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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2120642, 2021 08 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34387678

RESUMO

Importance: As medical faculty have central roles during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to study the pandemic's association with the vitality and careers of medical school faculty. Objective: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected midcareer research faculty in academic medicine. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study included medical school faculty who participated in the C-Change Mentoring and Leadership Institute. All US medical school faculty recipients of recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) RO1, RO1-equivalent, and K awards were invited to apply to the institute. The 99 applicants who met inclusion criteria were stratified by degree (MD or MD/PhD vs PhD), gender, and race/ethnicity. Enrollment was offered to applicants randomly selected for 40 spots, demographically balanced by sex, underrepresented in medicine minority (URMM) status, and degree. In April 2020, an inquiry was emailed to faculty enrolled in the institute requesting responses to questions about meaning in work, career choice, and values. A qualitative analysis of narrative data responses, using grounded theory, was undertaken to determine key themes. This study is part of a NIH-funded randomized trial to test the efficacy of a group peer mentoring course for midcareer faculty and study the course's mechanisms of action. Main Outcomes and Measures: Key themes in data. Results: Of 40 enrolled participants, 39 responded to the inquiry, for a response rate of 97%. The analytic sample included 39 faculty members; 19 (47%) were women, 20 (53%) identified as URMM, and 20 (53%) had an MD or MD with PhD vs 19 (47%) with PhD degrees. Key themes in the data that emerged describing faculty lived experience of the pandemic included increased meaningfulness of work; professionalism and moral responsibility; enhanced relationships with colleagues; reassertion of career choice; disrupted research; impact on clinical work; attention to health disparities, social justice and advocacy; increased family responsibilities; psychological stress; and focus on leadership. Conclusions and Relevance: During the pandemic, diverse PhD and physician investigators reported increased meaningfulness in work and professionalism and enhanced relationships, all intrinsic motivators associated with vitality. Working during the pandemic appears to have produced intrinsic rewards positively associated with vitality, in addition to adverse mental health effects. These findings have implications for combatting burnout and retaining investigators in the future.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Médicos/psicologia , Profissionalismo , Pesquisadores/psicologia , Adulto , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos
3.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256871, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34464430

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Clinical research has been central to the global response to COVID-19, and the United Kingdom (UK), with its research system embedded within the National Health Service (NHS), has been singled out globally for the scale and speed of its COVID-19 research response. This paper explores the impacts of COVID-19 on clinical research in an NHS Trust and how the embedded research system was adapted and repurposed to support the COVID-19 response. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a multi-method qualitative case study of a research-intensive NHS Trust in London UK, we collected data through a questionnaire (n = 170) and semi-structured interviews (n = 24) with research staff working in four areas: research governance; research leadership; research delivery; and patient and public involvement. We also observed key NHS Trust research prioritisation meetings (40 hours) and PPI activity (4.5 hours) and analysed documents produced by the Trust and national organisation relating to COVID-19 research. Data were analysed for a descriptive account of the Trust's COVID-19 research response and research staff's experiences. Data were then analysed thematically. Our analysis identifies three core themes: centralisation; pace of work; and new (temporary) work practices. By centralising research prioritisation at both national and Trust levels, halting non-COVID-19 research and redeploying research staff, an increased pace in the setup and delivery of COVID-19-related research was possible. National and Trust-level responses also led to widescale changes in working practices by adapting protocols and developing local processes to maintain and deliver research. These were effective practical solutions borne out of necessity and point to how the research system was able to adapt to the requirements of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The Trust and national COVID-19 response entailed a rapid large-scale reorganisation of research staff, research infrastructures and research priorities. The Trust's local processes that enabled them to enact national policy prioritising COVID-19 research worked well, especially in managing finite resources, and also demonstrate the importance and adaptability of the research workforce. Such findings are useful as we consider how to adapt our healthcare delivery and research practices both at the national and global level for the future. However, as the pandemic continues, research leaders and policymakers must also take into account the short and long term impact of COVID-19 prioritisation on non-COVID-19 health research and the toll of the emergency response on research staff.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pesquisa/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19/virologia , Tomada de Decisões , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Pesquisadores/psicologia , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
4.
Narrat Inq Bioeth ; 11(1): 39-45, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34334467

RESUMO

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has affected practically every aspect of life across the globe for the past year or more; the practice of clinical research not the least. Clinician scientists attempting to start or continue work both related and unrelated to the disease itself have faced ethical, oversight, or regulatory challenges. No aspect of the clinical trial enterprise was unaffected. These narratives detail some of the barriers encountered and how the investigators coped (or didn't cope). Common themes emerged, ranging from a need to contribute, which drove the researchers to frustration with real and perceived obstructions (both old and new). The narratives disclose common ethical issues related to research during a pandemic: issues both qualitatively and quantitatively different from other human subject research; challenges both new and novel, as well as those previously seen, but writ large in the face of the crisis. The narratives also offer words of advice from the trenches and speak to successes, both large and small, and to the value of teamwork and focus on a common goal.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Pesquisa Biomédica/ética , COVID-19 , Pandemias , Pesquisadores/ética , Ética em Pesquisa , Humanos , Narração , Pesquisadores/psicologia , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 139(8): 896-897, 2021 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34196670

RESUMO

Importance: Emerging vision scientists who have yet to be awarded their first independent funding may have their research careers disproportionately affected by early COVID-19-related disruptions. In September 2020, the Alliance for Eye and Vision Research convened a panel of 22 such scientists (nominated by their academic institutions) to communicate to the US Congress about the importance of vision research. As part of the effort, interviews were conducted with scientists about the effect of the pandemic on their research. Observations: Qualitative areas of adverse consequences from the early months of COVID-19 disruptions included striking interruptions of patient-based research, limits on other types of clinical research, loss of research time for scientists with young children (especially women), challenges with animal colonies and cell cultures, impediments to research collaborations, and loss of training time. Conclusions and Relevance: The early months during the COVID-19 pandemic increased career stress on many early-stage investigators in the vision field and delayed (and may potentially derail) their ability to attract their first independent research funding grant. As a result, federal and private granting agencies may need to take these factors into account to retain talented, early-stage vision researchers.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/organização & administração , COVID-19/complicações , Escolha da Profissão , Oftalmologia/organização & administração , Pesquisadores/educação , SARS-CoV-2 , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Oftalmologia/educação , Quarentena/psicologia , Pesquisadores/psicologia , Apoio à Pesquisa como Assunto/organização & administração , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
14.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251410, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33974651

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to explore the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic on ongoing and upcoming drug clinical trials. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with clinical trial staff and clinical trial subjects were surveyed by questionnaire in this study. The results of interviews and questionnaire showed that coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to many changes in the implementation of drug clinical trials, including: a variety of meetings being held online webinars using various platforms, telemedicine and follow-up by video, A large number of deviations from protocol and losses of follow-up, delivery of clinical trial drugs by express, additional workload caused by screening for coronavirus, and anxiety of subjects. These results suggest that the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak has hindered the progress and damaged the quality of clinical trials. The online meeting, remote follow-up, express delivery of drugs and remote monitoring in the epidemic environment can ensure the progress of clinical trials to a certain extent, but they cannot fully guarantee the quality as before.


Assuntos
COVID-19/patologia , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Adulto , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Ansiedade/etiologia , COVID-19/tratamento farmacológico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/virologia , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pacientes/psicologia , Pesquisadores/psicologia , SARS-CoV-2/isolamento & purificação , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina , Adulto Jovem
19.
Mol Biol Cell ; 32(6): 461-466, 2021 03 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33720779

RESUMO

Early career researchers are frequent and valuable contributors to peer review. Systemic changes that acknowledge this fact would result in ethical co-reviewing, peer reviews of greater quality, and a reduction in peer reviewer burden.


Assuntos
Autoria , Revisão da Pesquisa por Pares/tendências , Má Conduta Científica/ética , Humanos , Revisão da Pesquisa por Pares/normas , Pesquisadores/psicologia , Má Conduta Científica/tendências
20.
Public Health Res Pract ; 31(1)2021 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690786

RESUMO

AIM: To describe and reflect on an Aboriginal researcher's experience of vicarious trauma arising from a qualitative study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with chronic disease. METHODS: In-depth semistructured interviews with thematic analysis were undertaken to explore the psychosocial factors experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women as they managed their chronic disease. An 'Indigenous women's standpoint theory' approach was adopted to frame discussion. This approach gives strength and power to the voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their diverse cultural lived experiences. The raw and often brutal realities this approach exposed had a triggering impact on the Aboriginal team member for whom these realities were familiar. Interviews were conducted with participants from four Aboriginal Medical Services from urban, rural and remote Australia. Analysis of the interviews, and reflection regarding the researcher's experiences, occurred within the context of a multidisciplinary team. Participant selection for the interview study was purposive. Seventy-two participants were selected for this study. The duration of the study was 2 years, and it was undertaken between March and December 2014, and finalised in December 2016. RESULTS: In exploring how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women managed their own health and wellbeing, compelling stories of trauma, domestic violence and generational incarceration were shared with the researcher. Hearing and re-living some of these overwhelming experiences left her feeling isolated and distressed. These compelling stories contributed to her experience of vicarious trauma. CONCLUSION: When Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers conduct research in Indigenous communities, we should monitor, prepare for and provide appropriate care and support to researchers to address the potential for vicarious trauma. These considerations are paramount if we are to build the capacity of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers to conduct Indigenous health research.


Assuntos
Fadiga por Compaixão/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Grupo com Ancestrais Oceânicos/psicologia , Pesquisadores/psicologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Doença Crônica/epidemiologia , Fadiga por Compaixão/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Pesquisa Qualitativa , População Rural , População Urbana
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