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1.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 305, 2019 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31711478

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC) has emerged as a primary approach to health care. This care focuses on the cultural diversity of the patients rather than the views of the health care professionals. PC-CSHC enables the patient to feel comfortable, respected, and trusted in the health care delivery process. As users of traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM) rarely inform their conventional health care providers of such use, the providers need to identify the users of T&CM themselves to avoid negative interaction with conventional medicine and to be able to provide them with PC-CSHC. Since the patterns of traditional medicine (TM) use are different to those of complementary medicine (CM), the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence, and the health- and sociodemographic associations for visits to TM- and CM providers in an urban population. METHOD: The data were collected through two self-administrated questionnaires from the seventh survey of the Tromsø Study, a population-based cohort study conducted in 2015-2016. All inhabitants of Tromsø aged 40 or above were invited (n = 32,591) and n = 21,083 accepted the invitation (response rate 65%). Pearson chi-square tests and one-way ANOVA tests were used to describe differences between the groups whereas binary logistic regressions were used for adjusted values. RESULTS: The results revealed that 2.5% of the participants had seen a TM provider, 8.5% had seen a CM provider whereas 1% had visited both a TM and a CM provider during a 12-month period. TM users tended to be older, claim that religion was more important to them, have poorer economy and health, and have lower education compared to CM users. We found that more than 90% of the participants visiting T&CM providers also used conventional medicine. CONCLUSION: A considerable number of the participants in this study employed parallel health care modalities including visits to conventional, traditional, and complementary medicine providers. To offer patient-centered culturally sensitive health care that is tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy and spiritual needs, conventional health care providers need knowledge about, and respect for their patients' use of parallel health care systems.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pacientes/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Assistência Ambulatorial/psicologia , Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Coortes , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Demografia , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega , Pacientes/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevalência , Religião , Confiança
2.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 259, 2019 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31533782

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Traditional and complementary medicines (T&CM) are any form of medicine, practice, treatment, product, technology, knowledge system or ceremony outside of conventional medical practice that aims to prevent and/or treat illness and/or promote well-being. Alongside conventional cancer treatments, T&CM usage is increasing; with 19% of indigenous Australians with cancer reporting using T&CM. There is limited evidence surrounding T&CM use and disclosure by indigenous patients. Our aim was to explore healthcare providers' views about usage, disclosure/non-disclosure of T&CM by Indigenous cancer patients. METHODS: Semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 healthcare providers, including three indigenous providers, at a large urban hospital providing care to Indigenous cancer patients were conducted to explore providers' experiences and attitudes towards T&CM use by Indigenous cancer patients. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to thematically analyse the data. RESULTS: Analysis revealed six themes: concern about risk; no 'real' benefits; perception of T&CM and conventional medicine as antithetical; barriers to disclosure; 'patients' choice' a double-edged sword; and providers' lack of knowledge about T&CM. Healthcare providers perceived discord between T&CM and conventional medicine. Most lacked knowledge of T&CM, and had concerns around negative-interactions with conventional treatments. They considered T&CM outside their role, citing this as reasoning for their lack of knowledge. Indigenous healthcare providers had greater understanding and openness towards T&CM. CONCLUSIONS: Given the potential usage of T&CM by Indigenous cancer patients, providers need a more comprehensive understanding of T&CM in order to inform discussion and facilitate effective disclosure on this topic. If indigenous Australians with cancer feel that cancer care providers are unreceptive to discussing T&CM, patient care risks being compromised; particularly given the potential for negative interactions between T&CM and conventional cancer treatments. Fostering health care interactions where indigenous patients feel comfortable to discuss T&CM usage should be a priority for all cancer care services.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Neoplasias/terapia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/psicologia
3.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 251, 2019 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31500604

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) is gaining increased interest worldwide, the structural factors associated with the usage of TCAM at the social level have not been sufficiently explored. We aim to understand the social structure of uncertainty in society that affects the TCAM usage for men and women. METHODS: We studied 32 countries using data from the International Social Survey Programme and the World Bank. In this study, we defined TCAM usage as visits to an alternative/traditional/folk health care practitioner during the past 12 months. We performed a correlation analysis and used a generalized linear model . RESULTS: The prevalence of TCAM usage in terms of visits to practitioners was 26.1% globally, while usage varied across the 32 countries. Generalized linear models showed that unemployment rate was associated with the prevalence of TCAM usage in terms of visits to practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: At the social-structural level TCAM usage involving visits to practitioners was related to job insecurity. Job insecurity led to a decrease in TCAM usage regarding visits to practitioners. These findings suggest that it is necessary to consider the social-structural factors of uncertainty in society when designing health policies related to TCAM.


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Assistência Ambulatorial/psicologia , Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Incerteza , Adulto Jovem
5.
Australas Psychiatry ; 27(4): 345-347, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30860396

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This article describes the voice hearing experiences of a young Maori man, and the joint Maori healing and psychiatry assessment he received, in which the Maori healer (WN) concluded that some of the young man's experiences could be accounted for by ancestral kaitiaki (spiritual guardians). CONCLUSIONS: Kaitiaki are commonly accepted in Te Ao Maori (the Maori world) as an explanation for some types of voice hearing experiences. Collaboration between a Maori healer and a psychiatrist can offer Maori whanau (individuals and families) more appropriate mental health assessment and intervention than conventional psychiatric assessment alone when Maori spiritual experiences are suspected.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Cultura , Alucinações/terapia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Adolescente , Alucinações/etnologia , Humanos , Masculino , Nova Zelândia , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos , Terapias Espirituais/psicologia
6.
Int Nurs Rev ; 66(3): 329-337, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30843192

RESUMO

AIM: This study explored self-management practices in relation to traditional methods for managing illness in newborns and infants and the implications of these practices on infant health. BACKGROUND: Self-medication with folk remedies is believed to have short- and long-term impacts on well-being. Little is known about how mothers in Arab societies used their traditional beliefs and practices in self-managing their newborns' and infants' health. METHODS: Data were collected from five focus groups using open-ended questions with 37 mothers. Participants were selected using snowball sampling and were recruited from four different cities in Jordan between June 2016 and August 2016. ETHICAL APPROVAL: All identifying information regarding the study participants has been omitted, and this study was approved by the Academic Research Committee at the University of Jordan. FINDINGS: Mothers were more willing to try herbal remedies, traditional massage and certain foods to self-manage their infants' health. Folk remedies were not restricted to traditions handed down through generations, but included a representation of newly emerged trends towards 'safety' or 'nature'. CONCLUSIONS: While the use of folk remedies have been handed down generations as customs, today, virtual support groups and social media provide modern resources for folk remedies' promotion in care and self-management. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: Nursing and health policymakers can use our findings for planning and developing strategies and health policies that increase public awareness about adverse health effects associated with herbal remedies. Such strategies are likely to be facilitated through partnerships between nursing and midwifery education institutions, antenatal clinics and social media in the region.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Saúde/etnologia , Cuidado do Lactente/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia , Mães/psicologia , Adulto , Árabes , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Jordânia , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Percepção Social
7.
BMC Geriatr ; 19(1): 36, 2019 02 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30732566

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Aotearoa/New Zealand population is ageing and numerous studies demonstrate with this phenomenon comes increases in non-communicable diseases, injuries and healthcare costs among other issues. Further, significant inequities exist between Maori (Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand) and non-Maori around poor ageing and health. Most research addressing these issues is deficit oriented; however, the current research project takes a strengths-based approach that highlights the potential of kaumatua (elders) by asserting mana motuhake (autonomy, identity and self-actualisation). We believe that the esteem of elders in Maori culture signals transformative potential. Specifically, this project utilises a 'tuakana-teina' (older sibling/younger sibling) peer-educator model, where kaumatua work with other kaumatua in relation to health and wellbeing. The objectives of the project are (a) to develop the capacity of kaumatua as peer educators, whilst having positive impacts on their sense of purpose, health and wellbeing; and (b) to enhance the social and health outcomes for kaumatua receiving the intervention. METHODS: The research is grounded in principles of Kaupapa Maori and community-based participatory research, and brings together an Indigenous community of kaumatua, community health researchers, and academic researchers working with two advisory boards. The project intervention involves an orientation programme for tuakana peer educators for other kaumatua (teina). The research design is a pre- and post-test, clustered staggered design. All participants will complete a baseline assessment of health and wellbeing consistent with Maori worldviews (i.e., holistic model). The tuakana and teina participants will be divided into two groups with the first group completing the intervention during the first half of the project and the second group during the second half of the project. All participants will complete post-test assessments following both interventions allowing comparison of the two groups along with repeated measures over time. DISCUSSION: The findings will provide an evidence base for the importance and relevancy of kaumatua knowledge to create contextually based and culturally safe age-friendly environments that facilitate engagement and participation by kaumatua for kaumatua. If the model is effective, we will seek to facilitate the dissemination and scalability of the intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ( ACTRN12617001396314 ); Date Registered: 3 October 2017 (retrospectively registered).


Assuntos
Acontecimentos que Mudam a Vida , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos/educação , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos/etnologia , Grupo Associado , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Análise por Conglomerados , Feminino , Serviços de Saúde/tendências , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/tendências , Nova Zelândia/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos/psicologia , Sistema de Registros , Estudos Retrospectivos
8.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 29(4): 1188-1208, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30449743

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The global burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing, especially in Central America. In resource-limited settings, such as Guatemala, there are significant barriers to diabetes care and many Guatemalans use medicinal plants as treatment. The purpose of this study is to understand the use of medicinal plants in an indigenous population with diabetes in rural Guatemala. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in communities around San Lucas Tolimán, Guatemala with people with diabetes, health promoters, and traditional healers. RESULTS: Out of the 55 people with diabetes interviewed, 35 (63.6%) had used medicinal plants, most frequently using Artemisia absinthium, Moringa oleifera, Carica papaya, and Neurolaena lobata. The majority of participants cited lack of access to medications as the reason for their use of medicinal plants. CONCLUSION: There is widespread use of medicinal plants in San Lucas Tolimán. More research is needed to understand the degree of glycemic control in these communities.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Plantas Medicinais , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Artemisia absinthium , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Carica , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Guatemala , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Moringa oleifera , Fatores Sexuais
10.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 99(6): 1369-1377, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30298811

RESUMO

Enteric fever is a systemic bacterial infection in humans that is endemic in Cambodia and for which antibiotic resistance is increasingly reported. To guide public health programs, this qualitative study sought to explore community perceptions on transmission and treatment. Participant observation was carried out in hospital settings, pharmacies, and at a community level in Phnom Penh. In-depth interviews 39 and one focus group discussion were carried out with blood culture-confirmed enteric fever patients and purposively selected key informants. Informants were theoretically sampled based on initial themes identified using abductive analysis. Nvivo 11 was used for thematic coding. An urgent need to address health literacy concerning the transmission of enteric fever was identified, as lay informants did not link the disease and its symptoms to bacterial contamination of foods and drinks but rather to foods considered "bad" following humoral illness interpretations. As a result, lay informants considered recurrence of enteric fever preventable with appropriate dietary restrictions and Khmer traditional medicines. This study also reveals pluralistic health-care-seeking behavior. For initial and mild symptoms, patients preferred home treatment or traditional healing practices; limited household finances delayed treatment seeking. When symptoms persisted, patients first visited drug outlets or private practitioners, where they received a mix of nonessential medicines and one or more antibiotics often without prescription or confirmation of diagnosis. Inappropriate use of antibiotics was common and was related to diagnostic uncertainty and limited finances, factors which should be addressed during future efforts to improve the uptake of appropriate diagnostics and treatment of enteric fever.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Percepção Social , Febre Tifoide/psicologia , Adulto , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Camboja/epidemiologia , Ceftriaxona/uso terapêutico , Participação da Comunidade , Características da Família , Feminino , Gentamicinas/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Salmonella paratyphi A/efeitos dos fármacos , Salmonella paratyphi A/patogenicidade , Salmonella paratyphi A/fisiologia , Salmonella typhi/efeitos dos fármacos , Salmonella typhi/patogenicidade , Salmonella typhi/fisiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Febre Tifoide/diagnóstico , Febre Tifoide/tratamento farmacológico , Febre Tifoide/epidemiologia
11.
J Community Health Nurs ; 35(3): 148-161, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30024284

RESUMO

Curanderismo is a system of traditional folk practices and beliefs that address health and healing in the Hispanic community. Curanderismo serves a function in the daily lives of Hispanics worldwide, providing them access to culturally appropriate healthcare, and agency over their own, and their family's health. Cultural competency in the area of curanderismo is invaluable, as curanderismo is a folk resource that if acknowledged and embraced by nurses and healthcare practitioners can aid in healthcare delivery and increased healthcare utilization among Hispanic populations.


Assuntos
Hispano-Americanos , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Competência Cultural , Cultura , Doença/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Humanos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Cura Mental/psicologia , Saúde Mental/etnologia , Religião e Medicina , Espiritualidade
12.
Int J Med Mushrooms ; 20(5): 445-450, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29953359

RESUMO

The gucchi mushroom, Morchella esculenta, commonly known as the morel, is called thunthoo in the Bhaderwahi dialect spoken in District Doda of Jammu and Kashmir, India, and is an expensive food item that grows wild and is collected manually. Its nutritive and medicinal values are acknowledged. The farming community in the district traditionally collects the mushroom from forested areas through a well-managed community approach. Elders of families and communities have taught farmers how to identify the mushroom, recognize distribution patterns, and collect it. The knowledge and ability to differentiate M. esculenta from other poisonous wild mushrooms has also been inherited from the elders and community members. Women and children collect it from the outskirts of the forested areas and villages; men penetrate deeper into the dense forests in groups. It is either sold fresh to local shopkeepers or dried at home; the majority of gucchi collectors do the latter. Traditionally, the mushrooms are most commonly dried in the sun or the kitchen. The mushroom fetches a remunerative price and supplements the household incomes of the rural folk who collect it. Marketing gucchi has not been reported as a constraint. It has traditionally been used to overcome gastric problems and indigestion, as a tonic, to help heal wounds, and to reduce joint pain. Its medicinal uses are, however, restricted to only the hills and far-flung areas.


Assuntos
Ascomicetos , Conhecimento , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Agricultura/economia , Agricultura/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Índia , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/economia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
13.
J Relig Health ; 57(5): 1948-1960, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29730807

RESUMO

Religiosity/spirituality can affect health and quality of life in myriad ways. Religion has been present since the first moments of our evolutionary history, whether it is understood as a byproduct or as an adaptation of our cognitive evolution. We investigated how religion influences medicinal plant-based local medical systems (LMSs) and focuses on how individual variation in the degree of religiosity/spirituality affects the structure of LMSs. The knowledge of people about their medical systems was obtained through the free-listing technique, and level of religiosity/spirituality was calculated using the Brazilian version of the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality. We employed a Generalized Linear Model to obtain the best model. Religiosity/spirituality is predictive of structural and functional aspects of medicinal plant-based LMSs. Our model encourages a discussion of the role of religion in the health of an individual as well as in the structure of an individual's support system. Religiosity/spirituality (and the dimensions of Commitment and Religious and Spiritual History, in particular) act to protect structural and functional elements of LMSs. By providing protection, the LMS benefits from greater resilience, at both the individual and population levels. We suggest that the socialization process resulting from the religious phenomenon has contributed to the complexity and maintenance of LMSs by means of the interaction of individuals as they engage in their religious observances, thus facilitating cultural transmission.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Religião , Espiritualidade , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto , Brasil , Etnobotânica , Etnofarmacologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
14.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 18(1): 62, 2018 Feb 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29448941

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Traditional healing practice is an important and integral part of healthcare systems in almost all countries of the world. Very few studies have addressed the holistic scenario of traditional healing practices in Bangladesh, although these serve around 80% of the ailing people. This study explored distinctive forms of traditional healing practices in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: During July to October 2007, the study team conducted 64 unstructured interviews, and 18 key informant interviews with traditional healers and patients from Bhabanipur and Jobra, two adjacent villages in Chittagong district, Bangladesh. The study also used participatory observations of traditional healing activities in the treatment centers. RESULTS: Majority of the community members, especially people of low socioeconomic status, first approached the traditional healers with their medical problems. Only after failure of such treatment did they move to qualified physicians for modern treatment. Interestingly, if this failed, they returned to the traditional healers. This study identified both religious and non-religious healing practices. The key religious healing practices reportedly included Kalami, Bhandai, and Spiritual Healing, whereas the non-religious healing practices included Sorcery, Kabiraji, and Home Medicine. Both patients and healers practiced self-medication at home with their indigenous knowledge. Kabiraji was widely practiced based on informal use of local medicinal plants in rural areas. Healers in both Kalami and Bhandari practices resorted to religious rituals, and usually used verses of holy books in healing, which required a firm belief of patients for the treatment to be effective. Sorcerers deliberately used their so-called supernatural power not only to treat a patient but also to cause harm to others upon secret request. The spiritual healing reportedly diagnosed and cured the health problems through communication with sacred spirits. Although the fee for diagnosis was small, spiritual healing required different types of treatment instruments, which made the treatment implicitly expensive. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional healing was widely practiced as the means of primary healthcare in rural areas of Bangladesh, especially among the people with low socioeconomic status. The extent of services showed no decline with the advancement of modern medical sciences; rather it has increased with the passage of time.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Terapias Espirituais/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Bangladesh , Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Religião , Saúde da População Rural , Terapias Espirituais/psicologia , Recursos Humanos , Adulto Jovem
15.
Health Policy Plan ; 33(4): 483-493, 2018 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29452365

RESUMO

This study contributes to the health policy debate on medical systems integration by describing and analysing the interactions between health-care users, indigenous healers, and the biomedical public health system, in the so far rarely documented case of post-conflict Burundi. We adopt a mixed-methods approach combining (1) data from an existing survey on access to health-care, with 6,690 individuals, and (2) original interviews and focus groups conducted in 2014 with 121 respondents, including indigenous healers, biomedical staff, and health-care users. The findings reveal pluralistic patterns of health-care seeking behaviour, which are not primarily based on economic convenience or level of education. Indigenous healers' diagnosis is shown to revolve around the concept of 'enemy' and the need for protection against it. We suggest ways in which this category may intersect with the widespread experience of trauma following the civil conflict. Finally, we find that, while biomedical staff displays ambivalent attitudes towards healers, cross-referrals occasionally take place between healers and health centres. These findings are interpreted in light of the debate on health systems integration in Sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, we discuss policy options regarding healers' accreditation, technical training, management of cross-referrals as well as of herb-drug interactions; and we emphasise healers' psychological support role in helping communities deal with trauma. In this respect, we argue that the experience of conflict, and the experiences and conceptualizations of mental and physical illness, need to be taken into account when devising appropriate public or international health policy responses.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Tradicional/estatística & dados numéricos , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Adulto , Antropologia Cultural , Conflitos Armados , Burundi , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
J Transcult Nurs ; 29(4): 354-362, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29308702

RESUMO

Introduction/Importance: Given the promise of integrating traditional healing practices into primary care, we sought to examine the influence of primary care providers' racial concordance and Indigenous patients' ethnic salience on traditional healing treatment decisions. METHOD: Using a descriptive comparative design with an online clinical case vignette, we measured provider decision making via a 5-point Provider Acceptance of Traditional Healing-Referral and Consult questionnaire. Aggregated results of the main effects and interactional effects were analyzed using a 2 × 2 analysis of variance between-subjects design. RESULTS: The main effect for patient racial concordance on the dependent variable was significant, F(1, 89) = 5.71, p = .02. CONCLUSIONS: Provider-patient racial concordance does increase the providers' likelihood of consulting with and referring patients to traditional healing practices, regardless of the patient's ethnic salience. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: All health care providers require training in traditional healing practices for Indigenous persons as guided by the cultural safety framework.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional/normas , Médicos de Atenção Primária/psicologia , Encaminhamento e Consulta/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Análise de Variância , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Populacionais/etnologia , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Encaminhamento e Consulta/tendências , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
18.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 20(5): 1197-1205, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28994002

RESUMO

Mexican immigrants have a rich history of traditional healers. This analysis describes the conditions for which Mexican immigrants seek treatment from sobadores, and delineates factors that influence seeking treatment from a sobador or a biomedical doctor. This systematic qualitative analysis uses interview data collected with 24 adult Mexican immigrants to North Carolina who had been treated by a sobador in the previous 2 years. Immigrants are engaged in medical pluralism, seeking care from sobadores and biomedical doctors based on the complaint and patient's age. Using a hierarchy of resort, adults seek treatment from sobadores for musculoskeletal pain not involving a fracture. Doctors are first consulted when treating children; sobadores are consulted if doctors do not provide culturally appropriate treatment. Mexican immigrants seek care that addresses their culturally determined health concerns. The need to improve access to culturally competent biomedical health care for vulnerable immigrant populations continues.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Americanos Mexicanos/psicologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Adulto , Competência Cultural , Diversidade Cultural , Feminino , Gastroenteropatias/terapia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Infertilidade/terapia , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Massagem/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dor Musculoesquelética/terapia , North Carolina , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Fatores Socioeconômicos
19.
Complement Ther Clin Pract ; 29: 207-212, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29122263

RESUMO

Herbs have long been used in the treatment of diabetes. Therefore, a cross-sectional study of a random sample of diabetic patients was conducted to assess their knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about the use of herbs to control diabetes. Approximately 64% of the patients had previously used herbs for controlling diabetes; 27%, 20.3%, 15.2%, and 10.8% used myrrh, black seeds, fenugreek, and aloe, respectively. Approximately 55.1% patients preferred using herbs to prescription drugs, while 75.2% used herbs with the prescribed medications. Only 38.3% patients informed their doctors about using herbs. Moreover, 54.2% of respondents experienced no side effects using herbs, and 64.5% noticed an improvement in blood sugar level while using herbs. No significant relationship between demographic characteristics and herbal medicine use was found. In conclusion, most diabetic patients exhibited low knowledge, attitude, and beliefs regarding herbal use. Therefore, the development of an awareness program is needed to improve these factors.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Medicina Herbária/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Conscientização , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Arábia Saudita , Adulto Jovem
20.
Compr Child Adolesc Nurs ; 40(sup1): 29-36, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29166197

RESUMO

Instead of seeking conventional health care, the Dayak tribe in Borneo, Indonesia, treats sick children at home with traditional medicine. The objective of this descriptive, qualitative study was to explore the Dayak tribe's use of traditional medicine to care for sick children. Comprehensive interviews were conducted with 10 caregivers, with collected data analyzed using content analysis. Key recurring themes identified were: 1) traditional medicine as first aid; 2) ease of access and cost-effectiveness; 3) traditional medicine was not always effective; 4) a combination of natural ingredients and beliefs; 5) the importance of "communicating" with plants; and 6) engagement with metaphysical forces. Health professionals should respect familial cultures' beliefs regarding the provision of health care at home. Furthermore, they need to develop competency in performing cultural assessments and providing information to these parents on the risks of not seeking professional emergency care for children with conditions that can't be handled at home with traditional medicine.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/métodos , Pediatria/métodos , Grupos Populacionais/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/normas , Humanos , Indonésia , Entrevistas como Assunto , Medicina Tradicional/psicologia , Medicina Tradicional/normas , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Pediatria/normas , Pesquisa Qualitativa
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