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1.
Am Surg ; 86(2): 152-157, 2020 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32106909

RESUMO

The professional use of social media is increasingly prevalent today, particularly in medicine and surgery. Several recent movements have highlighted the strengths of this forum for networking and mentorship for females in surgery who otherwise may lack mentors locally. We sought to describe modern uses for and strengths of social media for women in surgery globally via a systematic review of the literature. Multiple efforts and avenues have promoted gender equality in surgery, while also uniting female surgeons in a collaborative virtual network of colleagues. In particular, movements on Twitter, such as #ILookLikeASurgeon and #NYerORCoverChallenge, as well as other collaborative virtual fora have brought visibility to female surgeons, while drawing the young population of students and trainees toward surgical careers. Social media provides a unique opportunity for female trainees and established surgeons alike to network and establish mentorship relationships, which may aid in fostering interest in surgery and closing the gender gap in our field.


Assuntos
Tutoria , Médicas , Mídias Sociais , Cirurgiões , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Tutoria/métodos , Mentores/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicas/organização & administração , Médicas/provisão & distribução , Salários e Benefícios/estatística & dados numéricos , Sexismo , Mídias Sociais/organização & administração , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , Mídias Sociais/tendências , Cirurgiões/organização & administração , Cirurgiões/provisão & distribução
2.
Instr Course Lect ; 69: 245-254, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32017731

RESUMO

Women comprise approximately 50% of medical students; however, only 14% of current orthopaedic residents are women. There are many factors that contribute to the reluctance of female medical students to enter the field including limited exposure to musculoskeletal medicine during medical school, negative perception of the field, lack of female mentors, barriers to promotion, and acceptance by senior faculty. Diversity in orthopaedics is critical to provide culturally competent care. Two pipeline programs, the Perry Initiative and Nth Dimensions, have successful track records in increasing female and underrepresented minorities in orthopaedic surgery residency training. Recognizing and combating implicit bias in orthopaedics will improve recruitment, retention, promotion, and compensation of female orthopaedic surgeons. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the current status of women in orthopaedics, describe ways to improve diversity in the field, and make surgeons aware of how implicit bias can contribute to discrepancies seen in orthopaedic surgery, including pay scale inequities and women in leadership positions.


Assuntos
Ortopedia , Médicas , Sexismo , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Procedimentos Ortopédicos
4.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(1): 35-43, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31902427

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess adherence to and individual or systematic deviations from predicted physician compensation by gender or race/ethnicity at a large academic medical center that uses a salary-only structured compensation model incorporating national benchmarks and clear standardized pay steps and increments. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: All permanent staff physicians employed at Mayo Clinic medical practices in Minnesota, Arizona, and Florida who served in clinical roles as of January 2017. Each physician's pay, demographics, specialty, full-time equivalent status, benchmark pay for the specialty, leadership role(s), and other factors that may influence compensation within the plan were collected and analyzed. For each individual, the natural log of pay was used to determine predicted pay and 95% CI based on the structured compensation plan, compared with their actual salary. RESULTS: Among 2845 physicians (861 women, 722 nonwhites), pay equity was affirmed in 96% (n=2730). Of the 80 physicians (2.8%) with higher and 35 (1.2%) with lower than predicted pay, there was no interaction with gender or race/ethnicity. More men (31.4%; 623 of 1984) than women (15.9%; 137 of 861) held or had held a compensable leadership position. More men (34.7%; 688 of 1984) than women (20.5%; 177 of 861) were represented in the most highly compensated specialties. CONCLUSION: A structured compensation model was successfully applied to all physicians at a multisite large academic medical system and resulted in pay equity. However, achieving overall gender pay equality will only be fully realized when women achieve parity in the ranks of the most highly compensated specialties and in leadership roles.


Assuntos
Planos de Incentivos Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicos , Salários e Benefícios , Fatores Sexuais , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/economia , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Competência Clínica/economia , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Masculino , Modelos Econométricos , Médicos/classificação , Médicos/economia , Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicas/economia , Médicas/normas , Salários e Benefícios/classificação , Salários e Benefícios/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
5.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 189-189.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903608
6.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 189-189.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903612
7.
Med J Aust ; 212(4): 190-190.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31903614
12.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e59-e62, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31973829

RESUMO

The Women in Anaesthesia Research Symposium (Prato, Italy; 4 June, 2019), supported by the British Journal of Anaesthesia in collaboration with Monash University, was organised to discuss challenges facing women in anaesthesia clinical practice and research. We provide an overview of institutional or departmental measures that were proposed during the symposium that may empower women in anaesthesia today.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/organização & administração , Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , Médicas , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Sexismo/prevenção & controle , Assédio Sexual/prevenção & controle , Direitos da Mulher
13.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e63-e69, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31980155

RESUMO

The under-representation of women in academic leadership roles, including in anaesthesiology, is a well-documented phenomenon that has persisted for decades despite more women attending medical school, participating in anaesthesiology residencies, and joining academic faculties. The percentage of female anaesthesiologists who hold senior academic ranks or leadership roles, such as chair, lags behind the percentage of female anaesthesiologists overall. Trends towards increasing the numbers of women serving in educational leadership roles, specifically residency programme directors, suggest that there are areas in which academic anaesthesiology has been, and can continue, improving gender imbalance. Continued institutional efforts to recruit women into anaesthesiology, reduce gender bias, and promote interventions that foster gender equity in hiring and promotion will continue to benefit women, academic anaesthesiology departments, and the healthcare system overall.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/tendências , Internato e Residência/tendências , Médicas/tendências , Sexismo/tendências , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/tendências , Anestesiologia/educação , Anestesiologia/organização & administração , Escolha da Profissão , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/organização & administração , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Liderança , Médicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Faculdades de Medicina/organização & administração , Faculdades de Medicina/tendências , Sexismo/prevenção & controle , Estados Unidos
14.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e70-e76, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31982114

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women face gender-based challenges in their medical education and career. Inequitable access to procedural training, a confidence gap, and professional identity deficit have been shown. We made a gender comparison of procedural case volume, confidence for independent practice, perceived gender and ethnic bias, and professional identity in Australasian anaesthesia trainees. METHODS: An online, voluntary, anonymous survey using SurveyMonkey® was delivered to Australasian anaesthesia trainees. Information collected included demographics, experience and confidence in 12 anaesthetic procedures, assessments relating to confidence and professional identity, and perceived gender and ethnic bias. Gender differences were evaluated. RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty-six trainees (22.2%) of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) responded. Male trainees reported a higher number (standard deviation) of procedures performed greater than 10 times (men 4.45 [2.55], women 3.78 [1.95]; P<0.001 adjusted for training level). Men were more likely to rate themselves at a training competency above their actual training level (men 18.6%, women 7.8%; P=0.004) and exaggerate procedural experience to supervisors (men 30.8%, women 11.8%; P<0.001). Final-year male trainees felt significantly more prepared for independent practice (P=0.021, trend across ordered responses). Women reported significantly higher levels of gender bias exhibited by patients (men 1.1%, women 84.5%; P<0.001) and in training overall (men 10.3%, women 55.3%; P<0.001), which was compounded in women with an ethnic minority background. CONCLUSIONS: A discrepancy exists between the number of procedures performed by male and female anaesthesia trainees in Australia and New Zealand. Relative male overconfidence may be a major contributing factor to the gender confidence gap.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/educação , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/organização & administração , Médicas/psicologia , Sexismo , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Austrália , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Nova Zelândia , Relações Médico-Paciente , Autoimagem , Fatores Sexuais , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia
18.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 145(2): 433e-437e, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31985662

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women now constitute 40.5 percent of integrated plastic surgery residents; however, in 2007, women represented only 11.3 percent of the leadership positions in plastic surgery societies and journal editorial boards. The authors analyzed female representation in these societies and editorial boards over the past 10 years. METHODS: Names of board members from the major plastic surgery societies (American Society of Plastic Surgeons, The Plastic Surgery Foundation, and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, among others) for the past 10 years and the major plastic journals (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Annals of Plastic Surgery, and so on) from the past 5 years were extracted from their websites. The yearly percentage of female plastic surgery residents was obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education published data. The proportions of women in society leadership, editorial boards, and residency were compared with data analyses of time series trend and linear and Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average time series modeling. RESULTS: Over the past 10 years, the percentage of female residents has grown steadily, from 21.84 percent to 37.31 percent. Similarly, female representation in society leadership has grown from 6.78 percent to 20.29 percent. Both growth coefficients were statistically significant and showed no statistical difference between the two. In contrast, editorial board leadership over the past 5 years showed statistically insignificant growth and showed a statistically significant difference when compared to the growth of the percentage of female residents and female representation in society leadership. CONCLUSION: Female representation in plastic surgery society leadership shows promising growth, whereas their representation on editorial boards showed significantly less growth, which may reflect the slower turnover on these boards.


Assuntos
Médicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Cirurgia Plástica/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Masculino , Editoração , Distribuição por Sexo , Sociedades Médicas , Estados Unidos
19.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e155-e159, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31973823

RESUMO

An increasing number of global initiatives aim to address the disconnection between the increasing number of women entering medicine and the persistence of gender imbalance in the physician anaesthesiologist workforce. This commentary complements the global movement's efforts to increase women's representation in academic anaesthesiology by presenting considerations for fostering inclusion for women in academic anaesthesiology from both the faculty and departmental leadership perspectives in a US academic anaesthesiology department.


Assuntos
Academias e Institutos , Anestesiologistas , Anestesiologia , Médicas , Docentes de Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança
20.
Br J Anaesth ; 124(3): e171-e177, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31980158

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have confirmed gender imbalance in anaesthesia leadership. Whether women anaesthesiologists aspire to career advancement has not been reported. This European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) survey explored anaesthesiologists' motivation to advance their careers into leadership positions, and to identify reported barriers to advancement. METHODS: ESA members (n=10 033, 5245 men, 3759 women, 1029 undefined) were invited to complete a 25-item, Internet-based survey, and responses were analysed thematically. RESULTS: In total, 3048 ESA members (1706 women, 1342 men, 30% of all members) responded to the survey. The majority were specialists, married or with a partner, and have children; 47% of women and 48% of men wish to pursue a leadership career. Barriers to career promotion noted by women were primarily attributed to work-private time considerations (extra workload and less personal time [84%], responsibility for care of family [65%], lack of part-time work opportunities [67%]), and the shift away from clinical work [59%]). Men respondents indicated the same barriers although the proportions were significantly lower. Considerations related to the partner (lack of support, career development of partner) were last on the list of variables reported by women as barriers. Importantly, many women noted deficiencies in leadership (68%) and research education (55%), and women role models (41%) and self-confidence (44%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest survey to date of women anaesthesiologists' view on career advancement. Despite the many barriers noted by women, they are as eager as men to assume leadership positions. The survey results help in identifying possible areas for intervention to assist in career development.


Assuntos
Anestesiologistas , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Liderança , Médicas , Adulto , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Feminino , Identidade de Gênero , Humanos , Masculino , Mentores , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Sexismo
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