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1.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000815, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760062

RESUMO

Two illustrations integrate current knowledge about severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronaviruses and their life cycle. They have been widely used in education and outreach through free distribution as part of a coronavirus-related resource at Protein Data Bank (PDB)-101, the education portal of the RCSB PDB. Scientific sources for creation of the illustrations and examples of dissemination and response are presented.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Bases de Dados de Proteínas , Medicina nas Artes , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Animais , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Pesquisa Biomédica/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Apresentação de Dados , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação/métodos , Estágios do Ciclo de Vida , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Mucosa Respiratória/virologia
3.
CBE Life Sci Educ ; 19(3): es7, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32822277

RESUMO

Experiential learning is an effective educational tool across many academic disciplines, including career development. Nine different institutions bridged by the National Institutes of Health Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training Consortium compared their experiments in rethinking and expanding training of predoctoral graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in the biomedical sciences to include experiential learning opportunities. In this article, we provide an overview of the four types of experiential learning approaches our institutions offer and compare the learning objectives and evaluation strategies employed for each type. We also discuss key factors for shaping experiential learning activities on an institutional level. The framework we provide can help organizations determine which form of experiential learning for career training might best suit their institutions and goals and aid in the successful design and delivery of such training.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Escolha da Profissão , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Pesquisadores/educação , Estudantes , Emprego , Docentes , Geografia , Humanos , Internato e Residência
5.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(7): e1008007, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32702019

RESUMO

Biomedical research is becoming increasingly data driven. New technologies that generate large-scale, complex data are continually emerging and evolving. As a result, there is a concurrent need for training researchers to use and understand new computational tools. Here we describe an efficient and effective approach to developing curriculum materials that can be deployed in a research environment to meet this need.


Assuntos
Biologia Computacional/educação , Currículo , Algoritmos , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Gráficos por Computador , Retroalimentação , Internet , Aprendizagem , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Software
6.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0230697, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32639955

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: As biomedical research becomes more data-intensive, computational reproducibility is a growing area of importance. Unfortunately, many biomedical researchers have not received formal computational training and often struggle to produce results that can be reproduced using the same data, code, and methods. Programming workshops can be a tool to teach new computational methods, but it is not always clear whether researchers are able to use their new skills to make their work more computationally reproducible. METHODS: This mixed methods study consisted of in-depth interviews with 14 biomedical researchers before and after participation in an introductory programming workshop. During the interviews, participants described their research workflows and responded to a quantitative checklist measuring reproducible behaviors. The interview data was analyzed using a thematic analysis approach, and the pre and post workshop checklist scores were compared to assess the impact of the workshop on the computational reproducibility of the researchers' workflows. RESULTS: Pre and post scores on a checklist of reproducible behaviors did not change in a statistically significant manner. The qualitative interviews revealed that several participants had made small changes to their workflows including switching to open source programming languages for their data cleaning, analysis, and visualization. Overall many of the participants indicated higher levels of programming literacy, and an interest in further training. Factors that enabled change included supportive environments and an immediate research need, while barriers included collaborators that were resistant to new tools, and a lack of time. CONCLUSION: While none of the workshop participants completely changed their workflows, many of them did incorporate new practices, tools, or methods that helped make their work more reproducible and transparent to other researchers. This indicates that programming workshops now offered by libraries and other organizations contribute to computational reproducibility training for researchers.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Software , Fluxo de Trabalho , Humanos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
7.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1235: 165-178, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32488642

RESUMO

In higher education (HE), distance learning (DL) has increased worldwide. Many educational establishments have embraced online distance learning (ODL), with online courses being delivered by a great number of institutions, ranging from community colleges to major universities world-wide. Distance learning (DL) is not a new concept (Keegan D. Theoretical principles of distance education, London, Routledge, 1993), it dates as far back as the eighteenth century as a means of providing access to those who would otherwise not be able to participate in face-to-face educational courses. Traditional DL courses lacked interactivity and the emergence of computers and the internet provided the opportunity for learners to undertake online distance learning (ODL). Many ODL students are biomedical professionals juggling work and family commitments, and therefore the ability to study at a time and place that suits them allows them to engage in learning that they otherwise would not be able to do without relocating. However, whilst ODL offers greater learning opportunities, the lack of campus time and face-to-face learning contact can result in learners feeling isolated.Knowledge is constructed in the midst of interactions with others and is shaped by the skills and abilities valued in a particular culture. Thus, the teacher plays a key role in this learning process in shaping the leaning activities and supporting the development of knowledge and understanding. Therefore, it can be said that the role of the ODL instructor differs from that associated with traditional on-campus education. The instructor becomes the facilitator to support student learning, whilst the student actively participates in what and how knowledge is imparted. Consequently, students studying online are often required to take on a greater responsibility for their own learning. They learn more independently than the on-campus students, as they cannot just simply follow what the other students are doing, they must log into the VLE as a solitary initiative and interact with fellow students and their tutor of their own accords, this chapter looks at how presence and belonging can be supported in ODL as well as supporting staff and students to transition to ODL.


Assuntos
Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/educação , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Educação a Distância , Docentes , Internet , Aprendizagem , Estudantes , Docentes/psicologia , Humanos , Estudantes/psicologia , Universidades/organização & administração
11.
Tunis Med ; 98(2): 99-109, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32395798

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: A Certificate of Specialization (C2S) in research methodology and scientific communication was established at the Faculty of Medicine of Bejaia (Algeria), for the benefit of university hospital teachers, in 2018. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a clinical certifying-research training program on the acquisition of fundamental knowledge for the conduct of health research projects in its three conceptual, operational and editorial phases. METHODS: This training took place during three face-to-face seminars (a total of 12 teaching days), in the form of lectures and workshops by eight lecturers, with a final exam and a thesis dissertation project. The data were collected through Pre- and post-tests which were distributed before and after each seminar while the questionnaire was administered by the end of the training in order to assess the whole course of this training. The knowledge assessment grids were composed of 20 items for each of the first two seminars and 12 items for the third seminar. According to the categories of the Likert scale, these items were weighted from 1 to 5 points, an overall score for the 52 items of 260 points. RESULTS: A total of 38 candidates (selected from 140 applications) attended this training with an overall presenteeism rate of 93%. The differential scores ("pre-test" and "post-test") of progression of knowledge were successively 60%, 49% and 42% in the three seminars. Out of a total of 260 points, the overall learning score of all three seminars increased from an average of 119 points ± 8.66 to 180 points ± 15.87 (p <10-7), with a differential score of 51.6%. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of the C2S clinical research program of the Bejaia Faculty of Medicine documented the significant evolution of knowledge of research methodology and scientific writing tools. The continuity of this training and its generalization to the Maghreb faculties of health sciences are highly recommended, for the improvement of scientific production in Algeria and the Great Maghreb.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Certificação , Currículo/normas , Docentes de Medicina , Capacitação de Professores/normas , Redação/normas , Argélia , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Certificação/normas , Educação Médica/normas , Docentes de Medicina/educação , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Inquéritos e Questionários
15.
Fertil Steril ; 113(3): 653-660.e1, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32192598

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine research interests of reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) physicians and assess their academic productivity. DESIGN: A questionnaire composed by the Society for REI (SREI) board members was e-mailed to members. PubMed was queried to quantify peer-reviewed publications. SETTING: An internal SREI questionnaire to members and online publication search. PATIENT(S): Not applicable. INTERVENTION(S): Questions involving research being performed, funding, relevance to fellow thesis, and important areas of future research. Publications were ascertained in the past 3 years, past 10 years, and total publications for SREI members. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Question responses and number of peer-reviewed publications. RESULT(S): Most respondents currently conduct research, which was predominantly clinical. One-third have current research funding and two-thirds were ever funded. One-third had a National Institutes of Health grant and about half were principal investigators. Two-thirds had a basic science fellow thesis and 44% of respondents perform research related to their fellowship thesis. Important research areas included infertility outcomes, implantation, preimplantation genetic testing, and genetics. In the past 3 years, SREI members published 3,408 peer-reviewed articles (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 4.4 ± 9.0). In the past 10 years, SREI members had 10,162 peer-reviewed publications (mean±SD, 13.0 ± 24.3). When all publications were considered, SREI members published 24,088 peer-reviewed articles (mean±SD, 30.9 ± 53.0). CONCLUSION(S): The REI fellows have learned to construct scientific articles, which will help them to better interpret the literature in the care of patients. The SREI members continue to pursue scientific investigation, commonly related to their fellowship thesis. Respondents support SREI funding research; the success of which should be judged by publications. Overall, SREI members have demonstrated significant academic productivity and published about 1,000 articles/year for the past 10 years, affirming the importance of research training.


Assuntos
Sucesso Acadêmico , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , Endocrinologistas , Endocrinologia , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Reprodutiva , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Certificação , Eficiência , Endocrinologistas/educação , Endocrinologistas/normas , Endocrinologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Endocrinologia/educação , Endocrinologia/normas , Endocrinologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Revisão da Pesquisa por Pares , Editoração/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina Reprodutiva/educação , Medicina Reprodutiva/normas , Medicina Reprodutiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
16.
PLoS One ; 15(2): e0228934, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32059042

RESUMO

Limited empirical data exists on why women and minority students enter Biomedical Career Enrichment Programs (BCEPs) and how program variables-such as duration of research-influence their intention to pursue research careers. This exploratory study reports motivators for participation in BCEPs among women and racial/ethnic minority students-historically underrepresented groups-and the influence of program and personal variables on their research-career intent and self-efficacy beliefs. We studied the program variables of research experience, research duration, and mentor influence; and the personal variables of race, gender, family, and peers. Using the conceptual framework of planned behavior theory and social cognitive career theory, we interviewed students from underrepresented groups participating in BCEPs that offered research experience for short duration (Group A), long duration (Group B), and no research experience (Group C). We utilized Atlas Ti, a qualitative methodological software tool, to analyze the interview responses. Students choosing a BCEP with research experience cited "opportunity to gain experience" and "interest or curiosity in research" as motivators. Duration of research experience had a positive relationship with enhancement in research skills and self-efficacy beliefs, but did not change the initial research-career intent of these BCEP participants. The study revealed an interesting and unexpected theme of "perceived deterrents" to a career in research that included stress of competition (e.g. grants), the instability of projects, and the isolation of scientific research. Importantly, the study findings indicate the need to reform program design and science policies that challenge the current biomedical workforce and dissuade interested students from underrepresented groups from entering the field.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Grupos Minoritários/psicologia , Mulheres/psicologia , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , Comportamento de Escolha/ética , Tomada de Decisões , Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Feminino , Identidade de Gênero , Humanos , Intenção , Motivação , Projetos Piloto , Autoeficácia , Fatores Sexuais , Estudantes/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
20.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 102(3): 494-496, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31912776

RESUMO

The brain drain of professionals from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to developed countries is well documented and partially due to the challenges faced by biomedical researchers to establish themselves back at home, after training abroad. These challenges may result in the loss of highly trained individuals from LMICs and reduce the availability of local expertise to develop/inform best practices in health care and to direct locally relevant research. The path of training of LMIC researchers in high-income countries is well documented. However, strategies for a successful reintegration of biomedical researchers back to their home research institutions in LMICs are less clear. We report observations of workshops addressing repatriation needs of researchers returning to their home countries after training abroad during the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) 2017 and 2018 annual meetings. Strategies proposed include maintaining connections with the home research institution, ideally through collaborations, planning 18 months ahead before returning with grants applications submitted, and engaging in networking throughout the training period. In addition to presenting our observations, we hope to build a network to facilitate this process, compile resources, and identify expertise within the ASTMH to develop robust strategies to allow young biomedical researchers to flourish in LMICs.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/economia , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Países em Desenvolvimento , Recursos em Saúde , Pesquisadores/educação , Medicina Tropical/educação , África ao Sul do Saara , Escolha da Profissão , Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , América Latina , Medicina Tropical/economia
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