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2.
Acute Med ; 18(3): 148-157, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31536052

RESUMO

Doctors training in Acute Internal Medicine (AIM) need to provide evidence that they can effectively manage 20 'top' and 40 'other important' acute medical presentations. However, the presentations considered important in the AIM curriculum do not have an empirical evidence base. This study compared real-life presentations against those in the AIM curriculum. Data on all presentations to the acute medical service at The Royal Free Hospital, London, were collected retrospectively for five non-consecutive weeks and prospectively for one week. Five frequently encountered presentations viz: cough, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, hyperglycaemia and lethargy were not amongst those listed as 'top' or 'other important' in the AIM curriculum. Hence, demonstration of competency in these presentations is currently not an explicit requirement.


Assuntos
Medicina Interna , Currículo , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educação , Médicos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reino Unido
3.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 65(8): 1048-1054, 2019 Sep 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31531600

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Medical Residency is a recognized form of professional qualification, but there are criticisms regarding the overload of work activities. Given the length of the daily and weekly workdays, residents develop practices that enable them to reconcile the Residency with their personal life. AIM: To describe time management strategies in the daily routine of Internal Medicine Medical Residents of a university hospital in São Paulo, Brasil. METHODS: Eight interviews were conducted with resident physicians of the second year, addressing aspects of personal and family life, theoretical study, practical activities, and work bonds. Content analysis was carried out using the MaxQDA software. RESULTS: Six thematic categories emerged from the reports: work organization at the Medical Residency; learning and/or professional activities; housing, financial planning, and household activities; time for leisure and interpersonal relationship; family planning/children; rest/sleep. DISCUSSION: Several strategies are adopted for time management: residing near the hospital, domestic activities helped by housekeepers, postponement of maternity leave, and social support centered on interacting with other residents. There are paid activities not associated with the Residency, which lead to reduced time for rest, study, and leisure, with a greater loss during work at night shifts. CONCLUSIONS: Residents experience a period of intense learning, which requires a high workload and complex work. The evaluation of the work organization of medical residents should include not only time for rest but also time management strategies for daily activities, which can reduce the negative outcomes associated with long working hours.


Assuntos
Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Gerenciamento do Tempo , Carga de Trabalho/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Brasil , Feminino , Hospitais Universitários , Humanos , Medicina Interna/estatística & dados numéricos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Carga de Trabalho/psicologia
4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 13(4): 2647-2652, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405689

RESUMO

AIMS: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an inpatient diabetes care education during the first year of internal medicine residency training on inpatient glycemic control. METHODS: The program was comprised of 1-hr small group teaching per 4-week rotation and twice-a-week morning insulin round by an endocrinologist. Inpatient insulin management guideline leaflet was provided to all internal medicine residents. We retrospectively collected the point-of-care testing for glucose (POCT-glu) data in patients admitted to the general medicine wards and compared the mean of blood glucose (BG) before and after the education program. A total of 134438 POCT-glu values from 7055 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: After the initiation of the education program, mean BG levels significantly decreased during the first year and were lowest during the second year after education (Mean BG at baseline was 161.38 ±â€¯64.10 mg/dL; 1st year, 159.48 ±â€¯62.53 mg/dL and 2nd year, 155.60 ±â€¯64.94 mg/dL, p-value < 0.0001). The reduction of BG levels was more pronounced in the patients with previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus than patients with underlying diabetes mellitus. The rates of severe hypoglycemia (defined by BG < 40 mg/dL or 2.2 mmol/L) were not significantly different before and after education (baseline 0.12%, 1st year 0.14%, and 2nd year 0.14%, p-value = 0.632). CONCLUSIONS: Lack of confidence and inadequate knowledge of insulin treatment in physicians were important barriers to glycemic management. Consistent education in internal medicine residents led to a significant improvement in inpatient glycemic control.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/normas , Hiperglicemia/prevenção & controle , Hipoglicemia/prevenção & controle , Pacientes Internados/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Interna/educação , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto/normas , Idoso , Biomarcadores/análise , Glicemia/análise , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Feminino , Seguimentos , Hemoglobina A Glicada/análise , Hospitalização , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Internato e Residência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Testes Imediatos , Prognóstico , Melhoria de Qualidade , Estudos Retrospectivos
6.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4 Suppl): 73-78, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428261

RESUMO

Background: Attributes of the clinical learning environment (CLE) are a measure of quality in postgraduate medical education, and assessing the CLE is a component of the New Accreditation System being introduced in Singapore by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International. There is a dearth of published studies of CLE quality in Singapore. Objective: Our study had 3 aims: (1) to measure the CLE in 1 Singaporean residency program; (2) to compare trainee perceptions by sex, training level, and experience; and (3) to identify areas for improvement. Methods: Between October and December 2017, we conducted a mixed assessment of the CLE in an internal medicine program in Singapore, using the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) and qualitative exploration using a focus group. Results: Of 153 IM residents, 136 (89%) provided PHEEM responses and 8 participated in the focus group. Total PHEEM scores and scores for the 3 subscales were higher than published data on the use of the PHEEM in international settings. Exploration of selected PHEEM responses via a focus group identified attributes associated with negative perceptions of the CLE: excessive workload, inadequate faculty presence in the CLE, and unmet trainee needs. It also suggested senior residents' clinical workloads, greater responsibilities, and pending examinations may contribute to their less positive perceptions of the CLE. Conclusions: Our analysis using the PHEEM showed overall positive perceptions of the CLE, along with areas for improvement amenable to interventions. Our approach has relevance to an accreditation model with ongoing evaluation of the CLE.


Assuntos
Acreditação/normas , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência , Melhoria de Qualidade , Adulto , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Singapura , Inquéritos e Questionários , Carga de Trabalho/psicologia
7.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4 Suppl): 91-99, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428264

RESUMO

Background: While resident participation in global health (GH) rotations has grown, little is known about trainee perceptions of the personal value of these international clinical experiences and their importance to the objectives of GH training. Objective: We sought to better understand the clinical scenarios experienced during international rotations that residents perceived as most meaningful and the frequency of these experiences across scenarios and participating residents. Methods: Using the conceptual framework of Schön's reflection on action, we asked University of Minnesota GH track pediatric and internal medicine-pediatric residents to describe 10 clinical scenarios they found interesting or impactful during their 2016-2017 GH elective. We conducted a qualitative analysis of the deidentified resident narratives and mapped themes to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. Results: All eligible residents (n = 13) participated, yielding 129 unique clinical scenarios from 7 countries. We identified 5 thematic groups: (1) addressing challenges in making diagnoses in resource-limited settings; (2) dealing with patient outcomes different from those expected in the United States; (3) encountering and managing diseases in a different clinical context; (4) encountering and managing diseases in a different cultural context; and (5) reflecting on learning and self-growth. Of the 129 unique clinical scenarios, 30% (n = 39) had not been previously experienced by participants. Across the 5 themes, all ACGME core competencies were addressed. Conclusions: Residents identified meaningful scenarios of their GH experiences that are relevant to the educational and clinical objectives of GH training.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Saúde Global , Medicina Interna/educação , Internacionalidade , Internato e Residência , Aprendizagem , Pediatria/educação , Acreditação/normas , Adulto , Competência Cultural , Feminino , Recursos em Saúde/provisão & distribução , Humanos , Masculino , Narração , Estados Unidos
8.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4 Suppl): 146-151, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428272

RESUMO

Background: Research shows that when patients and health care providers share responsibility for clinical decisions, both patient satisfaction and quality of care increase, and resource use decreases. Yet few studies have assessed how to train residents to use shared decision-making (SDM) in their practice. Objective: We developed and evaluated a SDM training program in internal medicine. Methods: Senior internal medicine residents from 3 hospitals in Switzerland were assessed shortly before and 2 months after completing a program that included a 2-hour workshop and pocket card use in clinical practice. Encounters with standardized patients (SPs) were recorded and SDM performance was assessed using a SDM completeness rating scale (scores ranging from 0 to 100), a self-reported questionnaire, and SPs rating the residents. Results: Of 39 eligible residents, 27 (69%) participated. The mean (SD) score improved from 65 (SD 13) to 71 (SD 12; effect size [ES] 0.53; P = .011). After training, participants were more comfortable with their SDM-related knowledge (ES 1.42, P < .001) and skills (ES 0.91, P < .001), and with practicing SDM (ES 0.96, P < .001). Physicians applied SDM concepts more often in practice (ES 0.71, P = .001), and SPs felt more comfortable with how participants discussed their care (ES 0.44, P = .031). Conclusions: The SDM training program improved the competencies of internal medicine residents and promoted the use of SDM in clinical practice. The approach may be of interest for teaching SDM to residents in other disciplines and to medical students.


Assuntos
Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência , Simulação de Paciente , Adulto , Avaliação Educacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Participação do Paciente , Médicos , Autorrelato , Inquéritos e Questionários
9.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4 Suppl): 165-168, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428275

RESUMO

Background: Interns in the internal medicine program at American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC) come from diverse educational backgrounds based on American, French, and Egyptian systems, similar to other settings in the Middle East. To help this diverse group of trainees integrate into their new role, the institution launched an intern retreat in 2014 and repeated the event 3 times to date. Objective: We describe the experience with the AUBMC intern retreat and discuss the format and interns' perceptions of the benefits of the event. Methods: The retreat was divided into workshops and team-building sessions. Workshop topics focused on communication, teamwork, time management, survival tips, patient-physician interaction, and resident well-being. Fun activities were meant to strengthen peer-to-peer relationship and included a treasure hunt, Jeopardy game, and basketball. Results: Retreats took place in 2014, 2016, and 2017, and involved 72 of 102 interns (71%), as participation was optional. The 2015 retreat had to be canceled due to logistical problems. Of 72 eligible interns, 61 (85%) responded to the evaluation survey. The majority rated the activity as fun or interesting; sessions with the highest ratings included communication, patient-physician interaction, and resident well-being. There was unanimous agreement to make the retreat a yearly tradition. Each year, we collected feedback and made changes to further improve the retreat experience. Conclusions: The retreat is now an established activity. In an institution that accepts interns from different backgrounds, the retreat has strengthened peer-to-peer relations, improved communication, and contributed to a collegial and supportive work environment.


Assuntos
Capacitação em Serviço , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência , Grupo Associado , Adulto , Comunicação , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Humanos , Relações Médico-Paciente , Inquéritos e Questionários
10.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4): 389-401, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440332

RESUMO

Background: Management of mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important and complex aspect of caring for critically ill patients. Management strategies and technical operation of the ventilator are key skills for physicians in training, as lack of expertise can lead to substantial patient harm. Objective: We performed a narrative review of the literature describing MV education in graduate medical education (GME) and identified best practices for training and assessment methods. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar for English-language, peer-reviewed articles describing MV education and assessment. We included articles from 2000 through July 2018 pertaining to MV education or training in GME. Results: Fifteen articles met inclusion criteria. Studies related to MV training in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, general surgery, and internal medicine residency programs, as well as subspecialty training in critical care medicine, pediatric critical care medicine, and pulmonary and critical care medicine. Nearly half of trainees assessed were dissatisfied with their MV education. Six studies evaluated educational interventions, all employing simulation as an educational strategy, although there was considerable heterogeneity in content. Most outcomes were assessed with multiple-choice knowledge testing; only 2 studies evaluated the care of actual patients after an educational intervention. Conclusions: There is a paucity of information describing MV education in GME. The available literature demonstrates that trainees are generally dissatisfied with MV training. Best practices include establishing MV-specific learning objectives and incorporating simulation. Next research steps include developing competency standards and validity evidence for assessment tools that can be utilized across MV educational curricula.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Internato e Residência , Aprendizagem , Respiração Artificial/normas , Treinamento por Simulação/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Medicina de Emergência/educação , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educação , Médicos
11.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4): 412-419, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440335

RESUMO

Background: Internal medicine (IM) residency programs receive information about applicants via academic transcripts, but studies demonstrate wide variability in satisfaction with and usefulness of this information. In addition, many studies compare application materials to only 1 or 2 assessment metrics, usually standardized test scores and work-based observational faculty assessments. Objective: We sought to determine which application materials best predict performance across a broad array of residency assessment outcomes generated by standardized testing and a yearlong IM residency ambulatory long block. Methods: In 2019, we analyzed available Electronic Residency Application Service data for 167 categorical IM residents, including advanced degree status, research experience, failures during medical school, undergraduate medical education award status, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores. We compared these with post-match residency multimodal performance, including standardized test scores and faculty member, peer, allied health professional, and patient-level assessment measures. Results: In multivariate analyses, USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores were most predictive of performance across all residency performance domains measured. Having an advanced degree was associated with higher patient-level assessments (eg, physician listens, physician explains, etc). USMLE Step 1 scores were associated with in-training examination scores only. None of the other measured application materials predicted performance. Conclusions: USMLE Step 2 CK scores were the highest predictors of residency performance across a broad array of performance measurements generated by standardized testing and an IM residency ambulatory long block.


Assuntos
Avaliação Educacional/normas , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência , Licenciamento em Medicina/normas , Desempenho Profissional/normas , Competência Clínica/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Humanos
12.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4): 447-453, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440340

RESUMO

Background: Specialized primary care internal medicine (PC IM) residency programs and tracks aim to provide dedicated PC training. How programs deliver this is unclear. Objective: We explored how PC IM programs and tracks provide ambulatory training. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey from 2012 to 2013 of PC IM program and track leaders via a search of national databases and program websites. We reported PC IM curricular content, clinical experiences, and graduate career pursuits, and assessed correlation between career pursuits and curricular content and clinical experiences. Results: Forty-five of 70 (64%) identified PC IM programs and tracks completed the survey. PC IM programs provide a breadth of curricular content and clinical experiences, including a mean 22.8 weeks ambulatory training and a mean 69.4 continuity clinics per year. Of PC IM graduates within 5 years, 55.8% pursue PC or general internal medicine (GIM) careers and 23.1% pursue traditional subspecialty fellowship training. Curricular content and clinical experiences correlate weakly with career choices. PC IM graduates pursuing PC or GIM careers correlated with ambulatory rotation in women's health (correlation coefficient [rho] = 0.36, P = .034) and mental health (rho = 0.38, P = .023) and curricular content in teaching and medical education (rho = 0.35, P = .035). PC IM graduates pursuing subspecialty fellowship negatively correlated with curricular content in leadership and teams (rho = -0.48, P = .003) and ambulatory training time (rho = -0.38, P = .024). Conclusions: PC IM programs and tracks largely deliver on the promise to provide PC training and education and produce graduates engaged in PC and GIM.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Estudos Transversais , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Humanos , Liderança , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4): 475-478, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440345

RESUMO

Background: The Medical School Performance Evaluation (MSPE) is an important factor for application to residency programs. Many medical schools are incorporating recent recommendations from the Association of American Medical Colleges MSPE Task Force into their letters. To date, there has been no feedback from the graduate medical education community on the impact of this effort. Objective: We surveyed individuals involved in residency candidate selection for internal medicine programs to understand their perceptions on the new MSPE format. Methods: A survey was distributed in March and April 2018 using the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine listserv, which comprises 4220 individuals from 439 residency programs. Responses were analyzed, and themes were extracted from open-ended questions. Results: A total of 140 individuals, predominantly program directors and associate program directors, from across the United States completed the survey. Most were aware of the existence of the MSPE Task Force. Respondents read a median of 200 to 299 letters each recruitment season. The majority reported observing evidence of adoption of the new format in more than one quarter of all medical schools. Among respondents, nearly half reported the new format made the MSPE more important in decision-making about a candidate. Within the MSPE, respondents recognized the following areas as most influential: academic progress, summary paragraph, graphic representation of class performance, academic history, and overall adjective of performance indicator (rank). Conclusions: The internal medicine graduate medical education community finds value in many components of the new MSPE format, while recognizing there are further opportunities for improvement.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico/normas , Competência Clínica/normas , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Faculdades de Medicina/normas , Educação Médica , Humanos , Diretores Médicos/organização & administração , Estudantes de Medicina , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 281, 2019 Jul 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31345190

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The history of standardized residency training programs (SRTP) in China is not long. As one of the top medical colleges in China, Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) has the history and experience of the oldest SRTP in the country. Understanding the job status of PUMCH residents would be conducive to a better development of the national resident training in the future. METHODS: This study analyzed the demographic information, job burnout scale, working time, and job status of postgraduate year 1-3 residents that took part in the SRTP of the Department of Internal Medicine of PUMCH in August 2017. RESULTS: The survey data of 159 residents (including PUMCH residents, local-resident-trainees, and clinical postgraduates) were collected. The average working time was 11.38 ± 1.55 h per day and 83.28 ± 8.80 h per week. The average night shift frequency was 4.74 ± 0.59 days. There were 100 residents (62.2%) with symptoms of job burnout, which had a certain correlation with working time (p < 0.05). The self-evaluation of the clinical postgraduates about their working quality of life was lower than that of other residents (p < 0.05). There were various reasons for long working-time, great work pressure, and job burnout. Job burnout was independently associated with the average working time per day (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.47-3.75, P < 0.001) and average length of duty period (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.26-1.84, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The job burnout of residents that took part in SRTP at the PUMCH could not be ignored, which had a certain correlation with work time and early training background.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Satisfação no Emprego , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado , Adulto , Esgotamento Profissional/epidemiologia , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educação , Masculino , Tutoria , Qualidade de Vida , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
17.
Lakartidningen ; 1162019 May 07.
Artigo em Sueco | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31192436

RESUMO

A prerequisite for rational use of medicines is adequate prescribing skills; drug treatment is a complex task requiring diagnostic competence combined with pharmacologic knowledge and patient communication skills. Acquiring professional confidence in the art of prescribing is essential during medical training. The results of this questionnaire study, conducted in four medical schools in Sweden after the course in internal medicine (252 respondents; response rate: 74%; median age: 24 years, 61% female), show that 45% and 62% were confident in performing medication reviews and writing medication summary reports, respectively, i.e. the basics of prescribing. The confidence increased by the number of reviews and reports performed, i.e. the extent of practice (correlation coefficients: 0.41 and 0.38, respectively, both p<0.0001), as did the extent of the students' reflection on important aspects of drug treatment such as adherence, adverse reactions, renal function, dosing, and drug interactions. In multivariate regression analyses, major predictors for confidence in performing medication reviews were extent of practice and extent of clinical supervision. The results suggest that these factors are keys to acquiring professional confidence in the art of prescribing.


Assuntos
Prescrições de Medicamentos/normas , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Reconciliação de Medicamentos/normas , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Adulto , Competência Clínica , Feminino , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educação , Masculino , Farmacologia/educação , Farmacologia Clínica/educação , Autoimagem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Suécia , Adulto Jovem
18.
South Med J ; 112(6): 310-314, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31158883

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Healthcare professionals are at higher risk for workplace violence (WPV) than workers in other sectors. This elevated risk exists despite the vast underreporting of WPV in the medical setting. The challenge of responding to this risk is compounded by limited empirical research on medical training environments. Understanding trainees' experience and educating them on workplace safety, WPV reporting, and awareness of resources are shared goals of educational and institutional leadership. In our setting, clear understanding and education were urgent after the enactment of a statewide "constitutional carry" law affording individuals a right to carry concealed firearms in all state-owned universities and hospitals, beginning in July 2017. We sought to examine the incidence of WPV affecting Internal Medicine trainees to understand the types of violence encountered, reporting rates, and the factors that influence reporting. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of Internal Medicine residents and fellows in practice for the previous 12 months. Survey items included both forced choice and open-ended questions. Descriptive statistics were calculated and used to summarize the study variables. χ2 tests were performed to examine whether sex differences existed for each of the survey questions. Qualitative responses were content analyzed and organized thematically. RESULTS: Of 186 trainees, 88 completed the survey. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced WPV, with >90% of cases involving a patient, a patient's family member, or a patient's friend. Verbal assault was the most common type of incident encountered. Trainees formally reported fewer than half of the violent incidents disclosed in the survey. Major factors that influenced reporting included the severity of the incident, condition of the patient, and clarity of the reporting mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: Previous research indicates similar amounts and types of WPV. Likewise, a large percentage of the incidents are not reported. Addressing the key factors related to why physicians underreport can inform institutions on how to make systematic changes to reduce WPV and its negative impact. Future research is needed to examine whether specific interventions can be implemented to improve reporting and reduce the incidence of WPV.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Medicina Interna/educação , Violência no Trabalho/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Kansas , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi ; 58(6): 435-438, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31159522

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate senior resident training program "resident team leader in the Department of General Internal Medicine" at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Methods: We surveyed the residents or the fellows who had been selected as resident team leaders and received the training from October 2014 to September 2018 on their comments and suggestions. Results: Twenty-two rotated senior residents who were selected as team leaders in the Department of General Internal Medicine completed the survey. Almost all (21/22, 95.5%) of the respondents reported that they learnt more in general as team leaders by Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The mean VAS scores of clinical skills were 7.23±1.27, 7.86±1.32 in teaching abilities, 8.14±0.89 in leadership evaluation. Scales as chief resident assistants were 8.44±1.26. Sixteen respondents (72.7%) considered that pre-job training by attending doctors was necessary. Another 8 (36.4%) respondents addressed their demands on training of teaching skills. Conclusions: The senior resident training program "resident team leader in the Department of General Internal Medicine" improves the competency of rotated senior residents. It is a valuable pilot study on senior resident training and worthy of further application in other departments and hospitals.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência , Hospitais , Humanos , Projetos Piloto , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
20.
Dermatol Online J ; 25(5)2019 May 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31220906

RESUMO

Chronic wounds are highly prevalent and have become a public health crisis. Successful treatment of chronic wounds requires that healthcare providers study both the pathophysiology of wound healing and maintain knowledge of the most current wound care guidelines set forth by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Unfortunately, medical students currently receive limited wound care training. A focused and well-organized course integrating a diverse group of medical and surgical faculty, residents, and medical students in the clinical years has been created to address this growing medical issue. The goal of such curricular innovations is to help future physicians gain exposure to chronic wounds and develop crucial clinical skills so they enter residency prepared to offer basic treatments and prevent rapid deterioration of the many wounds they will encounter.


Assuntos
Currículo , Cicatrização , Ferimentos e Lesões/terapia , Doença Crônica , Dermatologia/educação , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educação , Medicina Física e Reabilitação/educação , Podiatria/educação , Cirurgia Plástica/educação
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