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1.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 16471, 2020 10 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33020502

RESUMO

SARS-CoV-2 has a zoonotic origin and was transmitted to humans via an undetermined intermediate host, leading to infections in humans and other mammals. To enter host cells, the viral spike protein (S-protein) binds to its receptor, ACE2, and is then processed by TMPRSS2. Whilst receptor binding contributes to the viral host range, S-protein:ACE2 complexes from other animals have not been investigated widely. To predict infection risks, we modelled S-protein:ACE2 complexes from 215 vertebrate species, calculated changes in the energy of the complex caused by mutations in each species, relative to human ACE2, and correlated these changes with COVID-19 infection data. We also analysed structural interactions to better understand the key residues contributing to affinity. We predict that mutations are more detrimental in ACE2 than TMPRSS2. Finally, we demonstrate phylogenetically that human SARS-CoV-2 strains have been isolated in animals. Our results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 can infect a broad range of mammals, but few fish, birds or reptiles. Susceptible animals could serve as reservoirs of the virus, necessitating careful ongoing animal management and surveillance.


Assuntos
Peptidil Dipeptidase A/química , Filogenia , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/química , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/genética , Humanos , Mamíferos , Simulação de Acoplamento Molecular , Mutação , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/classificação , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/genética , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/metabolismo , Ligação Proteica , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/metabolismo
2.
Zootaxa ; 4838(1): zootaxa.4838.1.5, 2020 Aug 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33056834

RESUMO

This article represents the third (and last) part of the catalogue of ectoparasitic gamasid mites associated with small mammals in Asiatic Russia (Siberia and the Russian Far East). A total of 19 species of the genus Hirstionyssus Fonseca, 1948 are indexed, with data on their taxonomic position, nomenclature, host range, and distribution within the region. As a conclusion, a brief overview of fauna of ectoparasitic gamasid mites parasitising Micromammalia (except bats) of Asiatic Russia is given. In total, 71 mite species belonging to nine genera of three families (Haemogamasidae, Hirstionyssidae, Laelapidae) are recorded and divided among taxonomic and ecological groupings.


Assuntos
Ácaros , Animais , Mamíferos , Federação Russa
3.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4943, 2020 10 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009384

RESUMO

Despite their high vulnerability, insular ecosystems have been largely ignored in climate change assessments, and when they are investigated, studies tend to focus on exposure to threats instead of vulnerability. The present study examines climate change vulnerability of islands, focusing on endemic mammals and by 2050 (RCPs 6.0 and 8.5), using trait-based and quantitative-vulnerability frameworks that take into account exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. Our results suggest that all islands and archipelagos show a certain level of vulnerability to future climate change, that is typically more important in Pacific Ocean ones. Among the drivers of vulnerability to climate change, exposure was rarely the main one and did not explain the pattern of vulnerability. In addition, endemic mammals with long generation lengths and high dietary specializations are predicted to be the most vulnerable to climate change. Our findings highlight the importance of exploring islands vulnerability to identify the highest climate change impacts and to avoid the extinction of unique biodiversity.


Assuntos
Mudança Climática , Ilhas , Mamíferos/fisiologia , Animais , Dieta , Análise de Componente Principal , Especificidade da Espécie
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4641, 2020 09 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32934213

RESUMO

Despite recent advances in circuit engineering, the design of genetic networks in mammalian cells is still painstakingly slow and fraught with inexplicable failures. Here, we demonstrate that transiently expressed genes in mammalian cells compete for limited transcriptional and translational resources. This competition results in the coupling of otherwise independent exogenous and endogenous genes, creating a divergence between intended and actual function. Guided by a resource-aware mathematical model, we identify and engineer natural and synthetic miRNA-based incoherent feedforward loop (iFFL) circuits that mitigate gene expression burden. The implementation of these circuits features the use of endogenous miRNAs as elementary components of the engineered iFFL device, a versatile hybrid design that allows burden mitigation to be achieved across different cell-lines with minimal resource requirements. This study establishes the foundations for context-aware prediction and improvement of in vivo synthetic circuit performance, paving the way towards more rational synthetic construct design in mammalian cells.


Assuntos
Expressão Gênica , Mamíferos/genética , MicroRNAs/genética , Animais , Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Humanos , Mamíferos/metabolismo , Proteínas/genética , Proteínas/metabolismo
5.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4844, 2020 09 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32973204

RESUMO

Akkermansia muciniphila is a mucin-degrading bacterium commonly found in the human gut that promotes a beneficial effect on health, likely based on the regulation of mucus thickness and gut barrier integrity, but also on the modulation of the immune system. In this work, we focus in OgpA from A. muciniphila, an O-glycopeptidase that exclusively hydrolyzes the peptide bond N-terminal to serine or threonine residues substituted with an O-glycan. We determine the high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the unliganded form of OgpA, the complex with the glycodrosocin O-glycopeptide substrate and its product, providing a comprehensive set of snapshots of the enzyme along the catalytic cycle. In combination with O-glycopeptide chemistry, enzyme kinetics, and computational methods we unveil the molecular mechanism of O-glycan recognition and specificity for OgpA. The data also contribute to understanding how A. muciniphila processes mucins in the gut, as well as analysis of post-translational O-glycosylation events in proteins.


Assuntos
Microbioma Gastrointestinal/fisiologia , Mucinas/metabolismo , Peptídeo-N4-(N-acetil-beta-glucosaminil) Asparagina Amidase/química , Peptídeo-N4-(N-acetil-beta-glucosaminil) Asparagina Amidase/metabolismo , Verrucomicrobia/metabolismo , Animais , Sítios de Ligação , Cristalografia por Raios X , Glicopeptídeos/química , Humanos , Mamíferos , Simulação de Acoplamento Molecular , Mucina-1/metabolismo , Polissacarídeos/química , Conformação Proteica , Alinhamento de Sequência , Verrucomicrobia/enzimologia
6.
Viruses ; 12(9)2020 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32916958

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To prioritize the development of antiviral compounds, it is necessary to compare their relative preclinical activity and clinical efficacy. METHODS: We reviewed in vitro, animal model, and clinical studies of candidate anti-coronavirus compounds and placed extracted data in an online relational database. RESULTS: As of August 2020, the Coronavirus Antiviral Research Database (CoV-RDB; covdb.stanford.edu) contained over 2800 cell culture, entry assay, and biochemical experiments, 259 animal model studies, and 73 clinical studies from over 400 published papers. SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV account for 85% of the data. Approximately 75% of experiments involved compounds with known or likely mechanisms of action, including monoclonal antibodies and receptor binding inhibitors (21%), viral protease inhibitors (17%), miscellaneous host-acting inhibitors (10%), polymerase inhibitors (9%), interferons (7%), fusion inhibitors (5%), and host protease inhibitors (5%). Of 975 compounds with known or likely mechanism, 135 (14%) are licensed in the U.S. for other indications, 197 (20%) are licensed outside the U.S. or are in human trials, and 595 (61%) are pre-clinical investigational compounds. CONCLUSION: CoV-RDB facilitates comparisons between different candidate antiviral compounds, thereby helping scientists, clinical investigators, public health officials, and funding agencies prioritize the most promising compounds and repurposed drugs for further development.


Assuntos
Antivirais/farmacologia , Betacoronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Bases de Dados Factuais , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Animais , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Células Cultivadas , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Coronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Avaliação Pré-Clínica de Medicamentos , Humanos , Mamíferos , Modelos Animais , Pandemias , Sistema de Registros , Especificidade da Espécie , Interface Usuário-Computador
7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4904, 2020 09 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32994391

RESUMO

Mammalian frugivores are critical seed dispersers, but many are under threat of extinction. Futhermore, the impact of past and future defaunation on plant assemblages has yet to be quantified at the global scale. Here, we integrate palm and mammalian frugivore trait and occurrence data and reveal a global positive relationship between fruit size and frugivore body size. Global variation in fruit size is better explained by present-day frugivore assemblages than by Late Pleistocene assemblages, suggesting ecological and evolutionary reorganization after end-Pleistocene extinctions, except in the Neotropics, where some large-fruited palm species may have outlived their main seed dispersers by thousands of years. Our simulations of frugivore extinction over the next 100 years suggest that the impact of defaunation will be highest in the Old World tropics, and an up to 4% assemblage-level decrease in fruit size would be required to maintain the global body size-fruit size relationship. Overall, our results suggest that while some palm species may be able to keep pace with future defaunation through evolutionary changes in fruit size, large-fruited species may be especially vulnerable to continued defaunation.


Assuntos
Arecaceae/fisiologia , Coevolução Biológica , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Frutas/anatomia & histologia , Mamíferos/fisiologia , Animais , Arecaceae/anatomia & histologia , Tamanho Corporal/genética , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Extinção Biológica , Frutas/genética , Herbivoria/fisiologia , Mamíferos/anatomia & histologia , Tamanho do Órgão/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Dispersão de Sementes/fisiologia
8.
Med Sci (Paris) ; 36(8-9): 783-796, 2020.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32773024

RESUMO

SARS-CoV-2 is a new human coronavirus (CoV), which emerged in People's Republic of China at the end of 2019 and is responsible for the global Covid-19 pandemic that caused more than 540 000 deaths in six months. Understanding the origin of this virus is an important issue and it is necessary to determine the mechanisms of its dissemination in order to be able to contain new epidemics. Based on phylogenetic inferences, sequence analysis and structure-function relationships of coronavirus proteins, informed by the knowledge currently available, we discuss the different scenarios evoked to account for the origin - natural or synthetic - of the virus. On the basis of currently available data, it is impossible to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 is the result of a natural zoonotic emergence or an accidental escape from experimental strains. Regardless of its origin, the study of the evolution of the molecular mechanisms involved in the emergence of this pandemic virus is essential to develop therapeutic and vaccine strategies.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Coronavirus/classificação , Evolução Molecular , Pandemias , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , RNA Viral/genética , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Derramamento de Material Biológico , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronaviridae/transmissão , Infecções por Coronaviridae/veterinária , Infecções por Coronaviridae/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças , Mutação com Ganho de Função , Genoma Viral , HIV/genética , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Humanos , Mamíferos/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Vírus Reordenados/genética , Alinhamento de Sequência , Homologia de Sequência de Aminoácidos , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/química , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/fisiologia , Zoonoses
9.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0227163, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32822346

RESUMO

Illegal hunting is a persistent problem in many protected areas, but an overview of the extent of this problem and its impact on wildlife is lacking. We reviewed 40 years (1980-2020) of global research to examine the spatial distribution of research and socio-ecological factors influencing population decline within protected areas under illegal hunting pressure. From 81 papers reporting 988 species/site combinations, 294 mammal species were reported to have been illegally hunted from 155 protected areas across 48 countries. Research in illegal hunting has increased substantially during the review period and showed biases towards strictly protected areas and the African continent. Population declines were most frequent in countries with a low human development index, particularly in strict protected areas and for species with a body mass over 100 kg. Our results provide evidence that illegal hunting is most likely to cause declines of large-bodied species in protected areas of resource-poor countries regardless of protected area conservation status. Given the growing pressures of illegal hunting, increased investments in people's development and additional conservation efforts such as improving anti-poaching strategies and conservation resources in terms of improving funding and personnel directed at this problem are a growing priority.


Assuntos
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/legislação & jurisprudência , Internacionalidade , Mamíferos , Animais , Dinâmica Populacional
10.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4063, 2020 08 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32792525

RESUMO

The neuroendocrine hypothalamus is the central regulator of vital physiological homeostasis and behavior. However, the cellular and molecular properties of hypothalamic neural progenitors remain unexplored. Here, hypothalamic radial glial (hRG) and hypothalamic mantle zone radial glial (hmRG) cells are found to be neural progenitors in the developing mammalian hypothalamus. The hmRG cells originate from hRG cells and produce neurons. During the early development of hypothalamus, neurogenesis occurs in radial columns and is initiated from hRG cells. The radial glial fibers are oriented toward the locations of hypothalamic subregions which act as a scaffold for neuronal migration. Furthermore, we use single-cell RNA sequencing to reveal progenitor subtypes in human developing hypothalamus and characterize specific progenitor genes, such as TTYH1, HMGA2, and FAM107A. We also demonstrate that HMGA2 is involved in E2F1 pathway, regulating the proliferation of progenitor cells by targeting on the downstream MYBL2. Different neuronal subtypes start to differentiate and express specific genes of hypothalamic nucleus at gestational week 10. Finally, we reveal the developmental conservation of nuclear structures and marker genes in mouse and human hypothalamus. Our identification of cellular and molecular properties of neural progenitors provides a basic understanding of neurogenesis and regional formation of the non-laminated hypothalamus.


Assuntos
Hipotálamo/citologia , Hipotálamo/metabolismo , Células-Tronco Neurais/citologia , Células-Tronco Neurais/metabolismo , Animais , Análise por Conglomerados , Feminino , Genes Supressores de Tumor , Proteína HMGA2/genética , Proteína HMGA2/metabolismo , Humanos , Hibridização In Situ , Mamíferos , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Proteínas de Membrana/metabolismo , Camundongos , Neurogênese/genética , Neurogênese/fisiologia , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/metabolismo , Gravidez
11.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3845, 2020 07 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32737295

RESUMO

Many experimental studies suggest that animals can rapidly learn to identify odors and predict the rewards associated with them. However, the underlying plasticity mechanism remains elusive. In particular, it is not clear how olfactory circuits achieve rapid, data efficient learning with local synaptic plasticity. Here, we formulate olfactory learning as a Bayesian optimization process, then map the learning rules into a computational model of the mammalian olfactory circuit. The model is capable of odor identification from a small number of observations, while reproducing cellular plasticity commonly observed during development. We extend the framework to reward-based learning, and show that the circuit is able to rapidly learn odor-reward association with a plausible neural architecture. These results deepen our theoretical understanding of unsupervised learning in the mammalian brain.


Assuntos
Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia , Rede Nervosa , Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia , Condutos Olfatórios/fisiologia , Percepção Olfatória/fisiologia , Olfato/fisiologia , Animais , Teorema de Bayes , Simulação por Computador , Mamíferos , Neurônios/citologia , Neurônios/fisiologia , Odorantes/análise , Bulbo Olfatório/fisiologia , Recompensa
12.
Proc Biol Sci ; 287(1932): 20200972, 2020 08 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32781953

RESUMO

Maternal senescence is the detrimental effect of increased maternal age on offspring performance. Despite much recent interest given to describing this phenomenon, its distribution across animal species is poorly understood. A review of the published literature finds that maternal age affects pre-adult survival in 252 of 272 populations (93%) representing 97 animal species. Age effects tended to be deleterious in invertebrates and mammals, including humans, confirming the presence of senescence. However, bird species were a conspicuous exception, as pre-adult survival tended to increase with maternal age in surveyed populations. In all groups, maternal-age effects became more negative in older mothers. Invertebrates senesced faster than vertebrates, and humans aged faster than non-human mammals. Within invertebrates, lepidopterans demonstrated the most extreme rates of maternal-effect senescence. Among the surveyed studies, phylogeny, life history and environment (e.g. laboratory versus wild populations) were tightly associated; this made it difficult to make confident inferences regarding the causes of diversity for the phenomenon. However, we provide some testable suggestions, and we observe that some differences appear to be consistent with predictions from evolutionary theory. We discuss how future work may help clarify ultimate and proximate causes for this diversity.


Assuntos
Evolução Biológica , Idade Materna , Animais , Biodiversidade , Feminino , Humanos , Invertebrados , Mamíferos , Herança Materna
13.
Mol Cell ; 79(6): 902-916.e6, 2020 09 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32768407

RESUMO

A long-standing conundrum is how mitotic chromosomes can compact, as required for clean separation to daughter cells, while maintaining close parallel alignment of sister chromatids. Pursuit of this question, by high resolution 3D fluorescence imaging of living and fixed mammalian cells, has led to three discoveries. First, we show that the structural axes of separated sister chromatids are linked by evenly spaced "mini-axis" bridges. Second, when chromosomes first emerge as discrete units, at prophase, they are organized as co-oriented sister linear loop arrays emanating from a conjoined axis. We show that this same basic organization persists throughout mitosis, without helical coiling. Third, from prophase onward, chromosomes are deformed into sequential arrays of half-helical segments of alternating handedness (perversions), accompanied by correlated kinks. These arrays fluctuate dynamically over <15 s timescales. Together these discoveries redefine the foundation for thinking about the evolution of mitotic chromosomes as they prepare for anaphase segregation.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/genética , Cromossomos/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Mitose/genética , Adenosina Trifosfatases/genética , Anáfase/genética , Animais , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/isolamento & purificação , Cromátides/genética , Proteínas Cromossômicas não Histona , DNA Topoisomerases Tipo II/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/isolamento & purificação , Imageamento Tridimensional , Mamíferos , Metáfase/genética , Prófase/genética
14.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008589, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845889

RESUMO

Accurate data on the Lassa virus (LASV) human case fatality rate (CFR) and the prevalence of LASV in humans, rodents and other mammals are needed for better planning of actions that will ultimately reduce the burden of LASV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. In this systematic review with meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, Scopus, Africa Journal Online, and African Index Medicus from 1969 to 2020 to obtain studies that reported enough data to calculate LASV infection CFR or prevalence. Study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted independently. We extracted all measures of current, recent, and past infections with LASV. Prevalence and CFR estimates were pooled using a random-effect meta-analysis. Factors associated with CFR, prevalence, and sources of between-study heterogeneity were determined using subgroup and metaregression analyses. This review was registered with PROSPERO, CRD42020166465. We initially identified 1,399 records and finally retained 109 reports that contributed to 291 prevalence records from 25 countries. The overall CFR was 29.7% (22.3-37.5) in humans. Pooled prevalence of LASV infection was 8.7% (95% confidence interval: 6.8-10.8) in humans, 3.2% (1.9-4.6) in rodents, and 0.7% (0.0-2.3) in other mammals. Subgroup and metaregression analyses revealed a substantial statistical heterogeneity explained by higher prevalence in tissue organs, in case-control, in hospital outbreak, and surveys, in retrospective studies, in urban and hospital setting, in hospitalized patients, and in West African countries. This study suggests that LASV infections is an important cause of death in humans and that LASV are common in humans, rodents and other mammals in sub-Saharan Africa. These estimates highlight disparities between sub-regions, and population risk profiles. Western Africa, and specific key populations were identified as having higher LASV CFR and prevalence, hence, deserving more attention for cost-effective preventive interventions.


Assuntos
Febre Lassa/epidemiologia , Febre Lassa/veterinária , Vírus Lassa , África ao Sul do Saara/epidemiologia , Animais , Bases de Dados Factuais , Hospitais , Humanos , Febre Lassa/virologia , Mamíferos , Prevalência , Roedores
16.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3888, 2020 08 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32753666

RESUMO

First proposed as antimicrobial agents, histones were later recognized for their role in condensing chromosomes. Histone antimicrobial activity has been reported in innate immune responses. However, how histones kill bacteria has remained elusive. The co-localization of histones with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in immune cells suggests that histones may be part of a larger antimicrobial mechanism in vivo. Here we report that histone H2A enters E. coli and S. aureus through membrane pores formed by the AMPs LL-37 and magainin-2. H2A enhances AMP-induced pores, depolarizes the bacterial membrane potential, and impairs membrane recovery. Inside the cytoplasm, H2A reorganizes bacterial chromosomal DNA and inhibits global transcription. Whereas bacteria recover from the pore-forming effects of LL-37, the concomitant effects of H2A and LL-37 are irrecoverable. Their combination constitutes a positive feedback loop that exponentially amplifies their antimicrobial activities, causing antimicrobial synergy. More generally, treatment with H2A and the pore-forming antibiotic polymyxin B completely eradicates bacterial growth.


Assuntos
Anti-Infecciosos/farmacologia , Bactérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Bactérias/genética , Estruturas Cromossômicas/efeitos dos fármacos , Histonas/metabolismo , Prótons , Animais , Estruturas Cromossômicas/metabolismo , Cromossomos Bacterianos/metabolismo , DNA Bacteriano/metabolismo , Sinergismo Farmacológico , Escherichia coli/efeitos dos fármacos , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Imunidade Inata , Mamíferos , Polimixina B/farmacologia , Análise de Sequência de RNA , Staphylococcus aureus/efeitos dos fármacos , Staphylococcus aureus/metabolismo
17.
Nature ; 584(7821): 398-402, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32759999

RESUMO

Land use change-for example, the conversion of natural habitats to agricultural or urban ecosystems-is widely recognized to influence the risk and emergence of zoonotic disease in humans1,2. However, whether such changes in risk are underpinned by predictable ecological changes remains unclear. It has been suggested that habitat disturbance might cause predictable changes in the local diversity and taxonomic composition of potential reservoir hosts, owing to systematic, trait-mediated differences in species resilience to human pressures3,4. Here we analyse 6,801 ecological assemblages and 376 host species worldwide, controlling for research effort, and show that land use has global and systematic effects on local zoonotic host communities. Known wildlife hosts of human-shared pathogens and parasites overall comprise a greater proportion of local species richness (18-72% higher) and total abundance (21-144% higher) in sites under substantial human use (secondary, agricultural and urban ecosystems) compared with nearby undisturbed habitats. The magnitude of this effect varies taxonomically and is strongest for rodent, bat and passerine bird zoonotic host species, which may be one factor that underpins the global importance of these taxa as zoonotic reservoirs. We further show that mammal species that harbour more pathogens overall (either human-shared or non-human-shared) are more likely to occur in human-managed ecosystems, suggesting that these trends may be mediated by ecological or life-history traits that influence both host status and tolerance to human disturbance5,6. Our results suggest that global changes in the mode and the intensity of land use are creating expanding hazardous interfaces between people, livestock and wildlife reservoirs of zoonotic disease.


Assuntos
Biodiversidade , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/virologia , Animais , Aves/microbiologia , Aves/parasitologia , Aves/virologia , Humanos , Mamíferos/microbiologia , Mamíferos/parasitologia , Mamíferos/virologia , Especificidade da Espécie , Zoonoses/transmissão
18.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000764, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32780733

RESUMO

Tissue vibrations in the larynx produce most sounds that comprise vocal communication in mammals. Larynx morphology is thus predicted to be a key target for selection, particularly in species with highly developed vocal communication systems. Here, we present a novel database of digitally modeled scanned larynges from 55 different mammalian species, representing a wide range of body sizes in the primate and carnivoran orders. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we demonstrate that the primate larynx has evolved more rapidly than the carnivoran larynx, resulting in a pattern of larger size and increased deviation from expected allometry with body size. These results imply fundamental differences between primates and carnivorans in the balance of selective forces that constrain larynx size and highlight an evolutionary flexibility in primates that may help explain why we have developed complex and diverse uses of the vocal organ for communication.


Assuntos
Canidae/fisiologia , Felidae/fisiologia , Herpestidae/fisiologia , Laringe/fisiologia , Primatas/fisiologia , Vocalização Animal/fisiologia , Animais , Evolução Biológica , Tamanho Corporal , Canidae/anatomia & histologia , Canidae/classificação , Felidae/anatomia & histologia , Felidae/classificação , Feminino , Herpestidae/anatomia & histologia , Herpestidae/classificação , Laringe/anatomia & histologia , Masculino , Mamíferos , Tamanho do Órgão , Filogenia , Primatas/anatomia & histologia , Primatas/classificação , Caracteres Sexuais , Fatores Sexuais , Som
19.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237835, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32817725

RESUMO

Fisheries bycatch has been identified as the greatest threat to marine mammals worldwide. Characterizing the impacts of bycatch on marine mammals is challenging because it is difficult to both observe and quantify, particularly in small-scale fisheries where data on fishing effort and marine mammal abundance and distribution are often limited. The lack of risk frameworks that can integrate and visualize existing data have hindered the ability to describe and quantify bycatch risk. Here, we describe the design of a new geographic information systems tool built specifically for the analysis of bycatch in small-scale fisheries, called Bycatch Risk Assessment (ByRA). Using marine mammals in Malaysia and Vietnam as a test case, we applied ByRA to assess the risks posed to Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) and dugongs (Dugong dugon) by five small-scale fishing gear types (hook and line, nets, longlines, pots and traps, and trawls). ByRA leverages existing data on animal distributions, fisheries effort, and estimates of interaction rates by combining expert knowledge and spatial analyses of existing data to visualize and characterize bycatch risk. By identifying areas of bycatch concern while accounting for uncertainty using graphics, maps and summary tables, we demonstrate the importance of integrating available geospatial data in an accessible format that taps into local knowledge and can be corroborated by and communicated to stakeholders of data-limited fisheries. Our methodological approach aims to meet a critical need of fisheries managers: to identify emergent interaction patterns between fishing gears and marine mammals and support the development of management actions that can lead to sustainable fisheries and mitigate bycatch risk for species of conservation concern.


Assuntos
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Pesqueiros/normas , Sistemas de Informação Geográfica , Mamíferos/fisiologia , Animais , Cetáceos/fisiologia , Golfinhos/fisiologia , Dugong/fisiologia , Humanos , Malásia , Medição de Risco , Tartarugas/fisiologia , Vietnã
20.
An Acad Bras Cienc ; 92(2): e20181113, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785429

RESUMO

Research on the past use of animals in medicine, particularly in Brazil, is still scarce. This work aimed to perform a dialogical analysis of information retrieved from historical documents composed in the nineteenth century about the therapeutic use of animal species in Benedictine monasteries in Brazil and their contemporary medicinal applications. Cross-referencing of seven written codices from the nineteenth century Benedictine monasteries infirmaries was performed for taxonomic identification and with therapeutic indications. Animal species provided 13 zootherapeutic resources, which were related to 17 therapeutic indications. Insects, birds and mammals concentrated the greatest number of pharmaceutical actions (37%, 32% and 16% of the therapeutic indications). Medicinal animals used in the past are species commonly applied in the European medicine over centuries. This reveals that the practiced medicine in Benedictine monasteries was influenced by medical concepts from Europe. Also, it shows that still today this European medicine is the basis of therapeutic practice. Such research is essential for a better scientific understanding of the history of medicine, focusing on how different cultures have contributed to the actual therapeutic practice. In this way it is possible to trace a history zootherapy in Brazil, demonstrating the persistence of their use over the time.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional , Animais , Brasil , Mamíferos
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