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1.
Global Health ; 17(1): 4, 2021 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33402169

RESUMO

During global pandemics, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), crisis communication is indispensable in dispelling fears, uncertainty, and unifying individuals worldwide in a collective fight against health threats. Inadequate crisis communication can bring dire personal and economic consequences. Mounting research shows that seemingly endless newsfeeds related to COVID-19 infection and death rates could considerably increase the risk of mental health problems. Unfortunately, media reports that include infodemics regarding the influence of COVID-19 on mental health may be a source of the adverse psychological effects on individuals. Owing partially to insufficient crisis communication practices, media and news organizations across the globe have played minimal roles in battling COVID-19 infodemics. Common refrains include raging QAnon conspiracies, a false and misleading "Chinese virus" narrative, and the use of disinfectants to "cure" COVID-19. With the potential to deteriorate mental health, infodemics fueled by a kaleidoscopic range of misinformation can be dangerous. Unfortunately, there is a shortage of research on how to improve crisis communication across media and news organization channels. This paper identifies ways that legacy media reports on COVID-19 and how social media-based infodemics can result in mental health concerns. This paper discusses possible crisis communication solutions that media and news organizations can adopt to mitigate the negative influences of COVID-19 related news on mental health. Emphasizing the need for global media entities to forge a fact-based, person-centered, and collaborative response to COVID-19 reporting, this paper encourages media resources to focus on the core issue of how to slow or stop COVID-19 transmission effectively.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Comunicação em Saúde/normas , Humanos , Meios de Comunicação de Massa/normas , Pandemias , Mídias Sociais/normas
2.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 75-83, 2021 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33424467

RESUMO

Objective: There are concerns about nonscientific and/or unclear information on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) that is available on the Internet. Furthermore, people's ability to understand health information varies and depends on their skills in reading and interpreting information. This study aims to evaluate the readability and creditability of websites with COVID-19-related information. Methods: The search terms "coronavirus," "COVID," and "COVID-19" were input into Google. The websites of the first thirty results for each search term were evaluated in terms of their credibility and readability using the Health On the Net Foundation code of conduct (HONcode) and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), Gunning Fog, and Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRE) scales, respectively. Results: The readability of COVID-19-related health information on websites was suitable for high school graduates or college students and, thus, was far above the recommended readability level. Most websites that were examined (87.2%) had not been officially certified by HONcode. There was no significant difference in the readability scores of websites with and without HONcode certification. Conclusion: These results suggest that organizations should improve the readability of their websites and provide information that more people can understand. This could lead to greater health literacy, less health anxiety, and the provision of better preventive information about the disease.


Assuntos
/enfermagem , Compreensão , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Confiabilidade dos Dados , Bases de Dados Factuais/estatística & dados numéricos , Letramento em Saúde/métodos , Internet , Autocuidado/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
3.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 90-96, 2021 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33424469

RESUMO

Background: A request for consumer health information training for public librarians led to the development of a specialized consumer health reference and health literacy training program by professional consumer health librarians from an academic medical center. Professional consumer health librarians created an interactive presentation aimed at improving public librarians' ability to respond to consumer health questions and provide vetted health resources. Case Presentation: Building on professional expertise, librarians at Weill Cornell Medicine developed a live class demonstration accompanied by a representative subject LibGuide to support public librarians who assist patrons with health questions. Skills involved in effectively communicating with patrons who are seeking consumer health information include conducting reference interviews, matching patrons' needs with appropriate resources, teaching useful Internet search methods, assessing health information, and understanding health literacy issues. Originally envisioned as two in-person live demonstrations, the team proactively adapted the program to respond to the stay-at-home social-distancing order put in place in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Conclusions: The team successfully led an in-person live training session followed by an adapted online training experience, the latter designed to complete the curricula while complying with city and state orders.


Assuntos
Instrução por Computador/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/estatística & dados numéricos , Currículo , Letramento em Saúde/métodos , Bibliotecários/educação , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cidade de Nova Iorque
4.
Health Commun ; 36(1): 74-80, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33167736

RESUMO

Emerging infectious disease (EID) outbreaks such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic create unknown risks, uncertainty, and anxiety around the world. Accurate and timely information can help the public understand the outbreak and manage their lives. Presented here is a study of how residents of Hubei Province, the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in China, use media for information seeking, scanning, and sharing while under lockdown through in-depth interviews. We find that (1) individuals primarily acquire information through information scanning from official governmental sources, (2) information sharing is more frequent with family members through private channels than with one's extended social networks and the general public through pubic channels mostly due to concerns with censorship, and (3) individuals' information need and information use change substantially during different stages of the outbreak. These findings provide insights into how individuals in China use different media for information during an unprecedented public health crisis and make sense of the limited and often confusing and contradictory information that is available to them. Such findings can inform future health communication efforts during EID outbreaks.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Adulto , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Relações Interpessoais , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Mídias Sociais
5.
Health Commun ; 36(1): 23-31, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33183090

RESUMO

This online survey took place on March 7, 2020 at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States. Participants (n = 698) completed an online survey in which they were asked to reflect on their mediated and interpersonal information consumption, in addition to reporting on risk perceptions, general efficacy perceptions, and preventative behaviors specific to COVID-19 in the past seven days. Participant age and chronic condition status were controlled for in all analyses. Time spent consuming news, social media, and health website information was not related to risk perceptions. Time spent on health websites predicted time spent having interpersonal conversations about COVID-19, as well as general efficacy levels. Following the Extended Parallel Process Model, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, and general perceived efficacy predicted preventative behaviors. The vast majority of participants did report taking preventative action against COVID-19, most commonly in the form of hand washing, with many enacting stronger preventative behaviors that had yet to be recommended for the general population. Overall, mediated and interpersonal information exposure had minimal effects on perceived risk and perceived general efficacy, which in turn predicted 27.5% of the variance in preventative behavior. Efficacy was the most powerful among these predictors, and health websites, specifically governmental websites, appeared to be underutilized resources with the potential to promote efficacy during outbreaks. Further research is needed to understand causation in these relationships and to assist in successful message transmission.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Autoeficácia , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Comunicação em Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Medição de Risco , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
6.
Health Commun ; 36(1): 81-88, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33249853

RESUMO

During the COVID-19 pandemic, parents were issued numerous, sometimes changing, safeguarding directives including social distancing, mask use, hygiene, and stay-at-home orders. Enacting these behaviors for the parent presented challenges, but the responsibility for children to follow protocol properly was an even more daunting undertaking. Self-efficacy is one of the most power predictors of health behavior and has been adapted to a context-specific crisis self-efficacy scale conducted on March20, 2020, captures real-time perceptions of parents as coronavirus anxieties peaked. The study reveals a relationship between self- and protective efficacy that is mediated by parents' assessments of how informed they are about COVID-19. It also examines the role of perceived knowledge on information-seeking and scrutiny of pandemic information found online. Important directions for future research to develop the protective efficacy construct emerge as well as evidence of the rich applied and theoretical value of a deeper understanding of the perceived ability to perform recommended actions to protect another.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Pais/psicologia , Autoeficácia , Adulto , Idoso , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Pandemias , Medição de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adulto Jovem
8.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 12: CD012829, 2020 12 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33285618

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is now a rising commitment to acknowledge the role patients and families play in contributing to their safety. This review focuses on one type of involvement in safety - patient and family involvement in escalation of care for serious life-threatening conditions i.e. helping secure a step-up to urgent or emergency care - which has been receiving increasing policy and practice attention. This review was concerned with the negotiation work that patient and family members undertake across the emergency care escalation pathway, once contact has been made with healthcare staff. It includes interventions aiming to improve detection of symptoms, communication of concerns and staff response to these concerns. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions designed to increase patient and family involvement in escalation of care for acute life-threatening illness on patient and family outcomes, treatment outcomes, clinical outcomes, patient and family experience and adverse events. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP) ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform from 1 Jan 2000 to 24 August 2018. The search was updated on 21 October 2019. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-randomised controlled trials where the intervention focused on patients and families working with healthcare professionals to ensure care received for acute deterioration was timely and appropriate. A key criterion was to include an interactive element of rehearsal, role play, modelling, shared language, group work etc. to the intervention to help patients and families have agency in the process of escalation of care. The interventions included components such as enabling patients and families to detect changes in patients' conditions and to speak up about these changes to staff. We also included studies where the intervention included a component targeted at enabling staff response. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Seven of the eight authors were involved in screening; two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies, with any disagreements resolved by discussion to reach consensus. Primary outcomes included patient and family outcomes, treatment outcomes, clinical outcomes, patient and family experience and adverse events. Our advisory group (four users and four providers) ensured that the review was of relevance and could inform policy and practice. MAIN RESULTS: We included nine studies involving 436,684 patients and family members and one ongoing study. The published studies focused on patients with specific conditions such as coronary artery disease, ischaemic stroke, and asthma, as well as pregnant women, inpatients on medical surgical wards, older adults and high-risk patients with a history of poor self-management. While all studies tested interventions versus usual care, for four studies the usual care group also received educational or information strategies. Seven of the interventions involved face-to-face, interactional education/coaching sessions aimed at patients/families while two provided multi-component education programmes which included components targeted at staff as well as patients/families. All of the interventions included: (1) an educational component about the acute condition and preparedness for future events such as stroke or change in fetal movements: (2) an engagement element (self-monitoring, action plans); while two additionally focused on shared language or communication skills. We had concerns about risk of bias for all but one of the included studies in respect of one or more criteria, particularly regarding blinding of participants and personnel. Our confidence in results regarding the effectiveness of interventions was moderate to low. Low-certainty evidence suggests that there may be moderate improvement in patients' knowledge of acute life-threatening conditions, danger signs, appropriate care-seeking responses, and preparedness capacity between interactional patient-facing interventions and multi-component programmes and usual care at 12 months (MD 4.20, 95% CI 2.44 to 5.97, 2 studies, 687 participants). Four studies in total assessed knowledge (3,086 participants) but we were unable to include two other studies in the pooled analysis due to differences in the way outcome measures were reported. One found no improvement in knowledge but higher symptom preparedness at 12 months. The other study found an improvement in patients' knowledge about symptoms and appropriate care-seeking responses in the intervention group at 18 months compared with usual care. Low-certainty evidence from two studies, each using a different measure, meant that we were unable to determine the effects of patient-based interventions on self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was higher in the intervention group in one study but there was no difference in the other compared with usual care. We are uncertain whether interactional patient-facing and multi-component programmes improve time from the start of patient symptoms to treatment due to low-certainty evidence for this outcome. We were unable to combine the data due to differences in outcome measures. Three studies found that arrival times or prehospital delay time was no different between groups. One found that delay time was shorter in the intervention group. Moderate-certainty evidence suggests that multi-component interventions probably have little or no impact on mortality rates. Only one study on a pregnant population was eligible for inclusion in the review, which found no difference between groups in rates of stillbirth. In terms of unintended events, we found that interactional patient-facing interventions to increase patient and family involvement in escalation of care probably have few adverse effects on patient's anxiety levels (moderate-certainty evidence). None of the studies measured or reported patient and family perceptions of involvement in escalation of care or patient and family experience of patient care. Reported outcomes related to healthcare professionals were also not reported in any studies. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Our review identified that interactional patient-facing interventions and multi-component programmes (including staff) to increase patient and family involvement in escalation of care for acute life-threatening illness may improve patient and family knowledge about danger signs and care-seeking responses, and probably have few adverse effects on patient's anxiety levels when compared to usual care. Multi-component interventions probably have little impact on mortality rates. Further high-quality trials are required using multi-component interventions and a focus on relational elements of care. Cognitive and behavioural outcomes should be included at patient and staff level.


Assuntos
Estado Terminal/terapia , Tratamento de Emergência , Família , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde , Participação do Paciente/métodos , Segurança do Paciente , Doença Aguda/mortalidade , Doença Aguda/psicologia , Doença Aguda/terapia , Adulto , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Comunicação , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Estado Terminal/mortalidade , Estado Terminal/psicologia , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Negociação/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Gravidez , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Autoeficácia , Avaliação de Sintomas/métodos
9.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e040989, 2020 10 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33109677

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The spread of misinformation has accompanied the coronavirus pandemic, including topics such as immune boosting to prevent COVID-19. This study explores how immune boosting is portrayed on the internet during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Content analysis. METHODS: We compiled a dataset of 227 webpages from Google searches in Canada and the USA using the phrase 'boost immunity' AND 'coronavirus' on 1 April 2020. We coded webpages for typology and portrayal of immune boosting and supplements. We recorded mentions of microbiome, whether the webpage was selling or advertising an immune boosting product or service, and suggested strategies for boosting immunity. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between webpages that appeared in the searches in Canada and the USA. The most common types of webpages were from news (40.5%) and commercial (24.7%) websites. The concept of immune boosting was portrayed as beneficial for avoiding COVID-19 in 85.5% of webpages and supplements were portrayed as beneficial in 40% of the webpages, but commercial sites were more likely to have these portrayals. The top immune boosting strategies were vitamin C (34.8%), diet (34.4%), sleep (34.4%), exercise (30.8%) and zinc (26.9%). Less than 10% of the webpages provide any critique of the concept of immune boosting. CONCLUSIONS: Pairing evidence-based advice for maintaining one's health (eg, healthy diet, exercise, sleep) with the phrase immune boosting and strategies lacking in evidence may inadvertently help to legitimise the concept, making it a powerful marketing tool. Results demonstrate how the spread of misinformation is complex and often more subtle than blatant fraudulent claims.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Infecções por Coronavirus , Fatores Imunológicos , Imunoterapia , Internet , Marketing , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Canadá/epidemiologia , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Confiabilidade dos Dados , Suplementos Nutricionais/normas , Humanos , Fatores Imunológicos/normas , Fatores Imunológicos/uso terapêutico , Imunoterapia/métodos , Imunoterapia/normas , Disseminação de Informação/ética , Disseminação de Informação/métodos , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Internet/tendências , Marketing/ética , Marketing/métodos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Saúde Pública , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(8): e15899, 2020 08 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32773375

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Uncertainty is integral to evidence-informed decision making and is of particular importance for preference-sensitive decisions. Communicating uncertainty to patients and the public has long been identified as a goal in the informed and shared decision-making movement. Despite this, there is little quantitative research on how uncertainty in health information is perceived by readers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different uncertainty descriptions regarding the evidence for a treatment effect in a written research summary for the public. METHODS: We developed 8 versions of a research summary on a fictitious drug for tinnitus with varying degrees (Q1), sources (Q2), and magnitudes of uncertainty (Q3). We recruited 2099 members of the German public from a web-based research panel. Of these, 1727 fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were randomly presented with one of these research summaries. Randomization was conducted by using a centralized computer with a random number generator. Web-based recruitment and data collection were fully automated. Participants were not aware of the purpose of the study and alternative presentations. We measured the following outcomes: perception of the treatment effectiveness (primary), certainty in the judgement of treatment effectiveness, perception of the body of evidence, text quality, and intended decision. The outcomes were self-assessed. RESULTS: For the primary outcome, we did not find a global effect for Q1 and Q2 (P=.25 and P=.73), but we found a global effect for Q3 (P=.048). Pairwise comparisons showed a weaker perception of treatment effectiveness for the research summary with 3 sources of uncertainty compared to the version with 2 sources of uncertainty (P=.04). Specifically, the proportion of the participants in the group with 3 sources of uncertainty that perceived the drug as possibly beneficial was 9% lower than that of the participants in the group with 2 sources of uncertainty (92/195, 47.2% vs 111/197, 56.3%, respectively). The proportion of the participants in the group with 3 sources of uncertainty that considered the drug to be of unclear benefit was 8% higher than that of the participants in the group with 2 sources of uncertainty (72/195, 36.9% vs 57/197, 28.9%, respectively). However, there was no significant difference compared to the version with 1 source of uncertainty (P=.31). We did not find any meaningful differences between the research summaries for the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Communicating even a large magnitude of uncertainty for a treatment effect had little impact on the perceived effectiveness. Efforts to improve public understanding of research are needed to improve the understanding of evidence-based health information. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00015911, https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00015911. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/13425.


Assuntos
Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia , Incerteza , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Envio de Mensagens de Texto
12.
Matern Child Health J ; 24(10): 1238-1247, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32613332

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Parents of children with a chronic illness (CI) are at risk for psychosocial problems. The aim of this study was to refine an existing face-to-face intervention into an online psychosocial group intervention for parents by (1) exploring which themes are important, (2) determine what type of intervention parents would like and (3) assess parents' practical preferences. METHODS: Parents of children with a CI (0-18 years) were invited to complete an online questionnaire. To acquire more in-depth information, focus groups and telephone interviews were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS: 272 parents (mean age = 43.1 years, 85% female) participated. Three focus groups (15 parents) and seven telephone interviews were conducted. Most important themes were: the CI of the child, family functioning, taking care of yourself, relationships with others and practical support. Parents preferred a group with parents of children in the same age category. At first, parents preferred face-to-face contact. After an explanation and demonstration of an online intervention, parents became more positive about online support, mostly because they could participate from home. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Parents have a need for psychosocial support focusing on different themes. Professionals should explain and demonstrate an online intervention to parents. Based on these results, Op Koers Online for parents was developed. An RCT to assess feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention is currently running.


Assuntos
Doença Crônica/psicologia , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental/métodos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Internet , Pais/educação , Psicoterapia de Grupo/métodos , Qualidade de Vida , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/organização & administração , Família , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Pais/psicologia , Apoio Social , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
15.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 966, 2020 Jun 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32560712

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is increasing in Vietnam with studies indicating low levels of knowledge and awareness and late presentation. While there is a growing body of literature on challenges faced by women in accessing breast cancer services, and for delivering care, no studies have sought to analyse breast cancer messaging in the Vietnamese popular media. The aim of this study was to investigate and understand the content of messages concerning breast cancer in online Vietnamese newspapers in order to inform future health promotional content. METHODS: This study describes a mixed-methods media content analysis that counted and ranked frequencies for media content (article text, themes and images) related to breast cancer in six Vietnamese online news publications over a twelve month period. RESULTS: Media content (n = 129 articles & n = 237 images) sampled showed that although information is largely accurate, there is a marked lack of stories about Vietnamese women's personal experiences. Such stories could help bridge the gap between what information about breast cancer is presented in the Vietnamese media, and what women in Vietnam understand about breast cancer risk factors, symptoms, screening and treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Given findings from other studies indicating low levels of knowledge and women with breast cancer experiencing stigma and prejudice, more nuanced and in-depth narrative-focused messaging may be required.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/psicologia , Meios de Comunicação , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/psicologia , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Preconceito , Estigma Social , Vietnã
16.
s.l; Paraná (Estado). Secretaria de Estado; jun. 2020.
Não convencional em Português | LILACS, Coleciona SUS | ID: biblio-1102899

RESUMO

O Plano de Contingência é um documento elaborado com o intuito de auxiliar o Estado do Paraná na resposta ao enfrentamento da pandemia pelo coronavírus, originada na cidade de Wuhan, na China, no final do ano de 2019. O vírus SARS CoV-2, causador da Doença COVID-19, pode determinar sérios danos à saúde das pessoas e à economia dos entes federados. Neste Plano estão definidas as responsabilidades da Secretaria de Estado e Secretarias Municipais de Saúde, em parceria com o Ministério da Saúde, na organização necessária para gestão e funcionamento dos serviços de saúde, de modo a atender as situações de emergência relacionadas à circulação do vírus no Paraná. O documento visa a integralidade das ações na prevenção e monitoramento da doença, bem como na assistência à saúde da população. As ações em andamento e as que serão implementadas devem promover a assistência adequada às pessoas, com sensível e oportuna atuação da vigilância em saúde, bem como ações de informação e comunicação. Para tanto, é necessário que os municípios mantenham seus planos de contingência atualizados, contemplando a realidade local para planejamento e organização de ações. Estas diretrizes têm por objetivo colaborar com os serviços de saúde na mitigação dos processos epidêmicos, comunicação de risco e na redução da morbimortalidade por COVID-19. As equipes de saúde no Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) já desenvolvem diversas atividades de rotina e deverão dar sustentação às ações definidas neste Plano de Contingência.


Assuntos
Pneumonia Viral , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Planos de Contingência , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Controle Sanitário de Aeroportos e Aeronaves , Controle Sanitário de Portos e Embarcações , Controle Sanitário de Fronteiras , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos
18.
J Aging Soc Policy ; 32(4-5): 460-470, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32507061

RESUMO

Older adults are in triple jeopardy during COVID-19: compared with younger people, older adults are (1) more likely to develop serious conditions and experience higher mortality; (2) less likely to obtain high quality information or services online; and (3) more likely to experience social isolation and loneliness. Hybrid solutions, coupling online and offline strategies, are invaluable in ensuring the inclusion of vulnerable populations. Most of these solutions require no new inventions. Finding the financial resources for a rapid, well-coordinated implementation is the biggest challenge. Setting up the requisite support systems and digital infrastructure is important for the present and future pandemics.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Internet , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Participação Social , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Betacoronavirus , Computadores , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Família , Abastecimento de Alimentos/métodos , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Isolamento Social , Apoio Social , Telemedicina/organização & administração
19.
Nutr. hosp ; 37(3): 609-615, mayo-jun. 2020. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-193870

RESUMO

Educar y sensibilizar al consumidor para moderar el consumo de alcohol es clave para potenciar un estilo de vida saludable. Los profesionales de la salud (PS) en general, y los farmacéuticos comunitarios o los médicos y enfermeros de Atención Primaria (AP) en particular, son influenciadores clave en la educación para prevenir conductas de riesgo. El desconocimiento por parte del consumidor de conceptos como la unidad de bebida estándar, las recomendaciones de consumo, o las equivalencias de alcohol en las bebidas consumidas, puede generar consumos de riesgo alto, dado que el alcohol es alcohol y no depende de la bebida que lo contiene. Asimismo, los PS no suelen estar familiarizados con estos conceptos y con el uso de herramientas para la detección precoz, como puede ser el cuestionario AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). Proponemos un abordaje multidisciplinar (médicos y enfermeros de AP, farmacia comunitaria, dietistas-nutricionistas) para educar al consumidor sobre el riesgo asociado al consumo de alcohol, sustentado en la elaboración de un protocolo de actuación consensuado entre las sociedades científicas de estos colectivos profesionales, cuyo objetivo fundamental es contribuir a la formación óptima y actualizada de los PS. Este protocolo de actuación pretende, por tanto, prevenir conductas de riesgo mediante la educación del consumidor y la detección de hábitos de consumo de alto riesgo. Asimismo, este abordaje multidisciplinar y coordinado debe servir para impulsar la comunicación entre los distintos colectivos a la hora de proporcionar información relevante para abordar el consumo de riesgo desde la AP de Salud


Educating and increasing awareness in the consumer to achieve a moderate alcohol consumption is key to promote a healthy lifestyle. Health care professionals (HCP), in particular community pharmacists and Primary Care (PC) physicians and nurses, are key influencers in the education to prevent risk behaviors. A consumer's poor knowledge of concepts such as standard unit, the recommendations on alcohol use, or the alcohol equivalence in the drinks consumed, can lead to a high-risk use, since "alcohol is alcohol" no matter what beverage contains it. Moreover, HCPs are usually not familiar with these concepts and with early detection tools such as the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). We propose a multidisciplinary approach (PC physicians and nurses, community pharmacy, dietists-nutritionists) to educate consumers on the risks associated with the use of alcohol, supported by the development of a protocol of action subscribed by the scientific societies of these professional groups, with the main objective of contributing to optimal and updated training for HCPs. Thus, this protocol of action aims to prevent risk behaviors through consumer education, and to detect high-risk alcohol use. Moreover, this multidisciplinary and coordinated approach should help to boost communication between the different collectives involved when providing relevant information to tackle risky alcohol use from PC


Assuntos
Humanos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Pessoal de Saúde/organização & administração , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Estilo de Vida , Assunção de Riscos , Diagnóstico Precoce , Inquéritos e Questionários , Defesa do Consumidor/educação , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/organização & administração , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/prevenção & controle
20.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32367206

RESUMO

The Internet is now a central source of health information. An ideal design of web services and e­health programs requires valid evaluations of users' perceptions, the so-called user experience. As part of a research project with the German Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA), a toolbox for website evaluation (for screening and monitoring) was compiled for this purpose from freely available quantitative empirical questionnaires. With this toolbox, key aspects of the web user experience can be reliably and validly assessed. In this article, we describe the toolbox's components, underlying quality criteria, and practical experiences.The aim of the toolbox is to facilitate methodically high-quality, comprehensive, and time-efficient analyses. A total of nine standardized instruments and supplementary single items from three areas are documented. In the standard version of the toolbox, 35 items are used that can be answered in less than 10 min. For an extended examination of a website, the toolbox documents additional measures on website content, usability, and aesthetics. We discuss both the advantages and limitations of the toolbox and give an outlook on possible future developments.


Assuntos
Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Internet , Atitude , Alemanha , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
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