interaction term 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99; P<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Digital care navigation interventions including Health eNav may be a critical component in the health delivery service system as the digital safety net for those whose social vulnerability is exacerbated in times of crisis, disasters, or global pandemics owing to multiple social inequities. We found that increased engagement in a digital HIV care navigation intervention helped improve viral suppression and mental health-intersecting comorbid conditions-6 months after the intervention concluded. Digital care navigation may be a promising, effective, sustainable, and scalable intervention. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/16406.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35805604

RESUMO

This study aimed to explore the psychological welfare, as indicated by postnatal depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, and posttraumatic growth (growth after contending with stressful birth events), of Israeli gay fathers through surrogacy in comparison to heterosexual fathers. For that purpose, a sample of 167 Israeli fathers (M = 35.6, SD = 4.4) was recruited (68 identified as gay fathers through surrogacy and 99 as heterosexual fathers). Participants completed questionnaires assessing their postnatal depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, and sense of posttraumatic growth after becoming fathers. Results indicated that gay fathers through surrogacy reported higher levels of life satisfaction and posttraumatic growth than heterosexual fathers. Yet, gay fathers also reported higher levels of postnatal depressive symptomatology than heterosexual fathers when life satisfaction or posttraumatic growth values were low or medium. The findings were interpreted in light of the hardships associated with cross-border surrogacy and the psychological outcomes associated with succeeding to become fathers after contending with them. The study contributes to the limited literature on postnatal depressive symptomatology and posttraumatic growth among gay fathers through surrogacy and provides clinicians and policymakers with relevant information on the psychological strengths and potential difficulties associated with cross-border surrogacy among gay fathers.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Crescimento Psicológico Pós-Traumático , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Pai/psicologia , Feminino , Heterossexualidade/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Israel/epidemiologia , Masculino , Satisfação Pessoal , Gravidez , Mães Substitutas/psicologia
15.
J Neurovirol ; 28(3): 446-455, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35821194

RESUMO

Although co-occurring methamphetamine (meth) use and HIV amplify the risk for neuropsychiatric comorbidities, the underlying neuroimmune mechanisms are not well characterized. We examined whether a detectable viral load and dysregulated metabolism of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters predicted subsequent levels of sexual compulsivity and sexual sensation seeking. This 15-month longitudinal study enrolled 110 sexual minority men (SMM) living with HIV who had biologically confirmed meth use (i.e., reactive urine or hair toxicology results). Peripheral venous blood samples collected at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 15 months were used to measure a detectable viral load (> 40 copies/mL), the kynurenine/tryptophan (K/T) ratio, and the phenylalanine/tyrosine (P/T) ratio. The K/T and P/T ratios index dysregulated serotonin and catecholamine (e.g., dopamine) synthesis, respectively. In a cross-lagged panel model, a detectable viral load at 6 months predicted greater sexual compulsivity at 12 months after adjusting for prior levels of sexual compulsivity and recent stimulant use (ß = 0.26, p = 0.046). A greater P/T ratio at baseline predicted decreased sexual sensation seeking at 6 months (ß = - 0.25, p = 0.004) after adjusting for baseline sexual sensation seeking and recent stimulant use. Taken together, HIV replication and dysregulated catecholamine synthesis could potentiate sexual compulsivity while decreasing sexual pleasure in SMM who use meth.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Metanfetamina , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Catecolaminas , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Metanfetamina/efeitos adversos , Sexualidade
16.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(10): 706-712, 2022 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35794818

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) remain disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Interaction between psychosocial factors likely plays a role in HIV acquisition risk. We aimed to analyze the association of loneliness and self-rated attractiveness with HIV acquisition risk, and determine whether these associations were mediated by gay telephone chatlines or online dating platforms. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included HIV-negative gbMSM 16 years or older enrolled into the Momentum Health Study from February 2012 to February 2015. Loneliness, self-rated attractiveness (exposures) and use of gay chatlines or online dating platforms (mediators) were assessed through self-interviews. Human immunodeficiency virus acquisition risk (outcome) was assessed by the HIV Incidence Risk Index. Weighted logistic regression modeled the association and moderation effect between exposures and outcome. Mediation models estimated 3-way direct effect among exposures, mediators, and outcome. RESULTS: Of 542 gbMSM, those who were lonely (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.54; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.04-2.28) and attractive (aOR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.04-2.76) had increased odds for HIV acquisition risk. Our moderation analysis demonstrated a heightened joint effect among lonely and attractive participants (aOR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.08-2.65). Use of gay telephone chatlines or online dating platforms mediated 30.5% of the association between loneliness and HIV acquisition risk, but did not mediate attractiveness and HIV acquisition risk. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the provision of interventions focusing on mental health support and safer sex practices through gay telephone chatlines or online dating platforms is promising to help alleviate the HIV burden among gbMSM.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Canadá/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , HIV , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Solidão , Masculino
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35886579

RESUMO

Young sexual minority Black men (YSMBM) report widespread instances of Racialized Sexual Discrimination (RSD) when seeking intimate partners online. RSD is associated with negative psychological health outcomes; however, little is known about the differences between virtual environments, and whether users are exposed to differential types/frequencies of RSD across different virtual environments. Using data from a cross-sectional web survey of YSMBM (N = 548), a multivariate Kruskal-Wallis test was conducted comparing those who primarily used Jack'd and those who primarily used Grindr to meet intimate partners; the frequency with which these two groups encountered six RSD domains was compared. Men who primarily used Grindr reported more frequent instances of White superiority and rejection from White men compared with men who primarily used Jack'd. Men who primarily used Jack'd reported more frequent instances of physical objectification from Black men compared with men who primarily used Grindr. RSD may manifest differentially based on the specific venue that YSMBM use. Such differences may reflect the sociodemographic makeup of these spaces, as well as differences in acceptability/normalization of different forms of RSD. These findings have implications for the development of anti-RSD initiatives that target the specific sociocultural norms that are unique to different virtual environments.


Assuntos
Homossexualidade Masculina , Aplicativos Móveis , Estudos Transversais , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Sexismo , Comportamento Sexual , Parceiros Sexuais
18.
J Sex Med ; 19(7): 1090-1097, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35654717

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Only a minority of men experiencing sexual problems will seek professional help and the proportion of gay or bisexual men can be even lower. AIM: To investigate if sexual identity and minority stress are related to professional help-seeking in Polish gay and bisexual men. METHODS: Sexual identity was measured with the standard question: "Do you consider yourself to be heterosexual, gay, or bisexual?" Men who provided a complete set of answers to the study tools and replied "yes" to the question: "Have you ever had a problem with sexual functioning that lasted at least several months?" were included (Ntotal =644, Nstraight = 203, Ngay = 324, Nbi = 117). A simple question on help-seeking was: "Did you seek professional assistance then?" Other data were gathered with the use of a self-constructed questionnaire. Minority stress processes, that is, internalized homophobia, expectations of rejection, and identity concealment, were measured with the subscales of the Sexual Minority Stress Scale. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to test the statistical significance of sexual identity and minority stress processes as predictors of professional help-seeking. OUTCOMES: Contacting a specialist when experiencing a sexual problem. RESULTS: A total of 84.5% of all men did not seek professional help. Gay identity (OR = 0.58, P = .045), as opposed to bisexual identity, was significantly related to reduced odds of consulting a specialist. Age (OR = 1.03, P = .005), number of doctor's visits per year (OR = 1.51, P < .001), and a psychiatric diagnosis (OR = 1.65, P = .043) were positively related to help-seeking behaviors. Identity concealment significantly decreased the likelihood of consulting a specialist (OR = 0.94, P = .017). CLINICAL TRANSLATION: Specialists need to be aware that gay identity and identity concealment may prevent a proportion of men from seeking their help and thus should be publicly explicit about their inclusive and nonpathologizing approach to sexual diversity. STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS: The major strengths of the study include the use of a relatively large sample size and data from the little recognized Polish context characterized by a predominantly hostile anti-LGBT social climate, and exploration of a neglected topic of substantial significance at the public and individual levels. The major limitations are the use of nonprobability sampling, cross-sectional self-report design, and a single question to capture the presence of sexual problems with no measurement of associated distress. CONCLUSION: Gay men are at risk of avoiding help-seeking when experiencing sexual problems because of identity concealment. Grabski B., Kasparek K., Koziara K., et al. Professional Help-Seeking in Men Experiencing Sexual Problems - The Role of Sexual Identity and Minority Stress. J Sex Med 2022;19:1090-1097.


Assuntos
Bissexualidade , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Identidade de Gênero , Homofobia/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual
19.
Arch Sex Behav ; 51(5): 2711-2730, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35676566

RESUMO

Technological advances like the Internet and Internet-enabled devices, such as smartphones, and the dating and hookup websites and apps available to the users of them, have transformed the nature, organization, and practice of sex work in fundamental ways. Some scholars have argued that these changes have contributed to a normalization of male exchange sex (i.e., providing sex in exchange for money, drugs, shelter, or goods), and in so doing, have diminished the stigma historically associated with it. However, little empirical research has focused on how male sex workers (MSWs), including those engaged in what might be called informal or incidental or casual sex work and primarily use dating/hookup websites and apps not designed for commercial to meet clients experience and manage stigma. To help fill this gap, we analyzed interview data from 180 MSWs who engaged in exchange sex and met their client on dating/hookup websites and apps. Most participants felt that sex work was still highly stigmatized in society at large, but many also felt it was generally accepted-if not completely normalized-within the gay community. Nevertheless, many struggled with the emotional impact of engaging in a stigmatized practice and most employed one or more of the following stigma management strategies: information management, distancing, discrediting the discreditors, asserting no other option existed, and challenging or reframing stereotypes and narratives. These findings indicate that MSWs, even those engaged in informal or incidental sex work, who meet clients on dating/hookup websites and apps are still strongly affected by sex work-related stigma and seek to manage it in various ways. Future research should investigate the sources of internalized stigma among this under-studied population of sex workers.


Assuntos
Profissionais do Sexo , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Trabalho Sexual , Smartphone , Estigma Social
20.
Arch Sex Behav ; 51(5): 2437-2450, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35727464

RESUMO

Heterosexual gender roles are not directly relevant to gay romantic relationships, but gay men often take on different relationship roles depending on their sexual roles. In the present paper, we argue that gay men might draw on sexually explicit media (SEM) featuring men who have sex with men (MSM) to get information about how insertive sexual partners ("tops") and receptive sexual partners ("bottoms") typically behave. For this to be the case, however, we would have to reliably observe different behavior in SEM performers acting as tops vs. bottoms. We examined 220 of the most viewed online dyadic MSM SEM videos to determine whether performed verbal and physical intimacy, victimization, and sexual behaviors depended on the sexual role taken. We found that tops and bottoms engaged in similar amounts of intimacy behaviors, but that bottoms were depicted as initiating sexual activity more than tops. Tops enacted physical and psychological victimization more than bottoms, although these behaviors were rare. Tops were shown taking the insertive role across all sexual acts and versatile performers (i.e., those taking both insertive and receptive roles) were rarely depicted. The present study adds to the literature about the complexity of sexual-self-labels, and suggests that MSM SEM depictions of intimacy and sexual decision-making depend on the sexual role taken.


Assuntos
Homossexualidade Masculina , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Heterossexualidade , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Parceiros Sexuais/psicologia
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