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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 744, 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33036570

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The triple burden of COVID-19, tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus is one of the major global health challenges of the twenty-first century. In high burden HIV/TB countries, the spread of COVID-19 among people living with HIV is a well-founded concern. A thorough understanding of HIV/TB and COVID-19 pandemics is important as the three diseases interact. This may clarify HIV/TB/COVID-19 as a newly related field. However, several gaps remain in the knowledge of the burden of COVID-19 on patients with TB and HIV. This study was conducted to review different studies on SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV or COVID-19 associated with HIV/TB co-infection or only TB, to understand the interactions between HIV, TB and COVID-19 and its implications on the burden of the COVID-19 among HIV/TB co-infected or TB patients, screening algorithm and clinical management. METHODS: We conducted an electronic search of potentially eligible studies published in English in the Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials, PubMed, Medrxiv, Google scholar and Clinical Trials Registry databases. We included case studies, case series and observational studies published between January, 2002 and July, 2020 in which SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and COVID-19 co-infected to HIV/TB or TB in adults. We screened titles, abstracts and full articles for eligibility. Descriptive and meta-analysis were done and results have been presented in graphs and tables. RESULTS: After removing 95 duplicates, 58 out of 437 articles were assessed for eligibility, of which 14 studies were included for descriptive analysis and seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Compared to the descriptive analysis, the meta-analysis showed strong evidence that current TB exposure was high-risk COVID-19 group (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.06-2.65, P = 0.03). The pooled of COVID-19/TB severity rate increased from OR 4.50 (95% CI 1.12-18.10, P = 0.03), the recovery rate was high among COVID-19 compared to COVID-19/TB irrespective of HIV status (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.83-2.74, P < 0.001) and the mortality was reduced among non-TB group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In summary, TB was a risk factor for COVID-19 both in terms of severity and mortality irrespective of HIV status. Structured diagnostic algorithms and clinical management are suggested to improve COVID-19/HIV/TB or COVID-19/TB co-infections outcomes.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Saúde Global/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Prevalência , Sistema de Registros , Fatores de Risco
2.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 28: e3365, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês, Português, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027403

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the cost-effectiveness ratio and the budget impact of sending text messages associated with medical consultations in order to reduce the viral load of patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. METHOD: a randomized clinical trial, basis for the development of a dynamic cohort model with Markov states in order to compare medical appointments for adults infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus versus the alternative strategy that associated medical consultations to sending text messages through telephone. RESULTS: 156 adults participated in the study. As for the viral load, it was verified that in the control group there was an increase, in the intervention group A (weekly messages) there was a reduction (p = 0.002) and in group B (biweekly messages) there was no statistically significant difference. Sending text messages would prevent 286,538 new infections by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and 282 deaths in the 20-year period, compared to the standard treatment. The alternative strategy would result in saving R$ 14 billion in treatment costs. CONCLUSION: weekly sending messages in association with the standard treatment can reduce the circulating viral load due to its effect in decreasing new infections, in addition to reducing health costs.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Envio de Mensagens de Texto , Adulto , Análise Custo-Benefício , HIV , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Humanos , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde
3.
Yale J Biol Med ; 93(4): 579-585, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33005122

RESUMO

Not only do epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), and the current Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) cause the loss of millions of lives, but they also cost the global economy billions of dollars. Consequently, there is an urgent need to formulate interventions that will help control their spread and impact when they emerge. The education of young girls and women is one such historical approach. They are usually the vulnerable targets of disease outbreaks - they are most likely to be vehicles for the spread of epidemics due to their assigned traditional roles in resource-limited countries. Based on our work and the work of others on educational interventions, we propose six critical components of a cost-effective and sustainable response to promote girl-child education in resource-limited settings.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes , Infecções por Coronavirus , Identidade de Gênero , Saúde Global , Educação em Saúde , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Criança , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Saúde Global/economia , Saúde Global/educação , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Doença pelo Vírus Ebola/epidemiologia , Doença pelo Vírus Ebola/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Pandemias/economia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
4.
Colomb Med (Cali) ; 51(2): e4276, 2020 Jun 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33012888

RESUMO

Before a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 became available, several measures to control COVID-19 pandemic are necessary. Analogously, in the absence of an available vaccine, Combination HIV Prevention Programmes have consolidated a large experience of biomedical, behavioral and structural interventions suitable for several epidemiological settings. Adaptation of such experiences can organize mid-term and long-term responses to face COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vacinas Virais/administração & dosagem
5.
Colomb Med (Cali) ; 51(2): e4327, 2020 Jun 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33012892

RESUMO

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the main risk factors associated with the progression to severe disease or death have been typically advanced age, diabetes mellitus, obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, and chronic pneumopathy. Because of their immunosuppression status, persons with HIV were also expected to have a higher susceptibility to infection or a poor clinical evolution. So far, this has not been confirmed to happen, giving way to hypotheses about the role of immunosuppression or the use of antiretrovirals, which could explain this paradox. In this article we present the existing data on the epidemiology and characteristics of HIV-COVID-19 co-infection, discuss the available evidence on the possible factors involved in the evolution of individuals affected by both viruses, analyze other determinants that may negatively affect persons with HIV during the pandemic, and present recommendations for the prevention and care of COVID-19 infection in the context of HIV.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Coinfecção , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Progressão da Doença , Infecções por HIV/virologia , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Fatores de Risco
6.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e043763, 2020 10 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33020109

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated whether implementation of lockdown orders in South Africa affected ambulatory clinic visitation in rural Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN). DESIGN: Observational cohort SETTING: Data were analysed from 11 primary healthcare clinics in northern KZN. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 46 523 individuals made 89 476 clinic visits during the observation period. EXPOSURE OF INTEREST: We conducted an interrupted time series analysis to estimate changes in clinic visitation with a focus on transitions from the prelockdown to the level 5, 4 and 3 lockdown periods. OUTCOME MEASURES: Daily clinic visitation at ambulatory clinics. In stratified analyses, we assessed visitation for the following subcategories: child health, perinatal care and family planning, HIV services, non-communicable diseases and by age and sex strata. RESULTS: We found no change in total clinic visits/clinic/day at the time of implementation of the level 5 lockdown (change from 90.3 to 84.6 mean visits/clinic/day, 95% CI -16.5 to 3.1), or at the transitions to less stringent level 4 and 3 lockdown levels. We did detect a >50% reduction in child healthcare visits at the start of the level 5 lockdown from 11.9 to 4.7 visits/day (-7.1 visits/clinic/day, 95% CI -8.9 to 5.3), both for children aged <1 year and 1-5 years, with a gradual return to prelockdown within 3 months after the first lockdown measure. In contrast, we found no drop in clinic visitation in adults at the start of the level 5 lockdown, or related to HIV care (from 37.5 to 45.6, 8.0 visits/clinic/day, 95% CI 2.1 to 13.8). CONCLUSIONS: In rural KZN, we identified a significant, although temporary, reduction in child healthcare visitation but general resilience of adult ambulatory care provision during the first 4 months of the lockdown. Future work should explore the impacts of the circulating epidemic on primary care provision and long-term impacts of reduced child visitation on outcomes in the region.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/tendências , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Saúde Pública , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Betacoronavirus , Serviços de Planejamento Familiar/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Pediatria/estatística & dados numéricos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Pública/métodos , Saúde Pública/estatística & dados numéricos , População Rural
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027390

RESUMO

The aim of the study was to assess the factors associated with mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV. The study design is a retrospective cohort. The population consisted of 323 HIV-positive mothers and their newborns, attended at the Perinatal Nucleus/HUPE-UERJ, municipality of Rio de Janeiro, in the period of 2007-2018. The average age of mothers was 27 years (14-44), with 12.7% (41) of adolescents. The majority (66.8%) knew they were infected during pregnancy: 39.4% in the current pregnancy and 27.4% in a previous pregnancy. The incidence of MTCT was 2.7% in 2007-2009, 1% in 2010-2015 and 0 in 2016-2018. The viral load in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy was > 1.000 copies/mL or unknown in all mothers with positive newborns and in 19% (42/221) of mothers with negative newborns (p=0.003). The duration of antiretroviral use was > 4 weeks in 92.3% (264/286) of mothers with HIV-negative newborns and in 2 in the HIV-positive group (p=0.004). One of the 4 infected newborns and 2 of the negative ones did not use oral zidovudine (p=0.04). There was no association between amniorrhexis and MTCT (p=0.99), with the Apgar score in the 5th minute of life (p=0.96), with marital status (p=0.54), ethnicity (p=0.65), adolescence (p=0.42), mode of delivery (p=0.99), beginning of prenatal care (p=0.44) or with maternal comorbidities (p=0.48). The conclusion of the study points out that the main factors associated with MTCT are the elevated maternal viral load in the 3rd trimester, the time of use of ART and the non-administration of zidovudine for the newborns.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/estatística & dados numéricos , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Adolescente , Adulto , Fármacos Anti-HIV/administração & dosagem , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
9.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32970170

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) annually publishes an estimate of the number of new HIV diagnoses and the total number of people diagnosed with HIV in Germany. So far, only medication prescription data have served as secondary data as a basis for such estimates. OBJECTIVES: In this study, we used billing data from the outpatient sector to estimate the number of patients with newly diagnosed HIV, the overall number of patients with HIV, and the HIV test rates in those with statutory health insurance in Germany. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed billing data from the outpatient sector for all persons covered by statutory health insurance between 2009 and 2018. We designed annual cohorts of patient for the years 2011 to 2017 and analyzed the number of HIV diagnoses, the number of HIV-related care services, and HIV testing rates. RESULTS: Every year, about 6000 new patients with HIV are treated in outpatient care. The total number of patients with HIV in 2011 was about 59,300 (0.106%), which increased to 80,800 (0.141%) in 2017. The average increase in the total number of patients per year of about 3600 was significantly below the estimated number of newly treated patients for each year. CONCLUSION: The results may provide an indication of patients receiving HIV care in the outpatient sector. The secondary data provide the possibility of developing another epidemiological data source for population-based representation of the administrative prevalence of HIV. To clarify over-representation, there is a need for further research on patients who are using outpatient care for the first time.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Assistência Ambulatorial , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Prevalência
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21360, 2020 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871863

RESUMO

HIV prevalence is higher among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM), owing to their unsafe sexual behavior. Further, MSM indulge in behaviors such as consumption of alcohol/oral drugs and/or injecting during/before sex that poses the risk of unsafe behaviors, thereby increasing their vulnerability to HIV. The study aims to analyze the factors associated with HIV infection among the multi-risk MSM using any substances with those MSM who do not use substances.Community-based cross-sectional survey design using probability-based sampling between October 2014 and November 2015.For the nation-wide Integrated Biological and Behavioral Surveillance (IBBS), 23,081 MSM were recruited from 4067 hotspots in 108 districts across India. Information on demographics, sexual behaviors, substance use, sexual partners, and awareness on HIV and its management was collected from the consented respondents using computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) by trained personnel. Blood samples were tested for HIV. Statistical analyses were done, to study the associations between substance use and its influence on high-risk sexual behaviors and HIV infection.One in 3 MSM (33.88%) in India were substance users, thus exhibiting "multi-risk" (MR) behaviors. Significantly higher HIV prevalence (3.8%, P < .05) was reported among MR-MSM, despite 97.2% of them being aware of HIV. Higher HIV prevalence among MSM exhibiting homosexual behavior for ≤1 year is of specific concern, as this accounts to recent infections and indicates the increased vulnerability of the infection among the new entrants.Substance-use resulting in high-risk sexual behavior was significantly associated with higher HIV prevalence among MR-MSM. Integrated targeted interventions focusing on safe sex and safe-IDU practices among MR-MSM are required to end the disease transmission.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/transmissão , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento Sexual/etnologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Conscientização , Estudos Transversais , Usuários de Drogas/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/etnologia , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Prevalência , Assunção de Riscos , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Parceiros Sexuais/classificação , Adulto Jovem
11.
Stroke ; 51(10): 3156-3168, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32897811

RESUMO

Understanding the relationship between infection and stroke has taken on new urgency in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This association is not a new concept, as several infections have long been recognized to contribute to stroke risk. The association of infection and stroke is also bidirectional. Although infection can lead to stroke, stroke also induces immune suppression which increases risk of infection. Apart from their short-term effects, emerging evidence suggests that poststroke immune changes may also adversely affect long-term cognitive outcomes in patients with stroke, increasing the risk of poststroke neurodegeneration and dementia. Infections at the time of stroke may also increase immune dysregulation after the stroke, further exacerbating the risk of cognitive decline. This review will cover the role of acute infections, including respiratory infections such as COVID-19, as a trigger for stroke; the role of infectious burden, or the cumulative number of infections throughout life, as a contributor to long-term risk of atherosclerotic disease and stroke; immune dysregulation after stroke and its effect on the risk of stroke-associated infection; and the impact of infection at the time of a stroke on the immune reaction to brain injury and subsequent long-term cognitive and functional outcomes. Finally, we will present a model to conceptualize the many relationships among chronic and acute infections and their short- and long-term neurological consequences. This model will suggest several directions for future research.


Assuntos
Aterosclerose/epidemiologia , Infecções/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Arritmias Cardíacas/epidemiologia , Arritmias Cardíacas/fisiopatologia , Aterosclerose/imunologia , Aterosclerose/fisiopatologia , Bacteriemia/epidemiologia , Bacteriemia/imunologia , Bacteriemia/fisiopatologia , Betacoronavirus , Doença Crônica , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/fisiopatologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/imunologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/fisiopatologia , Endotélio/fisiopatologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/imunologia , Infecções por HIV/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Hospedeiro Imunocomprometido/imunologia , Infecções/imunologia , Infecções/fisiopatologia , Inflamação/imunologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/imunologia , Influenza Humana/fisiopatologia , Pandemias , Ativação Plaquetária , Agregação Plaquetária , Pneumonia/epidemiologia , Pneumonia/imunologia , Pneumonia/fisiopatologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/fisiopatologia , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/imunologia , Trombose/epidemiologia , Trombose/imunologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/epidemiologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/imunologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/fisiopatologia
12.
WHO South East Asia J Public Health ; 9(2): 104-106, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32978341

RESUMO

Sex workers have been one of the marginalized groups that have been particularly affected by India's stringent lockdown in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The sudden loss of livelihood and lack of access to health care and social protection intensified the vulnerabilities of sex workers, especially those living with HIV. In response, Ashodaya Samithi, an organization of more than 6000 sex workers, launched an innovative programme of assistance in four districts in Karnataka. Since access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) was immediately disrupted, Ashodaya adapted its HIV outreach programme to form an alternative, community-led system of distributing ART at discreet, private sites. WhatsApp messaging was used to distribute information on accessing government social benefits made available in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Other assistance included advisory messages posted in WhatsApp groups to raise awareness, dispel myths and mitigate violence, and regular, discreet phone check-ins to follow up on the well-being of members. The lessons learnt from these activities represent an important opportunity to consider more sustainable approaches to the health of marginalized populations that can enable community organizations to be better prepared to respond to other public health crises as they emerge.


Assuntos
Participação da Comunidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Profissionais do Sexo , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia
15.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1375, 2020 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907565

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Measuring progress towards the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 treatment targets is key to assessing progress towards turning the HIV epidemic tide. In 2017, the UNAIDS model estimated that 75% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) globally knew their HIV positive status, 79% of those who knew their status were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 81% of those who knew their HIV status and were on ART had a suppressed viral load. The fifth South African national HIV sero-behavioural survey collected nationally representative data that enabled the empirical estimation of these 90-90-90 targets for the country stratified by a variety of key factors. METHODS: To evaluate progress towards achievement of the 90-90-90 targets for South Africa, data obtained from a national, representative, cross-sectional population-based multi-stage stratified cluster random survey conducted in 2017 were analysed. The Fifth South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey (SABSSM V), collected behavioural and biomarker data from individuals residing in households from 1000 randomly selected Small Area Layers (SALs), across all nine provinces of the country. Structured questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic data, knowledge and perceptions about HIV, and related risk behaviours. Blood samples were collected to test for HIV infection, antiretroviral use, and viral suppression (defined as < 1000 copies/ml). Weighted proportions of study participants aged 15 years and older who tested HIV positive were computed for those who reported awareness of their status (1st 90), and among these, those who were currently on ART (2nd 90) and of these, those who were virally suppressed (3rd 90). RESULTS: Among persons 15 years and older who were HIV positive, 84.8% were aware of their HIV positive status, of whom 70.7% were currently on ART, with 87.4% of these estimated to have suppressed viral load at the time of the survey. These estimates varied by sex, age, and geo-location type. Relatively higher percentages across all three indicators for women compared to men were observed: 88.7% versus 78.2% for those aware of their status, 72.3% versus 67.7% for on ART, and 89.8% versus 82.3% for viral suppression. Knowing one's positive HIV status increased with age: 74.0, 85.8, and 88.1% for age groups 15-24 years old, 25-49 years old and 50-64 years old, although for those 65 years and older, 78.7% knew their HIV positive status. A similar pattern was observed for the 2nd 90, among those who knew their HIV positive status, 51.7% of 15 to 24 year olds, 70.5% of those aged 25-49 years old, 82.9% of those aged 50-64 years old and 82.4% of those aged 65 years or older were currently on ART. Viral suppression for the above mentioned aged groups, among those who were on ART was 85.2, 87.2, 89.5, and 84.6% respectively. The 90-90-90 indicators for urban areas were 87.7, 66.5, and 87.2%, for rural settings was 85.8, 79.8, and 88.4%, while in commercial farming communities it was 56.2, 67.6 and 81.4%. CONCLUSIONS: South Africa appears to be on track to achieve the first 90 indicator by 2020. However, it is behind on the second 90 indicator with ART coverage that was ~ 20-percentage points below the target among people who knew their HIV status, this indicates deficiencies around linkage to and retention on ART. Overall viral suppression among those on ART is approaching the target at 87.4%, but this must be interpreted in the context of low reported ART coverage as well as with variation by age and sex. Targeted diagnosis, awareness, and treatment programs for men, young people aged 15-24 years old, people who reside in farming communities, and in specific provinces are needed. More nuanced 90-90-90 estimates within provinces, specifically looking at more granular sub-national level (e.g. districts), are needed to identify gaps in specific regions and to inform provincial interventions.


Assuntos
Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Conscientização , Epidemias , Objetivos , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Carga Viral , Logro , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/virologia , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , População Rural , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Nações Unidas , Adulto Jovem
16.
An. psicol ; 36(2): 232-241, mayo 2020. tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-192059

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The cardinal aim of the present study was to assess the level of social support, self esteem and quality of life among people living with HIV/AIDS in Jammu and Kashmir State of India. Further, the study strived to explore the relationship between independent and dependent variables. METHOD: The study consists a sample of 460 AIDS patients selected through purposive sampling technique, out of them 177 (38.3%) were male, 283 (61.5%) were female patients; 295 (64.1%) were married and 165 (35.9%) were unmarried. Measures included Enriched Social Support Inventory by Mitchell et al., (2003), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (1965) and Quality of Life Scale by Sharma & Nasreen (2014). For the statistical analysis of data Mean, Standard deviation, Frequency distribution, t-test, one way analysis of variance, correlation analysis and Scheffe's post hoc test was applied by SPSS 20.0 version. Findings: The findings illustrated that majority of patients have poor social support, lower self-esteem and poor quality of life; also it reveals that patient's social support, and self-esteem differs by age, occupation, duration of illness, gender, and marital status. However their quality of life differs only by their age, occupation, duration of illness, and marital status. Further the result shows social support and self-esteem are positively correlated with quality of life


ANTECEDENTES: El objetivo principal del presente estudio fue evaluar el nivel de apoyo social, autoestima y calidad de vida entre las personas que viven con el VIH / SIDA en Jammu y el Esta do de Cachemira de la India. Además, el estudio se esforzó por explorar la relación entre variables independientes y dependientes. Método: El estudio consiste en una muestra de 460 pacientes con SIDA seleccionados mediante una técnica de muestreo intencional, de ellos 177 (38.3%) eran hombres, 283 (61.5%) eran pacientes femeninas; 295 (64.1%) estaban casados y 165 (35.9%) no estaban casados. Las medidas incluyeron el Inventario de apoyo social enriquecido de Mitchell et al. (2003), la Escala de autoestima de Rosenberg (1965) y la Escala de calidad de vida de Sharma y Nasreen (2014). Para el análisis estadístico de los datos, la versión SPSS 20.0 aplicó la media, la desviación estándar, la distribución de frecuencia, la prueba t, el análisis de varianza unidireccional, el cuadrado de eta, el análisis de correlación y la prueba post hoc de Scheffe. Hallazgos: Los hallazgos ilustran que la mayoría de los pacientes tienen poco apoyo social, baja autoestima y mala calidad de vida; también revela que el apoyo social y la autoestima del paciente difieren según la edad, la ocupación, la duración de la enfermedad, el género y el estado civil. Sin embargo, su calidad de vida difiere solo por su edad, ocupación, duración de la enfermedad y estado civil. Además, el resultado muestra que el apoyo social y la autoestima se correlacionan positivamente con la calidad de vida


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/psicologia , Apoio Social , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Autoimagem , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Índia/epidemiologia , Análise de Variância
17.
S Afr Med J ; 110(7): 661-666, 2020 Jul 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880344

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: South African guidelines recommend a syndromic approach for the management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), based on the presence of genital symptoms. However, the guidelines do not prescribe specific indications for microbiology testing for patients presenting with or without repeat genital symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence of and factors associated with repeat genital symptoms among STI service attendees at primary care facilities. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study at 7 STI primary care facilities participating in the aetiological surveillance of STIs between January 2015 and December 2016. Demographic and clinical information and appropriate genital specimens were collected from participants presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome (VDS), male urethral syndrome (MUS) and/or genital ulcer syndrome (GUS). Repeat genital symptoms were defined as self-reported history of the same STI-related genital symptoms in the preceding 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with repeat genital symptoms. RESULTS: Of 1 822 eligible participants, 480 (30%) had repeat genital symptoms (25% and 75% in the preceding 3 months and 12 months, respectively). Of those with repeat genital symptoms, the median age was 28 (interquartile range (IQR) 24 - 32) years, and 54% were females. The most common aetiological agents among participants with VDS, MUS and GUS were bacterial vaginosis (n=132; 55%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (n=172; 81%) and ulcers (n=67; 63%), respectively. One hundred and seven (20%) participants had no detectable common STI aetiology. In the multivariable analysis, repeat genital symptoms were associated with HIV co-infection (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 1.78), VDS diagnosis (aOR 1.39; 95% CI 1.10 - 1.76), self-reported condom use (aOR 1.56; 95% CI 1.20 - 2.03) and age 25 - 34 years (aOR 1.33; 95% CI 1.03 - 1.71). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a high prevalence of repeat genital symptoms ‒ a significant proportion without STI aetiology. Identified factors of repeat genital symptoms highlight the need for improved integration of HIV and STI prevention and management. Further research is needed to determine the aetiology of repeat genital symptoms and the contribution of non-STI causes.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Genitais Femininos/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Genitais Masculinos/epidemiologia , Úlcera/epidemiologia , Descarga Vaginal/epidemiologia , Adulto , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Preservativos/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Vigilância da População , Prevalência , Atenção Primária à Saúde , África do Sul/epidemiologia
18.
S Afr Med J ; 110(7): 671-677, 2020 Jul 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880346

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite substantial progress in reducing pregnancy-related preventable morbidity and mortality, these remain unacceptably high in developing countries. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) revised recommendations for antenatal care (ANC) from a 4-visit model to a minimum of 8 ANC contacts to reduce perinatal mortality further and improve women's experience of care. The guidelines also recommend that the first ANC visit (ANC-1) should occur during the first trimester. OBJECTIVES: To describe the uptake of routine ANC and its associated factors in South Africa (SA) prior to the 2016 WHO recommendations, when the country recommended 4 ANC visits, to bring to light potential challenges in achieving the current recommendations. METHODS: Secondary data analyses were performed from 3 facility-based, cross-sectional national surveys, conducted to measure 6-week mother-to-child transmission of HIV and coverage of related interventions in SA. These surveys recruited mother-infant pairs attending selected public primary healthcare facilities for their infants' 6-week immunisation in 2010, 2011 -2012 and 2012 -2013. Quantitative questionnaires were used to gather sociodemographic and antenatal-to-peripartum information from Road to Health cards and maternal recall. The inclusion criteria for this secondary assessment were at least 1 ANC visit, the primary outcome being uptake of ≥4 ANC visits. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to: (i) identify maternal factors associated with ANC visits; and (ii) establish whether receiving selected ANC activities was associated with frequency or timing of ANC-1. RESULTS: Of the 9 470, 9 646 and 8 763 women who attended at least 1 ANC visit, only 47.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 45.4 -49.6), 55.6% (95% CI 53.2 -58.0) and 56.7% (95% CI 54.3 -59.1) adhered to ≥4 ANC visits, while 36.0% (95% CI 34.5 -37.5), 43.5% (95% CI 42.0 -45.1) and 50.8% (95% CI 49.3 -52.2) attended ANC-1 early (before 20 weeks' gestation) in 2010, 2011 -2012 and 2012 -2013, respectively. Multiparity and lower socioeconomic status were significantly associated with non-adherence to the 4-visit ANC recommendation, while a later survey year, higher education, being married, >19 years old, HIV-positive, planned pregnancy and knowing how HIV is transmitted vertically were strongly related to ≥4 ANC visits. The number of women who received selected ANC activities increased significantly with survey year and ≥4 ANC visits, but was not associated with timing of ANC-1. CONCLUSIONS: Despite increases in the uptake of ≥4 ANC visits and early ANC-1 rates between 2010 and 2013, these practices remain suboptimal. Adhering to ≥4 ANC visits improved coverage of selected ANC activities, implying that strengthening efforts to increase the uptake of ANC from at least 4 to 8, could improve overall outcomes.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Cuidado Pré-Natal/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Estudos Transversais , Escolaridade , Serviços de Planejamento Familiar/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Estado Civil , Paridade , Cooperação do Paciente , Gravidez , Classe Social , África do Sul/epidemiologia
19.
J Sex Med ; 17(10): 1827-1834, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883631

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Social distancing in the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may affect the sexual behavior of men who have sex with men (MSM). In early March 2020, Israel imposed travel restrictions and limited social contacts to household members only. The effects of these restrictions on the sexual behavior and mental health of MSM are unknown. AIM: To assess sexual behaviors and mental health of Israeli MSM during social distancing and to compare sexual behaviors before and during social distancing, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data were collected through anonymous web-based questionnaires in a popular geospatial application used by MSM between March and April 2020 during the social-distancing period. OUTCOMES: The dependent variable was casual sex, in violation of social-distancing regulations. Independent variables were demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors before and during social-distancing restrictions, and mental health. RESULTS: Of the 2,562 participants, 1,012 (39.5%) continued to meet new casual sex partners during this period. Being of a younger age, single, and with higher levels of mental distress predicted engagement in casual sex during the social-distancing period. MSM reduced their sexual risk and limited sexual repertoire-in particular, kissing with their sexual partners. Participants also spent more time in dating applications than in the pre-social-distancing period and increased their use of sex phone, webcams, and porn consumption. They perceived the threat of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus to be greater than that of HIV: only 3.2% could imagine themselves having sex with a partner who is infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with 30.1% in case of HIV, P < .01. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: MSM reduced their risk behaviors during social distancing because of the threat of COVID-19. Casual sex during social distancing was associated with negative feelings of mental distress. Future public health response in the future waves of COVID-19 morbidity should strike a balance between containment measures and the need for social distancing with its possible mental and social burdens. STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS: This is the first study in Israel and one of the few in the world to examine sexual behaviors among MSM during the COVID-19 social distancing period. It involved a relatively large sample, through convenience sampling, which limits causality. Findings should be interpreted cautiously, specifically because COVID-19-related behaviors and circumstances may change rapidly. CONCLUSION: The negative feelings of distress due to social distancing should be considered as a potential barrier to adherence among vulnerable populations, such as MSM. Future public health response should strike a balance between containment measures and its possible mental, social, and financial burdens. Shilo G, Mor Z. COVID-19 and the Changes in the Sexual Behavior of Men Who Have Sex With Men: Results of an Online Survey. J Sex Med 2020;17:1827-1834.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/psicologia , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Israel , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Assunção de Riscos , Parceiros Sexuais/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Lancet HIV ; 7(9): e620-e628, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890497

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up in sub-Saharan Africa combined with weak routine virological monitoring has driven increasing HIV drug resistance. We investigated ART failure, drug resistance, and early mortality among patients with HIV admitted to hospital in Malawi. METHODS: This observational cohort study was nested within the rapid urine-based screening for tuberculosis to reduce AIDS-related mortality in hospitalised patients in Africa (STAMP) trial, which recruited unselected (ie, irrespective of clinical presentation) adult (aged ≥18 years) patients with HIV-1 at admission to medical wards. Patients were included in our observational cohort study if they were enrolled at the Malawi site (Zomba Central Hospital) and were taking ART for at least 6 months at admission. Patients who met inclusion criteria had frozen plasma samples tested for HIV-1 viral load. Those with HIV-1 RNA of at least 1000 copies per mL had drug resistance testing by ultra-deep sequencing, with drug resistance defined as intermediate or high-level resistance using the Stanford HIVDR program. Mortality risk was calculated 56 days from enrolment. Patients were censored at death, at 56 days, or at last contact if lost to follow-up. The modelling strategy addressed the causal association between HIV multidrug resistance and mortality, excluding factors on the causal pathway (most notably, CD4 cell count, clinical signs of advanced HIV, and poor functional and nutritional status). FINDINGS: Of 1316 patients with HIV enrolled in the STAMP trial at the Malawi site between Oct 26, 2015, and Sept 19, 2017, 786 had taken ART for at least 6 months. 252 (32%) of 786 patients had virological failure (viral load ≥1000 copies per mL). Mean age was 41·5 years (SD 11·4) and 528 (67%) of 786 were women. Of 237 patients with HIV drug resistance results available, 195 (82%) had resistance to lamivudine, 128 (54%) to tenofovir, and 219 (92%) to efavirenz. Resistance to at least two drugs was common (196, 83%), and this was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1·7, 95% CI 1·2-2·4; p=0·0042). INTERPRETATION: Interventions are urgently needed and should target ART clinic, hospital, and post-hospital care, including differentiated care focusing on patients with advanced HIV, rapid viral load testing, and routine access to drug resistance testing. Prompt diagnosis and switching to alternative ART could reduce early mortality among inpatients with HIV. FUNDING: Joint Global Health Trials Scheme of the Medical Research Council, UK Department for International Development, and Wellcome Trust.


Assuntos
Farmacorresistência Viral , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/virologia , HIV-1/efeitos dos fármacos , Carga Viral , Adulto , Terapia Antirretroviral de Alta Atividade , Duração da Terapia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/mortalidade , HIV-1/genética , Hospitalização , Humanos , Malaui/epidemiologia , Masculino , Mortalidade , RNA Viral , Falha de Tratamento
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