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1.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 3: CD004406, 2021 03 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33728634

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Antibiotics provide only modest benefit in treating sore throat, although their effectiveness increases in people with positive throat swabs for group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS). It is unclear which antibiotic is the best choice if antibiotics are indicated. This is an update of a review first published in 2010, and updated in 2013, 2016, and 2020. OBJECTIVES: To assess the comparative efficacy of different antibiotics in: (a) alleviating symptoms (pain, fever); (b) shortening the duration of the illness; (c) preventing clinical relapse (i.e. recurrence of symptoms after initial resolution); and (d) preventing complications (suppurative complications, acute rheumatic fever, post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis). To assess the evidence on the comparative incidence of adverse effects and the risk-benefit of antibiotic treatment for streptococcal pharyngitis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases up to 3 September 2020: CENTRAL (2020, Issue 8), MEDLINE Ovid (from 1946), Embase Elsevier (from 1974), and Web of Science Thomson Reuters (from 2010). We also searched clinical trial registers on 3 September 2020. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised, double-blind trials comparing different antibiotics, and reporting at least one of the following: clinical cure, clinical relapse, or complications and/or adverse events. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened trials for inclusion and extracted data using standard methodological procedures as recommended by Cochrane. We assessed the risk of bias of included studies according to the methods outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and used the GRADE approach to assess the overall certainty of the evidence for the outcomes. We have reported the intention-to-treat analysis, and also performed an analysis of evaluable participants to explore the robustness of the intention-to-treat results. MAIN RESULTS: We included 19 trials reported in 18 publications (5839 randomised participants): six trials compared penicillin with cephalosporins; six compared penicillin with macrolides; three compared penicillin with carbacephem; one compared penicillin with sulphonamides; one compared clindamycin with ampicillin; and one compared azithromycin with amoxicillin in children. All participants had confirmed acute GABHS tonsillopharyngitis, and ages ranged from one month to 80 years. Nine trials included only, or predominantly, children. Most trials were conducted in an outpatient setting. Reporting of randomisation, allocation concealment, and blinding was poor in all trials. We downgraded the certainty of the evidence mainly due to lack of (or poor reporting of) randomisation or blinding, or both; heterogeneity; and wide confidence intervals. Cephalosporins versus penicillin We are uncertain if there is a difference in symptom resolution (at 2 to 15 days) for cephalosporins versus penicillin (odds ratio (OR) for absence of symptom resolution 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55 to 1.12; 5 trials; 2018 participants; low-certainty evidence). Results of the sensitivity analysis of evaluable participants differed (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.97; 5 trials; 1660 participants; very low-certainty evidence). We are uncertain if clinical relapse may be lower for cephalosporins compared with penicillin (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.99; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 50; 4 trials; 1386 participants; low-certainty evidence). Very low-certainty evidence showed no difference in reported adverse events. Macrolides versus penicillin We are uncertain if there is a difference between macrolides and penicillin for resolution of symptoms (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.35; 6 trials; 1728 participants; low-certainty evidence). Sensitivity analysis of evaluable participants resulted in an OR of 0.79, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.09; 6 trials; 1159 participants). We are uncertain if clinical relapse may be different (OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.48 to 3.03; 6 trials; 802 participants; low-certainty evidence).  Azithromycin versus amoxicillin Based on one unpublished trial in children, we are uncertain if resolution of symptoms is better with azithromycin in a single dose versus amoxicillin for 10 days (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.05; 1 trial; 673 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Sensitivity analysis for per-protocol analysis resulted in an OR of 0.29, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.73; 1 trial; 482 participants; very low-certainty evidence). We are also uncertain if there was a difference in relapse between groups (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.82; 1 trial; 422 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Adverse events were more common with azithromycin compared to amoxicillin (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.99; 1 trial; 673 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Carbacephem versus penicillin There is low-certainty evidence that compared with penicillin, carbacephem may provide better symptom resolution post-treatment in adults and children (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.99; NNTB 14.3; 3 trials; 795 participants). Studies did not report on long-term complications, so it was unclear if any class of antibiotics was better in preventing serious but rare complications.  AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We are uncertain if there are clinically relevant differences in symptom resolution when comparing cephalosporins and macrolides with penicillin in the treatment of GABHS tonsillopharyngitis. Low-certainty evidence in children suggests that carbacephem may be more effective than penicillin for symptom resolution. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions regarding the other comparisons in this review. Data on complications were too scarce to draw conclusions. These results do not demonstrate that other antibiotics are more effective than penicillin in the treatment of GABHS pharyngitis. All studies were conducted in high-income countries with a low risk of streptococcal complications, so there is a need for trials in low-income countries and Aboriginal communities, where the risk of complications remains high.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Faringite/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Estreptocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Streptococcus pyogenes , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Amoxicilina/efeitos adversos , Amoxicilina/uso terapêutico , Ampicilina/efeitos adversos , Ampicilina/uso terapêutico , Antibacterianos/efeitos adversos , Azitromicina/efeitos adversos , Azitromicina/uso terapêutico , Cefalosporinas/efeitos adversos , Cefalosporinas/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Clindamicina/efeitos adversos , Clindamicina/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Lactente , Macrolídeos/efeitos adversos , Macrolídeos/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Penicilinas/efeitos adversos , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Faringite/microbiologia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Infecções Estreptocócicas/microbiologia , Sulfonamidas/efeitos adversos , Sulfonamidas/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
2.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 3: CD008726, 2021 03 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33661539

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Caesarean section increases the risk of postpartum infection for women and prophylactic antibiotics have been shown to reduce the incidence; however, there are adverse effects. It is important to identify the most effective class of antibiotics to use and those with the least adverse effects.  OBJECTIVES: To determine, from the best available evidence, the balance of benefits and harms between different classes of antibiotic given prophylactically to women undergoing caesarean section, considering their effectiveness in reducing infectious complications for women and adverse effects on both mother and infant. SEARCH METHODS: For this 2020 update, we searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 December 2019), and reference lists of retrieved studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different classes of prophylactic antibiotics given to women undergoing caesarean section.  RCTs published in abstract form were also included. We excluded trials that compared drugs with placebo or drugs within a specific class; these are assessed in other Cochrane Reviews. We excluded quasi-RCTs and cross-over trials. Cluster-RCTs were eligible for inclusion but none were identified. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: We included 39 studies, with 33 providing data (8073 women). Thirty-two studies (7690 women) contributing data administered antibiotics systemically, while one study (383 women) used lavage and was analysed separately. We identified three main comparisons that addressed clinically important questions on antibiotics at caesarean section (all systemic administration), but we only found studies for one comparison, 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors'.   We found no studies for the following comparisons: 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus lincosamides' and 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus lincosamides plus aminoglycosides'. Twenty-seven studies (22 provided data) included comparisons of cephalosporins (only) versus penicillins (only). However for this update, we only pooled data relating to different sub-classes of penicillins and cephalosporins where they are known to have similar spectra of action against agents likely to cause infection at caesarean section. Eight trials, providing data on 1540 women, reported on our main comparison, 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors'. We found data on four other comparisons of cephalosporins (only) versus penicillins (only) using systemic administration: antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus non-antistaphylococcal penicillins (natural and broad spectrum) (9 studies, 3093 women); minimally antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (3rd generation) versus non-antistaphylococcal penicillins (natural and broad spectrum) (4 studies, 854 women); minimally antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (3rd generation) versus broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors (2 studies, 865 women); and minimally antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (3rd generation) versus broad spectrum and antistaphylococcal penicillins (1 study, 200 women). For other comparisons of different classes of antibiotics, only a small number of trials provided data for each comparison, and in all but one case data were not pooled. For all comparisons, there was a lack of good quality data and important outcomes often included few women. Three of the studies that contributed data were undertaken with drug company funding, one was funded by the hospital, and for all other studies the funding source was not reported. Most of the studies were at unclear risk of selection bias, reporting bias and other biases, partly due to the inclusion of many older trials where trial reports did not provide sufficient methodological information. We undertook GRADE assessment on the only main comparison reported by the included studies, antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors, and the certainty ranged from low to very low, mostly due to concerns about risk of bias, wide confidence intervals (CI), and few events. In terms of the primary outcomes for our main comparison of 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins (1st and 2nd generation) versus broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors': only one small study reported sepsis, and there were too few events to identify clear differences between the drugs (risk ratio (RR) 2.37, 95% CI 0.10 to 56.41, 1 study, 75 women, very low-certainty evidence). There may be little or no difference between these antibiotics in preventing endometritis (RR 1.10; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.60, 7 studies, 1161 women; low-certainty evidence). None of the included studies reported on infant sepsis or infant oral thrush. For our secondary outcomes, we found there may be little or no difference between interventions for maternal fever (RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.75, 3 studies, 678 women; low-certainty evidence). We are uncertain of the effects on maternal: wound infection (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.90, 4 studies, 543 women), urinary tract infection (average RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.11 to 3.73, 4 studies, 496 women), composite adverse effects (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.09 to 10.50, 2 studies, 468 women), and skin rash (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.28 to 4.1, 3 studies, 591 women) (all very low certainty evidence). Although maternal allergic reactions were reported by two studies, there were no events. There were no infant outcomes reported in the included studies. For the other comparisons, the results for most outcomes had wide CIs, few studies and few women included. None of the included trials reported on longer-term maternal outcomes, or on any infant outcomes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based on the best currently available evidence, 'antistaphylococcal cephalosporins' and 'broad spectrum penicillins plus betalactamase inhibitors' may have similar efficacy at caesarean section when considering immediate postoperative infection, although we did not have clear evidence for several important outcomes. Most trials administered antibiotics at or after cord clamping, or post-operatively, so results may have limited applicability to current practice which generally favours administration prior to skin incision. We have no data on any infant outcomes, nor on late infections (up to 30 days) in the mother; these are important gaps in the evidence that warrant further research. Antimicrobial resistance is very important but more appropriately investigated by other trial designs.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Infecções Bacterianas/prevenção & controle , Cefalosporinas/uso terapêutico , Cesárea/efeitos adversos , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Antibacterianos/efeitos adversos , Antibacterianos/classificação , Antibioticoprofilaxia/métodos , Cefalosporinas/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Penicilinas/efeitos adversos , Gravidez , Infecção Puerperal/prevenção & controle , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Inibidores de beta-Lactamases/uso terapêutico
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(10): e24915, 2021 Mar 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33725850

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Antibiotic resistance poses a challenge for Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment. Current guidelines strongly recommend avoiding repeated treatments with the same antibiotic to prevent the emergence of drug resistance. However, for penicillin-allergic patients with recurrent H. pylori eradication failures, avoiding repeated treatments with the same antibiotic severely limits the choice of treatment. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 47-year-old woman with a penicillin allergy for whom 2 previous levofloxacin and bismuth-based therapies had failed. DIAGNOSIS: H. pylori infection. INTERVENTIONS: Agar dilution susceptibility testing and gene sequence analysis was performed to confirm levofloxacin susceptibility again. Therefore, we treated her with a 14-day regimen consisting of levofloxacin (500 mg once daily), furazolidone (100 mg twice daily), colloidal bismuth pectin (220 mg twice daily), and esomeprazole (20 mg twice daily). OUTCOMES: The patient was successfully treated with a third levofloxacin and bismuth-based regimen. LESSONS: Antibiotics included in previous failed therapies need not be eliminated if no antibiotic resistance is found on antimicrobial susceptibility testing.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Gastrite/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Helicobacter/tratamento farmacológico , Helicobacter pylori/efeitos dos fármacos , Levofloxacino/farmacologia , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Bismuto/uso terapêutico , DNA Bacteriano/genética , DNA Bacteriano/isolamento & purificação , Hipersensibilidade a Drogas/diagnóstico , Hipersensibilidade a Drogas/imunologia , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/genética , Quimioterapia Combinada/métodos , Esomeprazol/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Furazolidona/uso terapêutico , Mucosa Gástrica/patologia , Gastrite/diagnóstico , Gastrite/microbiologia , Gastrite/patologia , Infecções por Helicobacter/diagnóstico , Infecções por Helicobacter/microbiologia , Infecções por Helicobacter/patologia , Helicobacter pylori/genética , Helicobacter pylori/isolamento & purificação , Humanos , Levofloxacino/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Penicilinas/imunologia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Recidiva , Retratamento/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 3: CD003427, 2021 03 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33724440

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited disorders that result in haemoglobin abnormalities and other complications. Injury to the spleen, among other factors, contribute to persons with SCD being particularly susceptible to infection. Infants and very young children are especially vulnerable. The 'Co-operative Study of Sickle Cell Disease' observed an incidence rate for pneumococcal septicaemia of 10 per 100 person-years in children under the age of three years. Vaccines, including customary pneumococcal vaccines, may be of limited use in this age group. Therefore, prophylactic penicillin regimens may be advisable for this population. This is an update of a Cochrane Review which was first published in 2002, and previously updated, most recently in 2017.  OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis against pneumococcus in children with SCD receiving antibiotic prophylaxis compared to those without in relation to: 1. incidence of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection; 2. mortality (as reported in the included studies); 3. drug-related adverse events (as reported in the included studies) to the individual and the community; 4. the impact of discontinuing at various ages on incidence of infection and mortality. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and also two clinical trials registries: ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Registry Platform (not in 2020 given access issues relating to Covid-19 pandemic). Additionally, we carried out hand searching of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: 25 January 2021. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent pneumococcal infection in children with SCD with placebo, no treatment or a comparator drug. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane were used. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. The authors used the GRADE criteria to assess the certainty of the evidence. MAIN RESULTS: Six trials were identified by the searches, of which three trials were eligible for inclusion. A total of 880 children, who were between three months to five years of age at randomization were included. The included studies were conducted in centres in the USA and in Kingston, Jamaica. In trials that investigated initiation of penicillin on risk of pneumococcal infection, the odds ratio was 0.37 (95% confidence interval 0.16 to 0.86) (two trials, 457 children) (low-certainty evidence), while for withdrawal the odds ratio was 0.49 (95% confidence interval 0.09 to 2.71) (one trial, 400 children) (low-certainty evidence). Adverse drug effects were rare and minor. Rates of pneumococcal infection were found to be relatively low in children over the age of five years. Overall, the certainty of the evidence for all outcomes was judged to be low. The results from the risk of bias assessment undertaken identified two domains in which the risk of bias was considered to be high, these were incomplete outcome data (attrition bias) (two trials) and allocation concealment (selection bias) (one trial). Domains considered to have a low risk of bias for all three trials were selective reporting (reporting bias) and blinding (performance and detection bias). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The evidence examined was determined to be of low certainty and suggests that prophylactic penicillin significantly reduces risk of pneumococcal infection in children with homozygous SCD, and is associated with minimal adverse reactions. Further research may help to determine the ideal age to safely withdraw penicillin.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme/complicações , Antibioticoprofilaxia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Infecções Pneumocócicas/prevenção & controle , Fatores Etários , Anemia Falciforme/genética , Antibioticoprofilaxia/efeitos adversos , Viés , Pré-Escolar , Doença da Hemoglobina SC/complicações , Homozigoto , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Adesão à Medicação , Penicilinas/efeitos adversos , Infecções Pneumocócicas/epidemiologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/mortalidade , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Talassemia beta/complicações
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(7): e24788, 2021 Feb 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33607833

RESUMO

RATIONALE: In recent decades, the incidence of advanced syphilis has declined due to early recognition and the application of effective antibiotics. Advanced syphilis often manifests in the cardiovascular system as simple aortitis, aortic valve insufficiency, coronary artery stenosis or obstruction, Aortic aneurysm and mucinous myocarditis. In most case reports on the subject, acute myocardial infarction caused by syphilis was reported to be due to aortic valve insufficiency and coronary stenosis as a result of the involvement of the aorta. PATIENT CONCERNS: The patient was a 48-year-old woman. She was admitted to our hospital because of intermittent upper abdominal pain with chest tightness for 3 hours. The patient reported a past syphilis infection, when she was hospitalized for hysteromyoma surgery four years ago, and had no related treatment. DIAGNOSIS: According to the characteristics of coronary angiography and results of lab tests and echocardiography, she was finally diagnosed with myocardial infarction associated with syphilis. INTERVENTIONS: At the first diagnosis of syphilis, the patient did not received antibiotics treatment. After the diagnosis of myocardial infarction, she received the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) operation assisted by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) technology, successfully got drug -eluted stents in right coronary artery ostium and left main ostium. Then the patient received penicillin to treat the syphilis infection. OUTCOMES: After coronary revascularization, the cardiac function of the patients was gradually improved, and the left ventricular ejection fraction was gradually improved after combined with optimized drug therapy. LESSONS: The cardiovascular system is often involved in the stages of advanced syphilis with severe complications like myocardial infarction. Standard treatment should be given as soon as syphilis is diagnosis. For stenosis of coronary ostium, the PCI assisted by ECMO technology did not only ensure the effectiveness of the treatment, but also reduce the surgical risk of the patient. This case indicated the effectiveness of ECMO-assisted PCI, and thus may provide a reference for future patient treatment.


Assuntos
Infarto do Miocárdio/etiologia , Sífilis Cardiovascular/complicações , Angiografia Coronária , Ecocardiografia , Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/terapia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Intervenção Coronária Percutânea , Sífilis Cardiovascular/tratamento farmacológico , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(1): 64-69, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33478601

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare antibiotic treatment with clindamycin versus penicillin V or G in terms of time to recovery and recurrence in patients with peritonsillar infection, including both peritonsillar cellulitis and peritonsillar abscess. METHOD: This retrospective cohort study examined the records of 296 patients diagnosed with peritonsillar infection. Based on the ENT doctor's choice of antibiotics, patients were divided into clindamycin and penicillin groups. RESULTS: Mean number of days in follow up was 3.5 days in the clindamycin group and 3.4 days in the penicillin group. The recurrence rate within 2 months was 7 per cent in the clindamycin group and 4 per cent in the penicillin group. CONCLUSION: This study found no significant differences in either recovery or recurrence between the groups. This supports the use of penicillin as a first-line treatment, considering the greater frequency of adverse effects of clindamycin shown in previous studies, as well as its profound collateral damage on the intestinal microbiota, resulting in antibiotic resistance.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Celulite (Flegmão)/tratamento farmacológico , Clindamicina/uso terapêutico , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Abscesso Peritonsilar/tratamento farmacológico , Tonsilite/tratamento farmacológico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
8.
REVISA (Online) ; 10(1): 195-204, 2021.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1177903

RESUMO

Objetivo: conhecer as gestantes com sífilis no estado de São Paulo, últimos cinco anos disponíveis. Método: estudo epidemiológico, quantitativo descritivo transversal, com dados secundários, com diagnósticos notificados (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação) - banco de dados do Departamento de Informática do Sistema Único de Saúde, das gestantes com sífilis, período 2014-2018. Resultados: encontrado 44.894 gestantes com sífilis no estado de SP, com crescimento importante nos dois últimos anos, maior prevalência (53,1%) na idade de 20-29 anos, raças brancas (43,1%), ensino fundamental completo (27,9%) e médio completo (26,1%). Maior percentual de diagnósticos realizado no primeiro trimestre (49,4%) e, 3,9% das gestantes não realizaram tratamento. Conclusão: é um agravo crescente, com baixa qualidade no preenchimento das fichas de notificação, prejudicando a assistência/qualidade do pré-natal, interferindo nas análises adequadas, afetando a tomada de decisão para tratamento correto. Resultados podem auxiliar em ações de educação em saúde e prevenção dos grupos vulneráveis.


Objective: to get to know pregnant women with syphilis in the state of São Paulo, the last five years available. Method: epidemiological, quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional study, with secondary data, with notified diagnoses (Information System for Notifiable Diseases) - database of the Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System, of pregnant women with syphilis, period 2014-2018. Results: found 44,894 pregnant women with syphilis in the state of SP, with significant growth in the last two years, higher prevalence (53.1%) at the age of 20-29 years, white races (43.1%), complete elementary school (27,9%) and complete high school (26.1%). Higher percentage of diagnoses performed in the first trimester (49.4%) and 3.9% of pregnant women did not undergo treatment. Conclusion: it is a growing problem, with low quality in filling out the notification forms, impairing the prenatal care / quality, interfering in the appropriate analyzes, affecting the decision-making for correct treatment. Results can assist in health education and prevention of vulnerable groups.


Objetivo: conocer mujeres embarazadas con sífilis en el estado de São Paulo, los últimos cinco años disponibles. Método: estudio epidemiológico, cuantitativo, descriptivo transversal, con datos secundarios, con diagnósticos notificados (Sistema de Información de Enfermedades Notificables) - base de datos del Departamento de Informática del Sistema Único de Salud, de gestantes con sífilis, período 2014-2018. Resultados: se encontraron 44.894 gestantes con sífilis en el estado de SP, con crecimiento significativo en los últimos dos años, mayor prevalencia (53,1%) en la edad de 20-29 años, razas blancas (43,1%), primaria completa (27 , 9%) y bachillerato completo (26,1%). Mayor porcentaje de diagnósticos realizados en el primer trimestre (49,4%) y 3,9% de gestantes no recibieron tratamiento. Conclusión: es un problema creciente, con baja calidad en el llenado de los formularios de notificación, perjudicando la calidad / atención prenatal, interfiriendo en los análisis adecuados, afectando la toma de decisiones para el correcto tratamiento. Los resultados pueden ayudar en la educación sanitaria y la prevención de grupos vulnerables.


Assuntos
Humanos , Feminino , Gravidez , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Adulto Jovem , Sífilis/epidemiologia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Brasil/epidemiologia , Sífilis/tratamento farmacológico , Estudos Transversais , Idade Gestacional , Distribuição por Idade , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Escolaridade , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(40): e22321, 2020 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33019408

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Congenital syphilis (CS) can manifest as a variety of clinical presentations according to the severity in symptomatic infants during neonatal period. Preterm neonates with CS may have more clinical evidences of infection and be more severely affected by CS compared with term ones. With increasing survival of markedly premature infants for recent decades, CS may be a challenging problem in those with severe manifestations associated with combined pathophysiologies of CS and prematurity. PATIENT CONCERNS: A very low birth weight infant at 32 weeks gestation presented with an unusual CS presentation consisting of prematurity-associated severe neonatal morbidities including meconium obstruction, prolonged cholestatic jaundice with elevated liver enzymes, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with a bleeding diathesis, in addition to common or typical manifestations of CS. DIAGNOSES: Congenital syphilis. INTERVENTIONS: Therapy consisting of a complete course of parenteral penicillin, blood component therapy, proximal ileotomy with inspissated meconium evacuation and distal loop ileostomy, and other conservative treatments. OUTCOMES: Resolution with normal gastrointestinal function and improved liver function was observed. LESSONS: This case suggests that in premature infants CS may manifest as unusual severe neonatal morbidities that may result from combination of syphilitic pathologies and contributors or conditions associated with prematurity including multisystem immaturity.


Assuntos
Recém-Nascido Prematuro/fisiologia , Recém-Nascido de muito Baixo Peso/fisiologia , Sífilis Congênita/fisiopatologia , Sífilis Congênita/terapia , Transfusão de Componentes Sanguíneos/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Íleo Meconial/cirurgia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Sífilis Congênita/diagnóstico
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 804, 2020 Oct 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33121455

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Misuse and overuse of antibiotics by physicians in the treatment of children is common in China. This study aimed to reveal the overall use of antibiotics to treat children hospitalized in four types of pediatric wards. METHODS: Seven independent point prevalence surveys (PPSs) were conducted in Shanghai Children's Hospital of Shanghai Jiao Tong University over the period 2012 to 2018. Pediatric ward types were defined general pediatric medical, pediatric surgical, pediatric intensive care units (PICU), and neonatal. RESULTS: A total of 3975 pediatric patients were included in the study, of which 63.9% received at least one dose antibiotic. The top five classes of antibiotics administered were cephalosporins (43.8%, n = 1743), penicillins (13.2%, n = 526), carbapenems (8.7%, n = 347), nitroimidazoles (7.1%, n = 281) and macrolides (6.5%, n = 257). The five most commonly used generic antibiotics were cefuroxime (14.9%, n = 594), ceftriaxone (9.7%, n = 387), cefotaxime (9.0%, n = 358), meropenem (8.1%, n = 320) and ampicillin/sulbactam (6.0%, n = 239). Meropenem was among top five antibiotics prescribed in the general pediatric, PICU and neonatal wards and sixth in the pediatric surgical wards. Of all children on antibiotics, 23.4% received prophylactic treatment, and prophylaxis accounted for 68.1% of indications for treatment in the pediatric surgical wards. CONCLUSIONS: Given that over-treatment with third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems has been associated with treatment-resistant infections, the prescription of these drugs should be strictly controlled and monitored, and measures should be taken to improve the management of surgical prophylaxis in hospitalized children in China.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Carbapenêmicos/uso terapêutico , Cefalosporinas/uso terapêutico , Hospitais Pediátricos , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Centros de Atenção Terciária , Adolescente , Antibioticoprofilaxia , Carbapenêmicos/efeitos adversos , Cefalosporinas/efeitos adversos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , China , Estudos de Coortes , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/efeitos dos fármacos , Feminino , Hospitalização , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Prescrições , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 794, 2020 Oct 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33109122

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hemorrhage is an important complication of leptospirosis. Once acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) occurs as a secondary condition, treatment is extremely difficult and the mortality rate is very high. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a 49-year-old. He was admitted to the hospital because he had experienced a fever and cough for 4 days. Hemorrhage, respiratory failure, ARDS and other symptoms appeared soon after admission. Due to severe pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to ARDS, mechanical ventilation was performed through tracheal intubation. During intubation, the patient suffered cardiac arrest, and the patient's condition worsened. He was confirmed to have leptospirosis through second-generation sequencing of the alveolar lavage fluid. Finally, we successfully treated the patient with penicillin as an anti-infective medication and venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (v-vECMO). To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the successful application of ECMO in mainland China. CONCLUSIONS: Leptospirosis can induce serious but transient ARDS with a better prognosis than other causes of ARDS. Our patient was successfully treated with V-vECMO.


Assuntos
Oxigenação por Membrana Extracorpórea , Hemorragia/etiologia , Hemorragia/cirurgia , Leptospira/genética , Leptospirose/complicações , /cirurgia , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Líquido da Lavagem Broncoalveolar/microbiologia , China , Humanos , Leptospira/isolamento & purificação , Leptospirose/tratamento farmacológico , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Prognóstico , Respiração Artificial/efeitos adversos , Insuficiência Respiratória/etiologia , Insuficiência Respiratória/cirurgia , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 703, 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32977759

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Treatment of gonorrhea is complicated by the development of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) to the antibiotics recommended for treatment. Knowledge on types of plasmids and the antibiotic resistance genes they harbor is useful in monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance. In Kenya, studies on gonococcal antimicrobial resistance are few and data on plasmid mediated drug resistance is limited. The present study characterizes plasmid mediated resistance in N. gonorrhoeae isolates recovered from Kenya between 2013 and 2018. METHODS: DNA was extracted from 36 sub-cultured GC isolates exhibiting varying drug resistance profiles. Whole genome sequencing was done on Illumina MiSeq platform and reads assembled de-novo using CLC Genomics Workbench. Genome annotation was performed using Rapid Annotation Subsystem Technology. Comparisons in identified antimicrobial resistance determinants were done using Bioedit sequence alignment editor. RESULTS: Twenty-four (66.7%) isolates had both ß-lactamase (TEM) and TetM encoding plasmids. 8.3% of the isolates lacked both TEM and TetM plasmids and had intermediate to susceptible penicillin and tetracycline MICs. Twenty-six (72%) isolates harbored TEM encoding plasmids. 25 of the TEM plasmids were of African type while one was an Asian type. Of the 36 isolates, 31 (86.1%) had TetM encoding plasmids, 30 of which harbored American TetM, whereas 1 carried a Dutch TetM. All analyzed isolates had non-mosaic penA alleles. All the isolates expressing TetM were tetracycline resistant (MIC> 1 mg/L) and had increased doxycycline MICs (up to 96 mg/L). All the isolates had S10 ribosomal protein V57M amino acid substitution associated with tetracycline resistance. No relation was observed between PenB and MtrR alterations and penicillin and tetracycline MICs. CONCLUSION: High-level gonococcal penicillin and tetracycline resistance in the sampled Kenyan regions was found to be mediated by plasmid borne blaTEM and tetM genes. While the African TEM plasmid, TEM1 and American TetM are the dominant genotypes, Asian TEM plasmid, a new TEM239 and Dutch TetM have emerged in the regions.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/genética , Gonorreia/tratamento farmacológico , Gonorreia/epidemiologia , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genética , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Plasmídeos/genética , Resistência a Tetraciclina/genética , Tetraciclina/uso terapêutico , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolamento & purificação , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma , beta-Lactamases/genética
13.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(4): 756-764, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925625

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare maternal and cord blood penicillin concentrations in women with and without obesity who are receiving intrapartum group B streptococcus (GBS) prophylaxis. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study of term women receiving intrapartum penicillin prophylaxis for GBS colonization (determined by antenatal rectovaginal culture). The following outcomes were compared between obese (body mass index [BMI] 35 or higher at delivery) and nonobese (BMI less than 30 at delivery) groups: penicillin concentration in maternal blood (after two penicillin doses) and umbilical cord blood, GBS rectovaginal colonization status on admission and after two completed doses, and neonatal GBS colonization (using a postnatal ear swab). Fifty-five women were needed to detect a 0.75 SD difference in cord blood penicillin concentrations. RESULTS: Fifty-five women were enrolled and had all specimens collected; 49 had complete data for analysis (obese n=25, nonobese n=24). There was no difference in the median maternal penicillin concentration between groups (obese 4.2 micrograms/mL vs nonobese 4.0 micrograms/mL, P=.58). There was, however, a 60% lower median cord blood penicillin concentration in the obese compared with the nonobese group (2.7 micrograms/mL vs 6.7 micrograms/mL, respectively, P<.01), with no significant difference in time from last penicillin dose to delivery (obese 2.9 hours vs nonobese 1.7 hours, P=.07). The difference in cord blood concentrations remained significant after adjustment for nulliparity, hypertensive disorders, and time from last penicillin dose to delivery. Only 59.6% of women tested positive for GBS by rectovaginal culture on admission (obese 60.9% vs nonobese 58.3%, P=.86). CONCLUSION: The median cord blood penicillin concentration was 60% lower in neonates born to women with obesity compared with those born to women without obesity. However, all concentrations exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration. Maternal penicillin levels were not significantly different between groups. More than 40% of women who previously tested positive for GBS by antenatal culture tested negative for GBS on admission for delivery.


Assuntos
Sangue Fetal/química , Triagem Neonatal/métodos , Obesidade , Penicilinas , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez , Infecções Estreptocócicas , Streptococcus agalactiae/isolamento & purificação , Adulto , Antibacterianos/sangue , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Antibioticoprofilaxia/métodos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Monitoramento de Medicamentos/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Obesidade/sangue , Obesidade/complicações , Obesidade/diagnóstico , Avaliação de Processos e Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Penicilinas/sangue , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/sangue , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Reto/microbiologia , Infecções Estreptocócicas/sangue , Infecções Estreptocócicas/complicações , Infecções Estreptocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Vagina/microbiologia
14.
Pediatrics ; 146(3)2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32759380

RESUMO

Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of community and health care-associated bacteremia, with authors of recent studies estimating the incidence of S aureus bacteremia (SAB) in high-income countries between 8 and 26 per 100 000 children per year. Despite this, <300 children worldwide have ever been randomly assigned into clinical trials to assess the efficacy of treatment of SAB. A panel of infectious diseases physicians with clinical and research interests in pediatric SAB identified 7 key clinical questions. The available literature is systematically appraised, summarizing SAB management in children in relation to these priority clinical questions. The management of neonates, children, and adolescents with SAB is predominantly based on clinical experience and trial data extrapolated from adult studies, with limited high-quality evidence available to guide management. The optimal, comprehensive management strategies for SAB in children will remain unknown until the questions outlined are answered through prospective observational cohorts and inclusion of children with SAB in clinical trials.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Bacteriemia/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Estafilocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Staphylococcus aureus , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Algoritmos , Bacteriemia/diagnóstico , Bacteriemia/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/etiologia , Cefalosporinas/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Técnica Delfos , Esquema de Medicação , Ecocardiografia , Endocardite Bacteriana/diagnóstico por imagem , Endocardite Bacteriana/tratamento farmacológico , Glicopeptídeos/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Injeções Intravenosas , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina , Estudos Observacionais como Assunto , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Infecções Estafilocócicas/diagnóstico , Infecções Estafilocócicas/epidemiologia , Staphylococcus aureus/isolamento & purificação , Vancomicina/uso terapêutico , beta-Lactamas/uso terapêutico
15.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 514, 2020 Jul 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32677988

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, an increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been observed. Until now, no protocol for an external quality assessment (EQA) has been available for Germany. The German gonococcal resistance network (GORENET) performed an EQA of primary laboratories in Germany in order to assess quality of antibiotic susceptibility testing, to gain information about laboratory procedures and to assess the impact of these procedures on test results. METHODS: Laboratories assessed drug susceptibility to cefixime, ceftriaxone, azithromycin, penicillin and ciprofloxacin for five N. gonorrhoeae strains, using their standard laboratory protocols. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were compared to World Health Organisation (WHO) consensus results (or, if not available, reference laboratory results), while deviation by +/- one doubling dilution was accepted. Data on laboratory procedures were collected via a standardised questionnaire. Generalized linear models and conditional inference trees (CTREE) were used to assess relationships between laboratory procedures and testing outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty-one primary laboratories participated in the EQA in June 2018. 96% of ciprofloxacin MICs were reported within accepted deviations, as well as 88% for cefixime, 85% for ceftriaxone, 79% for penicillin and 70% for azithromycin. The use of interpretation standards and general laboratory procedures like agar base, incubation settings or the use of control strains strongly differed between laboratories. In statistical analysis, incubation time of cultures < 24 h was associated with correct measurements. Additionally, a 5% CO2 concentration was associated with correct results regarding azithromycin compared to 3%. CTREE analysis showed that incubation time, humidity and CO2 concentration had the greatest influence on the average deviation from consensus results. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we report the development of a protocol for N. gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Germany. While testing results were in accordance with the expected consensus results in 70-96%, depending on the antibiotic agent, laboratory methodology was heterogeneous and may significantly affect the testing quality. We therefore recommend the development of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility testing in Germany.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/efeitos dos fármacos , Gonorreia/tratamento farmacológico , Laboratórios/normas , Ensaio de Proficiência Laboratorial , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/efeitos dos fármacos , Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Azitromicina/farmacologia , Azitromicina/uso terapêutico , Cefixima/farmacologia , Cefixima/uso terapêutico , Ceftriaxona/farmacologia , Ceftriaxona/uso terapêutico , Ciprofloxacino/farmacologia , Ciprofloxacino/uso terapêutico , Alemanha , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Humanos , Ensaio de Proficiência Laboratorial/métodos , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Penicilinas/farmacologia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Controle de Qualidade , Padrões de Referência , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 507, 2020 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32660436

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen responsible for a broad range of infections. Epidemiological surveillance has been crucial to detect changes in the geographical and temporal variation of the disease pattern. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiological characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of GAS isolates from patients in Children's Hospital in Beijing. METHODS: From 2016 to 2017, pharyngeal swab samples were collected from the outpatients in Children's Hospital, Capital Institute of Pediatrics, who were diagnosed with scarlet fever. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed according to the distribution of conventional antibiotics and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations. The distribution of the macrolide-resistance genes (ermB, ermA, mefA), emm (M protein-coding gene) typing, and superantigens (SAg) gene profiling were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: A total of 297 GAS isolates were collected. The susceptibility of the isolates to penicillin, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin was 100%. The resistance rate to erythromycin and clindamycin was 98.3 and 96.6%, respectively. The dominant emm types were emm12 (65.32%), emm1 (27.61%), emm75 (2.69%), and emm89 (1.35%). Of the 297 isolates, 290 (97.64%) carried the ermB gene, and 5 (1.68%) carried the mefA gene, while none carried the ermA gene. The most common superantigen genes identified from GAS isolates were smeZ (96.97%), speC (92.59%), speG (91.58%), ssa (85.52%), speI (54.55%), speH (52.19%), and speA (34.34%). Isolates with the genotype emm1 possessed speA, speC, speG, speJ, speM, ssa, and smeZ, while emm12 possessed speC, speG, speH, speI, speM, ssa, and smeZ superantigens. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalent strain of GAS isolates in Beijing has a high resistance rate to macrolides; however, penicillin can still be the preferred antibiotic for treatment. Erythromycin resistance was predominantly mediated by ermB. The common emm types were emm12 and emm1. There was a correlation between emm and the superantigen gene. Thus, long-term monitoring and investigation of the emm types and superantigen genes of GAS prevalence are imperative.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/genética , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Escarlatina/tratamento farmacológico , Escarlatina/epidemiologia , Streptococcus pyogenes/imunologia , Adolescente , Antígenos de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas da Membrana Bacteriana Externa/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Pequim/epidemiologia , Reanimação Cardiopulmonar , Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Eritromicina/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Hospitais Pediátricos , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Escarlatina/microbiologia , Streptococcus pyogenes/isolamento & purificação , Superantígenos/genética
18.
N Z Med J ; 133(1516): 47-57, 2020 06 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32525861

RESUMO

AIM: To describe the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of recurrences of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in New Zealand 2010-14. METHOD: Retrospective hospital chart review for ARF with repeat hospital admissions from 2010-14, to identify recurrences of ARF. Definitions of recurrence as per NZ Heart Foundation Guidelines. RESULTS: There were 65 episodes of recurrent ARF among 60 patients. Maori 51%, Pacific 49%. Arthritis and carditis were the most common major manifestations. Median age at recurrence 21.6 years, (8-42 years), with 83% patients over 15 years. There were 841 first episodes of ARF in New Zealand in 2010-4. Overall New Zealand ARF recurrence rate was 7.2% (CI 5.5-8.9%). The recurrence rate was 4% for those under 16 years, 16% for those aged 16-20 and 25% for those >20 years (p<0.05). Seventy-three percent of recurrences occurred in the Auckland region. Recurrences of ARF were strongly associated with RHD progression. CONCLUSION: The risk of recurrence of ARF in New Zealand is low for children. In contrast, recurrences of ARF in New Zealand occur predominantly after age 15, and disproportionately in the Auckland DHBs. Current medical systems and registers may not be meeting the needs of adolescents and adults requiring secondary prophylaxis.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Antibioticoprofilaxia , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Febre Reumática/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Auditoria Médica , Erros Médicos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos , Recidiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Febre Reumática/complicações , Febre Reumática/prevenção & controle , Prevenção Secundária , Adulto Jovem
19.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd ; 1642020 05 07.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32395967

RESUMO

Penicillin allergy is commonly reported and often influences selection of antimicrobial treatment. Due to concerns about cross-allergic reactions, other beta-lactams - particularly cephalosporins - may also be avoided. This too often results in less effective treatment, more side effects and overconsumption of reserve antimicrobial agents. Most patients (> 90%) with a penicillin allergy label are not truly allergic, i.e., they do not have an 'immediate type' (IgE-mediated) allergy when tested. Based on current data, even in patients with a true penicillin allergy, the risk of severe cross-allergic reactions to cephalosporins is very low. Clinicians tend to overestimate this risk: this dilemma can be resolved with a systematic appraisal of risk probabilities. The limited risk of a true penicillin allergy being present and the subsequent low risk of a cross-allergic reaction to cephalosporins generally outweighs the disadvantages of selecting an alternative (non-beta-lactam) antimicrobial regimen.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Cefalosporinas/uso terapêutico , Hipersensibilidade a Drogas/etiologia , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Antibacterianos/efeitos adversos , Cefalosporinas/efeitos adversos , Reações Cruzadas , Humanos , Penicilinas/efeitos adversos , Medição de Risco
20.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 5: CD009880, 2020 05 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32407558

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Infective endocarditis is a microbial infection of the endocardial surface of the heart. Antibiotics are the cornerstone of treatment, but due to the differences in presentation, populations affected, and the wide variety of micro-organisms that can be responsible, their use is not standardised. This is an update of a review previously published in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To assess the existing evidence about the clinical benefits and harms of different antibiotics regimens used to treat people with infective endocarditis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase Classic and Embase, LILACS, CINAHL, and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science on 6 January 2020. We also searched three trials registers and handsearched the reference lists of included papers. We applied no language restrictions. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of antibiotic regimens for treating definitive infective endocarditis diagnosed according to modified Duke's criteria. We considered all-cause mortality, cure rates, and adverse events as the primary outcomes. We excluded people with possible infective endocarditis and pregnant women. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently performed study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment, and data extraction in duplicate. We constructed 'Summary of findings' tables and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of the evidence. We described the included studies narratively. MAIN RESULTS: Six small RCTs involving 1143 allocated/632 analysed participants met the inclusion criteria of this first update. The included trials had a high risk of bias. Three trials were sponsored by drug companies. Due to heterogeneity in outcome definitions and different antibiotics used data could not be pooled. The included trials compared miscellaneous antibiotic schedules having uncertain effects for all of the prespecified outcomes in this review. Evidence was either low or very low quality due to high risk of bias and very low number of events and small sample size. The results for all-cause mortality were as follows: one trial compared quinolone (levofloxacin) plus standard treatment (antistaphylococcal penicillin (cloxacillin or dicloxacillin), aminoglycoside (tobramycin or netilmicin), and rifampicin) versus standard treatment alone and reported 8/31 (26%) with levofloxacin plus standard treatment versus 9/39 (23%) with standard treatment alone; risk ratio (RR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 2.56. One trial compared fosfomycin plus imipenem 3/4 (75%) versus vancomycin 0/4 (0%) (RR 7.00, 95% CI 0.47 to 103.27), and one trial compared partial oral treatment 7/201 (3.5%) versus conventional intravenous treatment 13/199 (6.53%) (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.22 to 1.31). The results for rates of cure with or without surgery were as follows: one trial compared daptomycin versus low-dose gentamicin plus an antistaphylococcal penicillin (nafcillin, oxacillin, or flucloxacillin) or vancomycin and reported 9/28 (32.1%) with daptomycin versus 9/25 (36%) with low-dose gentamicin plus antistaphylococcal penicillin or vancomycin; RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.89. One trial compared glycopeptide (vancomycin or teicoplanin) plus gentamicin with cloxacillin plus gentamicin (13/23 (56%) versus 11/11 (100%); RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.85). One trial compared ceftriaxone plus gentamicin versus ceftriaxone alone (15/34 (44%) versus 21/33 (64%); RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.10), and one trial compared fosfomycin plus imipenem versus vancomycin (1/4 (25%) versus 2/4 (50%); RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.07 to 3.55). The included trials reported adverse events, the need for cardiac surgical interventions, and rates of uncontrolled infection, congestive heart failure, relapse of endocarditis, and septic emboli, and found no conclusive differences between groups (very low-quality evidence). No trials assessed quality of life. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This first update confirms the findings of the original version of the review. Limited and low to very low-quality evidence suggests that the comparative effects of different antibiotic regimens in terms of cure rates or other relevant clinical outcomes are uncertain. The conclusions of this updated Cochrane Review were based on few RCTs with a high risk of bias. Accordingly, current evidence does not support or reject any regimen of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of infective endocarditis.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Endocardite Bacteriana/tratamento farmacológico , Antibacterianos/efeitos adversos , Endocardite Bacteriana/microbiologia , Endocardite Bacteriana/mortalidade , Feminino , Fosfomicina/efeitos adversos , Fosfomicina/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Imipenem/efeitos adversos , Imipenem/uso terapêutico , Levofloxacino/efeitos adversos , Levofloxacino/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Penicilinas/efeitos adversos , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Vancomicina/efeitos adversos , Vancomicina/uso terapêutico
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