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1.
Int J Nanomedicine ; 16: 315-327, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33469288

RESUMO

Background: Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still considered incurable, even though the mechanisms of CRPC had been extensively researched. Studies have demonstrated that exosomes in the tumor microenvironment contribute to prostate cancer development and progression. However, the role of exosomes in the process of CRPC progression has not yet been determined. Methods: Co-culturing and exosome treatment assays combined with in vitro and in vivo assays were performed to determine the function of exosomes in the transformation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) cells into androgen-independent cells. Then, the mRNA expression profiles of ADPC cells and ADPC cells co-cultured with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) cell-derived exosomes were studied using microarrays. After silencing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies, and MTS assay were used to confirm the mechanisms of exosome participation in CRPC progression. Results: The results showed that ADPC cells acquired tolerance for androgen deprivation due to the exosome-mediated communication between cells. AIPC cell-derived exosomes promoted the transformation of ADPC cells into androgen-independent cells in vivo and in vitro. Microarray analysis revealed that HMOX1 in ADPC cells was up-regulated after treatment with AIPC cell-derived exosomes. Further results showed that HMOX1 is overexpressed in human AIPC specimens and protects ADPC cells from androgen deprivation. Conclusions: Our findings revealed that exosomes contribute to CRPC progression via promoting the transition of prostate cancer cells into an androgen-independent growth stage by activating HMOX1.


Assuntos
Androgênios/farmacologia , Exossomos/metabolismo , Heme Oxigenase-1/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Regulação para Cima/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Progressão da Doença , Exossomos/ultraestrutura , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos Endogâmicos NOD , Camundongos SCID , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Receptores Androgênicos/metabolismo , Microambiente Tumoral
2.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 401, 2021 01 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33452241

RESUMO

Mechanisms regulating DNA repair processes remain incompletely defined. Here, the circadian factor CRY1, an evolutionally conserved transcriptional coregulator, is identified as a tumor specific regulator of DNA repair. Key findings demonstrate that CRY1 expression is androgen-responsive and associates with poor outcome in prostate cancer. Functional studies and first-in-field mapping of the CRY1 cistrome and transcriptome reveal that CRY1 regulates DNA repair and the G2/M transition. DNA damage stabilizes CRY1 in cancer (in vitro, in vivo, and human tumors ex vivo), which proves critical for efficient DNA repair. Further mechanistic investigation shows that stabilized CRY1 temporally regulates expression of genes required for homologous recombination. Collectively, these findings reveal that CRY1 is hormone-induced in tumors, is further stabilized by genomic insult, and promotes DNA repair and cell survival through temporal transcriptional regulation. These studies identify the circadian factor CRY1 as pro-tumorigenic and nominate CRY1 as a new therapeutic target.


Assuntos
Carcinogênese/genética , Criptocromos/metabolismo , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Reparo de DNA por Recombinação/genética , Idoso , Antagonistas de Receptores de Andrógenos/farmacologia , Antagonistas de Receptores de Andrógenos/uso terapêutico , Androgênios/metabolismo , Carcinogênese/efeitos dos fármacos , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Sequenciamento de Cromatina por Imunoprecipitação , Criptocromos/genética , Quebras de DNA de Cadeia Dupla/efeitos dos fármacos , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Progressão da Doença , Seguimentos , Pontos de Checagem da Fase G2 do Ciclo Celular/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/genética , Estudos Prospectivos , Próstata/patologia , Próstata/cirurgia , Prostatectomia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/mortalidade , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/terapia , RNA-Seq , Receptores Androgênicos/metabolismo , Reparo de DNA por Recombinação/efeitos dos fármacos , Estudos Retrospectivos
3.
J Urol ; 205(1): 22-29, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960678

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The summary presented herein represents Part II of the two-part series dedicated to Advanced Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline discussing prognostic and treatment recommendations for patients with castration-resistant disease. Please refer to Part I for discussion of the management of patients with biochemical recurrence without metastatic disease after exhaustion of local treatment options as well as those with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. RESULTS: The Advanced Prostate Cancer Panel created evidence- and consensus-based guideline statements to aid clinicians in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer. Such statements are summarized in figure 1[Figure: see text] and detailed herein. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The systematic review utilized to inform this guideline was conducted by an independent methodological consultant. A research librarian conducted searches in Ovid MEDLINE (1998 to January Week 5 2019), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (through December 2018), and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2005 through February 6, 2019). An updated search was conducted prior to publication through January 20, 2020. The methodology team supplemented searches of electronic databases with the studies included in the prior AUA review and by reviewing reference lists of relevant articles. CONCLUSIONS: This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to treat patients diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer. Continued research and publication of high-quality evidence from future trials will be essential to improve the level of care for these patients.


Assuntos
Oncologia/normas , Osteoporose/prevenção & controle , Fraturas por Osteoporose/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/terapia , Urologia/normas , Técnicas de Ablação/métodos , Técnicas de Ablação/normas , Antagonistas de Androgênios/administração & dosagem , Antagonistas de Androgênios/efeitos adversos , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/administração & dosagem , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/efeitos adversos , Quimioterapia Adjuvante/efeitos adversos , Quimioterapia Adjuvante/métodos , Quimioterapia Adjuvante/normas , Consenso , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/normas , Humanos , Masculino , Oncologia/métodos , Gradação de Tumores , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Osteoporose/diagnóstico , Osteoporose/etiologia , Fraturas por Osteoporose/etiologia , Prognóstico , Prostatectomia/normas , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/diagnóstico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/mortalidade , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Radioterapia Adjuvante/efeitos adversos , Radioterapia Adjuvante/métodos , Radioterapia Adjuvante/normas , Sociedades Médicas/normas , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Urologia/métodos
4.
Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue ; 26(9): 788-792, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33377700

RESUMO

Objective: To investigate the effect and safety of the 3-week paclitaxel liposome protocol in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). METHODS: This retrospective study included 40 cases of CRPC treated by the 3-week paclitaxel liposome protocol from February 2014 to February 2019, which involved intravenous injection of 10 mg dexamethasone in 100 ml normal saline on the first day and that of metoclopramide and panxi tora azole on the second day, followed by about 3 hours of intravenous drip of paclitaxel liposome at 135 mg/m2 for a course of 3 weeks. During the follow-up period, the patients received detection of the serum PSA level before treatment and chest x-ray and whole-body bone scan every six months. After two courses of treatment, the patients were observed for the changes in the serum PSA level, relief of bone pain, quality of survival, overall survival rate, overall survival time and toxic reactions. The protocol was continued unless the patient underwent progression, refused for unacceptable toxicity, or died. RESULTS: The patients were aged 59 to 79 (mean 68.80±5.67) years old, with the serum PSA level of (28.05 ± 3.22) µg/L at the baseline and (4.12 ± 0.23) µg/L after treatment. Thirty-eight of the patients were followed up for 3 to 33 (mean 12.2) months. PSA-based evaluation showed therapeutic effectiveness in 14 cases (35%), stable condition in 21 (52.5 %) and progression in 5 (12.5 %). Of the 18 patients with bone metastasis and pain, 16 (88.9 %) experienced relief of the symptoms and reduced the use of painkillers, with the bone pain scores of 5.20 ± 1.22 vs 2.79 ± 0.57 before and after treatment. By the end of the follow-up, the overall survival rate was 55.0% (22/40) and the median survival time was 17 months (95% CI: 13.4-24.6). During the treatment, no obvious adverse reactions were observed except for anemia in 1 case and hair loss in another. CONCLUSIONS: For the treatment of CRPC in China, the 3-week paclitaxel liposome protocol has the advantages of desirable safety, low toxicity, acceptable drug tolerance and improved quality of survival, but its curative effect needs to be verified with more randomized clinical trials with larger samples and longer follow-ups.


Assuntos
Lipossomos/administração & dosagem , Paclitaxel/administração & dosagem , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Idoso , Neoplasias Ósseas/secundário , China , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Antígeno Prostático Específico/sangue , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Eur J Cancer ; 140: 140-146, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33091718

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer are at increased risk of complicated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, but it is still unclear if the risk of mortality is influenced by cancer type or ongoing anti-cancer treatments. An interesting debate concerning the potential relationship between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and SARS-CoV-2 infection has recently been opened in the case of prostate cancer (PC), and the aim of this multi-centre cohort study was to investigate the incidence and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostrate cancer (mCRPC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients with mCRPC who developed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and recorded their baseline clinical characteristics, their history of PC and SARS-CoV-2 infection, and their oncological status and treatment at the time of infection. The primary study end point was the death rate and the possible impact of the patients' PC-related history and treatments on mortality. RESULTS: Thirty-four of the 1433 patients with mCRPC attending the participating centres (2.3%) developed SARS-CoV-2 infection, 22 (64.7%) of whom were hospitalised. Most of the patients were symptomatic, the most frequent symptoms being fever (70.6%), dyspnoea (61.8%), cough (52.9%) and fatigue (38.2%). After a median follow-up of 21 days (interquartile range: 13-41), 13 patients had died (38.2%), 17 recovered (50.0%) and four (11.7%) were still infected. The number of treatments previously administered for mCRPC had a significant impact on mortality (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings contribute additional data to the current debate concerning the postulated protective role of ADT, which seems to be less in patients with metastatic PC.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Neoplasias Ósseas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ósseas/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/epidemiologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/mortalidade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias Ósseas/secundário , Neoplasias Ósseas/virologia , Terapia Combinada , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Itália/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Prognóstico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/virologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida
6.
Urol Clin North Am ; 47(4): 469-474, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008497

RESUMO

Multiple immunologic platforms have provided minimal impact in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, necessitating that novel approaches continue to be developed. Although checkpoint inhibitors have been largely ineffective, there remain small cohorts of patients who have durable responses but lack the conventional indicators for response to this class of drugs, that is, high mutational burden or significant genomic alterations, as seen in other solid tumors. This article presents an update on the evolution of immunotherapeutics that target a more lethal form of prostate cancer and provides the groundwork for future considerations as to how this field should proceed.


Assuntos
Quinases Ciclina-Dependentes/genética , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Imunoterapia/métodos , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/terapia , Idoso , Produtos Biológicos/uso terapêutico , Vacinas Anticâncer/administração & dosagem , Quinases Ciclina-Dependentes/efeitos dos fármacos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Invasividade Neoplásica/patologia , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Fenótipo , Medicina de Precisão/métodos , Prognóstico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Microambiente Tumoral/efeitos dos fármacos
7.
Anticancer Res ; 40(9): 5091-5095, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32878797

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether treatment with YM155, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of survivin, reversed cabazitaxel resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cabazitaxel resistance was induced in the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line, 22Rv1-CR. In vitro and in vivo models were used to test the efficacy of YM155 and cabazitaxel. RESULTS: Survivin gene expression was significantly higher in 22Rv1-CR than its parent cells (22Rv1). In 22Rv1-CR cells, YM155 significantly reduced expression of the survivin gene in a concentration-dependent manner. YM155 alone was poorly effective; however, it significantly enhanced the anticancer effects of cabazitaxel on 22Rv1-CR in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of survivin by YM155 overcomes cabazitaxel resistance in CRPC cells.


Assuntos
Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos/efeitos dos fármacos , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica/efeitos dos fármacos , Imidazóis/farmacologia , Naftoquinonas/farmacologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Survivina/genética , Taxoides/farmacologia , Animais , Apoptose/efeitos dos fármacos , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Proliferação de Células/efeitos dos fármacos , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/metabolismo , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , RNA Mensageiro/genética , Ensaios Antitumorais Modelo de Xenoenxerto
8.
Anticancer Res ; 40(9): 5107-5114, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32878799

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling may be one of the mechanisms of progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In this study, we investigated the possible therapeutic effect of vismodegib, a new Shh inhibitor, in a mouse CRPC model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We determined cell proliferation, apoptosis and the expression of EMT-related genes for three prostate cancer cell lines; androgen-dependent LNCaP and independent C4-2B and PC-3 in the presence of vismodegib in vitro. Fifty mg/kg of vismodegib were orally administered into mice bearing C4-2B and PC-3 tumors, respectively every other week for 3 weeks. RESULTS: Vismodegib significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in all cell lines in vitro (p<0.05). Vismodegib significantly inhibited EMT in CRPC cells and tumor growth in C4-2B-bearing mice compared to controls in vivo (p<0.05). Higher expression of caspase-3 and lower expression of vimentin in PC-3 and C4-2B tumors were induced by vismodegib in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION: Vismodegib inhibited cell proliferation via apoptosis and also suppressed EMT, showing anti-tumor effects in mice. Further mechanistic studies are needed to investigate the feasibility of vismodegib for CRPC treatment.


Assuntos
Anilidas/farmacologia , Antineoplásicos/farmacologia , Proteínas Hedgehog/metabolismo , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/metabolismo , Piridinas/farmacologia , Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Proliferação de Células/efeitos dos fármacos , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Transição Epitelial-Mesenquimal/efeitos dos fármacos , Humanos , Imuno-Histoquímica , Imunofenotipagem , Masculino , Camundongos , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Ensaios Antitumorais Modelo de Xenoenxerto
9.
Anticancer Res ; 40(9): 5229-5235, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32878811

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: The prolactin receptor (PRLR) is implicated in the tumorigenesis of breast and prostate cancers where it drives cell proliferation, survival, and migration. LFA102 is a humanized monoclonal antibody against PRLR with promising preclinical antitumor activity. To determine the maximum tolerated dose or a recommended dose, and to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile of LFA102 in Japanese patients, we conducted a phase I study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: LFA102 was intravenously infused every 4 weeks to patients with advanced breast or castration-resistant prostate cancer, and the dose increased from 3 to 40 mg/kg. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were treated, and toxicities were reported in 9 (64%) patients. They were all grade 1 or 2, and the most frequently observed toxicity was nausea (3 patients, 21%). No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. LFA102 did not show antitumor activity as a single agent. CONCLUSION: Treatment with LFA102 was well tolerated.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/uso terapêutico , Antineoplásicos Imunológicos/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias da Mama/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Idoso , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/administração & dosagem , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/efeitos adversos , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/farmacocinética , Antineoplásicos Imunológicos/administração & dosagem , Antineoplásicos Imunológicos/efeitos adversos , Antineoplásicos Imunológicos/farmacocinética , Biomarcadores Tumorais , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Esquema de Medicação , Monitoramento de Medicamentos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Metástase Neoplásica , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/etiologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/mortalidade , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
Br J Radiol ; 93(1115): 20200775, 2020 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880475

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The isotope bone scan (IBS) is the gold-standard imaging modality for detecting skeletal metastases as part of prostate cancer staging. However, its clinical utility for assessing skeletal metastatic burden is limited due to the need for subjective interpretation. We designed and tested a novel custom software tool, the Metastatic Bone Scan Tool (MetsBST), aimed at improving interpretation of IBSs, and compared its performance with that of an established software programme. METHODS: We used IBS images from 62 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and suspected bone metastases to design and implement MetsBST in MATLAB by defining thresholds used to identify the texture and size of metastatic bone lesions. The results of MetsBST were compared with those of the commercially available automated Bone Scan Index (aBSI) with regression analysis. RESULTS: There was strong agreement between the MetsBST and aBSI results (R2 = 0.9189). In a subregional analysis, MetsBST quantified the extent of metastatic disease in multiple bone sites in patients receiving multimodality therapy (radium-223 and external beam radiotherapy) to illustrate the differences in bone metastatic response to different treatments. CONCLUSION: The results of MetsBST and the commercial software aBSI were highly consistent. MetsBST introduces novel clinical utility by its ability to differentiate between the responses of different bone metastases to multimodality therapies. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: MetsBST reduces the variability in assessment of tumour burden caused by subjective interpretation. Therefore, it is a useful aid to physicians reporting nuclear medicine scans, and may improve decision-making in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Ósseas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Ósseas/secundário , Osso e Ossos/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Design de Software , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Neoplasias Ósseas/patologia , Neoplasias Ósseas/radioterapia , Ácido Etidrônico , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Compostos de Organotecnécio , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Compostos Radiofarmacêuticos , Análise de Regressão , Carga Tumoral , Bexiga Urinária/diagnóstico por imagem
11.
Lancet Oncol ; 21(11): 1513-1525, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926841

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In the CARD study, cabazitaxel significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival versus abiraterone or enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel and the alternative androgen signalling-targeted inhibitor. Here, we report the quality-of-life outcomes from the CARD study. METHODS: CARD was a randomised, multicentre, open-label, phase 4 study involving 62 clinical sites across 13 European countries. Patients (aged ≥18 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status ≤2) with confirmed metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) by means of an interactive voice-web response system to receive cabazitaxel (25 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks, 10 mg daily prednisone, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) versus abiraterone (1000 mg orally once daily plus 5 mg prednisone twice daily) or enzalutamide (160 mg orally daily). Stratification factors were ECOG performance status, time to disease progression on the previous androgen signalling-targeted inhibitor, and timing of the previous androgen signalling-targeted inhibitor. The primary endpoint was radiographic progression-free survival; here, we present more detailed analyses of pain (assessed using item 3 on the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form [BPI-SF]) and symptomatic skeletal events, alongside preplanned patient-reported outcomes, assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions, 5 level scale (EQ-5D-5L). Efficacy analyses were done in the intention-to-treat population. Pain response was analysed in the intention-to-treat population with baseline and at least one post-baseline assessment of BPI-SF item 3, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were analysed in the intention-to-treat population with baseline and at least one post-baseline assessment of either FACT-P or EQ-5D-5L (PRO population). Analyses of skeletal-related events were also done in the intention-to-treat population. The CARD study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02485691, and is no longer enrolling. FINDINGS: Between Nov 17, 2015, and Nov 28, 2018, of 303 patients screened, 255 were randomly assigned to cabazitaxel (n=129) or abiraterone or enzalutamide (n=126). Median follow-up was 9·2 months (IQR 5·6-13·1). Pain response was observed in 51 (46%) of 111 patients with cabazitaxel and 21 (19%) of 109 patients with abiraterone or enzalutamide (p<0·0001). Median time to pain progression was not estimable (NE; 95% CI NE-NE) with cabazitaxel and 8·5 months (4·9-NE) with abiraterone or enzalutamide (hazard ratio [HR] 0·55, 95% CI 0·32-0·97; log-rank p=0·035). Median time to symptomatic skeletal events was NE (95% CI 20·0-NE) with cabazitaxel and 16·7 months (10·8-NE) with abiraterone or enzalutamide (HR 0·59, 95% CI 0·35-1·01; log-rank p=0·050). Median time to FACT-P total score deterioration was 14·8 months (95% CI 6·3-NE) with cabazitaxel and 8·9 months (6·3-NE) with abiraterone or enzalutamide (HR 0·72, 95% CI 0·44-1·20; log-rank p=0·21). There was a significant treatment effect seen in changes from baseline in EQ-5D-5L utility index score in favour of cabazitaxel over abiraterone or enzalutamide (p=0·030) but no difference between treatment groups for change from baseline in EQ-5D-5L visual analogue scale (p=0·060). INTERPRETATION: Since cabazitaxel improved pain response, time to pain progression, time to symptomatic skeletal events, and EQ-5D-5L utility index, clinicians and patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer can be reassured that cabazitaxel will not reduce quality of life when compared with treatment with a second androgen signalling-targeted inhibitor. FUNDING: Sanofi.


Assuntos
Androstenos/administração & dosagem , Feniltioidantoína/análogos & derivados , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Taxoides/administração & dosagem , Idoso , Antagonistas de Androgênios/administração & dosagem , Antagonistas de Androgênios/efeitos adversos , Androgênios/genética , Androstenos/efeitos adversos , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Metástase Neoplásica , Feniltioidantoína/administração & dosagem , Feniltioidantoína/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/epidemiologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Qualidade de Vida , Taxoides/efeitos adversos , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
N Engl J Med ; 383(11): 1040-1049, 2020 09 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32905676

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Darolutamide is a structurally distinct androgen-receptor inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. In the planned primary analysis of a phase 3 trial, the median metastasis-free survival was significantly longer with darolutamide (40.4 months) than with placebo (18.4 months). The data for the analysis of overall survival were immature at the time of the primary analysis. METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 1509 men, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive darolutamide (955 patients) or placebo (554 patients) while they continued to receive androgen-deprivation therapy. After the results of the primary end-point analysis were found to be positive, unblinding of the treatment assignments occurred, and patients in the placebo group were permitted to cross over to receive open-label darolutamide treatment. At the time of this prespecified final analysis, which had been planned to be performed after approximately 240 deaths had occurred, overall survival and all other secondary end points were evaluated. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 29.0 months. At the time of unblinding of the data, all 170 patients who were still receiving placebo crossed over to receive darolutamide; 137 patients who had discontinued placebo before unblinding had occurred received at least one other life-prolonging therapy. Overall survival at 3 years was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80 to 86) in the darolutamide group and 77% (95% CI, 72 to 81) in the placebo group. The risk of death was significantly lower, by 31%, in the darolutamide group than in the placebo group (hazard ratio for death, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.88; P = 0.003). Darolutamide was also associated with a significant benefit with respect to all other secondary end points, including the time to first symptomatic skeletal event and the time to first use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. The incidence of adverse events after the start of treatment was similar in the two groups; no new safety signals were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Among men with nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, the percentage of patients who were alive at 3 years was significantly higher among those who received darolutamide than among those who received placebo. The incidence of adverse events was similar in the two groups. (Funded by Bayer HealthCare and Orion Pharma; ARAMIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02200614.).


Assuntos
Antagonistas de Receptores de Andrógenos/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Pirazóis/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Antagonistas de Receptores de Andrógenos/efeitos adversos , Estudos Cross-Over , Método Duplo-Cego , Fadiga/induzido quimicamente , Fraturas Ósseas/induzido quimicamente , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Metástase Neoplásica , Antígeno Prostático Específico/sangue , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/mortalidade , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Pirazóis/efeitos adversos
13.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0226056, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32881870

RESUMO

The androgen receptor (AR) is activated in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) despite low circulating levels of androgen, suggesting that intracellular signaling pathways and non-androgenic factors may contribute to AR activation. Many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and their ligands are also activated in these cells indicating that they may play a role in development of Prostate Cancer (PCa) and CRPC. Although a cross talk has been suggested between the two pathways, yet, the identity of GPCRs which may play a role in androgen signaling, is not established yet. By using blast analysis of 826 GPCRs, we identified a GPCR, GPCR 205, which exhibited maximum similarity with the ligand binding domain of the AR. We demonstrate that adhesion GPCR 205, also known as GPR56, can be activated by androgens to stimulate the Rho signaling pathway, a pathway that plays an important role in prostate tumor cell metastasis. Testosterone stimulation of GPR56 also activates the cAMP/ Protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, that is necessary for AR signaling. Knocking down the expression of GPR56 using siRNA, disrupts nuclear translocation of AR and transcription of prototypic AR target genes such as PSA. GPR56 expression is higher in all twenty-five prostate tumor patient's samples tested and cells expressing GPR56 exhibit increased proliferation. These findings provide new insights about androgen signaling and identify GPR56 as a possible therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer patients.


Assuntos
Androgênios/metabolismo , Núcleo Celular/metabolismo , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Receptores Androgênicos/metabolismo , Receptores Acoplados a Proteínas-G/metabolismo , Idoso , Animais , Células COS , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Chlorocebus aethiops , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Técnicas de Silenciamento de Genes , Células HEK293 , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Simulação de Acoplamento Molecular , Próstata/citologia , Próstata/patologia , Próstata/cirurgia , Prostatectomia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/cirurgia , RNA Interferente Pequeno/metabolismo , Receptores Acoplados a Proteínas-G/genética , Transdução de Sinais/genética , Testosterona/metabolismo , Transcrição Genética
14.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239686, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32997692

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: A significant proportion of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) harbor mutations in homologous recombination (HR) repair genes, with some of these mutations associating with increased tumor susceptibility to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and platinum-based chemotherapy. While mutations in some HR repair genes (e.g., BRCA1/2) have been associated with a more aggressive clinical course, prior studies correlating HR mutational status with treatment response to androgen receptor (AR) signaling inhibitors (ARSIs) or taxane-based chemotherapy have yielded conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective analysis to assess clinical outcomes to conventional, regulatory-approved therapies in mCRPC patients with somatic (monoallelic and biallelic) and/or germline HR repair mutations compared to patients without alterations as determined by clinical-grade next-generation sequencing assays. The primary endpoint was PSA30/PSA50 response, defined as ≥30%/≥50% prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reduction from baseline. Secondary endpoints of PSA progression-free survival (pPFS) and clinical/radiographic progression-free survival (crPFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. RESULTS: A total of 90 consecutively selected patients were included in this analysis, of which 33 (37%) were identified to have HR repair gene mutations. Age, race, Gleason score, prior surgery, and receipt of prior radiation therapy were comparable between carriers and non-carriers. There was no evidence that PSA30/PSA50 differed by HR gene mutational status. Median pPFS and crPFS ranged 3-14 months across treatment modalities, but there was no evidence either differed by HR gene mutational status (all p>0.05). There was also no difference in outcomes between those with BRCA2 or PALB2 mutations (n = 17) compared to those without HR repair mutations. CONCLUSION: HR gene mutational status was associated with comparable clinical outcomes following treatment with ARSIs or taxane-based chemotherapy. Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.


Assuntos
Mutação , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Reparo de DNA por Recombinação/genética , Idoso , Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Proteínas Mutadas de Ataxia Telangiectasia/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Quinases Ciclina-Dependentes/genética , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos , Proteína do Grupo de Complementação N da Anemia de Fanconi/genética , Humanos , Proteína Homóloga a MRE11/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Metástase Neoplásica , Inibidores de Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerases/uso terapêutico , Intervalo Livre de Progressão , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Inibidores da Síntese de Esteroides/uso terapêutico
15.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 34(8): 317-319, 2020 08 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785928

RESUMO

A 78-year-old man had a medical history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease, and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). He had progressed to first-line therapy for CRPC with abiraterone plus androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and as second-line therapy he was being treated with docetaxel, with biochemical progression in his last prostate specific antigen measurement. He was admitted to the hospital on April 2020, in the middle of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, because of painful bone lesions and deterioration of renal function.


Assuntos
Anticoagulantes/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Ósseas/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Cuidados Paliativos , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia , Idoso , Antagonistas de Androgênios/uso terapêutico , Androstenos/uso terapêutico , Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Conservadores da Densidade Óssea/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Ósseas/complicações , Neoplasias Ósseas/secundário , Dor do Câncer/complicações , Dor do Câncer/terapia , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Progressão da Doença , Docetaxel/uso terapêutico , Combinação de Medicamentos , Definição da Elegibilidade , Heparina de Baixo Peso Molecular/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva/provisão & distribução , Lopinavir/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Oxigenoterapia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/complicações , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Insuficiência Renal , Insuficiência Respiratória/etiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa , Ritonavir/uso terapêutico , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Ácido Zoledrônico/uso terapêutico
16.
Prostate ; 80(13): 1058-1070, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32692871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most prostate cancers express androgen receptor (AR), and our previous studies have focused on identifying transcription factors that modify AR function. We have shown that nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) regulates AR activity in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells in vitro. However, the status of NFIB in prostate cancer was unknown. METHODS: We immunostained a tissue microarray including normal, hyperplastic, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, primary prostatic adenocarcinoma, and castration-resistant prostate cancer tissue samples for NFIB, AR, and synaptophysin, a marker of neuroendocrine differentiation. We interrogated publically available data sets in cBioPortal to correlate NFIB expression and AR and neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPCa) activity scores. We analyzed prostate cancer cell lines for NFIB expression via Western blot analysis and used nuclear and cytoplasmic fractionation to assess where NFIB is localized. We performed co-immunoprecipitation studies to determine if NFIB and AR interact. RESULTS: NFIB increased in the nucleus and cytoplasm of prostate cancer samples versus matched normal controls, independent of Gleason score. Similarly, cytoplasmic AR and synaptophysin increased in primary prostate cancer. We observed strong NFIB staining in primary small cell prostate cancer. The ratio of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear NFIB staining was predictive of earlier biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, once adjusted for tumor margin status. Cytoplasmic AR was an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence. There was no statistically significant difference between NFIB and synaptophysin expression in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer, but cytoplasmic AR expression was increased in castration-resistant samples. In primary prostate cancer, nuclear NFIB expression correlated with cytoplasmic NFIB and nuclear AR, while cytoplasmic NFIB correlated with synaptophysin, and nuclear and cytoplasmic AR. In castration-resistant prostate cancer samples, NFIB expression correlated positively with an AR activity score, and negatively with the NEPCa score. In prostate cancer cell lines, NFIB exists in several isoforms. We observed NFIB predominantly in the nuclear fraction of prostate cancer cells with increased cytoplasmic expression seen in castration-resistant cell lines. We observed an interaction between AR and NFIB through co-immunoprecipitation experiments. CONCLUSION: We have described the expression pattern of NFIB in primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer and its positive correlation with AR. We have also demonstrated AR interacts with NFIB.


Assuntos
Fatores de Transcrição NFI/biossíntese , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Próstata/metabolismo , Receptores Androgênicos/biossíntese , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Imuno-Histoquímica , Masculino , Fatores de Transcrição NFI/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Receptores Androgênicos/genética , Análise Serial de Tecidos , Transcriptoma
17.
Clin Nucl Med ; 45(11): e486-e488, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32657864

RESUMO

A 66-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer to the bones. The patient started Ra-dichloride (Xofigo) therapy in April 2019. Tc-MDP bone scan and F-fluciclovine (Axumin) PET/CT showed discordant but overall complementary findings that indicated disease progression after 5 doses of Xofigo therapy. The patient's prostate-specific antigen increased from 33.81 ng/mL at baseline before Xofigo therapy and up to 394.3 ng/mL after the fifth dose of Xofigo treatment. Because of disease progression, Xofigo therapy was discontinued.


Assuntos
Osso e Ossos/diagnóstico por imagem , Ácidos Carboxílicos , Ciclobutanos , Tomografia Computadorizada com Tomografia por Emissão de Pósitrons , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/radioterapia , Rádio (Elemento)/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Humanos , Masculino , Metástase Neoplásica , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Radioisótopos/uso terapêutico
18.
Prostate ; 80(12): 950-961, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32648618

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is characterized by aberrant lipid metabolism, including elevated fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation. This study aimed to determine if CPT1B has a critical role in prostate cancer progression and to identify its regulatory mechanism. METHODS: CPT1B expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus databases was compared with patient survival data. A tissue microarray was constructed with 60 samples of prostate cancer and immunohistochemically stained for CPT1B. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines 22RV1 and C4-2 in which CPT1B expression had been stably knocked down were established; and cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and invasion were investigated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and colony formation assays, flow cytometry, and Transwell assays, respectively. To examine the impact of androgen receptor (AR) inhibition on CPT1B expression, JASPAR CORE was searched to identify AR-binding sites in CPT1B. Dual luciferase and ChIP assays were performed to confirm CPT1B activity and AR binding, respectively. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in prostate cancer underwent gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). Enzalutamide-resistant C4-2 cells were generated and the mechanism of enzalutamide resistance and downstream signaling pathway changes of CPT1B to C4-2 was explored through CCK-8 test. RESULTS: CPT1B expression was upregulated in human prostate cancer compared with normal prostate tissue and was associated with poor disease-free survival and overall survival. Silencing of CPT1B resulted in downregulated cell proliferation, reduced S-phase distribution, and lower invasive ability, whereas the opposite was observed in CRPC cells overexpressing CPTB1. DEGS in prostate cancer were correlated with G-protein-coupled receptor signaling, molecular transducer activity, and calcium ion binding. AR may regulate CPT1B expression and activity via specific binding sites, as confirmed by dual luciferase and ChIP assays. The CCK-8 experiment demonstrated that CPT1B overexpression in C4-2 cells did not significantly increase the ability of enzalutamide resistance. However, overexpression of CPT1B in C4-2R cells significantly increased the enzalutamide resistance. Upregulation of CPT1B expression increased AKT expression and phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: CPT1B is upregulated in prostate cancer and is correlated with poor prognosis, indicating its potential as a biomarker. AR inhibits the transcription of CPT1B. In the CRPC cell line, overexpression of CPT1B alone cannot promote enzalutamide resistance, but in the drug-resistant line C4-2R, overexpression of CPT1B can promote the resistance of C4-2R to enzalutamide.


Assuntos
Carnitina O-Palmitoiltransferase/antagonistas & inibidores , Feniltioidantoína/análogos & derivados , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/enzimologia , Carnitina O-Palmitoiltransferase/genética , Carnitina O-Palmitoiltransferase/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Ciclo Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Proliferação de Células/efeitos dos fármacos , Progressão da Doença , Regulação para Baixo , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos , Humanos , Masculino , Terapia de Alvo Molecular , Feniltioidantoína/farmacologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas c-akt/antagonistas & inibidores , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas c-akt/metabolismo , Receptores Androgênicos/biossíntese , Receptores Androgênicos/genética , Receptores Androgênicos/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
19.
Prostate ; 80(12): 1012-1023, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32649013

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Small cell neuroendocrine (NE) carcinomas of the prostate classically lose androgen receptor (AR) expression, may harbor loss of the RB1, TP53, and PTEN tumor suppressor genes, and are associated with a poor prognosis. However usual-type adenocarcinomas may also contain areas of NE differentiation, and in this context the molecular features and biological significance are less certain. METHODS: We examined the molecular phenotype and oncologic outcomes of primary prostate adenocarcinomas with ≥5% NE differentiation (≥5% chromogranin A-positive NE cells in any given tumor spot on tissue microarray) using three independent study sets: a set of tumors with paneth cell-like NE differentiation (n = 26), a retrospective case-cohort of intermediate- and high-risk patients enriched for adverse outcomes (n = 267), and primary tumors from a retrospective series of men with eventual castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) treated with abiraterone or enzalutamide (n = 55). RESULTS: Benign NE cells expressed significantly lower quantified AR levels compared with paired benign luminal cells (P < .001). Similarly, paneth-like NE carcinoma cells or carcinoma cells expressing chromogranin A expressed significantly lower quantified AR levels than paired non-NE carcinoma cells (P < .001). Quantified ERG protein expression, was also lower in chromogranin A-labeled adenocarcinoma cells compared with unlabeled cells (P < .001) and tumors with NE differentiation showed lower gene expression scores for AR activity compared with those without. Despite evidence of lower AR signaling, adenocarcinomas with NE differentiation did not differ by prevalence of TP53 missense mutations, or PTEN or RB1 loss, compared with those without NE differentiation. Finally, NE differentiation was not associated with time to metastasis in intermediate- and high-risk patients (P = .6 on multivariate analysis), nor with progression-free survival in patients with CRPC treated with abiraterone or enzalutamide (P = .9). CONCLUSION: NE differentiation in usual-type primary prostate adenocarcinoma is a molecularly and clinically distinct form of lineage plasticity from that occurring in small cell NE carcinoma.


Assuntos
Células Neuroendócrinas/patologia , Tumores Neuroendócrinos/patologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/patologia , Adenocarcinoma/genética , Adenocarcinoma/metabolismo , Adenocarcinoma/patologia , Carcinoma de Células Pequenas/genética , Carcinoma de Células Pequenas/metabolismo , Carcinoma de Células Pequenas/patologia , Diferenciação Celular/fisiologia , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Imuno-Histoquímica , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Células Neuroendócrinas/metabolismo , Tumores Neuroendócrinos/genética , Tumores Neuroendócrinos/metabolismo , PTEN Fosfo-Hidrolase/genética , PTEN Fosfo-Hidrolase/metabolismo , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/metabolismo , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Receptores Androgênicos/biossíntese , Receptores Androgênicos/genética , Receptores Androgênicos/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a Retinoblastoma/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a Retinoblastoma/metabolismo , Estudos Retrospectivos , Transdução de Sinais , Proteína Supressora de Tumor p53/genética , Proteína Supressora de Tumor p53/metabolismo , Ubiquitina-Proteína Ligases/genética , Ubiquitina-Proteína Ligases/metabolismo
20.
Prostate ; 80(13): 1134-1144, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32628304

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the initial treatment strategy for prostate cancer (PCa), recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually ensues. In this study, cancer-derived immunoglobulin G (CIgG) is found to be induced after ADT, identifying CIgG as a potential CRPC driver gene. METHODS: The expression of CIgG and its clinical significance in PCa tissue was analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas database and immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, the sequence features of prostate cell line VHDJH rearrangements were analyzed. We also assessed the effect of CIgG on the migratory, invasive and proliferative abilities of PCa cells in vitro and vivo. Suspended microsphere, colony formation and drug-resistant assays were performed using PC3 cells with high CIgG expression (CIgGhigh ) and low CIgG expression (CIgG-/low ), and A nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mouse tumor xenograft model was developed for the study of the tumorigenic effects of the different cell populations. The SOX2-CIgG signaling pathway was validated by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, luciferase, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and bioinformatics analyses. Finally, we investigated the effect of RP215 inhibition on the progression of PCa in vivo using a Babl/c nude mouse xenograft model. RESULTS: CIgG is frequently expressed in PCa and associated with clinicopathological characteristics, moreover, CIgG transcripts with unique patterns of VHDJH rearrangements are found in PCa cells. Functional analyses identified that CIgG was induced by ADT and upregulated by SOX2 (SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2) in PCa, promoting the development of PCa. In addition, our findings underscore a novel role of CIgG signaling in the maintenance of stemness and the progression of cancer through mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and AKT in PCa. In vivo experiments further demonstrated that depleting CIgG significantly suppressed the growth of PCa cell xenografts. Furthermore, a CIgG monoclonal antibody named RP215 exhibits tumor inhibitory effect as well. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that CIgG could be a driver of PCa development, and that targeting the SOX2-CIgG axis may therefore inhibit PCa development after ADT.


Assuntos
Imunoglobulina G/imunologia , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/imunologia , Fatores de Transcrição SOXB1/imunologia , Animais , Células HEK293 , Humanos , Imuno-Histoquímica , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos BALB C , Camundongos Endogâmicos NOD , Camundongos SCID , Células PC-3 , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/genética , Neoplasias de Próstata Resistentes à Castração/patologia , Fatores de Transcrição SOXB1/biossíntese , Fatores de Transcrição SOXB1/genética , Transdução de Sinais/imunologia , Análise Serial de Tecidos
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