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2.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 31(6): 538-548, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009087

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a historic perspective of the impact that major pandemics have had on human and their relationship with ophthalmology. The novel coronavirus epidemic is also analyzed, highlighting the relevance of the eye as a possible source of transmission, infection, and prognosis for the disease. RESULTS: Smallpox is suspected to be present for more than 12 000 years. However, trachoma seems to be the first recorded ophthalmological infectious disease. The deadliest pandemics include the bubonic plague, smallpox, and Spanish flu. The CoVID-19 epidemic is still developing and measures need to be implemented to prevent further escalation of the crisis. SUMMARY: Understanding the current facts in light of earlier historical evidence may help us prepare better to minimize the spread of infections in the future.


Assuntos
Oftalmopatias/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Animais , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus , Humanos , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919 , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Influenza Humana/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral
4.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1516, 2020 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33023561

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the association between crowding and transmission of viral respiratory infectious diseases, we investigated the change in transmission patterns of influenza and COVID-19 before and after a mass gathering event (i.e., carnival) in the Netherlands. METHODS: Information on individual hospitalizations related to the 2017/2018 influenza epidemic were accessed from Statistics Netherlands. The influenza cases were stratified between non-carnival and carnival regions. Distributions of influenza cases were plotted with time and compared between regions. A similar investigation in the early outbreak of COVID-19 was also conducted using open data from the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics between non-carnival and carnival regions were broadly similar. There were 13,836 influenza-related hospitalizations in the 2017/2018 influenza epidemic, and carnival fell about 1 week before the peak of these hospitalizations. The distributions of new influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 inhabitants with time between regions followed the same pattern with a surge of new cases in the carnival region about 1 week after carnival, which did not occur in the non-carnival region. The increase of new cases for COVID-19 in the carnival region exceeded that in the non-carnival region about 1 week after the first case was reported, but these results warrant caution as for COVID-19 there were no cases reported before the carnival and social measures were introduced shortly after carnival. CONCLUSION: In this study, a mass gathering event (carnival) was associated with aggravating the spread of viral respiratory infectious diseases.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Aglomeração , Epidemias , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Humanos , Países Baixos/epidemiologia
5.
Aust J Gen Pract ; 49(10): 683-686, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33015684

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: SARS-CoV-2 is known to cause milder disease in children when compared with adults, but the extent of this is unclear. The aim of this article is to estimate the case fatality rate (CFR) for SARS-CoV-2 infection and SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in young children aged <5 years, and compare this with estimated CFRs for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza. METHOD: This article reviews published case series of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the paediatric population and epidemiological data on COVID-19 published on official government websites internationally and in Australia. RESULTS: The CFR of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia in children aged <5 years is estimated to be 0.15-1.35%, which is lower than the estimated CFR of RSV pneumonia of 0.3-2.1%, but higher than the estimated CFR of influenza pneumonia of 0.14-0.45%. DISCUSSION: SARS-CoV-2 infection is likely to be less lethal than RSV in children aged <5 years, but more lethal than influenza.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Influenza Humana/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/mortalidade , Adolescente , Pré-Escolar , Saúde Global/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Mortalidade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/etiologia
6.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5009, 2020 10 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33024121

RESUMO

Comorbid conditions appear to be common among individuals hospitalised with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but estimates of prevalence vary and little is known about the prior medication use of patients. Here, we describe the characteristics of adults hospitalised with COVID-19 and compare them with influenza patients. We include 34,128 (US: 8362, South Korea: 7341, Spain: 18,425) COVID-19 patients, summarising between 4811 and 11,643 unique aggregate characteristics. COVID-19 patients have been majority male in the US and Spain, but predominantly female in South Korea. Age profiles vary across data sources. Compared to 84,585 individuals hospitalised with influenza in 2014-19, COVID-19 patients have more typically been male, younger, and with fewer comorbidities and lower medication use. While protecting groups vulnerable to influenza is likely a useful starting point in the response to COVID-19, strategies will likely need to be broadened to reflect the particular characteristics of individuals being hospitalised with COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Hospitalização , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Prevalência , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Espanha/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 53: e20190481, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027412

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute respiratory failure due to influenza require ventilatory support. However, mechanical ventilation itself can exacerbate lung damage and increase mortality. METHODS: The aim of this study was to describe a feasible and protective ventilation protocol, with limitation of the tidal volume to ≤6 mL/kg of the predicted weight and a driving pressure ≤15 cmH2O after application of the alveolar recruitment maneuver and PEEP titration. RESULTS: Initial improvement in oxygenation and respiratory mechanics were observed in the four cases submitted to the proposed protocol. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the mechanical ventilation strategy applied could be optimized.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana , Síndrome do Desconforto Respiratório do Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Respiração com Pressão Positiva , Respiração Artificial , Volume de Ventilação Pulmonar
8.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2020-09-25. (PHE/IHM/2020).
em Inglês | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-52741

RESUMO

This third edition of the landscape analysis of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses: Surveillance in the Americas provides regional and country-specific data that is used and valued by forums in the Region and beyond.Data of regional trends include surveillance of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), influenza-like illness (ILI), influenza vaccine, FluNet/FluID reporting, and participation in WHO’s External Quality Assessment Project (EQAP). The second half of the report presents country-specific data on sociodemographic indicators, surveillance systems, virologic analysis, laboratory capacity, and trends in human-animal interface (HAI). To strengthen the Region’s surveillance abilities, it is important to understand the current capacity of each country and the issues in that country that need attention. Similarly, to assess progress over time, it is necessary to document regional trends. Because several indicators had changed since the last analysis was published, PAHO conducted an extensive survey to collect and compile additional, varied, and detailed data. This report illustrates the complexities in surveillance of influenza and other respiratory viruses and highlights differences in the countries’ preparedness capacities through charts, infographics, tables, and brief narratives.


Assuntos
Doenças Respiratórias , Influenza Humana , Controle de Infecções , Vacinas contra Influenza , América
10.
Stroke ; 51(10): 3156-3168, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32897811

RESUMO

Understanding the relationship between infection and stroke has taken on new urgency in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This association is not a new concept, as several infections have long been recognized to contribute to stroke risk. The association of infection and stroke is also bidirectional. Although infection can lead to stroke, stroke also induces immune suppression which increases risk of infection. Apart from their short-term effects, emerging evidence suggests that poststroke immune changes may also adversely affect long-term cognitive outcomes in patients with stroke, increasing the risk of poststroke neurodegeneration and dementia. Infections at the time of stroke may also increase immune dysregulation after the stroke, further exacerbating the risk of cognitive decline. This review will cover the role of acute infections, including respiratory infections such as COVID-19, as a trigger for stroke; the role of infectious burden, or the cumulative number of infections throughout life, as a contributor to long-term risk of atherosclerotic disease and stroke; immune dysregulation after stroke and its effect on the risk of stroke-associated infection; and the impact of infection at the time of a stroke on the immune reaction to brain injury and subsequent long-term cognitive and functional outcomes. Finally, we will present a model to conceptualize the many relationships among chronic and acute infections and their short- and long-term neurological consequences. This model will suggest several directions for future research.


Assuntos
Aterosclerose/epidemiologia , Infecções/epidemiologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Arritmias Cardíacas/epidemiologia , Arritmias Cardíacas/fisiopatologia , Aterosclerose/imunologia , Aterosclerose/fisiopatologia , Bacteriemia/epidemiologia , Bacteriemia/imunologia , Bacteriemia/fisiopatologia , Betacoronavirus , Doença Crônica , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/fisiopatologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/imunologia , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/fisiopatologia , Endotélio/fisiopatologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/imunologia , Infecções por HIV/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Hospedeiro Imunocomprometido/imunologia , Infecções/imunologia , Infecções/fisiopatologia , Inflamação/imunologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/imunologia , Influenza Humana/fisiopatologia , Pandemias , Ativação Plaquetária , Agregação Plaquetária , Pneumonia/epidemiologia , Pneumonia/imunologia , Pneumonia/fisiopatologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/fisiopatologia , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/imunologia , Trombose/epidemiologia , Trombose/imunologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/epidemiologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/imunologia , Infecção pelo Vírus da Varicela-Zoster/fisiopatologia
11.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(705): 1598-1604, 2020 Sep 09.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32914590

RESUMO

Influenza A and B infections are marred with variable morbidity and, in some cases, develop into severe or even fatal respiratory, circulatory and neurologic complications. Respiratory complications are most common and involve primary-Influenza pneumonia and pneumonia from bacterial or fungal superinfections. Nonrespiratory complications can affect several organs/systems, namely the heart (myocarditis, type 1 and 2 myocardial infarction) and the nervous system (stroke, encephalitis, Guillain-Barré Syndrome). This article provides an overview of the basic pathophysiological aspects of Influenza virus infection, reviews the main severe respiratory and nonrespiratory complications and discusses the different treatments with their respective indications, contraindications and limitations.


Assuntos
Cardiopatias/virologia , Influenza Humana/fisiopatologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Influenzavirus A/patogenicidade , Influenzavirus B/patogenicidade , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/virologia , Cardiopatias/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/fisiopatologia
12.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(37): 1305-1309, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941415

RESUMO

After recognition of widespread community transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), by mid- to late February 2020, indicators of influenza activity began to decline in the Northern Hemisphere. These changes were attributed to both artifactual changes related to declines in routine health seeking for respiratory illness as well as real changes in influenza virus circulation because of widespread implementation of measures to mitigate transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Data from clinical laboratories in the United States indicated a 61% decrease in the number of specimens submitted (from a median of 49,696 per week during September 29, 2019-February 29, 2020, to 19,537 during March 1-May 16, 2020) and a 98% decrease in influenza activity as measured by percentage of submitted specimens testing positive (from a median of 19.34% to 0.33%). Interseasonal (i.e., summer) circulation of influenza in the United States (May 17-August 8, 2020) is currently at historical lows (median = 0.20% tests positive in 2020 versus 2.35% in 2019, 1.04% in 2018, and 2.36% in 2017). Influenza data reported to the World Health Organization's (WHO's) FluNet platform from three Southern Hemisphere countries that serve as robust sentinel sites for influenza from Oceania (Australia), South America (Chile), and Southern Africa (South Africa) showed very low influenza activity during June-August 2020, the months that constitute the typical Southern Hemisphere influenza season. In countries or jurisdictions where extensive community mitigation measures are maintained (e.g., face masks, social distancing, school closures, and teleworking), those locations might have little influenza circulation during the upcoming 2020-21 Northern Hemisphere influenza season. The use of community mitigation measures for the COVID-19 pandemic, plus influenza vaccination, are likely to be effective in reducing the incidence and impact of influenza, and some of these mitigation measures could have a role in preventing influenza in future seasons. However, given the novelty of the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertainty of continued community mitigation measures, it is important to plan for seasonal influenza circulation in the United States this fall and winter. Influenza vaccination of all persons aged ≥6 months remains the best method for influenza prevention and is especially important this season when SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus might cocirculate (1).


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Austrália/epidemiologia , Chile/epidemiologia , Humanos , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2020495, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32897374

RESUMO

Importance: Compared with seasonal influenza, the clinical features and epidemiologic characteristics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in US children remain largely unknown. Objective: To describe the similarities and differences in clinical features between COVID-19 and seasonal influenza in US children. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included children who were diagnosed with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 between March 25 and May 15, 2020, and children diagnosed with seasonal influenza between October 1, 2019, and June 6, 2020, at Children's National Hospital in the District of Columbia. Exposures: COVID-19 or influenza A or B. Main Outcomes and Measures: Rates of hospitalization, admission to the intensive care unit, and mechanical ventilator use and the association between underlying medical conditions, clinical symptoms, and COVID-19 vs seasonal influenza. Results: The study included 315 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (164 [52%] male; median age, 8.3 years [range, 0.03-35.6 years]) and 1402 patients diagnosed with seasonal influenza (743 [53%] male; median age, 3.9 years [range, 0.04-40.4 years]). Patients with COVID-19 and those with seasonal influenza had a similar hospitalization rate (54 [17%] vs 291 [21%], P = .15), intensive care unit admission rate (18 [6%] vs 98 [7%], P = .42), and use of mechanical ventilators (10 [3%] vs 27 [2%], P = .17). More patients hospitalized with COVID-19 than with seasonal influenza reported fever (41 [76%] vs 159 [55%], P = .005), diarrhea or vomiting (14 [26%] vs 36 [12%], P = .01), headache (6 [11%] vs 9 [3%], P = .01), body ache or myalgia (12 [22%] vs 20 [7%], P = .001), and chest pain (6 [11%] vs 9 [3%], P = .01). Differences between patients hospitalized with COVID-19 vs influenza who reported cough (24 [48%] vs 90 [31%], P = .05) and shortness of breath (16 [30%] vs 59 [20%], P = .13) were not statistically significant. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US children with COVID-19 or seasonal influenza, there was no difference in hospitalization rates, intensive care unit admission rates, and mechanical ventilator use between the 2 groups. More patients hospitalized with COVID-19 than with seasonal influenza reported clinical symptoms at the time of diagnosis.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Influenza Humana , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Adolescente , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Cidade de Nova Iorque , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estações do Ano , Adulto Jovem
14.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e17242, 2020 09 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32909955

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the influenza epidemiology among primary care workers could guide future recommendations to prevent transmission in primary care practices. Therefore, we designed a pilot study to assess the feasibility of using a work-based online influenza surveillance system among primary care workers. Such an approach is of particular relevance in the context of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, as its findings could apply to other infectious diseases with similar mechanisms of transmission. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine the feasibility of using a work-based online influenza surveillance system for primary care workers in Switzerland. METHODS: Physicians and staff of one walk-in clinic and two selected primary care practices were enrolled in this observational prospective pilot study during the 2017-2018 influenza season. They were invited to record symptoms of influenza-like illness in a weekly online survey sent by email and to self-collect a nasopharyngeal swab in case any symptoms were recorded. Samples were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction for influenza A, influenza B, and a panel of respiratory pathogens. RESULTS: Among 67 eligible staff members, 58% (n=39) consented to the study and 53% (n=36) provided data. From the time all participants were included, the weekly survey response rate stayed close to 100% until the end of the study. Of 79 symptomatic episodes (mean 2.2 episodes per participant), 10 episodes in 7 participants fitted the definition of an influenza-like illness case (attack rate: 7/36, 19%). One swab tested positive for influenza A H1N1 (attack rate: 3%, 95% CI 0%-18%). Swabbing was considered relatively easy. CONCLUSIONS: A work-based online influenza surveillance system is feasible for use among primary care workers. This promising methodology could be broadly used in future studies to improve the understanding of influenza epidemiology and other diseases such as COVID-19. This could prove to be highly useful in primary care settings and guide future recommendations to prevent transmission. A larger study will also help to assess asymptomatic infections.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Sistemas On-Line , Vigilância da População/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1 , Influenza Humana/diagnóstico , Influenza Humana/virologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Projetos Piloto , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Prevalência , Estudos Prospectivos , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Suíça
15.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1374, 2020 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32907562

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Influenza epidemics significantly weight on the Brazilian healthcare system and its society. Public health authorities have progressively expanded recommendations for vaccination against influenza, particularly to the pediatric population. However, the potential mismatch between the trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) strains and those circulating during the season remains an issue. Quadrivalent vaccines improves vaccines effectiveness by preventing any potential mismatch on influenza B lineages. METHODS: We evaluate the public health and economic benefits of the switch from TIV to QIV for the pediatric influenza recommendation (6mo-5yo) by using a dynamic epidemiological model able to consider the indirect impact of vaccination. Results of the epidemiological model are then imputed in a health-economic model adapted to the Brazilian context. We perform deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to account for both epidemiological and economical sources of uncertainty. RESULTS: Our results show that switching from TIV to QIV in the Brazilian pediatric population would prevent 406,600 symptomatic cases, 11,300 hospitalizations and almost 400 deaths by influenza season. This strategy would save 3400 life-years yearly for an incremental direct cost of R$169 million per year, down to R$86 million from a societal perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the switch would be R$49,700 per life-year saved and R$26,800 per quality-adjusted life-year gained from a public payer perspective, and even more cost-effective from a societal perspective. Our results are qualitatively similar in our sensitivity analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis shows that switching from TIV to QIV to protect children aged 6mo to 5yo in the Brazilian influenza epidemiological context could have a strong public health impact and represent a cost-effective strategy from a public payer perspective, and a highly cost-effective one from a societal perspective.


Assuntos
Análise Custo-Benefício , Vacinas contra Influenza , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Saúde Pública , Vacinação , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Economia Médica , Feminino , Hospitalização/economia , Humanos , Lactente , Vírus da Influenza B/classificação , Vírus da Influenza B/imunologia , Vacinas contra Influenza/economia , Vacinas contra Influenza/imunologia , Influenza Humana/economia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Econômicos , Anos de Vida Ajustados por Qualidade de Vida , Estações do Ano , Incerteza , Vacinação/economia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Can Respir J ; 2020: 1401053, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32934758

RESUMO

Background: The threat of contagious infectious diseases is constantly evolving as demographic explosion, travel globalization, and changes in human lifestyle increase the risk of spreading pathogens, leading to accelerated changes in disease landscape. Of particular interest is the aftermath of superimposing viral epidemics (especially SARS-CoV-2) over long-standing diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), which remains a significant disease for public health worldwide and especially in emerging economies. Methods and Results: The PubMed electronic database was systematically searched for relevant articles linking TB, influenza, and SARS-CoV viruses and subsequently assessed eligibility according to inclusion criteria. Using a data mining approach, we also queried the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). We aimed to answer the following questions: What can be learned from other coronavirus outbreaks (focusing on TB patients)? Is coinfection (TB and SARS-CoV-2) more severe? Is there a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2? How does the TB vaccine affect COVID-19? How does one diagnosis affect the other? Discussions. Few essential elements about TB and SARS-CoV coinfections were discussed. First, lessons from past outbreaks (other coronaviruses) and influenza pandemic/seasonal outbreaks have taught the importance of infection control to avoid the severe impact on TB patients. Second, although challenging due to data scarcity, investigating the pathological pathways linking TB and SARS-CoV-2 leads to the idea that their coexistence might yield a more severe clinical evolution. Finally, we addressed the issues of vaccination and diagnostic reliability in the context of coinfection. Conclusions: Because viral respiratory infections and TB impede the host's immune responses, it can be assumed that their lethal synergism may contribute to more severe clinical evolution. Despite the rapidly growing number of cases, the data needed to predict the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with latent TB and TB sequelae still lies ahead. The trial is registered with NCT04327206, NCT01829490, and NCT04121494.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Vacina BCG/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Coinfecção/imunologia , Coinfecção/fisiopatologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/fisiopatologia , Citocinas/imunologia , Erros de Diagnóstico , Surtos de Doenças , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/fisiopatologia , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/fisiopatologia , Vírus da SARS , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/fisiopatologia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Tuberculose/imunologia , Tuberculose/fisiopatologia , Tuberculose/prevenção & controle
19.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(8): 1345-1351, 2020 Aug 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32867448

RESUMO

Objective: To analyze the genomic characteristics of human infection with H9N2 avian influenza virus in Gansu province. Methods: The etiological analysis was conducted for human infection with H9N2 avian influenza virus detected in influenza like illness cases in northwestern China in 2016. Molecular bioinformatics Mega 7.0 software was used to analyze the full genomic sequences of the viral isolate. Results: The gene fragments of HA, NA, MP, NP, NS, PA, PB1 and PB2 of the isolate were highly similar (>90%) to those of H9N2 avian influenza virus strain isolated in external environment in Gansu from 2014 to 2019. The HA gene belonged to BJ/94-like branch, PB2 and MP belonged to G1/97-like branch, and the PB1, PA, NS, and NP genes belonged to F/98-like branch. MP and PB2 were closely related to H7N9, H10N8 and H5N6 viruses. Amino acid sequence alignment showed that the HA cleavage site was arranged in PSRSSR ↓ GLF, H183N and Q226L mutated which included 7 HA glycosylated sites; 62-64 sites of NA absented 3 amino acids (ITE); and M2-31N, NS1-42S, PA-356R, and PA-409N mutated. Conclusions: Apparently, this case of human infection with human infection with H9N2 avian influenza virus was an incidental. However, the isolates of H9N2 influenza virus in external environment of Gansu had a series of mammalian adaptive molecular markers, suggesting that the risk of human infection is higher. It is necessary to strengthen the surveillance by multi departments to deal with influenza pandemic.


Assuntos
Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H9N2/genética , Influenza Humana/virologia , China/epidemiologia , Microbiologia Ambiental , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H9N2/isolamento & purificação , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia
20.
F1000Res ; 9: 352, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32864104

RESUMO

Background: School closures have been a recommended non-pharmaceutical intervention in pandemic response owing to the potential to reduce transmission of infection between children, school staff and those that they contact. However, given the many roles that schools play in society, closure for any extended period is likely to have additional impacts. Literature reviews of research exploring school closure to date have focused upon epidemiological effects; there is an unmet need for research that considers the multiplicity of potential impacts of school closures. Methods: We used systematic searching, coding and synthesis techniques to develop a systems-based logic model. We included literature related to school closure planned in response to epidemics large and small, spanning the 1918-19 'flu pandemic through to the emerging literature on the 2019 novel coronavirus. We used over 170 research studies and a number of policy documents to inform our model. Results: The model organises the concepts used by authors into seven higher level domains: children's health and wellbeing, children's education, impacts on teachers and other school staff, the school organisation, considerations for parents and families, public health considerations, and broader economic impacts. The model also collates ideas about potential moderating factors and ethical considerations. While dependent upon the nature of epidemics experienced to date, we aim for the model to provide a starting point for theorising about school closures in general, and as part of a wider system that is influenced by contextual and population factors. Conclusions: The model highlights that the impacts of school closures are much broader than those related solely to health, and demonstrates that there is a need for further concerted work in this area. The publication of this logic model should help to frame future research in this area and aid decision-makers when considering future school closure policy and possible mitigation strategies.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Instituições Acadêmicas , Betacoronavirus , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos
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