Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 18.095
Filtrar
1.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(19): e017297, 2020 10 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32998607

RESUMO

Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) may worsen the prognosis of coronavirus disease 2019, but any association could be confounded by the cardiometabolic conditions indicating ACE-I/ARB use. We therefore examined the impact of ACE-Is/ARBs on respiratory tract infection outcomes. Methods and Results This cohort study included all adult patients hospitalized with influenza or pneumonia from 2005 to 2018 in Denmark using population-based medical databases. Thirty-day mortality and risk of admission to the intensive care unit in ACE-Is/ARBs users was compared with nonusers and with users of calcium channel blockers. We used propensity scores to handle confounding and computed propensity score-weighted risks, risk differences (RDs), and risk ratios (RRs). Of 568 019 patients hospitalized with influenza or pneumonia, 100 278 were ACE-I/ARB users and 37 961 were users of calcium channel blockers. In propensity score-weighted analyses, ACE-I/ARB users had marginally lower 30-day mortality than users of calcium channel blockers (13.9% versus 14.5%; RD, -0.6%; 95% CI, -1.0 to -0.1; RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), and a lower risk of admission to the intensive care unit (8.0% versus 9.6%; RD, -1.6%; 95% CI, -2.0 to -1.2; RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.80-0.87). Compared with nonusers, current ACE-I/ARB users had lower mortality (RD, -2.4%; 95% CI, -2.8 to -2.0; RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.83-0.87), but similar risk of admission to the intensive care unit (RD, 0.4%; 95% CI, 0.0-0.7; RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.09). Conclusions Among patients with influenza or pneumonia, ACE-I/ARB users had no increased risk of admission to the intensive care unit and slightly reduced mortality after controlling for confounding.


Assuntos
Antagonistas de Receptores de Angiotensina/uso terapêutico , Inibidores da Enzima Conversora de Angiotensina/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Influenza Humana/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia/tratamento farmacológico , Sistema Renina-Angiotensina/efeitos dos fármacos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Masculino , Razão de Chances , Pandemias , Pneumonia/epidemiologia , Pontuação de Propensão , Estudos Retrospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida/tendências
3.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5009, 2020 10 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33024121

RESUMO

Comorbid conditions appear to be common among individuals hospitalised with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but estimates of prevalence vary and little is known about the prior medication use of patients. Here, we describe the characteristics of adults hospitalised with COVID-19 and compare them with influenza patients. We include 34,128 (US: 8362, South Korea: 7341, Spain: 18,425) COVID-19 patients, summarising between 4811 and 11,643 unique aggregate characteristics. COVID-19 patients have been majority male in the US and Spain, but predominantly female in South Korea. Age profiles vary across data sources. Compared to 84,585 individuals hospitalised with influenza in 2014-19, COVID-19 patients have more typically been male, younger, and with fewer comorbidities and lower medication use. While protecting groups vulnerable to influenza is likely a useful starting point in the response to COVID-19, strategies will likely need to be broadened to reflect the particular characteristics of individuals being hospitalised with COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Hospitalização , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Prevalência , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Espanha/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
4.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd ; 1642020 08 13.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33030318

RESUMO

The Dutch example shows that there are not only differences but also several similarities between COVID-19 and the Spanish flu, although risk of infection and death toll were much higher than they are now, especially at the end of 1918. These similarities include emphasis on the importance of hand washing, prohibition of gatherings (and disregard of these rules), disruption of public life, uncertainty about the nature of the cause, praise of and warnings against ineffective medication as well as debate on use and necessity of certain measures. There is also the social context in which the disease and the measures taken to combat it are happening, with the poor paying the highest price, now as well as then.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1 , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919/história , Influenza Humana/história , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , História do Século XX , Humanos , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919/mortalidade , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919/prevenção & controle , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
5.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 47(6): 621-622, 2020 11 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33063776

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect most aspects of daily life, and looking for ways to cope and adapt in this altered state is a priority. Days of unsettling changes have turned into weeks, months, and, most likely, at least a year or more until an effective vaccine is distributed worldwide. COVID-19 has disrupted societies across the world, with a global scope that is unprecedented, ongoing, and without a demarcated end. Combined with the political turmoil related to the presidential election in the United States, environmental turmoil including widespread fires, and ongoing structural barriers (most notably systemic racism), 2020 has been, for most, a year that will live on in our minds long after the pandemic ends. .


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Influenza Humana , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Incerteza
6.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(42): 1528-1534, 2020 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33090987

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is primarily a respiratory illness, although increasing evidence indicates that infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can affect multiple organ systems (1). Data that examine all in-hospital complications of COVID-19 and that compare these complications with those associated with other viral respiratory pathogens, such as influenza, are lacking. To assess complications of COVID-19 and influenza, electronic health records (EHRs) from 3,948 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (March 1-May 31, 2020) and 5,453 hospitalized patients with influenza (October 1, 2018-February 1, 2020) from the national Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the largest integrated health care system in the United States,* were analyzed. Using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) codes, complications in patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were compared with those in patients with influenza. Risk ratios were calculated and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and underlying medical conditions; proportions of complications were stratified among patients with COVID-19 by race/ethnicity. Patients with COVID-19 had almost 19 times the risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than did patients with influenza, (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 18.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 12.40-28.00), and more than twice the risk for myocarditis (2.56; 1.17-5.59), deep vein thrombosis (2.81; 2.04-3.87), pulmonary embolism (2.10; 1.53-2.89), intracranial hemorrhage (2.85; 1.35-6.03), acute hepatitis/liver failure (3.13; 1.92-5.10), bacteremia (2.46; 1.91-3.18), and pressure ulcers (2.65; 2.14-3.27). The risks for exacerbations of asthma (0.27; 0.16-0.44) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (0.37; 0.32-0.42) were lower among patients with COVID-19 than among those with influenza. The percentage of COVID-19 patients who died while hospitalized (21.0%) was more than five times that of influenza patients (3.8%), and the duration of hospitalization was almost three times longer for COVID-19 patients. Among patients with COVID-19, the risk for respiratory, neurologic, and renal complications, and sepsis was higher among non-Hispanic Black or African American (Black) patients, patients of other races, and Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic) patients compared with those in non-Hispanic White (White) patients, even after adjusting for age and underlying medical conditions. These findings highlight the higher risk for most complications associated with COVID-19 compared with influenza and might aid clinicians and researchers in recognizing, monitoring, and managing the spectrum of COVID-19 manifestations. The higher risk for certain complications among racial and ethnic minority patients provides further evidence that certain racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionally affected by COVID-19 and that this disparity is not solely accounted for by age and underlying medical conditions.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Hospitalização , Influenza Humana/complicações , Influenza Humana/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Idoso , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Mortalidade Hospitalar/tendências , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Doenças Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Doenças Respiratórias/virologia , Medição de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
9.
Front Immunol ; 11: 552909, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33013925

RESUMO

The 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has caused a global health emergency. The outbreak of this virus has raised a number of questions: What is SARS-CoV-2? How transmissible is SARS-CoV-2? How severely affected are patients infected with SARS-CoV-2? What are the risk factors for viral infection? What are the differences between this novel coronavirus and other coronaviruses? To answer these questions, we performed a comparative study of four pathogenic viruses that primarily attack the respiratory system and may cause death, namely, SARS-CoV-2, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV), and influenza A viruses (H1N1 and H3N2 strains). This comparative study provides a critical evaluation of the origin, genomic features, transmission, and pathogenicity of these viruses. Because the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 is ongoing, this evaluation may inform public health administrators and medical experts to aid in curbing the pandemic's progression.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/genética , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/genética , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/genética , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vírus da SARS/genética , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia , Animais , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Aves/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/patogenicidade , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/patogenicidade , Influenza Aviária/epidemiologia , Influenza Aviária/transmissão , Influenza Aviária/virologia , Influenza Humana/transmissão , Influenza Humana/virologia , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/patogenicidade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Vírus da SARS/patogenicidade , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/transmissão , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/virologia , Virulência/imunologia
10.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(9): 953-956, 2020 09 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33031079

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Physical distancing preventive measures were implemented in Mexico as a response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (CoViD-19) pandemic. School closures occurred on March 16, 2020, in 10 out of 32 Mexican states, and one week later in the remaining states. Because the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the influenza virus have similar transmission mechanisms, we aimed to evaluate the impact of physical distancing on the incidence of influenza as a proxy of the impact on SARS-CoV-2 contagion. METHODOLOGY: A national flu surveillance system was cross-sectionally analyzed and daily average percent changes (APCs) of incidence rates were calculated throught Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Greater decreasing trends (APCs -8.8, 95% CI: -12.5, -4.5; vs. -6.0, 95% CI: -9.9, -2.0; p = 0.026) were documented in the states with earlier school closures and across age groups, suggesting that earlier implementation of physical distance results in reduced SARS-CoV-2 spread. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distancing policies decrease the incidence of influenza infections in Mexico; its favorable impact on the spread of SARS-CoV-2 is commendable.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Política de Saúde , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Quarentena/métodos , Distância Social , Isolamento Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Masculino , México/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Adulto Jovem
11.
Cell ; 183(2): 285-289, 2020 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33064981

RESUMO

Tragic events such as pandemics can be remembered as well as foreshadowed by works of art. Paintings by the artists Edvard Munch and John Singer Sargent (1918-19) tell us in real time what it was like to be stricken by the Spanish flu. Paintings by Edward Hopper (1940s and '50s) foretell the lockdown and social distancing of today's COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919 , Medicina nas Artes , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Pessoas Famosas , História do Século XX , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , I Guerra Mundial
15.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(15): 1777-1794, 2020 10 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33032740

RESUMO

Viral respiratory infections are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Underlying CVD is also associated with an increased risk of complications following viral respiratory infections, including increased morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization. Globally, these phenomena are observed with seasonal influenza and with the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Persons with CVD represent an important target population for respiratory virus vaccines, with capacity developed within 3 large ongoing influenza vaccine cardiovascular outcomes trials to determine the potential cardioprotective effects of influenza vaccines. In the context of COVID-19, these international trial networks may be uniquely positioned to redeploy infrastructure to study therapies for primary and secondary prevention of COVID-19. Here, we describe mechanistic links between influenza and COVID-19 infection and the risk of acute cardiovascular events, summarize the data to date on the potential cardioprotective effects of influenza vaccines, and describe the ongoing influenza vaccine cardiovascular outcomes trials, highlighting important lessons learned that are applicable to COVID-19.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Infecções por Coronavirus , Vacinas contra Influenza/farmacologia , Influenza Humana , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Cardiotônicos/farmacologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Saúde Pública , Fatores de Risco , Vacinação/métodos
16.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 31(6): 538-548, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009087

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a historic perspective of the impact that major pandemics have had on human and their relationship with ophthalmology. The novel coronavirus epidemic is also analyzed, highlighting the relevance of the eye as a possible source of transmission, infection, and prognosis for the disease. RESULTS: Smallpox is suspected to be present for more than 12 000 years. However, trachoma seems to be the first recorded ophthalmological infectious disease. The deadliest pandemics include the bubonic plague, smallpox, and Spanish flu. The CoVID-19 epidemic is still developing and measures need to be implemented to prevent further escalation of the crisis. SUMMARY: Understanding the current facts in light of earlier historical evidence may help us prepare better to minimize the spread of infections in the future.


Assuntos
Oftalmopatias/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Animais , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus , Humanos , Influenza Pandêmica, 1918-1919 , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Influenza Humana/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral
17.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1516, 2020 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33023561

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the association between crowding and transmission of viral respiratory infectious diseases, we investigated the change in transmission patterns of influenza and COVID-19 before and after a mass gathering event (i.e., carnival) in the Netherlands. METHODS: Information on individual hospitalizations related to the 2017/2018 influenza epidemic were accessed from Statistics Netherlands. The influenza cases were stratified between non-carnival and carnival regions. Distributions of influenza cases were plotted with time and compared between regions. A similar investigation in the early outbreak of COVID-19 was also conducted using open data from the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics between non-carnival and carnival regions were broadly similar. There were 13,836 influenza-related hospitalizations in the 2017/2018 influenza epidemic, and carnival fell about 1 week before the peak of these hospitalizations. The distributions of new influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 inhabitants with time between regions followed the same pattern with a surge of new cases in the carnival region about 1 week after carnival, which did not occur in the non-carnival region. The increase of new cases for COVID-19 in the carnival region exceeded that in the non-carnival region about 1 week after the first case was reported, but these results warrant caution as for COVID-19 there were no cases reported before the carnival and social measures were introduced shortly after carnival. CONCLUSION: In this study, a mass gathering event (carnival) was associated with aggravating the spread of viral respiratory infectious diseases.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Aglomeração , Epidemias , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Humanos , Países Baixos/epidemiologia
18.
PLoS Med ; 17(9): e1003225, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926731

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Early studies of narcolepsy after AS03-adjuvanted pandemic A/H1N12009 vaccine (Pandemrix) could not define the duration of elevated risk post-vaccination nor the risk in children aged under 5 years who may not present until much older. METHODS/FINDINGS: Clinical information and sleep test results, extracted from hospital notes at 3 large pediatric sleep centers in England between September 2017 and June 2018 for narcolepsy cases aged 4-19 years with symptom onset since January 2009, were reviewed by an expert panel to confirm the diagnosis. Vaccination histories were independently obtained from general practitioners (GPs). The odds of vaccination in narcolepsy cases compared with the age-matched English population was calculated after adjustment for clinical conditions that were indications for vaccination. GP questionnaires were returned for 242 of the 244 children with confirmed narcolepsy. Of these 5 were under 5 years, 118 were 5-11 years, and 119 were 12-19 years old at diagnosis; 39 were vaccinated with Pandemrix before onset. The odds ratio (OR) for onset at any time after vaccination was 1.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-2.89), The elevated risk period was restricted to onsets within 12 months of vaccination (OR 6.65 [3.44-12.85]) and was highest within the first 6 months. After one year, ORs were not significantly different from 1 up to 8 years after vaccination. The ORs were similar in under five-year-olds and older ages. The estimated attributable risk was 1 in 34,500 doses. Our study is limited by including cases from only 3 sleep centers, who may differ from cases diagnosed in nonparticipating centers, and by imprecision in defining the centers' catchment population. The potential for biased recall of onset shortly after vaccination in cases aware of the association cannot be excluded. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that vaccine-attributable cases have onset of narcolepsy within 12 months of Pandemrix vaccination. The attributable risk is higher than previously estimated in England because of identification of vaccine-attributable cases with late diagnoses. Absence of a compensatory drop in risk 1-8 years after vaccination suggests that Pandemrix does not trigger onsets in those in whom narcolepsy would have occurred later.


Assuntos
Narcolepsia/etiologia , Polissorbatos/efeitos adversos , Esqualeno/efeitos adversos , Vacinação/efeitos adversos , alfa-Tocoferol/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Combinação de Medicamentos , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/imunologia , Vacinas contra Influenza/efeitos adversos , Vacinas contra Influenza/uso terapêutico , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Masculino , Narcolepsia/epidemiologia , Narcolepsia/imunologia , Razão de Chances , Pandemias , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Biomed Environ Sci ; 33(8): 614-619, 2020 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933613

RESUMO

This study aimed to understand the differences in clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory features between the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019) and influenza A in children. Data of 23 hospitalized children with COVID-19 (9 boys, 5.7 ± 3.8 years old) were compared with age- and sex-matched 69 hospitalized and 69 outpatient children with influenza A from a hospital in China. The participants' epidemiological history, family cluster, clinical manifestations, and blood test results were assessed. Compared with either inpatients or outpatients with influenza A, children with COVID-19 showed significantly more frequent family infections and higher ratio of low fever (< 37.3 °C), but shorter cough and fever duration, lower body temperature, and lower rates of cough, fever, high fever (> 39 °C), nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sore throat, vomiting, myalgia or arthralgia, and febrile seizures. They also showed higher counts of lymphocytes, T lymphocyte CD8, and platelets and levels of cholinesterase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactic acid, but lower serum amyloid, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and shorter prothrombin time. The level of alanine aminotransferase in children with COVID-19 is lower than that in inpatients but higher than that in outpatients with influenza A. Pediatric COVID-19 is associated with more frequent family infection, milder symptoms, and milder immune responses relative to pediatric influenza A.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/sangue , Influenza Humana/imunologia , Masculino , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/sangue , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia
20.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(37): 1305-1309, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941415

RESUMO

After recognition of widespread community transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), by mid- to late February 2020, indicators of influenza activity began to decline in the Northern Hemisphere. These changes were attributed to both artifactual changes related to declines in routine health seeking for respiratory illness as well as real changes in influenza virus circulation because of widespread implementation of measures to mitigate transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Data from clinical laboratories in the United States indicated a 61% decrease in the number of specimens submitted (from a median of 49,696 per week during September 29, 2019-February 29, 2020, to 19,537 during March 1-May 16, 2020) and a 98% decrease in influenza activity as measured by percentage of submitted specimens testing positive (from a median of 19.34% to 0.33%). Interseasonal (i.e., summer) circulation of influenza in the United States (May 17-August 8, 2020) is currently at historical lows (median = 0.20% tests positive in 2020 versus 2.35% in 2019, 1.04% in 2018, and 2.36% in 2017). Influenza data reported to the World Health Organization's (WHO's) FluNet platform from three Southern Hemisphere countries that serve as robust sentinel sites for influenza from Oceania (Australia), South America (Chile), and Southern Africa (South Africa) showed very low influenza activity during June-August 2020, the months that constitute the typical Southern Hemisphere influenza season. In countries or jurisdictions where extensive community mitigation measures are maintained (e.g., face masks, social distancing, school closures, and teleworking), those locations might have little influenza circulation during the upcoming 2020-21 Northern Hemisphere influenza season. The use of community mitigation measures for the COVID-19 pandemic, plus influenza vaccination, are likely to be effective in reducing the incidence and impact of influenza, and some of these mitigation measures could have a role in preventing influenza in future seasons. However, given the novelty of the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertainty of continued community mitigation measures, it is important to plan for seasonal influenza circulation in the United States this fall and winter. Influenza vaccination of all persons aged ≥6 months remains the best method for influenza prevention and is especially important this season when SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus might cocirculate (1).


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Austrália/epidemiologia , Chile/epidemiologia , Humanos , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA