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5.
Acad Med ; 96(6): 836-841, 2021 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34031305

RESUMO

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has prioritized efforts to increase diversity in the biomedical research workforce. NIH-funded institutional career development awards may serve as one mechanism to facilitate these efforts. In 2013, the Duke University KL2 program, an internal career development program funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, set a goal to increase the number of investigators from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups (UREGs) to ≥ 50% of KL2 awardees. From 2013 to 2019, 133 KL2 applications were received, 38% from UREG investigators. Of the 21 scholars selected, 10 (47.6%) were UREG investigators; all were Black/African American. This represents a threefold increase in the proportion of UREG applications and a sixfold increase in the proportion of UREG KL2 scholars compared with Duke's previous KL2 cycles (2003-2012), during which only 13% of applicants and 8.3% of funded scholars were UREGs. Of the 12 KL2 scholars (7 UREG) who completed the program, 5 have received NIH funding as principal investigators of an external K award or R01, and 4 of them are UREG investigators; this constitutes a post-KL2 NIH funding success rate of 57% (4/7) for UREG scholars. Achieving this programmatic priority was facilitated by institutional support, clear communication of goals to increase the proportion of UREG KL2 awardees, and intentional strategies to identify and support applicants. Strategies included targeted outreach to UREG investigators, partnerships with other institutional entities, structured assistance for investigators with preparing their applications, and a KL2 program structure addressing common barriers to success for UREG investigators, such as lack of consistent mentorship, protected research time, and peer support. The authors' experience suggests that KL2 and other internal career development programs may represent a scalable, national strategy to increase diversity in the biomedical research workforce.


Assuntos
Distinções e Prêmios , Diversidade Cultural , Grupos Étnicos , Pesquisadores/economia , Apoio à Pesquisa como Assunto , Pesquisa Médica Translacional/economia , Humanos , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , North Carolina , Estados Unidos , Universidades
10.
Autism Res ; 14(6): 1078-1087, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33759380

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted autism research and services. Early career researchers (ECRs) are particularly vulnerable to the impact of the pandemic on job security and career development. The goal of this study was to capture the challenges ECRs are facing during the pandemic and the supports that are needed for career development and research. ECRs were invited to complete an online survey that focused on four major areas; the impact of COVID-19 on their research; changes in productivity due to COVID-19; changes to training due to COVID-19; and current mental health. 150 ECRs were eligible and provided sufficient data for inclusion. All but one ECRs reported their research had been negatively impacted by the pandemic. Reductions in productivity were reported by 85% of ECRs. The biggest impacts included recruitment of participants, increased needs at home and personal mental health. ECRs reported a 3-fold increase in burnout, as well as increased anxiety. ECR supports, such as funding, flexibility, and tenure extensions, are required to ensure ASD research does not suffer from a "lost generation" of researchers. LAY SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has had negative impacts on research around the world. Loss of productivity impedes autism research discoveries. However, researchers in the earliest phases of their career, specifically postdoctoral fellows through individuals in assistant professor (or equivalent) positions, are particularly vulnerable to long-lasting effects of pandemic-related disruptions which may limit their ability to continue as autism researchers. This survey highlights the needs of this group and identifies mechanisms by which these early career researchers may be supported in this time. This is critical to ensure the next generation of ASD researchers and clinician scientists continue on the path to advancing understanding of autism in the decades to come.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista , Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , COVID-19 , Eficiência , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pesquisadores , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Humanos , Pesquisadores/economia , Pesquisadores/educação , Pesquisadores/psicologia
15.
J Am Coll Surg ; 232(3): 265-274.e2, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33588041

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent literature suggests that the future of surgeon-scientists in the US has been threatened for the past several decades. However, we documented an overall increase in NIH funding for surgeon-scientists, as well as the number of NIH-funded surgeons, from 2010 to 2020. STUDY DESIGN: NIH-funded principal investigators (PIs) were identified for June 2010 and June 2020 using the NIH internal data platform iSearch Grants (version 2.4). Biographical sketches were searched for key terms to identify surgeon-scientists. Grant research types and total grant costs were collected. American Association of Medical Colleges data were used to determine total surgeon and physician populations. Bivariate chi-square analyses were performed using population totals and were corroborated using z-tests of population proportions using JMP (version 13.0.0). A 2-tailed p value <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: In June of 2020, a total of 1,031 surgeon-scientists held $872,456,710 in NIH funding. The percentage of funded surgeons significantly increased from 2010 (0.5%) to 2020 (0.7%) (p < 0.05), and the percentage of funded other physicians significantly decreased from 2.2% in 2010 to 1.6% in 2020 (p < 0.05). All surgeons sustained R grant funding at both time points (58% in 2020 and 60% in 2010), and specifically maintained basic science-focused R grants (73% in 2020 and 78% in 2010). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found surgeon-scientists are increasing in number and NIH funding and are becoming more diverse in their research efforts, while maintaining a focus on basic science.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/economia , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/economia , Pesquisadores/economia , Apoio à Pesquisa como Assunto/tendências , Especialidades Cirúrgicas/economia , Cirurgiões/economia , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , Humanos , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/tendências , Pesquisadores/tendências , Especialidades Cirúrgicas/tendências , Cirurgiões/tendências , Estados Unidos
19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(6)2021 02 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33531366

RESUMO

With more time being spent on caregiving responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic, female scientists' productivity dropped. When female scientists conduct research, identity factors are better incorporated in research content. In order to mitigate damage to the research enterprise, funding agencies can play a role by putting in place gender equity policies that support all applicants and ensure research quality. A national health research funder implemented gender policy changes that included extending deadlines and factoring sex and gender into COVID-19 grant requirements. Following these changes, the funder received more applications from female scientists, awarded a greater proportion of grants to female compared to male scientists, and received and funded more grant applications that considered sex and gender in the content of COVID-19 research. Further work is urgently required to address inequities associated with identity characteristics beyond gender.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Equidade de Gênero , Políticas , Pesquisadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Distinções e Prêmios , Pesquisa Biomédica/economia , Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , COVID-19/virologia , Eficiência , Feminino , Organização do Financiamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Pesquisadores/economia , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Fatores Sexuais
20.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 110(2): 288-291, 2021 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33412263

RESUMO

There is a need to foster future generations of radiation oncology physician scientists, but the number of radiation oncologists with sufficient education, training, and funding to make transformative discoveries is relatively small. A large number of MD/PhD graduates have entered he field of radiation oncology over the past 2 decades, but this has not led to a significant cohort of externally funded physician scientists. Because radiation oncologists leading independent research labs have the potential to make transformative discoveries that advance our field and positively affect patients with cancer, we created the Duke Radiation Oncology Research Scholar (RORS) Program. In crafting this program, we sought to eliminate barriers preventing radiation oncology trainees from becoming independent physician scientists. The RORS program integrates the existing American Board of Radiology Holman Pathway with a 2-year post-graduate medical education instructor position with 80% research effort at the same institution. We use a separate match for RORS and traditional residency pathways, which we hope will increase the diversity of our residency program. Since the inception of the RORS program, we have matched 2 trainees into our program. We encourage other radiation oncology residency programs at peer institutions to consider this training pathway as a means to foster the development of independent physician scientists and a diverse workforce in radiation oncology.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Radio-Oncologistas/educação , Radioterapia (Especialidade)/educação , Pesquisadores/educação , Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Recursos Humanos , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , North Carolina , Desenvolvimento de Programas/economia , Radio-Oncologistas/organização & administração , Radio-Oncologistas/provisão & distribuição , Radioterapia (Especialidade)/organização & administração , Pesquisadores/economia , Pesquisadores/organização & administração , Pesquisadores/provisão & distribuição
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