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1.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0254432, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34495962

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Community engagement (CE) is an effective public health strategy for improving health outcomes. There is limited published knowledge about effective approaches to CE in ensuring effective responses to COVID-19 throughout lockdowns, travel restrictions and social distancing. In this paper, we contribute to bridging this gap by highlighting experience of CE in Vietnam, specifically focusing on migrant workers in Vietnam. METHODS: A cross-sectional qualitative study design was used with qualitative data collection was carried out during August-October 2020. Two districts were purposefully selected from two large industrial zones. Data was collected using in-depth interviews (n = 36) with individuals and households, migrants and owners of dormitories, industrial zone factory representatives, community representatives and health authorities. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach. The study received ethics approval from the Hanoi University Institutional Review Board. RESULTS: The government's response to COVID-19 was spearheaded by the multi-sectoral National Steering Committee for the Prevention and Control of COVID-19, chaired by the Vice Prime Minister and comprised different members from 23 ministries. This structure was replicated throughout the province and local levels and all public and private organizations. Different activities were carried out by local communities, following four key principles of infection control: early detection, isolation, quarantine and hospitalization. We found three key determinants of engagement of migrant workers with COVID-19 prevention and control: availability of resources, appropriate capacity strengthening, transparent and continuous communication and a sense of trust in government legitimacy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Our results support the current literature on CE in infection control which highlights the importance of context and suggests that future CE should consider five key components: multi-sectoral collaboration with a whole-of-community approach to strengthen governance structures with context-specific partnerships; mobilization of resources and decentralization of decision making to encourage self-reliance and building of local capacity; capacity building through training and supervision to local institutions; transparent and clear communication of health risks and sensitization of local communities to improve compliance and foster trust in the government measures; and understanding the urgent needs ensuring of social security and engaging all parts of the community, specifically the vulnerable groups.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/legislação & jurisprudência , Participação da Comunidade/legislação & jurisprudência , Adulto , Fortalecimento Institucional/legislação & jurisprudência , Comunicação , Estudos Transversais , Coleta de Dados/legislação & jurisprudência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Saúde Pública/legislação & jurisprudência , Quarentena/legislação & jurisprudência , SARS-CoV-2/patogenicidade , Confiança , Vietnã , Adulto Jovem
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444000

RESUMO

Schools may play an essential role as an arena for co-creating community activities that enhance well-being, equity, and citizenship. Still, there is limited knowledge about physical and non-physical factors that contribute to well-being within such approaches. The aim of this study was to identify important factors for well-being as perceived by pupils, school employees, and parents in a community school in Norway. The participatory method photovoice was used, and seven pupils, six employees, and four parents participated by taking photos used as the basis for six focus group discussions. Transcripts of the discussions were analyzed using Systematic Text Condensation. The analysis showed that the participants experienced that the school's built and natural environment, the activities happening there, and the human resources and organization at the school facilitated perceptions of safety, inclusion, and cohesion, which in turn contributed to well-being. Furthermore, the results showed that co-creating schools as a community arena could be an innovative way of ensuring participation, equity, and well-being in the community. Such an approach might be especially important in deprived areas or in multi-ethnic communities. An important prerequisite to succeed is the openness of the school's staff to engage in co-creation with other stakeholders in the community.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde , Instituições Acadêmicas , Participação da Comunidade , Meio Ambiente , Grupos Focais , Humanos
4.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e048694, 2021 08 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34373306

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study employed the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to assess factors that enhanced or impeded the implementation of community engagement strategies using the Nigerian polio programme as a point of reference. DESIGN: This study was a part of a larger descriptive cross-sectional survey. The CFIR was used to design the instrument which was administered through face-to-face and phone interviews as well as a web-based data collection platform, Qualtrics. SETTING: The study took place in at least one State from each of the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria (Nasarawa, Borno, Kano, Sokoto, Anambra, Bayelsa, Lagos, Ondo and Oyo States as well as the Federal Capital Territory). PARTICIPANTS: The respondents included programme managers, policy-makers, researchers and frontline field implementers affiliated with the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) core partner organisations, the three tiers of the government health parastatals (local, state and federal levels) and academic/research institutions. RESULTS: Data for this study were obtained from 364 respondents who reported participation in community engagement activities in Nigeria's PEI. Majority (68.4%) had less than 10 years' experience in PEI, 57.4% were involved at the local government level and 46.9% were team supervisors. Almost half (45.0%) of the participants identified the process of conducting the PEI program and social environment (56.0%) as the most important internal and external contributor to implementing community engagement activities in the community, respectively. The economic environment (35.7%) was the most frequently reported challenge among the external challenges to implementing community engagement activities. CONCLUSION: Community engagement strategies were largely affected by the factors relating to the process of conducting the polio programme, the economic environment and the social context. Therefore, community engagement implementers should focus on these key areas and channel resources to reduce obstacles to achieve community engagement goals.


Assuntos
Erradicação de Doenças , Poliomielite , Participação da Comunidade , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Nigéria , Poliomielite/epidemiologia , Poliomielite/prevenção & controle
5.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Jul 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444793

RESUMO

Changes in school meal programs can affect well-being of millions of American children. Since 2014, high-poverty schools and districts nationwide had an option to provide universal free meals (UFM) through the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP). The COVID-19 pandemic expanded UFM to all schools in 2020-2022. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Kindergarten Class of 2010-2011, we measured CEP effects on school meal participation, attendance, academic achievement, children's body weight, and household food security. To provide plausibly causal estimates, we leveraged the exogenous variation in the timing of CEP implementation across states and estimated a difference-in-difference model with child random effects, school and year fixed effects. On average, CEP participation increased the probability of children's eating free school lunch by 9.3% and daily school attendance by 0.24 percentage points (p < 0.01). We find no evidence that, overall, CEP affected body weight, test scores and household food security among elementary schoolchildren. However, CEP benefited children in low-income families by decreasing the probability of being overweight by 3.1% (p < 0.05) and improving reading scores of Hispanic children by 0.055 standard deviations. UFM expansion can particularly benefit at-risk children and help improve equity in educational and health outcomes.


Assuntos
Assistência Alimentar/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços de Alimentação/estatística & dados numéricos , Refeições , Instituições Acadêmicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Sucesso Acadêmico , Peso Corporal , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Participação da Comunidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Segurança Alimentar/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Almoço , Masculino , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , SARS-CoV-2 , Estudantes , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444135

RESUMO

Wildfires represent a natural phenomenon with detrimental effects on natural resources and human health. A better knowledge, perception, and awareness of wildfire risk may help communities at risk of exposure to prevent future events and safeguard their own lives. The aim of this study is to explore differences between individuals with and without previous wildfire experience, in terms of (1) subjective and advanced wildfire knowledge, (2) self-reported perceptions, (3) level of information, (4) self-protection measures, and (5) importance of community involvement. As a second step, we investigated differences in the same variables, focusing more deeply on a group of individuals with previous wildfire experience, classifying them according to fire-related employment (fire-related workers vs. non-workers) and wildland-urban interface (WUI) proximity (WUI residents vs. non-WUI residents). The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to establish differences between the pairs of subsamples. Our results partially confirmed our hypothesis, that direct experience leads individuals to have a greater preparedness on the topic of wildfires. Perception of knowledge is reflected only at a shallow level of expertise, and, therefore, no relevant within-group differences related to fire-related employment or to WUI proximity were detected. Moreover, available information was perceived to be insufficient, thus we report a strong need for developing effective communication to high-risk groups, such as homeowners and fire-related workers.


Assuntos
Incêndios , Incêndios Florestais , Participação da Comunidade , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Humanos , Percepção
7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 637714, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34354972

RESUMO

Background: Community participation in global health interventions may improve outcomes and solve complex health issues. Although numerous community participatory approaches have been developed and introduced, there has been little focus on "how" and "who" to involve in the implementation of community-based clinical trials where unequal distribution of power between implementers and communities pre-exists. Addressing how to achieve community-based solutions in a malaria elimination trial in The Gambia, we developed the Community Lab of Ideas for Health (CLIH): a participatory approach that enabled communities to shape trial implementation. Methods: As part of transdisciplinary research, we conducted qualitative research with in-depth interviews, discussions, and observations in 17 villages in the North Bank Region of The Gambia between March 2016 and December 2017. We designed an iterative research process involving ethnography, stakeholder-analysis, participatory-discussions, and qualitative monitoring and evaluation, whereby each step guided the next. We drew upon ethnographic results and stakeholder-analysis to identify key-informants who became participants in study design and implementation. The participatory-discussions provided a co-creative space for sharing community-centric ideas to tackle trial implementation challenges. The proposed strategies for trial implementation were continuously refined and improved through our monitoring and evaluation. Results: The CLIH incorporated communities' insights, to co-create tailored trial implementation strategies including: village health workers prescribing and distributing antimalarial treatments; "compounds" as community-accepted treatment units; medicine distribution following compound micro-politics; and appropriate modes of health message delivery. Throughout the iterative research process, the researchers and communities set the common goal, namely to curtail the medical poverty trap by reducing malaria transmission and the burden thereof. This innovative collaborative process built trust among stakeholders and fully engaged researchers and communities in co-creation and co-implementation of the trial. Discussion: The CLIH approach succeeded in touching the local realities by incorporating a spectrum of perspectives from community-members and discerning project-derived knowledge from local-knowledge. This process allowed us to co-develop locally-oriented solutions and ultimately to co-establish an intervention structure that community-members were ready and willing to use, which resulted in high uptake of the intervention (92% adherence to treatment). Successfully, the CLIH contributed in bridging research and implementation.


Assuntos
Antimaláricos , Malária , Antimaláricos/uso terapêutico , Participação da Comunidade , Gâmbia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Malária/epidemiologia , Saúde Pública
8.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(16)2021 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34451053

RESUMO

Balance is key to independent mobility, and poor balance leads to a risk of falling and subsequent injury that can cause self-restriction of activity for older adults. Balance and mobility can be improved through training programs, but many programs are not intensive or engaging enough to sufficiently improve balance while maintaining adherence. As an alternative to traditional balance training, harnessed gardening sessions were conducted in an urban greenhouse as an example of a community activity through which balance and mobility can be trained and/or maintained. An inexpensive multidirectional harness system was developed that can be used as an assistive or rehabilitative device in community, private, and senior center gardens to allow balance or mobility-impaired adults to participate in programming. Two wearable sensor systems were used to measure responses to the system: the Polhemus G4 system measured gardeners' positions and center of mass relative to the base of support, and ActiGraph activity monitors measured the frequency and intensity of arm movements in garden as compared to home environments. The harnessed gardening system provides a safe environment for intense movement activity and can be used as a rehabilitation device along with wearable sensor systems to monitor ongoing changes.


Assuntos
Acidentes por Quedas , Jardinagem , Idoso , Participação da Comunidade , Humanos , Movimento , Equilíbrio Postural
9.
Lima; Perú. Ministerio de Salud; 20210700. 17 p.
Monografia em Espanhol | MINSAPERÚ | ID: biblio-1282404

RESUMO

El documento contiene las disposiciones que permitan la participación efectiva de los ciudadanos e instituciones en general respecto del proyecto en mención.


Assuntos
Preparações Farmacêuticas , Participação da Comunidade , Medicamentos Essenciais
10.
Soc Sci Med ; 284: 114246, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34311391

RESUMO

The global response to infectious diseases has seen a renewed interest in the use of community engagement to support research and relief efforts. From a perspective rooted in the social sciences, the concept of vulnerability offers an especially useful analytical frame for pursuing community engagement in a variety of contexts. However, few have closely examined the concept of vulnerability in community engagement efforts, leading to a need to better understand the various theories that underline the connections between the two. This literature review searched four databases (covering a total of 537 papers), resulting in 15 studies that analyze community engagement using a framing of vulnerability, broadly defined, in the context of an infectious disease, prioritizing historical and structural context and the many ways of constituting communities. The review identified historical and structural factors such as trust in the health system, history of political marginalization, various forms of racism and discrimination, and other aspects of vulnerability that are part and parcel of the main challenges faced by communities. The review found that studies using vulnerability within community engagement share some important characteristics (e.g., focus on local history and structural factors) and identified a few theoretical avenues from the social sciences which integrate a vulnerability-informed approach in community engagement. Finally, the review proposes an approach that brings together the concepts of vulnerability and community engagement, prioritizing participation, empowerment, and intersectoral collaboration.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis , Racismo , Doenças Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Participação da Comunidade , Programas Governamentais , Humanos , Assistência Médica , Confiança
11.
Environ Monit Assess ; 193(8): 511, 2021 Jul 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34302210

RESUMO

Belgrad Forest is one of the most visited forest areas in Istanbul and contains nine nature parks which are open to visitors and very popular. This study examines decision-making processes of the planning for these areas. To measure public participation in and approaches to the decision-making processes, a questionnaire was given to 1.103 visitors. It has been observed that the public does not participate in decision-making processes, although the public does have a role in legislation for the forest. Participants especially wanted to have input were determined to be ways of using the forest and ensuring that safety precautions and cleanliness were addressed. A SWOT analysis was carried out with the responsible groups and discussed approaches to planning, legislation, and implementation. The conclusion was that human pressure on nature parks should be reduced. It was suggested that non-governmental organizations should play an important role in decision-making mechanisms, as should individuals.


Assuntos
Monitoramento Ambiental , Florestas , Participação da Comunidade , Humanos , Parques Recreativos
12.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1470, 2021 07 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34320922

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Community engagement and volunteering are essential for the public response to COVID-19. Since March 2020 a large number of people in the UK have been regularly doing unpaid activities to benefit others besides their close relatives. Although most mutual aid groups emerged from local neighbourhoods and communities, official public institutions also fostered community volunteering, namely through the community champions scheme. By considering a broad definition of COVID-19 volunteering, this article describes a systematic review of the literature focused on one broad question: What have we learned about COVID-19 volunteering both at the UK national level and the more local community level? METHODS: A rapid review of the literature in peer-reviewed databases and grey literature was applied in our search, following the PRISMA principles. The search was conducted from 10 to 16 of October 2020, and sources were included on the basis of having been published between January and October 2020, focusing on COVID-19 and addressing community groups, volunteering groups, volunteers, or community champions in the UK. RESULTS: After initial screening, a total of 40 relevant sources were identified. From these, 27 were considered eligible. Findings suggest that food shopping and emotional support were the most common activities, but there were diverse models of organisation and coordination in COVID-19 volunteering. Additionally, community support groups seem to be adjusting their activities and scope of action to current needs and challenges. Volunteers were mostly women, middle-class, highly educated, and working-age people. Social networks and connections, local knowledge, and social trust were key dimensions associated with community organising and volunteering. Furthermore, despite the efforts of a few official public institutions and councils, there has been limited community engagement and collaboration with volunteering groups and other community-based organisations. CONCLUSIONS: We identified important factors for fostering community engagement and COVID-19 volunteering as well as gaps in the current literature. We suggest that future research should be directed towards deepening knowledge on sustaining community engagement, collaboration and community participation over time, during and beyond this pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Participação da Comunidade , Feminino , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Reino Unido , Voluntários
13.
J Glob Health ; 11: 04045, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34326995

RESUMO

Background: Community-based strategies to promote maternal health can help raise awareness of pregnancy danger signs and preparations for emergencies. The objective of this study was to assess change in birth preparedness and complication readiness (BPCR) and pregnant women's knowledge about pre-eclampsia as part of community engagement (CE) activities in rural Pakistan during the Community Level Interventions for Pre-eclampsia (CLIP) Trial. Methods: The CLIP Trial was a cluster randomized controlled trial that aimed to reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality using CE strategies alongside mobile health-supported care by community health care providers. CE activities engaged pregnant women at their homes and male stakeholders through village meetings in Hyderabad and Matiari in Sindh, Pakistan. These sessions covered pregnancy complications, particularly pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, BPCR and details of the CLIP intervention package. BPCR was assessed using questions related to transport arrangement, permission for care, emergency funds, and choice of facility birth attendant for delivery during quarterly household surveys. Outcomes were assessed via multilevel logistic regression with adjustment for relevant confounders with effects summarized as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There were 15 137 home-based CE sessions with pregnant women and families (n = 46 614) and 695 village meetings with male stakeholders (n = 7784) over two years. The composite outcomes for BPCR and pre-eclampsia knowledge did not differ significantly between trial arms. However, CE activities were associated with improved pre-eclampsia knowledge in some areas. Specifically, pregnant women in the intervention clusters were twice as likely to know that seizures could be a complication of pregnancy (odds ratio (OR) = 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11, 4.23) and 2.5 times more likely to know that high blood pressure is potentially life-threatening during pregnancy (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.31, 4.83) vs control clusters. Conclusions: The findings suggested that a CE strategy for male and female community stakeholders increased some measures of knowledge regarding complications of pre-eclampsia in low-resource settings. However, the effect of this intervention on long-term health outcomes needs further study. Trial registration: Clinical Trials.gov - INCT01911494.


Assuntos
Participação da Comunidade , Saúde Materna , Pré-Eclâmpsia , Saúde da População Rural , Adulto , Participação da Comunidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Materna/estatística & dados numéricos , Paquistão/epidemiologia , Pré-Eclâmpsia/epidemiologia , Pré-Eclâmpsia/prevenção & controle , Gravidez , Saúde da População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
Health Hum Rights ; 23(1): 259-271, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34194218

RESUMO

This paper presents a case study of how colonial legacies in Uganda have affected the shape and breadth of community participation in health system governance. Using Habermas's theory of deliberative democracy and the right to health, we examine the key components required for decolonizing health governance in postcolonial countries. We argue that colonization distorts community participation, which is critical for building a strong state and a responsive health system. Participation processes grounded in the principles of democracy and the right to health increase public trust in health governance. The introduction and maintenance of British laws in Uganda, and their influence over local health governance, denies citizens the opportunity to participate in key decisions that affect them, which impacts public trust in the government. Postcolonial societies must tackle how imported legal frameworks exclude and limit community participation. Without meaningful participation, health policy implementation and accountability will remain elusive.


Assuntos
Participação da Comunidade , Direitos Humanos , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Responsabilidade Social , Uganda
15.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 332, 2021 07 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34217259

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The onset of mental health problems generally occurs between the ages of 16 and 23 - the years in which young people follow post-secondary education, which is a major channel in our society to prepare for a career and enhance life goals. Several studies have shown that students with mental health problems have a higher chance of early school leaving. Supported Education services have been developed to support students with mental health problems to remain at school. The current project aims to study the effect of an individually tailored Supported Education intervention on remaining at school, study success, and satisfaction of students with mental health problems studying at an institute for intermediate vocational education and a university of applied sciences in the Netherlands. METHODS/DESIGN: The design combines quantitative research (Randomized Controlled Trial; RCT) with qualitative research (monitoring, interviews, focus groups). One hundred students with mental health problems recruited from the two educational institutes will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or control condition. The students in the intervention condition receive the Supported Education intervention given by a Supported Education specialist, the students in the active control condition receive support as usual plus advice from a trained staff member on potential supportive resources regarding studying with mental health problems. The primary outcome 'remaining at school', and the secondary outcome 'study success' will be determined using data from the school's administration. The secondary outcome 'student satisfaction' and other variables that will be studied in a more exploratory way, such as self-efficacy and study skills, will be determined through online questionnaires at baseline, at 6 and at 12 months follow-up. Focus groups and interviews with the students and Supported Education specialists will be carried out to complement the trial. DISCUSSION: This RCT is the first to assess the effect of Supported Education on remaining at school, next to study success and student satisfaction among students with mental health problems. The use of a mixed-methods design will result in a thorough evaluation of the effect of the intervention. Issues regarding the influx and possible attrition of students in the follow-up are discussed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered with Trialregister.nl, no. NL8349 , date registered: February 4th 2020. Register name: Community participation through education. Effectiveness of Supported Education for youth with mental health problems, a mixed methods study - Study protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. Protocol Version: 3, date: May 28th, 2021.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Estudantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Participação da Comunidade , Humanos , Países Baixos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Instituições Acadêmicas , Adulto Jovem
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34205781

RESUMO

This paper details U.S. Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Community Engagement Cores (CECs): (1) unique and cross-cutting components, focus areas, specific aims, and target populations; and (2) approaches utilized to build or sustain trust towards community participation in research. A mixed-method data collection approach was employed for this cross-sectional study of current or previously funded RCMIs. A total of 18 of the 25 institutions spanning 13 U.S. states and territories participated. CEC specific aims were to support community engaged research (94%); to translate and disseminate research findings (88%); to develop partnerships (82%); and to build capacity around community research (71%). Four open-ended questions, qualitative analysis, and comparison of the categories led to the emergence of two supporting themes: (1) establishing trust between the community-academic collaborators and within the community and (2) building collaborative relationships. An overarching theme, building community together through trust and meaningful collaborations, emerged from the supporting themes and subthemes. The RCMI institutions and their CECs serve as models to circumvent the historical and current challenges to research in communities disproportionately affected by health disparities. Lessons learned from these cores may help other institutions who want to build community trust in and capacities for research that addresses community-related health concerns.


Assuntos
Participação da Comunidade , Grupos Minoritários , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Confiança
20.
J Law Health ; 34(2): 190-214, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34185973

RESUMO

Effective July 1, 1972, California's Lanterman-Petris-Short Act (LPS Act) set the precedent for modern mental health commitment procedures in the U.S. named after its authors, State Assemblyman Frank Lanterman and State Senators Nicholas C. Petris and Alan Short, the LPS Act sought to "end the inappropriate, indefinite, and involuntary commitment of persons with mental health disorder"; to "provide prompt evaluation and treatment of persons with mental health disorders or impaired by chronic alcoholism"; and to "guarantee and protect public safety." Despite citing to these articles of intent, the LPS Act violates its own legislative intent through its inclusion of "gravely disabled" in its enforcement of involuntary psychiatric hold designations (also known as "5150 designations"). First, police officers are not required to make a medical diagnosis of a mental health disorder at the time of a 5150 designation; the broad scope of "gravely disabled" increases the number of persons police officers can involuntarily transport, increasing the likelihood of inappropriate and involuntary commitment of persons with mental health disorders. Second, the broad scope of "gravely disabled" produces an onslaught of 5150-designated persons (whether improperly designated or not) being sent to LPS-designated hospitals with limited resources (e.g., lack of beds and psychiatric staff); this results in patients waiting for an inordinate amount of time for a psychiatric evaluation and/or a hospital bed. Third, it is unclear whether the LPS Act sought to provide protection for the mentally ill or to provide protection from the mentally ill in its guarantee of protecting "public safety"; the inclusion of "gravely disabled" in 5150 designations indicates that the LPS Act provided the public with a duplicitous means of removing the mentally ill, impoverished, and houseless from the streets under the guise of "public safety." This Paper suggests the following to help remedy the effects of implementing the broadly defined "gravely disabled" in 5150 designations: (1) Remove "gravely disabled" from the 5150 criteria; (2) integrate the community with mental health advocacy efforts by creating outreach and education programs; and (3) implement a client-centric approach to interacting with persons with mental health disorders through restorative policing and the establishment of a restorative court.


Assuntos
Internação Compulsória de Doente Mental/legislação & jurisprudência , Pessoas com Deficiência/legislação & jurisprudência , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Internação Involuntária/legislação & jurisprudência , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Polícia/legislação & jurisprudência , California/epidemiologia , Participação da Comunidade , Humanos , Aplicação da Lei/métodos , Segurança , Terminologia como Assunto
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