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1.
Braz Oral Res ; 35: e031, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33729276

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the intraoral distribution of untreated caries and tooth loss and estimate the impact of different socioeconomic factors on the occurrence of these outcomes. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 652 18-year-old male adolescents from the city of Sapucaia do Sul, Brazil, who conscripted for military service. The participants answered a questionnaire addressing sociodemographic variables. Two trained and calibrated examiners performed the clinical examinations for the diagnosis of dental caries using the criteria of the World Health Organization. Tooth group and adolescent were the units of analysis for the primary outcomes of the study. Poisson regression analysis with robust variance was performed, with the calculation of crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The prevalence of caries experience and untreated caries was 70.2% and 39.3%, respectively, and 9.4% of the adolescents had missing teeth. Sixty-seven percent of the untreated caries and 98.8% of missing teeth were in first molars. The probability of dental caries and tooth loss was significantly higher among adolescents with less schooling (PR = 2.56; 95%CI: 1.97-3.32 and PR = 3.28; 95%CI: 1.61-6.65, respectively) and those whose mothers had less schooling (PR = 1.31; 95%CI: 1.03-1.67 and PR = 2.30; 95%CI: 1.18-4.50, respectively). In conclusion, the occurrence of untreated dental caries and tooth loss was concentrated in the first molars of adolescents. Moreover, the prevalence of both conditions was higher among adolescents with low schooling and whose mothers had low schooling, reflecting the strong intraoral and socioeconomic polarization of these outcomes.


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Perda de Dente , Adolescente , Brasil/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Cárie Dentária/epidemiologia , Suscetibilidade à Cárie Dentária , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
2.
Am J Epidemiol ; 190(2): 196-206, 2021 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33524121

RESUMO

Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is a highly fatal cancer that can be cured through cholecystectomy if identified early. The presence of gallstones is the primary risk factor for GBC, but few people with gallstones develop GBC. A key question is what drives the development of GBC among persons with gallstones. We initiated the Chile Biliary Longitudinal Study (Chile BiLS) to address this question. From 2016 to 2019, Chile BiLS enrolled 4,726 women aged 50-74 years with ultrasound-detected gallstones from southern-central Chile, accounting for an estimated 36% of eligible women with gallstones in the study area. The median age was 59 years; 25% of the women were Amerindian (Mapuche), 60% were obese, 25% had diabetes, and 6% had cardiovascular disease. Participants will be followed for gallbladder dysplasia or cancer for 6 years. As of April 30, 2020, over 91% of those eligible completed the year 2 follow-up visit. Data being collected include epidemiologic and sociodemographic information, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and tooth counts. Biosamples being taken include baseline plasma, buffy coat, red blood cells, serum, blood clot from serum, and PAXgene whole blood (PreAnalytiX GmbH, Hombrechtikon, Switzerland). Complete gallbladder sampling is conducted for most participants undergoing cholecystectomy. The Chile BiLS cohort study will increase our understanding of GBC etiology and could identify potential risk stratification and early detection strategies in high-risk areas.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/epidemiologia , Cálculos Biliares/epidemiologia , Idoso , Pressão Sanguínea , Pesos e Medidas Corporais , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Chile , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Feminino , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias da Vesícula Biliar/etnologia , Cálculos Biliares/diagnóstico por imagem , Cálculos Biliares/etnologia , Humanos , Mediadores da Inflamação/sangue , Estudos Longitudinais , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Projetos de Pesquisa , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33540933

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive early tooth loss multivariable model for periodontitis patients before periodontal treatment. A total of 544 patients seeking periodontal care at the university dental hospital were enrolled in the study. Teeth extracted after periodontal diagnosis and due to periodontal reasons were recorded. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were analyzed, considering the risk of short-term tooth loss. This study followed the transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD) guidelines for development and validation, with two cohorts considered as follows: 455 patients in the development phase and 99 in the validation phase. As a result, it was possible to compute a predictive model based on tooth type and clinical attachment loss. The model explained 25.3% of the total variability and correctly ranked 98.9% of the cases. The final reduced model area under the curve (AUC) was 0.809 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.629-0.989) for the validation sample and 0.920 (95% CI: 0.891-0.950) for the development cohort. The established model presented adequate prediction potential of early tooth loss due to periodontitis. This model may have clinical and epidemiologic relevance towards the prediction of tooth loss burden.


Assuntos
Periodontite , Perda de Dente , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Periodontite/diagnóstico , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Perda de Dente/diagnóstico , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
4.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol ; 159: 103221, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33482347

RESUMO

A number of epidemiological studies have suggested a positive association between periodontal diseases and oro-digestive cancers, including liver cancer. The purpose of the present systematic review was to analyze the current evidence regarding the potential association between periodontitis and/or tooth loss and the risk of liver cancer. A comprehensive search of PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases was conducted in August 2019. The inclusion criteria comprised all observational studies that assessed the relationship between periodontitis or tooth loss and liver cancer. Case reports, animal studies, experimental studies, and reviews were excluded. Due to great heterogeneity among the included studies, no meta-analysis was conducted. Six studies (five prospective cohorts and one case-control) comprising 619,834 subjects (including 916 liver cancer cases) were included. The studies were conducted in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Three large-scale cohort studies reported a positive association between periodontitis or tooth loss and the risk of liver cancer. One case-control study found some association between liver cancer and loss of 12-23 teeth, but such association was not replicated in patients with greater number of tooth loss. Contrarily, two studies failed to report any association between periodontitis and/or tooth loss and the risk of liver cancer. The available evidence suggests a possible link between tooth loss/periodontitis and the risk of liver cancer. However, the evidence is not conclusive enough, a fact that drives to conduct more, well-designed, prospective cohort studies to further explore the potential association between periodontitis and the risk of liver cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Hepáticas , Periodontite , Perda de Dente , Animais , Ásia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/etiologia , Periodontite/complicações , Periodontite/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Perda de Dente/complicações , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401662

RESUMO

We aimed to investigate the association between blood pressure (BP) and tooth loss and the mediation effect of age. A cross-sectional study from a reference dental hospital was conducted from September 2017 to July 2020. Single measures of BP were taken via an automated sphygmomanometer device. Tooth loss was assessed through oral examination and confirmed radiographically. Severe tooth loss was defined as 10 or more teeth lost. Additional study covariates were collected via sociodemographic and medical questionnaires. A total of 10,576 patients were included. Hypertension was more prevalent in severe tooth loss patients than nonsevere tooth lost (56.1% vs. 39.3%, p < 0.001). The frequency of likely undiagnosed hypertension was 43.4%. The adjusted logistic model for sex, smoking habits and body mass index confirmed the association between continuous measures of high BP and continuous measures of tooth loss (odds ratio (OR) = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.03-1.06, p < 0.001). Age mediated 80.0% and 87.5% of the association between periodontitis with both systolic BP (p < 0.001) and diastolic BP (p < 0.001), respectively. Therefore, hypertension and tooth loss are associated, with a consistent mediation effect of age. Frequency of undiagnosed hypertension was elevated. Age, gender, active smoking, and BMI were independently associated with raised BP.


Assuntos
Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Saúde Bucal , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adulto , Pressão Sanguínea , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Suíça/epidemiologia
6.
Am J Phys Anthropol ; 174(3): 451-462, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33340105

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Female reproduction is associated with physiological, metabolic, and nutritional demands that can negatively affect health and are possibly cumulative when parity is high. While it is probable that maternal oral health is similarly affected, available evidence is based on fairly low parity populations and likely confounders affecting oral health status were not considered. AIM: To determine the relationship between parity and tooth loss in a population with many high parity women. Contributions of age, reproductive and socioeconomic parameters, and oral health practices were considered. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 612 Hausa women of all parity levels aged 13-65 years. Women with ≥5 children were considered high parity. Sociodemographic status and oral health practices were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. All teeth present, (excluding third molars) and missing teeth were noted, with inquiries regarding tooth loss etiology. Associations with tooth loss were evaluated through correlations, ANOVA, post hoc analyses and Student's t tests. Effect sizes were used to interpret the magnitude of differences. Multiple regression (negative binomial model) was used to investigate predictors of tooth loss. RESULTS: Hausa women had a low prevalence of tooth loss, despite poor oral hygiene, and limited dental care. Older, middle SES, and higher parity women experienced significantly more tooth loss. Additionally, increased duration of reproductively active years was significantly related to fewer remaining teeth. CONCLUSION: Higher parity was related to greater tooth loss in Hausa women. Women with ≥5 children experienced more loss than lower parity age mates.


Assuntos
Paridade , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Antropologia Física , Estudos Transversais , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nigéria/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32867387

RESUMO

In this retrospective study, we identified risk factors for tooth loss in patients undergoing mid-long-term maintenance therapy. We surveyed 674 maintenance patients for ≥5 years after active treatment who visited a dental clinic between January 2015 and December 2016. Of these, 265 were men (mean age 54.6 ± 8.0 years old) and 409 were women (mean age 54.0 ± 7.9 years old). Study variables included patient compliance, sex, number of teeth lost, cause of tooth loss (dental caries, periodontal disease, root fracture, others, vital or non-vital teeth), age at start of maintenance, number of remaining teeth at start of maintenance, smoking, use of salivary secretion inhibitors, presence of diabetes mellitus, condition of periodontal bone loss, and use of a removable denture. Most lost teeth were non-vital teeth (91.7% of all cases) and the most common cause of tooth loss was tooth fracture (62.1% of all cases). A statistically significant risk factors for tooth loss was number of remaining teeth at the start of maintenance (p = 0.003).


Assuntos
Cárie Dentária , Doenças Periodontais , Fraturas dos Dentes , Perda de Dente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
8.
Gerodontology ; 37(4): 389-394, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32710496

RESUMO

AIM: To examine the association between the number of teeth and physical function limitation (PFL), as an indicator of frailty, among older adults in the USA. BACKGROUND: Physical function limitation is common among the elderly and potentially associated with oral health, particularly the number of extracted teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2014 (BRFSS, 2014), a cross-sectional national interview survey of US population, were analyzed. The number of participating older adults aged 65 and over was 158 962. The association between PFL, outcome and number of extracted teeth, demographic data, socio-economic status, smoking, general health, comorbidity conditions and body mass index (BMI) was assessed using logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of PFL was 28%. In the fully adjusted model, the number of extracted teeth had a significant association with PFL: edentulous older adults had higher odds for PFL, (odds ratio [OR]:1.36; 95%CI: 1.22, 1.52). Similarly, those who lost 6 teeth or more but not all were likely to have PFL (OR 1.35: 95% CI: 1.23, 1.48). CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant association between the number of extracted teeth and PFL among US older adults aged 65 and more, based on the data from BRFSS 2014. The findings indicate that losing teeth may be a potential risk for PFL.


Assuntos
Boca Edêntula , Perda de Dente , Dente , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Boca Edêntula/epidemiologia , Saúde Bucal , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(8): 104873, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32689647

RESUMO

This systematic review aims to evaluate the association between tooth loss and stroke. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. The PECO strategy was used to limit the eligibility criteria. The following databases were used on searches: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, LILACS and OpenGrey. We included observational studies performed in adults (Population), in which patients with tooth loss (Exposition) and patients without tooth loss (Comparison) were observed to investigate the association between tooth loss and stroke (Outcome). After searches, the results were submitted to a selection process, followed by data extraction, quality assessment and risk of bias evaluation. The certainty of the evidence was evaluated through GRADE approach. A total of 925 potential studies were retrieved by the searches and 9 were included in this review. Seven of the included articles described an association between tooth loss and stroke. Low risk of bias and a low certainty of the evidence were identified to all studies. The certainty of the evidence may be associated with the observational nature of the included studies. Even though an association between tooth loss and stroke was suggested, the low strength of the current evidence indicated the need for further investigations with a better methodological design to conclude this question.


Assuntos
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Observacionais como Assunto , Prevalência , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/diagnóstico , Perda de Dente/diagnóstico
10.
Aust Dent J ; 65 Suppl 1: S23-S31, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32583591

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe the prevalence of different tooth loss outcomes along with the use of dentures and implants among Australians aged 15+ years across socioeconomic and demographic groups. In addition, we performed time trend analyses of tooth loss. METHODS: Data from the National Study of Adult Oral Health 2017-18 included gender, age, residential location, household income, Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas, possession of dental insurance and pattern of dental visiting. Outcomes were complete tooth loss, inadequate dentition, average number of missing teeth, denture wearing and implants. We compared our findings with data from previous surveys carried out in 1987-88 and 2004-06. RESULTS: Tooth loss decreased from 14.4% in 1987-88 to 6.4% in 2004-06, and to 4.0% in 2017-18. The proportion of people with lack of functional dentition halved from 20.6% 1987-88 to 10.2% in 2017-18; the average number of teeth lost due for any reason slightly reduced from 2004-06 (6.1) to 2017-18 (5.7). Tooth loss increased with age and was higher among socioeconomically disadvantaged, uninsured and those with unfavourable pattern of dental visiting groups than in their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: An overall improvement in tooth retention was identified over the last decades. However, socioeconomic inequalities persist.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália , Dentaduras , Humanos , Saúde Bucal
11.
Int Dent J ; 70(5): 388-395, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32585047

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Second-hand smoke (SHS) is considered a risk factor for a number of oral diseases. However, its influence on tooth loss, which is the final consequence of periodontal disease and caries, remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate the association between SHS experience and the number of remaining teeth among non-smoking older Japanese individuals. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) 2013 were used. From the 27,561 people ≥65 years of age who responded to a self-reported questionnaire (response rate = 71.1%), data of 18,865 respondents who had never smoked were analysed. Multinomial logistic regression with multiple imputations was applied to estimate the odds ratio of the frequency of SHS exposures on the number of remaining teeth. RESULTS: The prevalence of participants with ≥20 teeth, 10-19 teeth, 5-9 teeth, 1-4 teeth, and no teeth were 53.2%, 20.4%, 9.9%, 6.6%, and 9.9%, respectively. The proportion of participants with SHS was 37.5%. After adjusting for sex, the SHS experience tended to be associated with a lower risk of having the fewer number of remaining teeth (P < 0.05). However, after being adjusted for age and sex, participants with SHS exposure at "a few times a week" and "almost every day" were significantly associated with the fewer number of teeth. After adding all other covariates, compared to the participants without any exposure to SHS, the odds ratio for having no teeth rather than having ≥20 teeth among the participants with daily exposure to SHS was 1.35 (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Daily second-hand smoke was significantly associated with fewer remaining teeth based on the self-reported survey among older Japanese people.


Assuntos
Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Perda de Dente/etiologia , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Japão/epidemiologia , Autorrelato
12.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0233505, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32437411

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Preventing tooth loss depends on oral health maintenance behaviors. This study hypothesized that adolescents with educational aspirations have greater motivation to invest in the future, including maintenance of oral health status. AIM: To analyze the association between a school academic climate of educational aspirations and tooth loss (first permanent molars) among adolescents. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was designed to include 2,500 adolescents (aged 14-19 years) enrolled in public high schools of Olinda located in Northeast Brazil. Multilevel Poisson regression random intercept models were conducted with tooth loss (first permanent molars) as the outcome. The primary cohort of interest was school academic climate, as measured by the proportion of students taking the national high school exams. RESULTS: Tooth loss of the first permanent molars (assessed by clinical exam) was more prevalent in adolescents from more disadvantaged backgrounds (receiving family allowance, low maternal education). However, after controlling for a wide range of individual characteristics, adolescents enrolled in schools with lower academic climate had a higher prevalence of tooth loss (PR 1.42, 95%CI: 1.09,1.85). CONCLUSION: The school academic climate is associated with tooth loss, suggesting that educational aspirations are linked to adolescent oral health maintenance behaviors.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Saúde Bucal , Instituições Acadêmicas , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Brasil/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Meio Social , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(21): 641-646, 2020 May 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32463807

RESUMO

Extensive tooth loss can lead to poor diet resulting in weight loss or obesity (1). It can also detract from physical appearance and impede speech, factors that can restrict social contact, inhibit intimacy, and lower self-esteem (1). Chronic medical conditions and oral conditions share common risk factors (2). Persons with chronic conditions are more likely to have untreated dental disease, which can result in tooth loss. Three measures of tooth loss during 1999-2004 and 2011-2016 were estimated by comparing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for each period among adults aged ≥50 years with selected chronic conditions.* The three measures were 1) edentulism (having no teeth); 2) severe tooth loss (having eight or fewer teeth) (3); and 3) lacking functional dentition (having <20 teeth out of 28, which is considered a full set for the purpose of NHANES assessments) (4). During 2011-2016, prevalences of edentulism and severe tooth loss were ≥50% higher among adults with fair or poor general health, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, diabetes, emphysema, heart disease, liver condition, or stroke than among those with those adults without the chronic condition. Lack of functional dentition was also more prevalent among adults with chronic conditions than among persons without these conditions. Tooth loss is preventable with self-care and routine dental visits (1). To encourage these behaviors, public health professionals can educate the public about the association between having a chronic condition and tooth loss, and primary care providers can educate their patients about the importance of healthy behaviors and screen and refer them for needed dental care.


Assuntos
Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Prevalência , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
14.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 20(6): 526-538, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32307825

RESUMO

Oral frailty is defined as a decrease in oral function accompanied by a decrease in mental and physical functions. Studies showing that people with oral frailty are at high risk of physical frailty, sarcopenia, severe conditions requiring nursing care and death have been reported in Japan. An increase in life expectancy and maintenance of teeth result in a decrease in the effect of the number of teeth. In contrast, a decrease in oral function as a result of aging has been suggested to have major effects on dysfunction and mortality risk. The present report is a narrative review of major clinical studies on the relationships of the number of teeth, dentures, occlusion and oral function with longevity, with the aim of providing information for future studies centered on oral function in Japan or overseas. This review clearly shows the relationships of the number of teeth, dentures, and occlusion with health and longevity. Recent studies have shown that, besides maintenance of the number of teeth, attempting to maintain or increase oral function, having a good diet and maintaining nutritional status are all linked to general health. Decreased oral function is a major risk factor for developing malnutrition and sarcopenia. Oral frailty, a new concept that has been recently introduced in Japan, is considered to have major effects on dental and oral health policies in Japan, in the old-age group, and is expected to be reflected in the dental and oral health policies of various countries, as they also predict increased life expectancies. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; ••: ••-••.


Assuntos
Longevidade , Saúde Bucal , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Oclusão Dentária , Dentaduras/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Idoso Fragilizado , Fragilidade , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Dente/anatomia & histologia , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32235684

RESUMO

This study aimed to test the association of contextual and individual socioeconomic status with tooth loss among Brazilian elderly people aged 65-74 years. Data from 5435 elderly participants from the Brazilian National Oral Health Survey (2010) were linked to city-level data for 27 state capitals and the Federal District. Tooth loss was clinically assessed according to the number of missing natural teeth. Contextual social variables included Human Development Index income (HDI-income) and HDI-education. Individual socioeconomic measures were monthly family income and years of schooling. Covariates included sex, skin colour, number of residents per room and number of goods. Multilevel Negative Binomial regression models were used to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals between contextual and individual variables and tooth loss. Contextual and individual income and education measures were consistently associated with tooth loss. Elderly people living in cities with low HDI-income and low HDI-education were respectively 21% and 33% more likely to present tooth loss. Cross-level interaction suggested that the relationship of lower income and lower schooling with tooth loss is different across levels of city-level income and city-level education inequality, respectively. Public policies aiming to reduce the income and education gaps and preventive dental interventions are imperative to tackle tooth loss among elderly people.


Assuntos
Fatores Socioeconômicos , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Idoso , Brasil/epidemiologia , Cidades , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Renda , Masculino , Análise Multinível , Saúde Bucal
16.
BMC Oral Health ; 20(1): 122, 2020 04 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32316955

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between dental status and mortality in community-dwelling older adults has been documented by several studies. The aim of this study was to analyze the contribution of self-assessed chewing ability, number of remaining teeth and serum albumin levels to mortality and the interactions between the three factors. METHODS: A 20-year follow-up study was conducted with 666 subjects aged 80 years (from 1996 to 2017) who resided in the 8 areas served by one health center in Iwate Prefecture. Health check-ups including physical fitness measurements were conducted at a meeting place or gymnasium. Medical interview and blood sampling were conducted by physician. Oral examination was examined by dentist. The number of remaining teeth, serum albumin levels, and self-assessed chewing ability were used as predictors of mortality. RESULTS: Among the 608 subjects (233 men and 375 women) included in this study, only 12 subjects (1.97%) survived after 20 years of follow-up. For men, dental status and serum levels of albumin were significantly associated with mortality. The hazard ratios of self-assessed chewing ability calculated by item response theory analysis and the inability to chew at least one food adjusted for serum albumin and tooth conditions were statistically significant in men. When adjusted by health status evaluated by blood tests, self-assessed chewing ability was statistically significant in men. According to path analysis, self-assessed chewing ability and serum albumin independently affected mortality in men. CONCLUSION: Masticatory dysfunction may be an important risk factor for mortality in men, even though it was self-assessed. Retaining chewing ability might be a useful predictor of longevity in older male adults.


Assuntos
Mastigação , Mortalidade/tendências , Saúde Bucal/estatística & dados numéricos , Albumina Sérica/análise , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Japão/epidemiologia , Expectativa de Vida , Masculino , Perda de Dente/fisiopatologia
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32244856

RESUMO

Consumption of green tea without sugar, as well as social networks, are associated with a lower risk of tooth loss. There is a possibility of confounding both factors because tea is often drunk with friends. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine whether green tea consumption is beneficially associated with the number of remaining teeth, while considering social networks. This cross-sectional study was based on the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) in 2016. Self-administered questionnaires containing questions about green tea consumption were mailed to 34,567 community-dwelling residents aged ≥ 65 years. We used the number of remaining teeth as a dependent variable, and green tea consumption and the number of friends met over the past month (social network size) as independent variables. Linear regression models with multiple imputation were used. A total of 24,147 people responded (response rate = 69.9%), and 22,278 valid data were included into our analysis. Participants' mean age was 74.2 years (standard deviation = 6.3), and 45.9% were men. Among the participants, 52.2% had ≥ 20 teeth, 34.2% drank 2-3 cups of green tea per day, and 32.6% met ≥ 10 people over the past month. After adjusting for all potential confounders, both higher green tea consumption and a larger social network size were associated with more remaining teeth (both p for trend < 0.001). The association of green tea was greater among those with smaller social networks (p for interaction < 0.05). The protective association of green tea was remarkable among people with smaller social networks.


Assuntos
Rede Social , Chá , Perda de Dente , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Japão/epidemiologia , Masculino , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
18.
J Dent ; 96: 103331, 2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32251697

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Previous cohort studies have reported the significant association between tooth loss and functional disability in aging adults. This study aimed to examine whether eating and communication difficulties mediate this association. METHODS: Data from wave 7 (2014-2015) to wave 8 (2016-2017) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. Severe tooth loss was defined as "< 20 teeth remaining" at baseline. Eating and communication difficulties were assessed through a questionnaire. Onset of functional disability 2-year later was assessed by activities of daily living (ADL) scale and instrumental ADL (IADL) scale. Baron and Kenny's causal steps and Karlson/Holm/Breen (KHB) method were used to examine the mediating effect. RESULTS: At baseline, 7,830 participants had no ADL disability and 7,678 participants had no IADL disability. The 2-year cumulative incidence of ADL disability and IADL disability were 7.5 % and 9.0 %, respectively. Severe tooth loss was associated with both incidence of ADL disability (OR = 1.40; 95 % CI = 1.13-1.74) and incidence of IADL disability (OR = 1.24; 95 % CI = 1.01-1.52). The mediating effect of eating difficulty on the association between severe tooth loss and ADL disability was 1.04 (95 % CI: 1.01, 1.06). The mediating effect of communication difficulty on the association between severe tooth loss and IADL disability was 1.05 (95 % CI: 1.02, 1.07). CONCLUSION: Severe tooth loss is associated with incidence of functional disability in middle-aged and older English adults. Eating and communication difficulties play the role as mediators in these associations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This prospective study contributes to elucidating parts of biological mechanism underlying tooth loss and functional disability in middle-aged and older adults. It suggests that oral health strategies aimed to protect teeth may be important in reducing the risk of functional disability.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Perda de Dente , Atividades Cotidianas , Idoso , Avaliação da Deficiência , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
19.
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique ; 68(2): 83-90, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32111348

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Older persons comprise a growing proportion of the European population and may have a distinct epidemiological oral profile requiring specific preventive and curative care poorly documented. The objectives of this study were to assess the oral health status of people ≥90 years of age in France, to compare their perceived and observed oral care needs and to investigate the oral problems associated with a low oral health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL). METHODS: An oral cross-sectional study was performed during the 25th follow-up of a cohort of older persons being followed up prospectively for screening of dementia over a 15-year period in Gironde and Dordogne, France. Clinical oral indices were determined by oral examinations conducted at the participants' place of living. Cohen's Kappa coefficient was used to assess the agreement between perceived and observed oral care needs. Oral problems associated with a low OHRQoL, measured with the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI<50) were investigated with logistic regression. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Data from 90 persons were analysed (76% female; median age=93 years; 20% living in an institution). Plaque and calculus were present in 93% and 58% respectively, of the 74 dentate participants. The mean number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth was 26.5 (±5.3); 66% of the participants had at least one untreated decayed tooth. Among the 85 participants with tooth loss not replaced by a fixed denture, two thirds had a removable dental prosthesis; 84% of these prostheses were considered to be maladapted. Among the 39 participants who felt unable to consult a dentist (43%), lack of transportation was the most frequently cited reason. Although 88% of the participants needed oral care, only 26% perceived that they had such a need (Kappa=0.06). Oral problems associated with a GOHAI<50 were the absence of posterior occluding teeth (OR=7.15; 95%CI=1.53-33.35; P=0.012), feeling of dry mouth (OR=11.94; 95%CI=3.21-44.39; P=0.0002) and oral pain (OR=9.06; 95%CI=1.91-69.00; P=0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Persons ≥90 years of age have considerable preventive and curative dental care needs that impact their quality-of-life but they are rarely aware and lack transportation. NCT04065828.


Assuntos
Assistência Odontológica , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde para Idosos , Doenças da Boca/terapia , Saúde Bucal , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Envelhecimento/fisiologia , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Assistência Odontológica/normas , Assistência Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Avaliação Geriátrica , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços de Saúde para Idosos/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde para Idosos/normas , Serviços de Saúde para Idosos/estatística & dados numéricos , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Doenças da Boca/epidemiologia , Doenças da Boca/prevenção & controle , Saúde Bucal/normas , Saúde Bucal/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Preventiva/normas , Medicina Preventiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Qualidade de Vida , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia
20.
BMC Oral Health ; 20(1): 51, 2020 02 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32059720

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adverse childhood experiences, including physical, sexual or emotional abuse, can have detrimental impacts on child and adult health. However, little research has explored the impact that such early life experiences have on oral health. This study examines whether experiencing adverse childhood experiences before the age of 18 years is associated with self-reported poor dental health in later life. METHODS: Using stratified random probability sampling, a household survey (N = 5307; age range 18-69 years) was conducted in the South of England (Hertfordshire, Luton and Northamptonshire). Data were collected at participants' homes using face-to-face interviews. Measures included exposure to nine adverse childhood experiences, and two dental outcomes: tooth loss (> 8 teeth lost due to dental caries or damage) and missing or filled teeth (direct or indirect restorations; > 12 missing or filled teeth). RESULTS: Strong associations were found between exposure to childhood adversity and poor dental health. The prevalence of tooth loss was significantly higher (8.3%) in those with 4+ adverse childhood experiences compared to those who had experienced none (5.0%; p < 0.05). A similar relationship was found for levels of missing or filled teeth (13.4%, 4+ adverse childhood experiences; 8.1%, none; p < 0.001). Exposure to 4+ adverse childhood experiences was associated with a higher level of tooth loss and restorations at any age, compared to individuals who had not experienced adversity. Demographically adjusted means for tooth loss increased with adverse childhood experience count in all age groups, rising from 1.0% (18-29 years) and 13.0% (60-69 years) in those with none, to 3.0% and 26.0%, respectively in those reporting 4+. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to childhood adversity could be an important predictive factor for poor dental health. As oral health is an important part of a child's overall health status, approaches that seek to improve dental health across the life-course should start with safe and nurturing childhoods free from abuse and neglect. Given the growing role that dental professionals have in identifying violence and abuse, it seems appropriate to raise awareness in the field of dentistry of the potential for individuals to have suffered adverse childhood experiences, and the mechanisms linking childhood adversity to poor dental health.


Assuntos
Experiências Adversas da Infância/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Odontológica para Crianças/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Bucal , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Cárie Dentária/epidemiologia , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Autorrelato , Perda de Dente/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
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