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1.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 127(9): 473-480, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33011752

RESUMO

The practical training in dental schools in the Netherlands is largely organised within the walls of the educational institution, while many other medical educational programmes provide practical training to a large extent in the professional environment. The external practical internship is a form of practical learning with which positive experience has been gained in foreign dental schools, both by students and dentist-supervisors. The Dutch dental schools have a joint plan to set up practical internships in dental practices for master's students in the final year of their education. The aim of such an internship is that students in the last phase of their programme learn to apply the acquired knowledge and skills in an actual professional environment. This includes both clinical and dental treatment and the ability to organise oral health care for patients and everything that comes with it. This article describes the outline of this programme.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia , Educação Continuada em Odontologia , Humanos , Países Baixos , Paladar
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33031651

RESUMO

Objective: Amid the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, health care workers of multiple disciplines have been designated as frontline doctors. This unforeseen situation has led to psychological problems among these health care workers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mental health status of pan-Indian frontline doctors combating the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted among frontline doctors of tertiary care hospitals in India (East: Kolkata, West Bengal; North: New Delhi; West: Nagpur, Maharashtra; and South: Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala) from May 23, 2020, to June 6, 2020. Doctors involved in clinical services in outpatient departments, designated COVID-19 wards, screening blocks, fever clinics, and intensive care units completed an online questionnaire. The 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale were used to assess depression and perceived stress. Results: The results of 422 responses revealed a 63.5% and 45% prevalence of symptoms of depression and stress, respectively, among frontline COVID-19 doctors. Postgraduate trainees constituted the majority (45.5%) of the respondents. Moderately severe and severe depression was noted in 14.2% and 3.8% of the doctors, respectively. Moderate and severe stress was noted in 37.4% and 7.6% of participants, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis showed working ≥ 6 hours/day (adjusted odds ratio: 3.5; 95% CI, 1.9-6.3; P < .0001) to be a significant risk factor for moderate or severe perceived stress, while single relationship status (adjusted odds ratio: 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.9; P = .002) and working ≥ 6 hours/day (adjusted odds ratio: 10.3; 95% CI, 4.3-24.6; P < .0001) significantly contributed to the development of moderate, moderately severe, or severe depression. Conclusions: The pandemic has taken a serious toll on the physical and mental health of doctors, as evident from our study. Regular screening of medical personnel involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COVID-19 should be conducted to evaluate for stress, anxiety, and depression.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Médicos/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Internato e Residência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Questionário de Saúde do Paciente , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevalência , Características de Residência , Fatores de Risco , Carga de Trabalho , Adulto Jovem
3.
Acad Med ; 95(10): 1521-1523, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33006869

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic is a public health emergency that demands leadership throughout the health care system. Leadership is the ability to guide a team or organization toward a stated goal or objective. In addition to hospital-wide leadership, there is need for leadership at the level of medical teams. Resident leadership is essential to ensure team function and patient care, yet residents are often overlooked as valuable leaders. This Perspective argues that residents can demonstrate leadership during a public health crisis by creating a culture of emotional intelligence in their medical teams. Emotional intelligence has been identified as a critical aspect of leadership and consists of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. In psychiatry, patient interactions depend upon psychiatrists demonstrating a high level of attention to their own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as well as those of the patient to communicate in a way that demonstrates both understanding and empathy. In this Perspective, a psychiatry resident uses expertise in emotional intelligence to recommend residents (1) be mindful, (2) ask and listen, (3) establish safety, and (4) unite around a common goal. These practical recommendations can be immediately implemented to increase emotional intelligence on medical teams to improve team function and patient care. Emotional intelligence is valuable at all levels of leadership, so hospital leadership and program directors should also heed these suggestions. While these recommendations are not unique to COVID-19, they are of paramount importance during the pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Inteligência Emocional , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Liderança , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Pandemias
4.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 108(4): 645-646, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33013224

RESUMO

While institutional repositories are common in medical schools and academic health centers, they have been used by only a small number of health systems to track and promote their research and scholarly activity. This article describes how Providence System Library Services leveraged their existing institutional repository platform to substitute a virtual showcase for an annual in-person event.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica , Curadoria de Dados , Internato e Residência , Bibliotecas Médicas , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Oregon , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
6.
Surg Clin North Am ; 100(5): 849-859, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32882167

RESUMO

Over the last 2 decades, rural locations have realized a steady decrease in surgical access and direct care. Owing to societal expectations for equal general and subspecialty surgical care in urban or rural areas, the ability to attract, train, and hold onto the rural surgeon has come into question. Our current general surgery training curriculum has been reevaluated as to its relevance for rural surgery and several alternatives to the traditional surgical training model have been proposed. The authors discuss and evaluate current and proposed methods for surgical training curriculums and methods for rural surgeon retention through continuing education models.


Assuntos
Cirurgia Geral/educação , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Currículo , Internato e Residência , Estados Unidos
7.
J Oral Facial Pain Headache ; 34(3): 255-264, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32870954

RESUMO

Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) are a curriculum development and learner assessment tool that ensure a trainee is able to safely translate the skills they have learned during residency into unsupervised clinical practice. Although EPAs are used extensively across various health professions worldwide, dentistry is just beginning to call for their development at both the predoctoral and postgraduate levels. Given the complex, multifactorial nature of orofacial pain disorders and the need for an interdisciplinary approach to management, the specialty of orofacial pain is well suited to embracing EPAs to ensure program graduates are prepared for practice. Therefore, 10 EPAs have been developed in a combined effort from program directors from every CODA-accredited postgraduate orofacial pain residency program.


Assuntos
Educação Baseada em Competências , Internato e Residência , Competência Clínica , Dor Facial , Humanos
8.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 108(2): 416-420, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890524

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Telemedicine was rapidly and ubiquitously adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are growing discussions as to its role postpandemic. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We surveyed patients, radiation oncology (RO) attendings, and RO residents to assess their experience with telemedicine. Surveys addressed quality of patient care and utility of telemedicine for teaching and learning core competencies. Satisfaction was rated on a 6-point Likert-type scale. The quality of teaching and learning was graded on a 5-point Likert-type scale, with overall scores calculated by the average rating of each core competency required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (range, 1-5). RESULTS: Responses were collected from 56 patients, 12 RO attendings, and 13 RO residents. Patient feedback was collected at 17 new-patient, 22 on-treatment, and 17 follow-up video visits. Overall, 88% of patients were satisfied with virtual visits. A lower proportion of on-treatment patients rated their virtual visit as "very satisfactory" (68.2% vs 76.5% for new patients and 82.4% for follow-ups). Only 5.9% of the new patients and none of the follow-up patients were dissatisfied, and 27% of on-treatment patients were dissatisfied. The large majority of patients (88%) indicated that they would continue to use virtual visits as long as a physical examination was not needed. Overall scores for medical training were 4.1 out of 5 (range, 2.8-5.0) by RO residents and 3.2 (range, 2.0-4.0) by RO attendings. All residents and 92% of attendings indicated they would use telemedicine again; however, most indicated that telemedicine is best for follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine is a convenient means of delivering care to patients, with some limitations demonstrated for on-treatment patients. The majority of both patients and providers are interested in using telemedicine again, and it will likely continue to supplement patient care.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência ao Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Radioterapia (Especialidade) , Telemedicina , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
14.
J Grad Med Educ ; 12(4): 507-511, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32879697

RESUMO

Background: The start of a new academic year in graduate medical education will mark a transition for postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents from medical school into residency. The relocation of individuals has significant implications given the COVID-19 pandemic and variability of the outbreak across the United States, but little is known about the extent of the geographic relocation taking place. Objective: We reported historical trends of PGY-1 residents staying in-state and those starting residency from out-of-state to quantify the geographic movement of individuals beginning residency training each year. Methods: We analyzed historical data collected by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in academic years 2016-2017, 2017-2018, and 2018-2019, comparing the locations of medical school and residency programs for PGY-1 residents to determine the number of matriculants from in-state medical schools and out-of-state medical schools. International medical school graduates (IMGs) were shown separately in the analysis and then combined with out-of-state matriculants. US citizens who trained abroad were counted among IMGs. Results: The total number of PGY-1s increased by 10.3% during the 3-year time period, from 29 338 to 32 348. When combined, IMGs and USMGs transitioning from one state or country to another state accounted for approximately 72% of PGY-1s each year. Approximately 63% of USMGs matriculated to a residency program in a new state, and IMGs made up 24.6% to 23.1% of PGY-1s over the 3-year period. Conclusions: Each year brings a substantial amount of movement among PGY-1s that highlights the need for policies and procedures specific to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Internato e Residência , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Área de Atuação Profissional , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Educação Médica , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Médicos Graduados Estrangeiros , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Estados Unidos , Local de Trabalho
16.
South Med J ; 113(9): 462-465, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32885267

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically changed resident training in the United States. Here, we explore the early perceived effects of COVID-19 on dermatology residents through an electronic sample survey and identify possible areas for targeted improvement in lieu of a possible second wave of COVID-19 cases. METHODS: On April 3, 2020, a survey of link with 25 questions was sent to dermatology program coordinators to be disseminated among dermatology residents in the United States. The survey was closed on April 13, 2020. All of the questions were optional and no personal identifiers were collected. RESULTS: A total of 140 dermatology residents from 50 different residency programs across 26 states responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (85%) reported negative effects of COVID-19 on their overall wellness. Despite the majority of residents (92%) speculating that COVID-19 will have negative long-term effects on the US economy, only 33% agreed or strongly agreed that it will affect their job prospects. Teledermatology was widely implemented following the declaration of a national emergency (96% of represented residencies compared with only 30% before the pandemic), with heavy resident involvement. The majority of residents (99%) reported having virtual didactics and that they found them to be beneficial. Most residents were uncomfortable with the prospect of being reassigned to a nondermatology specialty during the pandemic. In addition, 22% of residents believed that their leadership were not transparent and prompt in addressing changes relating to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology residents were affected negatively by COVID-19 in regard to their well-being, clinical training, and education. Several areas of improvement were identified that could improve our preparedness for a second wave of the virus.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Dermatologia , Pandemias , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/tendências , Pneumonia Viral , Dermatopatias/terapia , Telemedicina , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Dermatologia/educação , Dermatologia/métodos , Educação/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Inovação Organizacional , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Administração dos Cuidados ao Paciente/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Percepção Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/métodos , Telemedicina/tendências , Estados Unidos
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