Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 792
Filtrar
1.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1477, 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993614

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many migrants suffer from discrimination and poor health in China. We sought to examine the associations between experiences of discrimination and self-reported health among internal migrants in China, as well as the mediators of social integration and perceived stress. METHODS: The data was obtained from a specific survey of migrants, as a part of the National Health and Family Planning Dynamic Monitoring for Migrants conducted in 2014. A total of 15,999 migrants aged 15 to 59 years were recruited by a stratified, multistage clustered sampling procedure in eight Chinese cities. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was conducted. RESULTS: The results indicated that experiences of discrimination were associated with worse self-reported health (ß = - 0.32, P < 0.001), less social integration (ß = - 0.25, P < 0.001), as well as higher perceived stress (ß = 0.21, P < 0.01). Both objectively measured socioeconomic status (ß = 0.21, P < 0.001) and subjective social status (ß = 0.21, P < 0.01) had significantly positive correlations with self-reported health. CONCLUSIONS: The discrimination, social exclusion and perceived stress experienced by migrants have significant implications on their health.


Assuntos
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Preconceito/psicologia , Autorrelato , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Migrantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dinâmica Populacional , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Classe Social , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
2.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235436, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609765

RESUMO

Modern psychological theories postulate that individual differences in prejudice are determined by social and ideological attitudes instead of personality. For example, the dual-process motivational (DPM) model argues that personality does not directly associate with prejudice when controlling for the attitudinal variables that capture the authoritarian-conservatism motivation and the dominance motivation. Previous studies testing the DPM model largely relied on convenience samples and/or European samples, and have produced inconsistent results. Here we examined the extent to which anti-black prejudice was associated with the Big Five personality traits and social and ideological attitudes (authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, political party affiliation) in two large probability samples of the general population (N1 = 3,132; N2 = 2,483) from the American National Election Studies (ANES). We performed structural equation modeling (SEM) to test the causal assumptions between the latent variables and used survey weights to generate estimates that were representative of the population. Different from prior theories, across both datasets we found that two personality traits, agreeableness and conscientiousness, were directly associated with anti-black prejudice when controlling for authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and political party affiliation. We also found that a substantial part of the associations between personality traits and anti-black prejudice were mediated through those social and ideological attitudes, which might serve as candidates for prejudice-reduction interventions in the real world.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos , Personalidade , Preconceito/psicologia , Percepção Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Atitude , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Psicológicos , Política , Poder Psicológico , Teoria Psicológica , Predomínio Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(32): 19072-19079, 2020 08 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32719127

RESUMO

People may be sympathetic to violent extremism when it serves their own interests. Such support may manifest itself via biased recognition of hate crimes. Psychological surveys were conducted in the wakes of mass shootings in the United States, New Zealand, and the Netherlands (total n = 2,332), to test whether factors that typically predict endorsement of violent extremism also predict biased hate crime perceptions. Path analyses indicated a consistent pattern of motivated judgment: hate crime perceptions were directly biased by prejudicial attitudes and indirectly biased by an aggrieved sense of disempowerment and White/Christian nationalism. After the shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, disempowerment-fueled anti-Semitism predicted lower perceptions that the gunman was motivated by hatred and prejudice (study 1). After the shootings that occurred at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, disempowerment-fueled Islamoprejudice similarly predicted lower hate crime perceptions (study 2a). Conversely, after the tram shooting in Utrecht, Netherlands (which was perpetrated by a Turkish-born immigrant), disempowerment-fueled Islamoprejudice predicted higher hate crime perceptions (study 2b). Finally, after the Walmart shooting in El Paso, Texas, hate crime perceptions were specifically biased by an ethnonationalist view of Hispanic immigrants as a symbolic (rather than realistic) threat to America; that is, disempowered individuals deemphasized likely hate crimes due to symbolic concerns about cultural supremacy rather than material concerns about jobs or crime (study 3). Altogether, biased hate crime perceptions can be purposive and reveal supremacist sympathies.


Assuntos
Crime/psicologia , Emoções , Percepção Social , Atitude , Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Ódio , Humanos , Preconceito/psicologia , Relações Raciais , Violência/psicologia
5.
N Z Med J ; 133(1517): 18-23, 2020 06 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32595218

RESUMO

AIM: To consider the possibility of consequences beyond the alleviation of perceived individual suffering, for families left behind, communities and society as a whole should the End of Life Choice Act gain public support in the September 2020 referendum in New Zealand. METHOD: This study used the Yin case study approach to undertake a single semi-structured in-depth interview with a participant who self-identified as having first-hand experience of assisted dying from a relative's perspective (in a country where this is legal). Thematic analysis was used to identify themes and trends from the interview transcript. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged from the interview: the potential for assisted dying becoming an expectation for others to pursue when unwell and possibly facing a life-threatening illness; the notion of stigma being associated with the individual using assisted dying legislation and the family left behind; and that there may be the potential for such legislation to produce a contagion effect. CONCLUSION: The introduction of assisted dying legislation into New Zealand culture provides a potential hotspot for family, community and social discord that may not be easily remedied. Further study in New Zealand is required to investigate whether a contagion effect of assisted dying is possible, and how as a society, we negotiate what could become a conflicted pathway potentially complicated by prejudice, judgement and stigma.


Assuntos
Preconceito/psicologia , Estigma Social , Suicídio Assistido/legislação & jurisprudência , Humanos , Nova Zelândia
7.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(6): 873-876, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154831

RESUMO

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 has triggered global panic. We have conducted an anonymous online survey of Asian medical students in Poland to assess whether they experience any form of prejudice related to the ongoing pandemic. As demonstrated, the COVID-19 outbreak had triggered xenophobic reactions toward students of Asian-origin (n=85) before the first SARS-CoV-2 case was confirmed in Poland. Facing prejudice, including discrimination related to COVID-19, may add to feelings of isolation of students of Asian origin who study abroad, and affect career development, especially for students. We recommend that universities should proactively develop policies that support students, faculty, and staff affected by discriminatory behavior both during the current outbreak and in the future. However, preventing such behaviors should also be enforced by national authorities.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina , Xenofobia/psicologia , Adulto , Medo , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pandemias , Polônia , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Xenofobia/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
8.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(6): 873-876, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-228672

RESUMO

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 has triggered global panic. We have conducted an anonymous online survey of Asian medical students in Poland to assess whether they experience any form of prejudice related to the ongoing pandemic. As demonstrated, the COVID-19 outbreak had triggered xenophobic reactions toward students of Asian-origin (n=85) before the first SARS-CoV-2 case was confirmed in Poland. Facing prejudice, including discrimination related to COVID-19, may add to feelings of isolation of students of Asian origin who study abroad, and affect career development, especially for students. We recommend that universities should proactively develop policies that support students, faculty, and staff affected by discriminatory behavior both during the current outbreak and in the future. However, preventing such behaviors should also be enforced by national authorities.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina , Xenofobia/psicologia , Adulto , Medo , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pandemias , Polônia , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Xenofobia/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
9.
Arch Sex Behav ; 49(5): 1725-1739, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32356084

RESUMO

We conducted an experiment to assess whether targeting multiple beliefs about sexual orientation (SO) may be more effective in reducing homonegativity than focusing only on beliefs about its biogenetic origins. Participants (116 women, 85 men) were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions or a control condition. Those in the treatment conditions read essays summarizing: (1) research suggesting SO has biogenetic origins, (2) research suggesting SO is socially constructed and refuting beliefs about the discreteness, homogeneity, and informativeness of SO categories; or (3) research suggesting SO is biogenetic and research suggesting SO categories are socially constructed and not necessarily discrete, homogenous, or informative. We predicted participants in the conditions that targeted multiple beliefs related to the social construction of SO, not just its biogenetic origins, would exhibit the strongest reductions in beliefs about the discreteness, homogeneity, and informativeness of SO categories, and in homonegativity. We also predicted these participants would exhibit the greatest increases in support for gay and lesbian civil rights. We observed hypothesized shifts in SO beliefs across all experimental conditions. While there was a small main effect of time on homonegative prejudice, there was no main effect of condition and no changes in support for gay and lesbian civil rights. However, post hoc analyses suggested the two conditions addressing social constructionist beliefs accounted for most of the observed prejudice reduction. Implications for more comprehensive educational and social interventions designed to promote social justice for sexual minorities are discussed.


Assuntos
Preconceito/psicologia , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
11.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(6): 873-876, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32387102

RESUMO

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak caused by SARS-CoV-2 has triggered global panic. We have conducted an anonymous online survey of Asian medical students in Poland to assess whether they experience any form of prejudice related to the ongoing pandemic. As demonstrated, the COVID-19 outbreak had triggered xenophobic reactions toward students of Asian-origin (n=85) before the first SARS-CoV-2 case was confirmed in Poland. Facing prejudice, including discrimination related to COVID-19, may add to feelings of isolation of students of Asian origin who study abroad, and affect career development, especially for students. We recommend that universities should proactively develop policies that support students, faculty, and staff affected by discriminatory behavior both during the current outbreak and in the future. However, preventing such behaviors should also be enforced by national authorities.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Estudantes de Medicina , Xenofobia/psicologia , Adulto , Medo , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pandemias , Polônia , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Xenofobia/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
12.
Rev. Rol enferm ; 43(5): 363-370, mayo 2020. ilus
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-193624

RESUMO

Este artículo describe la percepción de los estudiantes de enfermería sobre los tipos de prejuicios experimentados con relación a la enfermería. METODOLOGÍA: Estudio exploratorio con un enfoque cualitativo, llevado a cabo en una institución de educación superior privada, en Belém-Pa (Brasil), de mayo a noviembre de 2019, a través de una entrevista semiestructurada, con muestreo de saturación, en un total de 30 participantes. Los datos se analizaron utilizando el método de Bardin. RESULTADOS: Se enumeraron cuatro categorías, a saber: 'Elección de la profesión', 'Tipos de prejuicio', 'Las causas y / o razones de los prejuicios experimentados en la profesión' y 'Las estrategias para hacer frente a los prejuicios. CONCLUSIÓN: Existe una necesidad urgente de abordar formas de combatir los prejuicios durante la licenciatura, teniendo en cuenta su prevalencia e impacto, para que las/os profesionales y estudiantes de enfermería tengan más seguridad y autonomía para desarrollar su trabajo con más motivación y entusiasmo


This article describes the perception of nursing students about the types of prejudices experienced in relation to nursing. METHODOLOGY: Exploratory study with a qualitative approach, carried out at a private higher education institution, in Belém-Pa (Brazil), from May to November 2019, through a semi-structured interview, with saturation sampling, in total of 30 participants. Data will be analyzed using the Bardin method. RESULTS: Four categories were listed, which are: 'Choice of profession', 'Types of prejudice', 'The causes and / or reasons of prejudice experienced in the profession' and 'Strategies for dealing with prejudice'. CONCLUSION: There is an urgent need to address ways to combat prejudice during undergraduate studies, taking into account its prevalence and impact, so that nursing professionals and students have more security and autonomy to carry out their work with more motivation and enthusiasm


Assuntos
Humanos , Percepção , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Autonomia Profissional , 25783 , Análise de Dados , Estereotipagem
15.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 27(1): 134-138, 2020 Mar 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32208592

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Medical care in geriatrics has its own specificity, and in order to build a successful doctor-patient relationship it is important while studying medicine to learn some functioning aspects of this age group. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to explore and describe the role of emotional intelligence in the attitudes of medical students towards elderly patients, taking into account their the place of residence. The place of residence has an impact on social relations and socialization, which could effect with disparities in behaviour towards elderly patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical University of Lublin students from rural (N=71; M=23.44 SD=1.80) and urban (N=87; M=23.34; SD=1.38) areas took part in the study. Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (INTE) and Attitude Towards Elderly Patients Questionnaire (ATEP) were used. RESULTS: There are statistically significant differences between medical students from rural and urban areas in their attitude towards elderly patients (p=0.001), but no differences were observed between rural and urban residents in terms of emotional intelligence (general result, action factor and cognitive factor). Positive correlations were observed between action factor (r=0.322), cognitive factor (r=0.311) and general INTE result (r=0.358) and attitude towards elderly patients in the group of medical students from rural area. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students from rural areas are characterized by a more positive attitude towards elderly patients than medical students from urban areas. The predictors of attitudes towards elderly patients are the cognitive factor of emotional intelligence and the place of residence of medical students. The results give the opportunity to design a well-developed programme of a geriatric course which could be matched to the personal predispositions of students.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Inteligência Emocional , Geriatria , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Relações Médico-Paciente , Polônia , Preconceito/psicologia , População Rural , Inquéritos e Questionários , População Urbana
16.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0230806, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32214397

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Identify how higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and weight discrimination are associated with romantic relationship formation and termination in young adults, and if the association was consistent for males and females. METHODS: First-year students (N = 1096) at entry to university (Time 1) provided BMI and self-reports of weight discrimination and romantic relationship status (in a relationship vs single); 550 were successfully resampled four months later (Time 2). Logistic generalized estimating equations (GEEs) examined if Time 1 relationship status was predicted by BMI and weight discrimination. Logistic GEEs were used to determine if Time 1 BMI and weight discrimination predicted Time 2 relationship status for the strata of students in, and out, of a relationship at Time 1. RESULTS: At baseline, students were less likely to be in a relationship if they had a higher BMI (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92, 0.96) or reported weight discrimination (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90). When stratified by gender, the association between higher BMI and weight discrimination with relationship status was only observed for females. Longitudinally, a BMI-based selection effect was observed for romantic relationship formation, but not termination. Of the students who were single at Time 1, each one unit higher baseline BMI decreased the odds of the student transitioning to a relationship by 9% at Time 2 (OR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85, 0.96). When stratified by gender the association of higher BMI decreased odds of relationship formation was only significant for females. No weight discrimination differences for selection in or out of a romantic relationship were observed. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest a weight-related selection effect for romantic relationship initiation, but not termination, in young female adults with lower BMIs. Weight discrimination was not associated with romantic relationship initiation or termination in this sample.


Assuntos
Índice de Massa Corporal , Parceiros Sexuais/psicologia , Universidades , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Preconceito/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
Z Gerontol Geriatr ; 53(3): 211-215, 2020 May.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32020286

RESUMO

More and more people with disabilities are reaching an advanced age. At the same time the life expectancy of the population as a whole is increasing, which is accompanied by an increase in physical, mental and cognitive impairments. This results in specific social inequalities and forms of discrimination, which, however, have so far not played a special role in the intersectionality debates. While the intersections of disability and gender and also of age and gender are being studied, there have been hardly any studies on the intersection of age (and especially higher age) and disability so far. It is also promising in terms of theory formation to combine both categories, which could be helpful for empirical research and the routine practice. In intersectionality research the question is discussed which categories can be regarded as central in order to critically analyze power structures and forms of discrimination. This article discusses to what extent both age and disability should be considered relevant categories in intersectional theory and research. To this end, the role of the body and the concept of normality with respect to both categories and their intersection are discussed.


Assuntos
Ageismo , Envelhecimento/psicologia , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Discriminação Psicológica , Humanos , Preconceito/psicologia
18.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 108, 2020 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31992261

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research has shown that discrimination is harmful to health, but there is relatively little known about discrimination experienced by people from refugee and asylum-seeking backgrounds in resettlement countries and associated health effects. This qualitative-focused mixed methods paper reports on discrimination experienced by refugees and asylum seekers, responses to discrimination, and impacts on health. METHODS: As part of a broader study of housing, social inclusion and health, surveys were completed by 423 adult refugees and asylum seekers living in South Australia who had been in Australia for up to 7 years. The survey included questions on discrimination based on skin colour, ethnicity and religion, as well as questions on hope, trust, belonging, sense of control and health (including the SF-8). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 65 survey participants, purposively sampled by visa status, continent and gender, further exploring experiences of discrimination. These and survey open-ended responses were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of survey participants reported experiences of discrimination since arriving in Australia (14% in the last year), and 90% of these felt that discrimination had harmed their health. Key settings of discrimination were public transport, within the neighbourhood, and in relation to employment. Those who reported discrimination had significantly worse mental health (p < .000) but not physical health. Discrimination was also associated with less sense of belonging (p = .001), lower levels of trust (p = .038), reduced sense of control (p = .012) and less hope (p = .006). Incidents described in interviews and the open-ended survey responses included incivility, physical assault, and denial of services, experienced across intersecting characteristics of race/ethnicity, religion, gender and visa status. Responses to discrimination spanned affective, cognitive and behavioural dimensions, ranging across types of experience, participant characteristics and context, with most individuals reporting multiple response types. While some of the responses were reported by participants as protective of health, participants' reflections indicated significant negative impacts on mental health in particular. CONCLUSION: Discrimination featured in the resettlement experiences of a significant number of refugees and asylum seekers, with participants reporting clear negative impacts on mental health. Addressing discrimination is a key resettlement and health issue requiring urgent action.


Assuntos
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Preconceito/psicologia , Refugiados/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Refugiados/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
19.
Br J Psychol ; 111(1): 17-35, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30868563

RESUMO

This research experimentally examined the effects of exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories on prejudice and discrimination. Study 1 (N = 166) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories concerning immigrants to Britain from the European Union (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) exacerbated prejudice towards this group. Study 2 (N = 173) found the same effect in a different intergroup context - exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) increased prejudice towards this group and reduced participants' willingness to vote for a Jewish political candidate. Finally, Study 3 (N = 114) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increased prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups (e.g., Asians, Arabs, Americans, Irish, Australians). The current research suggests that conspiracy theories may have potentially damaging and widespread consequences for intergroup relations.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Processos Grupais , Judeus , Política , Preconceito/psicologia , Adolescente , Árabes , Ásia/etnologia , Austrália/etnologia , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , União Europeia , Feminino , Humanos , Irlanda/etnologia , Masculino , Reino Unido
20.
Acad Med ; 95(3): 450-457, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31688038

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Microaggressions are subtle verbal or nonverbal everyday behaviors that arise from unconscious bias, covert prejudice, or hostility. They may contribute to the persistent disparities faced by women in medicine. In this study, the authors sought to identify common microaggressions experienced by women faculty in medicine and to determine if specific demographic characteristics affect the reported frequencies of these microaggressions. METHOD: The authors used chain referral sampling to collect real-life anecdotes about microaggressions from women faculty across the nation. Thirty-four unique experiences from those reported were identified and scripted then reenacted using professional actors to create 34 videos of the real-life microaggressions and 34 corresponding fictional "control" versions of the same situations. The videos, presented in a random order, were evaluated by faculty from 4 academic medical centers from 2016 to 2018. RESULTS: A total of 124 faculty (79 women, 45 men) participated. Women reported higher frequencies of microaggressions than men in 33 of the 34 videos depicting microaggressions (P value range: < .001 to .042, area under the curve range: 0.60-0.69). No such differences were seen with the control videos. Women identified 21 microaggressions as occurring frequently. No significant differences were found with respect to participants' age, race/ethnicity, academic rank, or years in medicine. Post hoc analyses showed that the microaggressions fell into 6 themes: encountering sexism, encountering pregnancy- and child care-related bias, having abilities underestimated, encountering sexually inappropriate comments, being relegated to mundane tasks, and feeling excluded/marginalized. CONCLUSIONS: Privilege is often invisible to those who have it, whereas bias and discrimination are readily apparent to those who experience it. Knowledge of common microaggressions will allow for targeted individual, interpersonal, and institutional solutions to mitigate disparities in medicine.


Assuntos
Agressão/psicologia , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Hostilidade , Preconceito/psicologia , Sexismo/psicologia , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/psicologia , Adulto , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Preconceito/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Sexismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA