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1.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E91, 2021 10 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34618667

RESUMO

Marshallese and Latino communities in Benton and Washington counties, Arkansas, were disproportionately affected by COVID-19. We evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehensive community-based intervention to reduce COVID-19 disparities in these communities. We examined all laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases in the 2 counties reported from April 6, 2020, through December 28, 2020. A 2-sample serial t test for rate change was used to evaluate changes in case rates before and after implementation of the intervention. After implementation, the proportions of cases among Marshallese and Latino residents declined substantially and began to align more closely with the proportions of these 2 populations in the 2 counties. Infection rates remained lower throughout the evaluation period, and weekly incidence also approximated Marshallese and Latino population proportions. Leveraging community partnerships and tailoring activities to specific communities can successfully reduce disparities in incidence among populations at high-risk for COVID-19 .


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Hispano-Americanos , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos , Arkansas/epidemiologia , COVID-19/etnologia , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/organização & administração , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos/estatística & dados numéricos
2.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 226, 2021 10 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34663330

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Healthcare quality measurements in the United States illustrate disparities by racial/ethnic group, socio-economic class, and geographic location. Redressing healthcare inequities, including measurement of and reimbursement for healthcare quality, requires partnering with communities historically excluded from decision-making. Quality healthcare is measured according to insurers, professional organizations and government agencies, with little input from diverse communities. This community-based participatory research study aimed to amplify the voices of community leaders from seven diverse urban communities in Minneapolis-Saint Paul Minnesota, view quality healthcare and financial reimbursement based on quality metric scores. METHODS: A Community Engagement Team consisting of one community member from each of seven urban communities -Black/African American, Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender-Queer-Two Spirit, Hmong, Latino/a/x, Native American, Somali, and White-and two community-based researchers conducted listening sessions with 20 community leaders about quality primary healthcare. Transcripts were inductively analyzed and major themes were identified. RESULTS: Listening sessions produced three major themes, with recommended actions for primary care clinics. #1: Quality Clinics Utilize Structures and Processes that Support Healthcare Equity. #2: Quality Clinics Offer Effective Relationships, Education, and Health Promotion. #3: Funding Based on Current Quality Measures Perpetuates Health Inequities. CONCLUSION: Community leaders identified ideal characteristics of quality primary healthcare, most of which are not currently measured. They expressed concern that linking clinic payment with quality metrics without considering social and structural determinants of health perpetuates social injustice in healthcare.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Afro-Americanos , Atenção à Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estados Unidos
3.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 18(1): 118, 2021 09 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34493306

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Over the past decade several physical activity (PA) interventions have been shown to be efficacious in a controlled research setting, however there is a continued lack of evidence for how to successfully implement these PA interventions in real-world settings such as the community. This review aims to explore the barriers and facilitators that affect the implementation of community-based PA interventions and make recommendations to improve implementation from the included studies. METHODS: A systematic literature search of EBSCOhost, Scopus, PUBMED and Web of Science was conducted to identify articles that reported qualitative data on the implementation factors of community-based interventions where PA was a primary outcome. Data were extracted using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) as a guide. Implementation factors and recommendations were then mapped onto the 5 domains of the CFIR and synthesised thematically. RESULTS: From 495 articles, a total of 13 eligible studies were identified, with 6 studies using a mixed methods approach, and 7 reporting qualitative methods only. There were 82 implementation factors identified, including 37 barriers and 45 facilitators, and a further 26 recommendations from the papers across all 5 domains of the CFIR. More barriers than facilitators were identified within the CFIR domain inner setting, in contrast to all other domains where facilitator numbers outweighed barriers. CONCLUSIONS: This review identified many facilitators and barriers of implementing physical activity interventions in the community. A key finding of this review was the impact of implementation strategies on successful implementation of community PA interventions. From the evidence, it was clear that many barriers to implementation could have been negated or reduced by an implementation plan in which several strategies are embedded. The findings of this review also suggest more attention to individual' skills and involvement is needed to improve self-efficacy and knowledge. The role of individuals across all organisational levels, from providers to leaders, can impact on the implementation of an intervention and its success. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO - CRD42020153821 .


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Pesquisa Qualitativa
4.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 117, 2021 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34526137

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America, but it has become a disease of global concern due to migration flows. Asymptomatic carriers may host the parasite for years, without knowing they are infected. The aim of this study is to assess prevalence of Chagas disease and evaluate the participants' level of knowledge between Latin American migrants attending a community-based screening campaign. METHODS: Three community-based campaigns were performed in Alicante (Spain) in 2016, 2017 and 2018, including educational chats and blood tests for Trypanosoma cruzi serology. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing knowledge about the mechanisms of transmission, disease presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. People seropositive for T. cruzi underwent diagnostic confirmation by two different tests. Results were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression and expressed as adjusted odds ratios (aORs), adjusting for age, sex, and time in Spain. RESULTS: A total of 596 participants were included in the study; 17% were aged under 18 years. Prevalence in adults was 11% [54/496; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.3-14.5%] versus 0% among children. All but one case were in Bolivians. Diagnosis was independently associated with having been born in Bolivia (aOR: 102, 95% CI: 13-781) and a primary school-level education (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.14-5.06). Of 54 people diagnosed with Chagas disease (most of whom were asymptomatic), 42 (77.7%) returned to the clinic at least once, and 24 (44.4%) received treatment. Multivariable analysis showed that coming from Argentina (aOR: 13, 95% CI: 1.61-1188) or Bolivia (aOR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.19-3.39) and having received information about Chagas disease in Spain (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.54-8.97) were associated with a good level of knowledge on the disease. Having primary level studies (aOR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.34-0.98) and coming from Ecuador (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.52-847) were independently associated with a lower level of knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based interventions are a good strategy for diagnosing neglected diseases such as Chagas disease in non-endemic countries and for identifying and treating infected, asymptomatic individuals.


Assuntos
Doença de Chagas/diagnóstico , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Trypanosoma cruzi/isolamento & purificação , Adulto , Doença de Chagas/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde Comunitária , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Estudos Transversais , Diagnóstico Precoce , Humanos , América Latina/etnologia , Programas de Rastreamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Espanha/epidemiologia
9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34493497

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Participatory research is a study method that engages patients in research programs, ideally from study design through to dissemination. It is not commonly used in diabetes health services research. Our objectives were to describe the process and challenges of conducting a participatory research project and to highlight the experiences of both patient co-researchers and academic researchers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We recruited people with lived experience of homelessness (PWLEH) and diabetes in Toronto, Canada to become patient co-researchers. They were asked to commit to attending biweekly meetings. We undertook two major research projects: concept mapping to choose a research focus; and photovoice to explore accessing healthy food while homeless. We used a convergent mixed-methods design to evaluate their experience. RESULTS: A diverse group of eight PWLEH had an average attendance of 82% over 21 meetings-despite this success, we encountered a number of challenges of conducting this research: funding, ethics approval and recruitment were particularly difficult. Group members reported that participation improved their ability to self-advocate in their diabetes care and provided them with tangible skills and social benefits. Group members stated that they valued being involved in all aspects of the research, in particular knowledge translation activities, including advocating for nutritious food at shelters; presenting to stakeholders; and meeting with policymakers. CONCLUSIONS: The use of participatory research methods enables academic researchers to support community members in pursuing research that is pertinent to them and which has a positive impact. In our study, co-researchers contributed in meaningful ways and also valued the experience.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Pessoas em Situação de Rua , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Humanos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Pesquisadores
11.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(4): 15579883211035241, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34414836

RESUMO

Compared to other occupational groups, farmers in Ireland experience a disproportionate burden of health problems, which impact farmers' livelihoods and farming sustainability. Internationally, farmers' poor health outcomes are associated with intersecting economic, environmental, socio-cultural, and occupation-specific factors linked to changes in agricultural governance. This qualitative study explored the challenges and stressors facing farmers in Ireland and how changes in farming governance have impacted farmers' identities, masculinities and health. Eleven focus groups (n = 26 female, n = 35 male, age-range 20s-70s) were conducted with both male farmers (n = 3 focus groups; n = 13) and key informants (n = 8 focus groups; n = 48, 22 male, 26 female). Utilizing Thematic Content Analysis, transcripts were coded independently by the first and second author using open and comparative coding techniques, with emerging themes grouped into primary and subthemes. Theme memos and conceptual maps tracked evolving relationships between themes. The analysis identified three broad themes. "Wrestling with challenges to autonomy and control within farming" examines the impact of tighter regulatory frameworks associated with changes to farming governance and unpacks other challenges associated with scale and succession. "Farming masculinities and health" explores how farming masculinities were closely aligned with farming practices and health practices and were framed relationally. "Isolation and the demise of rural communities" considers the impact of reduced social interaction on loneliness among farmers, particularly among more "at risk" single and older farmers. Findings provide unique insights into contemporary challenges and stressors facing farmers and have important implications for informing the design and roll-out of a national farmers' health training program.


Assuntos
Agricultura , Fazendeiros , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Masculinidade , Estresse Ocupacional , Adulto , Idoso , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Fazendeiros/psicologia , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Irlanda , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 32(3): 1208-1224, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34421026

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This paper seeks to understand why targeted efforts to recruit subjects from underrepresented communities have failed to meaningfully increase diversity of genomic reference data. APPROACH: We review a variety of mechanisms that have attempted to establish trust with communities underrepresented in genomic research, including sophisticated informed consent, broad consent, community consultation, and initiatives designed to diversify the scientific workforce. We also analyze the ability of deep community engagement of the type advanced by community-based participatory research (CBPR) to address deficiencies in previous strategies to build trust. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION: Previous strategies to build trust do not fully address key concerns related to the foundational aims and projects of scientific inquiry. The techniques of CBPR are well suited to address these concerns and thus build trust. Community engagement strategies show tremendous promise in supporting participation of underrepresented communities in genomic research.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Genômica , Humanos , Confiança
13.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34371862

RESUMO

Cooperative Extension is a community outreach program. Despite its large reach, there is a need for the evaluation of changes in health-related outcomes for individuals engaged with Cooperative Extension. A team-based challenge was developed using community-engaged participatory research integrated with Cooperative Extension to encourage healthy eating and physical activity behaviors through Cooperative Extension programming. Thus, the primary purpose of this secondary analysis was to (1) evaluate changes in anthropometric outcomes and (2) evaluate changes in health behavior outcomes. Associations of anthropometric changes and health behavior changes with engagement in the three-month team-based challenge were explored. Anthropometrics were measured using standard procedures, and intake of fruits and vegetables and physical activity were self-reported. Of the 145 participants in the community-engaged participatory research portion of the study, 52.4% (n = 76) had complete anthropometrics before and after the team-based challenge and were included in this study. At 3 months, there was a significant reduction in body mass index (-0.3 kg/m2, p = 0.024) and no significant change in waist circumference (p = 0.781). Fruit and vegetable intake significantly increased (+0.44 servings/day, p = 0.018). Physical activity did not significantly change based on (1) the number of days 30 or more minutes of physical activity was conducted (p = 0.765) and (2) Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire scores (p = 0.612). Changes in anthropometrics and health behaviors were not associated with engagement in the team-based challenge. Using community-engaged participatory research with community outreach programs, such as Cooperative Extension, can improve health-related outcomes in underserved populations. However, despite a participatory approach, changes in anthropometrics and health behaviors were not associated with engagement in the developed team-based challenge.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/métodos , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/métodos , Participação Social , Populações Vulneráveis/psicologia , Antropometria , Índice de Massa Corporal , Relações Comunidade-Instituição , Delaware , Dieta Saudável/psicologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Feminino , Frutas , Processos Grupais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Verduras , Circunferência da Cintura
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(30): e26563, 2021 Jul 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34397687

RESUMO

AIM: This study aimed to assess the outcome of community-based nutritional counseling interventions on eating habits of rural-dwelling children. METHODS: A group-randomized trial design was used in this study. A total of 108 rural-dwelling children from a community in the Enugu North agricultural zone, Enugu State, who participated in the study. The children were randomly assigned to 2 groups: the treatment group (n = 54) and the no-treatment control group (n = 54). The child eating behavior questionnaire was used for data collection. Parents of the participating children within each study group completed the child eating behavior questionnaire at 3 time points. The data collected were analyzed using an independent sample t test at a probability level of .05. RESULT: The outcome of the study showed that the children's eating habits in the treatment group improved positively following the community-based nutritional counseling intervention. The positive gain from exposure to the community-based nutritional counseling intervention program was sustained during follow-up for children in the treatment group compared with the no-treatment group. CONCLUSION: The community-based nutrition counseling intervention carried out among children in rural communities had a positive adjustment in children's eating habits. The intervention requires the constant collaboration of professional childhood educators, caregivers, home economists, school staff, healthcare specialists, families, and the children themselves. Furthermore, there is a need for future long-term evaluations of the effects of community-based nutritional counseling interventions on children's nutrition and eating habits.


Assuntos
Aconselhamento/métodos , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Terapia Nutricional/normas , Adolescente , Criança , Comportamento Infantil/psicologia , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Nigéria , Terapia Nutricional/métodos , Terapia Nutricional/estatística & dados numéricos , Estado Nutricional
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34360192

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Participatory health research (PHR) is a research approach in which people, including hidden populations, share lived experiences about health inequities to improve their situation through collective action. Boundary objects are produced, using arts-based methods, to be heard by stakeholders. These can bring about dialogue, connection, and involvement in a mission for social justice. This study aims to gain insight into the value and ethical issues of boundary objects that address health inequalities. A qualitative evaluation is conducted on three different boundary objects, created in different participatory studies with marginalized populations (mothers in poverty, psychiatric patients, and unemployed people). A successful boundary object evokes emotions among those who created the objects and those encountering these objects. Such objects move people and create an impulse for change. The more provocative the object, the more people feel triggered to foster change. Boundary objects may cross personal boundaries and could provoke feelings of discomfort and ignorance. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to ethics work. Boundary objects that are made by people from hidden populations may spur actions and create influence by improving the understanding of the needs of hidden populations. A dialogue about these needs is an essential step towards social justice.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444571

RESUMO

This study explores the impact of the 'pre-intervention effects' of a community-based intervention. This refers to participatory research processes and parallel publicity in the media on changes in alcohol use and relevant mechanisms (rules and norms about alcohol, accessibility of alcohol in a formal setting) among adolescents before any intervention is implemented. The aim was to investigate the contribution of these processes (i.e., pre-intervention effects) to changes in intervention-targeted factors before any actual intervention was implemented. In a quasi-experimental study, data were collected twice by means of self-report among adolescents living in two municipalities (control and experimental condition). A regression analysis showed negative pre-intervention main effects on adolescents' perceived accessibility of alcohol in a formal setting. Moreover, among adolescents aged 15 years and older, the normative decline in strictness of rules and norms was less steep in the experimental condition compared to the control condition. Additionally, adolescents aged 14 years and younger in the experimental condition reported more weekly drinking compared to their peers in the control condition. No differential effects across gender were found. To conclude, applying a co-creational approach in the development of an intervention not only contributes to more effective interventions in the end, but the involvement of and discussions in the community when planning the intervention contribute to changes in targeted factors. This implies that public discussions about the development of intervention strategies should be considered as an essential feature of co-creation in community-based interventions.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Grupo Associado , Autorrelato
17.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 160, 2021 07 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34247644

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Appropriate choice of research design is essential to rightly understand the research problem and derive optimal solutions. The Comorbidity Action in the North project sought to better meet the needs of local people affected by drug, alcohol and mental health comorbidity. The aim of the study focused on the needs of Aboriginal peoples and on developing a truly representative research process. A methodology evolved that best suited working with members of a marginalised Aboriginal community. This paper discusses the process of co-design of a Western methodology (participatory action research) in conjunction with the Indigenous methodologies Dadirri and Ganma. This co-design enabled an international PhD student to work respectfully with Aboriginal community members and Elders, health professionals and consumers, and non-Indigenous service providers in a drug and alcohol and mental health comorbidity project in Adelaide, South Australia. METHODS: The PhD student, Aboriginal Elder mentor, Aboriginal Working Party, and supervisors (the research team) sought to co-design a methodology and applied it to address the following challenges: the PhD student was an international student with no existing relationship with local Aboriginal community members; many Aboriginal people deeply distrust Western research due to past poor practices and a lack of implementation of findings into practice; Aboriginal people often remain unheard, unacknowledged and unrecognised in research projects; drug and alcohol and mental health comorbidity experiences are often distressing for Aboriginal community members and their families; attempts to access comorbidity care often result in limited or no access; and Aboriginal community members experience acts of racism and discrimination as health professionals and consumers of health and support services. The research team considered deeply how knowledge is shared, interpreted, owned and controlled, by whom and how, within research, co-morbidity care and community settings. The PhD student was supported to co-design a methodology that was equitable, democratic, liberating and life-enhancing, with real potential to develop feasible solutions. RESULTS: The resulting combined Participatory Action Research (PAR)-Dadirri-Ganma methodology sought to create a bridge across Western and Aboriginal knowledges, understanding and experiences. Foundation pillars of this bridge were mentoring of the PhD student by senior Elders, who explained and demonstrated the critical importance of Yarning (consulting) and Indigenous methodologies of Dadirri (deep listening) and Ganma (two-way knowledge sharing), and discussions among all involved about the principles of Western PAR. CONCLUSIONS: Concepts within this paper are shared from the perspective of the PhD student with the permission and support of local Elders and Working Group members. The intention is to share what was learned for the benefit of other students, research projects and community members who are beginning a similar journey.


Assuntos
Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde/métodos , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Saúde Mental/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos , Idoso , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos , Racismo , Austrália do Sul , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias
18.
Fam Community Health ; 44(4): 282-291, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34269697

RESUMO

Experiencing homelessness negatively impacts child health, development, and emotional-behavioral functioning, but there is limited knowledge regarding specific service priorities, as articulated by families themselves, to prevent or address these adverse sequelae. Thus, to elicit the service needs perspective of families in shelter and to translate these findings into real-world action, we undertook a community-based participatory research effort using Group-Level Assessment, a focus group methodology. An action-based participatory needs assessment called a Group-Level Assessment (GLA) was conducted in collaboration with parents currently experiencing homelessness. A total of 53 parents from 3 Cincinnati homeless shelters participated by responding to 17 to 20 open-ended prompts regarding their child's medical, developmental, learning, social, and behavioral needs. Using GLA methodology, we found that the needs expressed by families residing in shelters coalesced around the following themes: job and housing stability, education and skill development, emotional support, and improving shelter life. The GLA findings were then shared with shelter and community leaders, leading to a number of policy and practice enhancements in the shelters. This study demonstrates the power of the GLA approach to affect community action as a direct result of priorities generated by families experiencing homelessness.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Pessoas em Situação de Rua , Criança , Grupos Focais , Pessoas em Situação de Rua/estatística & dados numéricos , Habitação/normas , Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos
19.
Front Public Health ; 9: 694840, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34235133

RESUMO

Background: Research shows positive learning outcomes for students participating in service learning. However, the impacts of undergraduate student participation in Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) courses are minimally studied. Methods: We used a triangulation mixed-methods design approach to analyze short- and long-term (1-5 years post-course) data collected from 59 undergraduate students across 5 cohorts of a CBPR course (2014-19). Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data and descriptive statistics and frequencies were generated to analyze the quantitative data. Results: We developed five key themes based on short-term qualitative data: integration of CBPR and traditional research skills; importance of community engagement in research; identity; accountability; and collaboration. Themes from qualitative course evaluations aligned with these findings. Long-term qualitative data revealed that former students gained research knowledge, research skills, and professional skills and then applied these in other settings. This aligns with quantitative findings, where >79% of respondents reported that course participation "extensively" improved their research skills. Post-course, students still reflected on the importance of community engagement in research and reported a substantially enhanced likelihood of civic engagement. Discussion/Conclusions: Students gained critical knowledge and skills that positively impact their ability to engage in community-based work well after the end of course participation. Some students reported considering research-oriented careers and graduate programs for the first time after course participation. Collaborative learning experiences with community partners and members encouraged students to reflect on research designs that center community voices. We stress here that community partnerships require extensive cultivation, but they can create opportunities to translate findings directly back to communities and provide numerous benefits to undergraduate students. We hope that our findings provide the information needed to consider pilot testing practice-based CBPR courses in a variety of public health training contexts.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Objetivos , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Estudantes
20.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e048271, 2021 07 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34281928

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Pregnancy and early parenthood are key opportunities for interaction with health services and connecting to other families at the same life stage. Public antenatal care should be accessible to all, however barriers persist for families from refugee communities to access, navigate and optimise healthcare during pregnancy. Group Pregnancy Care is an innovative model of care codesigned with a community from a refugee background and other key stakeholders in Melbourne, Australia. Group Pregnancy Care aims to provide a culturally safe and supportive environment for women to participate in antenatal care in a language they understand, to improve health literacy and promote social connections and inclusion. This paper outlines Froup Pregnancy Care and provides details of the evaluation framework. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The evaluation uses community-based participatory research methods to engage stakeholders in codesign of evaluation methods. The study is being conducted across multiple sites and involves multiple phases, use of quantitative and qualitative methods, and an interrupted time series design. Process and cost-effectiveness measures will be incorporated into quality improvement cycles. Evaluation measures will be developed using codesign and participatory principles informed by community and stakeholder engagement and will be piloted prior to implementation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approvals have been provided by all six relevant authorities. Study findings will be shared with communities and stakeholders via agreed pathways including community forums, partnership meetings, conferences, policy and practice briefs and journal articles. Dissemination activities will be developed using codesign and participatory principles.


Assuntos
Cuidado Pré-Natal , Refugiados , Austrália , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Feminino , Humanos , Análise de Séries Temporais Interrompida , Gravidez
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