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1.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4916, 2020 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33004803

RESUMO

Self-incompatibility (SI) is a breeding system that promotes cross-fertilization. In Brassica, pollen rejection is induced by a haplotype-specific interaction between pistil determinant SRK (S receptor kinase) and pollen determinant SP11 (S-locus Protein 11, also named SCR) from the S-locus. Although the structure of the B. rapa S9-SRK ectodomain (eSRK) and S9-SP11 complex has been determined, it remains unclear how SRK discriminates self- and nonself-SP11. Here, we uncover the detailed mechanism of self/nonself-discrimination in Brassica SI by determining the S8-eSRK-S8-SP11 crystal structure and performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Comprehensive binding analysis of eSRK and SP11 structures reveals that the binding free energies are most stable for cognate eSRK-SP11 combinations. Residue-based contribution analysis suggests that the modes of eSRK-SP11 interactions differ between intra- and inter-subgroup (a group of phylogenetically neighboring haplotypes) combinations. Our data establish a model of self/nonself-discrimination in Brassica SI.


Assuntos
Brassica rapa/fisiologia , Melhoramento Vegetal , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Animais , Cristalografia , Flores/metabolismo , Haplótipos , Simulação de Dinâmica Molecular , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Proteínas de Plantas/ultraestrutura , Pólen/metabolismo , Ligação Proteica/fisiologia , Domínios Proteicos/fisiologia , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteínas Quinases/ultraestrutura , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Proteínas Recombinantes/ultraestrutura , Células Sf9 , Spodoptera
2.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4496, 2020 09 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32901024

RESUMO

Aging is characterized by the loss of homeostasis and the general decline of physiological functions, accompanied by various degenerative diseases and increased rates of mortality. Aging targeting small molecule screens have been performed many times, however, few have focused on endogenous metabolic intermediates-metabolites. Here, using C. elegans lifespan assays, we conducted a worm metabolite screen and identified an eukaryotes conserved metabolite, myo-inositol (MI), to extend lifespan, increase mobility and reduce fat content. Genetic analysis of enzymes in MI metabolic pathway suggest that MI alleviates aging through its derivative PI(4,5)P2. MI and PI(4,5)P2 are precursors of PI(3,4,5)P3, which is negatively related to longevity. The longevity effect of MI is dependent on the tumor suppressor gene, daf-18 (homologous to mouse Pten), independent of its classical pathway downstream genes, akt or daf-16. Furthermore, we found MI effects on aging and lifespan act through mitophagy regulator PTEN induced kinase-1 (pink-1) and mitophagy. MI's anti-aging effect is also conserved in mouse, indicating a conserved mechanism in mammals.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/metabolismo , Proteínas de Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolismo , Fatores de Transcrição Forkhead/metabolismo , Inositol/metabolismo , Longevidade/fisiologia , PTEN Fosfo-Hidrolase/metabolismo , Envelhecimento/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Animais Geneticamente Modificados , Caenorhabditis elegans/genética , Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolismo , Proteínas de Caenorhabditis elegans/genética , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Feminino , Fatores de Transcrição Forkhead/genética , Inositol/administração & dosagem , Locomoção/fisiologia , Longevidade/efeitos dos fármacos , Redes e Vias Metabólicas/genética , Metabolômica , Camundongos , Mitofagia/fisiologia , Modelos Animais , Fosfatos de Fosfatidilinositol/metabolismo , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Interferência de RNA , RNA-Seq
3.
Chem Biol Interact ; 330: 109251, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32888910

RESUMO

Cisplatin induces acute renal failure in humans and mice.Tubular apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation are the primary pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury(AKI). We previously reported that the depletion of Numb from proximal tubules exacerbates tubular cells apoptosis in cisplatin-induced AKI, however, the role of Numb in tubular necrosis and renal inflammation in cisplatin-induced AKI remains unclear. A mouse model of AKI was produced by cisplatin intraperitoneally injection in mice from proximal tubule-specific depletion of Numb (PT-Nb-KO) and their wild-type littermates (PT-Nb-WT) respectively. Renal Numb expression was determined by Western blotting. Renal morphological damage was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining). Tubular necrosis was evaluated by histological study and the protein level of renal Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) which is a molecular marker of necrosis. Leukocyte infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by immunostaining and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) respectively.The protein level of Numb was dramatically decreased in kidneys of PT-Nb-KO mice compared with PT-Nb-WT mice. After cisplatin injection, a significant increase of tubular injury score and the protein level of renal MLKL were detected in PT-Nb-KO mice compared with those in PT-Nb-WT. In addition, the number of F4/80-positve and CD3-positive cells, markers for macrophages and neutraphils respectively, showed significantly increased in kidneys from PT-Nb-KO mice compared with those in PT-Nb-WT mice. Consistently, the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and MCP-1 in the kidneys was higher in PT-Nb-KO mice than those in PT-Nb-WT mice. Numb play additional protective role in cisplatin-induced AKI through ameliorating tubular necrosis and renal inflammation besides attenuating cisplatin-induced tubular apoptosis.


Assuntos
Lesão Renal Aguda/patologia , Cisplatino/efeitos adversos , Inflamação/prevenção & controle , Proteínas de Membrana/fisiologia , Necrose/prevenção & controle , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/fisiologia , Animais , Contagem de Células , Citocinas/metabolismo , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Inflamação/etiologia , Túbulos Renais Proximais/patologia , Mastócitos , Proteínas de Membrana/deficiência , Camundongos , Camundongos Knockout , Necrose/etiologia , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/deficiência , Neutrófilos , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4845, 2020 09 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32973148

RESUMO

Herpesviruses encode conserved protein kinases (CHPKs) to stimulate phosphorylation-sensitive processes during infection. How CHPKs bind to cellular factors and how this impacts their regulatory functions is poorly understood. Here, we use quantitative proteomics to determine cellular interaction partners of human herpesvirus (HHV) CHPKs. We find that CHPKs can target key regulators of transcription and replication. The interaction with Cyclin A and associated factors is identified as a signature of ß-herpesvirus kinases. Cyclin A is recruited via RXL motifs that overlap with nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the non-catalytic N termini. This architecture is conserved in HHV6, HHV7 and rodent cytomegaloviruses. Cyclin A binding competes with NLS function, enabling dynamic changes in CHPK localization and substrate phosphorylation. The cytomegalovirus kinase M97 sequesters Cyclin A in the cytosol, which is essential for viral inhibition of cellular replication. Our data highlight a fine-tuned and physiologically important interplay between a cellular cyclin and viral kinases.


Assuntos
Replicação do DNA/fisiologia , Infecções por Herpesviridae/metabolismo , Herpesviridae/metabolismo , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Animais , Ciclina A/genética , Ciclina A/metabolismo , Citomegalovirus/genética , DNA/metabolismo , Células HEK293 , Herpesviridae/enzimologia , Herpesviridae/genética , Infecções por Herpesviridae/virologia , Humanos , Camundongos , Células NIH 3T3 , Sinais de Localização Nuclear/metabolismo , Fosforilação , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas , Proteínas Virais/genética , Proteínas Virais/metabolismo
5.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008761, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32790758

RESUMO

The virus-bacterial synergism implicated in secondary bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae following infection with epidemic or pandemic influenza A virus (IAV) is well documented. However, the molecular mechanisms behind such synergism remain largely ill-defined. In pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus, subsequent infection with S. pneumoniae leads to enhanced pneumococcal intracellular survival. The pneumococcal two-component system SirRH appears essential for such enhanced survival. Through comparative transcriptomic analysis between the ΔsirR and wt strains, a list of 179 differentially expressed genes was defined. Among those, the clpL protein chaperone gene and the psaB Mn+2 transporter gene, which are involved in the stress response, are important in enhancing S. pneumoniae survival in influenza-infected cells. The ΔsirR, ΔclpL and ΔpsaB deletion mutants display increased susceptibility to acidic and oxidative stress and no enhancement of intracellular survival in IAV-infected pneumocyte cells. These results suggest that the SirRH two-component system senses IAV-induced stress conditions and controls adaptive responses that allow survival of S. pneumoniae in IAV-infected pneumocytes.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Coinfecção/mortalidade , Vírus da Influenza A/patogenicidade , Influenza Humana/mortalidade , Pulmão/patologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/mortalidade , Streptococcus pneumoniae/patogenicidade , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Sobrevivência Celular , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Humanos , Influenza Humana/microbiologia , Influenza Humana/patologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Pulmão/microbiologia , Pulmão/virologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/microbiologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/patologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/virologia , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Streptococcus pneumoniae/metabolismo , Estresse Fisiológico , Virulência
6.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4285, 2020 08 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32855390

RESUMO

Plant hormone cytokinins are perceived by a subfamily of sensor histidine kinases (HKs), which via a two-component phosphorelay cascade activate transcriptional responses in the nucleus. Subcellular localization of the receptors proposed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as a principal cytokinin perception site, while study of cytokinin transport pointed to the plasma membrane (PM)-mediated cytokinin signalling. Here, by detailed monitoring of subcellular localizations of the fluorescently labelled natural cytokinin probe and the receptor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE 4 (CRE1/AHK4) fused to GFP reporter, we show that pools of the ER-located cytokinin receptors can enter the secretory pathway and reach the PM in cells of the root apical meristem, and the cell plate of dividing meristematic cells. Brefeldin A (BFA) experiments revealed vesicular recycling of the receptor and its accumulation in BFA compartments. We provide a revised view on cytokinin signalling and the possibility of multiple sites of perception at PM and ER.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Citocininas/metabolismo , Retículo Endoplasmático/metabolismo , Corantes Fluorescentes/química , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Receptores de Superfície Celular/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/citologia , Arabidopsis/genética , Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/genética , Brefeldina A/farmacologia , Citocininas/química , Corantes Fluorescentes/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Meristema/citologia , Meristema/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos
7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3563, 2020 07 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32678104

RESUMO

Rapidly increasing availability of genomic data and ensuing identification of disease associated mutations allows for an unbiased insight into genetic drivers of disease development. However, determination of molecular mechanisms by which individual genomic changes affect biochemical processes remains a major challenge. Here, we develop a multilayered proteomic workflow to explore how genetic lesions modulate the proteome and are translated into molecular phenotypes. Using this workflow we determine how expression of a panel of disease-associated mutations in the Dyrk2 protein kinase alter the composition, topology and activity of this kinase complex as well as the phosphoproteomic state of the cell. The data show that altered protein-protein interactions caused by the mutations are associated with topological changes and affected phosphorylation of known cancer driver proteins, thus linking Dyrk2 mutations with cancer-related biochemical processes. Overall, we discover multiple mutation-specific functionally relevant changes, thus highlighting the extensive plasticity of molecular responses to genetic lesions.


Assuntos
Neoplasias/genética , Neoplasias/patologia , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteômica/métodos , Linhagem Celular , Humanos , Espectrometria de Massas , Complexos Multiproteicos , Mutação , Proteínas de Neoplasias/metabolismo , Neoplasias/metabolismo , Fenótipo , Fosfoproteínas/metabolismo , Fosforilação , Conformação Proteica , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas , Proteínas Quinases/química , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/química , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Tirosina Quinases/química , Proteínas Tirosina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Tirosina Quinases/metabolismo , Proteoma/metabolismo
8.
Life Sci ; 257: 118116, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32702447

RESUMO

Emerging evidence implicates accelerated renal tubular epithelial cell (RTEC) senescence in renal fibrosis progression. Mitophagy protects against kidney injury. However, the mechanistic interplay between cell senescence and mitophagy in RTECs is not clearly defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibition of RTEC senescence and renal fibrosis by quercetin and explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that quercetin attenuated RTEC senescence induced by angiotensin II (AngII) in vitro and unilateral ureteral obstruction in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that mitochondrial abnormalities such as elevated reactive oxygen species, decreased membrane potential, and fragmentation and accumulation of mitochondrial mass, occurred in AngII-treated RTECs. Quercetin treatment reversed these effects. Furthermore, quercetin enhanced mitophagy in AngII-treated RTECs, which was markedly reduced by treatment with mitophagy-specific inhibitors. Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) was involved in quercetin-mediated PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1)/Parkin-associated mitophagy activation. Pharmacological antagonism of SIRT1 in AngII-treated RTECs blocked the effects of quercetin on mitophagy and cellular senescence. Finally, quercetin alleviated kidney fibrosis by reducing RTEC senescence via mitophagy. Collectively, the antifibrotic effect of quercetin involved inhibition of RTEC senescence, possibly through activation of SIRT1/PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy. These findings suggest that pharmacological elimination of senescent cells and stimulation of mitophagy represent effective therapeutic strategies to prevent kidney fibrosis.


Assuntos
Antioxidantes/farmacologia , Senescência Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Túbulos Renais Proximais/efeitos dos fármacos , Rim/patologia , Mitofagia/efeitos dos fármacos , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Quercetina/farmacologia , Sirtuína 1/metabolismo , Animais , Antioxidantes/uso terapêutico , Linhagem Celular , Epitélio/efeitos dos fármacos , Fibrose , Citometria de Fluxo , Rim/efeitos dos fármacos , Túbulos Renais Proximais/patologia , Quercetina/uso terapêutico , Ratos
9.
Mol Cell ; 79(3): 504-520.e9, 2020 08 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32707033

RESUMO

Protein kinases are essential for signal transduction and control of most cellular processes, including metabolism, membrane transport, motility, and cell cycle. Despite the critical role of kinases in cells and their strong association with diseases, good coverage of their interactions is available for only a fraction of the 535 human kinases. Here, we present a comprehensive mass-spectrometry-based analysis of a human kinase interaction network covering more than 300 kinases. The interaction dataset is a high-quality resource with more than 5,000 previously unreported interactions. We extensively characterized the obtained network and were able to identify previously described, as well as predict new, kinase functional associations, including those of the less well-studied kinases PIM3 and protein O-mannose kinase (POMK). Importantly, the presented interaction map is a valuable resource for assisting biomedical studies. We uncover dozens of kinase-disease associations spanning from genetic disorders to complex diseases, including cancer.


Assuntos
Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Doenças Genéticas Inatas/genética , Neoplasias/genética , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas/genética , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Ontologia Genética , Doenças Genéticas Inatas/enzimologia , Doenças Genéticas Inatas/patologia , Humanos , Redes e Vias Metabólicas/genética , Anotação de Sequência Molecular , Distrofias Musculares/enzimologia , Distrofias Musculares/genética , Distrofias Musculares/patologia , Neoplasias/enzimologia , Neoplasias/patologia , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/enzimologia , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/genética , Doenças Neurodegenerativas/patologia , Mapeamento de Interação de Proteínas/métodos , Proteínas Quinases/química , Proteínas Quinases/classificação , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/química , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas/química , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
10.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 21(1): 309, 2020 Jul 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32664863

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite continued efforts using chemical similarity methods in virtual screening, currently developed approaches suffer from time-consuming multistep procedures and low success rates. We recently developed a machine learning-based chemical binding similarity model considering common structural features from molecules binding to the same, or evolutionarily related targets. The chemical binding similarity measures the resemblance of chemical compounds in terms of binding site similarity to better describe functional similarities that arise from target binding. In this study, we have shown how the chemical binding similarity could be used in virtual screening together with the conventional structure-based methods. RESULTS: The chemical binding similarity, receptor-based pharmacophore, chemical structure similarity, and molecular docking methods were evaluated to identify an effective virtual screening procedure for desired target proteins. When we tested the chemical binding similarity method with test sets of 51 kinases, it outperformed the traditional structural similarity-based methods as well as structure-based methods, such as molecular docking and receptor-based pharmacophore modeling, in terms of finding active compounds. We further validated the results by performing virtual screening (using the chemical binding similarity and receptor-based pharmacophore methods) against a completely blind dataset for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EPHB4) and wee1-like protein kinase (WEE1). The in vitro kinase binding assay confirmed that 6 out of 13 (46.2%) for MEK1 and 2 out of 12 (16.7%) for EPHB4 were newly identified only by the chemical binding similarity model. CONCLUSIONS: We report that the virtual screening results could further be improved by combining the chemical binding similarity model with 3D-QSAR pharmacophore and molecular docking models. Not only the new inhibitors are identified in this study, but also many of the identified molecules have low structural similarity scores against already reported inhibitors and that show the revelation of novel scaffolds.


Assuntos
Simulação de Acoplamento Molecular , Relação Quantitativa Estrutura-Atividade , Área Sob a Curva , Sítios de Ligação , Humanos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Compostos Orgânicos/química , Compostos Orgânicos/metabolismo , Preparações Farmacêuticas/química , Preparações Farmacêuticas/metabolismo , Ligação Proteica , Proteínas Quinases/química , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Curva ROC
11.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235766, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32639993

RESUMO

High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) remains the deadliest form of epithelial ovarian cancer and despite major efforts little improvement in overall survival has been achieved. Identification of recurring "driver" genetic lesions has the potential to enable design of novel therapies for cancer. Here, we report on a study to find such new therapeutic targets for HGSOC using exome-capture sequencing approach targeting all kinase genes in 127 patient samples. Consistent with previous reports, the most frequently mutated gene was TP53 (97% mutation frequency) followed by BRCA1 (10% mutation frequency). The average mutation frequency of the kinase genes mutated from our panel was 1.5%. Intriguingly, after BRCA1, JAK3 was the most frequently mutated gene (4% mutation frequency). We tested the transforming properties of JAK3 mutants using the Ba/F3 cell-based in vitro functional assay and identified a novel gain-of-function mutation in the kinase domain of JAK3 (p.T1022I). Importantly, p.T1022I JAK3 mutants displayed higher sensitivity to the JAK3-selective inhibitor Tofacitinib compared to controls. For independent validation, we re-sequenced the entire JAK3 coding sequence using tagged amplicon sequencing (TAm-Seq) in 463 HGSOCs resulting in an overall somatic mutation frequency of 1%. TAm-Seq screening of CDK12 in the same population revealed a 7% mutation frequency. Our data confirms that the frequency of mutations in kinase genes in HGSOC is low and provides accurate estimates for the frequency of JAK3 and CDK12 mutations in a large well characterized cohort. Although p.T1022I JAK3 mutations are rare, our functional validation shows that if detected they should be considered as potentially actionable for therapy. The observation of CDK12 mutations in 7% of HGSOC cases provides a strong rationale for routine somatic testing, although more functional and clinical characterization is required to understand which nonsynonymous mutations alterations are associated with homologous recombination deficiency.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/genética , Janus Quinase 3/genética , Mutação , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteína Supressora de Tumor p53/genética , Proteína BRCA1/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/metabolismo , Cistadenocarcinoma Seroso/patologia , Feminino , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Janus Quinase 3/metabolismo , Neoplasias Ovarianas/metabolismo , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteína Supressora de Tumor p53/metabolismo
12.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0236950, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730335

RESUMO

The use of natural products as feed additives in the poultry industry is increasing; however, most studies focus on performance and growth with little regard for determining mechanism. Our laboratory designed a chicken (Gallus gallus)-specific immunometabolic kinome peptide array. Using this tool to examine the active enzymes responsible for phosphorylation events (kinases) provides important information on host and cellular functions. The objective of this project was to determine if feeding a microencapsulated product comprised of a blend of organic acids and botanicals (AviPlus®P) impacts the intestinal kinome of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus). Day-of-hatch chicks were provided 0 or 500g/MT of the additive and jejunal and ileal segments collected for kinome analysis to determine the mode-of-action of the additive. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis was performed by uploading the statistically significant peptides to the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes database. As a whole, GO and KEGG analysis showed similar activities in the ileum and jejunum. However, there were a small number of KEGG pathways that were only activated in either the ileum or jejunum, but not both. Analysis of the adipocytokine and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways showed differences between ileal and jejunal activity that were controlled, in part, by AKT3. Additionally, cytokine/chemokine evaluation showed the ileum had higher IL1ß, IL6, IL10, TNFα, IFNγ, CXCL8, and CCL4 mRNA expression levels (P<0.05). As a whole, the data showed the addition of microencapsulated organic acids and botanicals to a broiler diet activated many of the same signaling pathways in the ileum and jejunum; however, distinctions were observed. Taken together, the findings of this study begin to define the mode-of-action that microencapsulated organic acids and botanicals have on two important intestinal segments responsible for nutrient digestion and absorption in chickens.


Assuntos
Ácidos/farmacologia , Dieta/veterinária , Íleo/metabolismo , Jejuno/metabolismo , Compostos Fitoquímicos/farmacologia , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Ração Animal/análise , Animais , Galinhas , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Íleo/efeitos dos fármacos , Jejuno/efeitos dos fármacos , Plantas/química , Análise Serial de Proteínas , Proteínas Quinases/genética
13.
PLoS Genet ; 16(6): e1008840, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32579556

RESUMO

The S. cerevisiae ISR1 gene encodes a putative kinase with no ascribed function. Here, we show that Isr1 acts as a negative regulator of the highly-conserved hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), which converts glucose into uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), the carbohydrate precursor to protein glycosylation, GPI-anchor formation, and chitin biosynthesis. Overexpression of ISR1 is lethal and, at lower levels, causes sensitivity to tunicamycin and resistance to calcofluor white, implying impaired protein glycosylation and reduced chitin deposition. Gfa1 is the first enzyme in the HBP and is conserved from bacteria and yeast to humans. The lethality caused by ISR1 overexpression is rescued by co-overexpression of GFA1 or exogenous glucosamine, which bypasses GFA1's essential function. Gfa1 is phosphorylated in an Isr1-dependent fashion and mutation of Isr1-dependent sites ameliorates the lethality associated with ISR1 overexpression. Isr1 contains a phosphodegron that is phosphorylated by Pho85 and subsequently ubiquitinated by the SCF-Cdc4 complex, largely confining Isr1 protein levels to the time of bud emergence. Mutation of this phosphodegron stabilizes Isr1 and recapitulates the overexpression phenotypes. As Pho85 is a cell cycle and nutrient responsive kinase, this tight regulation of Isr1 may serve to dynamically regulate flux through the HBP and modulate how the cell's energy resources are converted into structural carbohydrates in response to changing cellular needs.


Assuntos
Glutamina-Frutose-6-Fosfato Transaminase (Isomerizante)/metabolismo , Hexosaminas/biossíntese , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/enzimologia , Metabolismo Energético , Glucose/metabolismo , Glutamina-Frutose-6-Fosfato Transaminase (Isomerizante)/genética , Mutação , Fosforilação , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Processamento de Proteína Pós-Traducional , Estabilidade Proteica , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Uridina Difosfato N-Acetilglicosamina/metabolismo
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(25): 14270-14279, 2020 06 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513699

RESUMO

Directional cell migration involves signaling cascades that stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge, and additional pathways must inhibit actin polymerization at the rear. During neuroblast migration in Caenorhabditis elegans, the transmembrane protein MIG-13/Lrp12 acts through the Arp2/3 nucleation-promoting factors WAVE and WASP to guide the anterior migration. Here we show that a tyrosine kinase, SRC-1, directly phosphorylates MIG-13 and promotes its activity on actin assembly at the leading edge. In GFP knockin animals, SRC-1 and MIG-13 distribute along the entire plasma membrane of migrating cells. We reveal that a receptor-like tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-3, maintains the F-actin polarity during neuroblast migration. Recombinant PTP-3 dephosphorylates SRC-1-dependent MIG-13 phosphorylation in vitro. Importantly, the endogenous PTP-3 accumulates at the rear of the migrating neuroblast, and its extracellular domain is essential for directional cell migration. We provide evidence that the asymmetrically localized tyrosine phosphatase PTP-3 spatially restricts MIG-13/Lrp12 receptor activity in migrating cells.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolismo , Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolismo , Movimento Celular/fisiologia , Neurônios/metabolismo , Proteínas Tirosina Fosfatases/metabolismo , Citoesqueleto de Actina/metabolismo , Complexo 2-3 de Proteínas Relacionadas à Actina/metabolismo , Actinas/metabolismo , Animais , Animais Geneticamente Modificados , Polaridade Celular/fisiologia , Proteína-1 Relacionada a Receptor de Lipoproteína de Baixa Densidade , Proteínas de Membrana/metabolismo , Fosforilação , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(25): 14433-14443, 2020 06 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513747

RESUMO

During infection, the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila manipulates a variety of host cell signaling pathways, including the Hippo pathway which controls cell proliferation and differentiation in eukaryotes. Our previous studies revealed that L. pneumophila encodes the effector kinase LegK7 which phosphorylates MOB1A, a highly conserved scaffold protein of the Hippo pathway. Here, we show that MOB1A, in addition to being a substrate of LegK7, also functions as an allosteric activator of its kinase activity. A crystallographic analysis of the LegK7-MOB1A complex revealed that the N-terminal half of LegK7 is structurally similar to eukaryotic protein kinases, and that MOB1A directly binds to the LegK7 kinase domain. Substitution of interface residues critical for complex formation abrogated allosteric activation of LegK7 both in vitro and within cells and diminished MOB1A phosphorylation. Importantly, the N-terminal extension (NTE) of MOB1A not only regulated complex formation with LegK7 but also served as a docking site for downstream substrates such as the transcriptional coregulator YAP1. Deletion of the NTE from MOB1A or addition of NTE peptides as binding competitors attenuated YAP1 recruitment to and phosphorylation by LegK7. By providing mechanistic insight into the formation and regulation of the LegK7-MOB1A complex, our study unravels a sophisticated molecular mimicry strategy that is used by L. pneumophila to take control of the host cell Hippo pathway.


Assuntos
Proteínas Adaptadoras de Transdução de Sinal/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Peptídeos e Proteínas de Sinalização Intracelular/metabolismo , Legionella pneumophila/metabolismo , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteínas Adaptadoras de Transdução de Sinal/genética , Regulação Alostérica , Animais , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Células HEK293 , Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno , Humanos , Peptídeos e Proteínas de Sinalização Intracelular/genética , Legionella pneumophila/patogenicidade , Doença dos Legionários/microbiologia , Doença dos Legionários/patologia , Macrófagos Alveolares/microbiologia , Macrófagos Alveolares/patologia , Camundongos , Simulação de Dinâmica Molecular , Mimetismo Molecular , Fosforilação , Ligação Proteica , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Células RAW 264.7 , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
16.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3151, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32561730

RESUMO

Mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) is the terminal protein in the pro-inflammatory necroptotic cell death program. RIPK3-mediated phosphorylation is thought to initiate MLKL oligomerization, membrane translocation and membrane disruption, although the precise choreography of events is incompletely understood. Here, we use single-cell imaging approaches to map the chronology of endogenous human MLKL activation during necroptosis. During the effector phase of necroptosis, we observe that phosphorylated MLKL assembles into higher order species on presumed cytoplasmic necrosomes. Subsequently, MLKL co-traffics with tight junction proteins to the cell periphery via Golgi-microtubule-actin-dependent mechanisms. MLKL and tight junction proteins then steadily co-accumulate at the plasma membrane as heterogeneous micron-sized hotspots. Our studies identify MLKL trafficking and plasma membrane accumulation as crucial necroptosis checkpoints. Furthermore, the accumulation of phosphorylated MLKL at intercellular junctions accelerates necroptosis between neighbouring cells, which may be relevant to inflammatory bowel disease and other necroptosis-mediated enteropathies.


Assuntos
Necroptose , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteína Serina-Treonina Quinases de Interação com Receptores/metabolismo , Animais , Linhagem Celular , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Humanos , Transporte Proteico , Proteínas de Junções Íntimas/metabolismo
17.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3150, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32561755

RESUMO

MLKL is the essential effector of necroptosis, a form of programmed lytic cell death. We have isolated a mouse strain with a single missense mutation, MlklD139V, that alters the two-helix 'brace' that connects the killer four-helix bundle and regulatory pseudokinase domains. This confers constitutive, RIPK3 independent killing activity to MLKL. Homozygous mutant mice develop lethal postnatal inflammation of the salivary glands and mediastinum. The normal embryonic development of MlklD139V homozygotes until birth, and the absence of any overt phenotype in heterozygotes provides important in vivo precedent for the capacity of cells to clear activated MLKL. These observations offer an important insight into the potential disease-modulating roles of three common human MLKL polymorphisms that encode amino acid substitutions within or adjacent to the brace region. Compound heterozygosity of these variants is found at up to 12-fold the expected frequency in patients that suffer from a pediatric autoinflammatory disease, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO).


Assuntos
Células-Tronco Hematopoéticas/metabolismo , Sistema Hematopoético/patologia , Necroptose/genética , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Animais , Animais Recém-Nascidos , Doenças Hereditárias Autoinflamatórias , Humanos , Inflamação/genética , Camundongos , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Osteomielite/genética , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo
18.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3133, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32561764

RESUMO

Proximity proteomics has greatly advanced the analysis of native protein complexes and subcellular structures in culture, but has not been amenable to study development and disease in vivo. Here, we have generated a knock-in mouse with the biotin ligase (BioID) inserted at titin's Z-disc region to identify protein networks that connect the sarcomere to signal transduction and metabolism. Our census of the sarcomeric proteome from neonatal to adult heart and quadriceps reveals how perinatal signaling, protein homeostasis and the shift to adult energy metabolism shape the properties of striated muscle cells. Mapping biotinylation sites to sarcomere structures refines our understanding of myofilament dynamics and supports the hypothesis that myosin filaments penetrate Z-discs to dampen contraction. Extending this proof of concept study to BioID fusion proteins generated with Crispr/CAS9 in animal models recapitulating human pathology will facilitate the future analysis of molecular machines and signaling hubs in physiological, pharmacological, and disease context.


Assuntos
Carbono-Nitrogênio Ligases/genética , Proteínas de Escherichia coli/genética , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Proteoma/metabolismo , Proteômica/métodos , Proteínas Repressoras/genética , Sarcômeros/metabolismo , Animais , Animais Recém-Nascidos , Biotinilação/genética , Feminino , Técnicas de Introdução de Genes , Masculino , Redes e Vias Metabólicas , Camundongos Transgênicos , Modelos Animais , Miocárdio/citologia , Miocárdio/metabolismo , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas/fisiologia , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteostase/fisiologia , Músculo Quadríceps/citologia , Músculo Quadríceps/metabolismo , Sarcômeros/genética , Transdução de Sinais/fisiologia , Relação Estrutura-Atividade
19.
Life Sci ; 256: 117923, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32522567

RESUMO

AIMS: Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) deficiency is associated with reduced expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and inferior clinical outcomes of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which LKB1 regulates PD-L1 expression and its role in programmed death 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy in NSCLC. MAIN METHODS: The impact of LKB1 on PD-L1 was assessed by western blot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in NSCLC. Activators/inhibitors of AMPK and NRF2 were applied to explore the mechanisms underlying the regulation of PD-L1 by LKB1. Efficiency of combined application of metformin and PD-1 blockade was evaluated in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. KEY FINDINGS: A remarkable positive correlation between LKB1 and PD-L1 expression was demonstrated in NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of LKB1 decreased PD-L1 in TC-1 cells, whereas overexpression of LKB1 increased PD-L1 in A549 cells. We further characterized that AMPK mediated the upregulation of PD-L1 by LKB1. Inhibition of AMPK or NRF2 markedly reduced PD-L1 in LKB1-intact NSCLC cells. In contrast, activation of AMPK or NRF2 reversed PD-L1 expression in LKB1-deficient NSCLC cells. Combined administration of metformin and anti-PD-1 antibody efficiently inhibited the growth of LKB1-intact tumors, whereas no obvious suppression was observed in LKB1-deficient tumors. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrated that LKB1 upregulates PD-L1 expression in NSCLC by activating the AMPK and KEAP1/NRF2 signaling. Activation of LKB1-AMPK with metformin improves the therapeutic effect of PD-1 blockade in NSCLC with wild-type LKB1.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/farmacologia , Antineoplásicos/farmacologia , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/metabolismo , Neoplasias Pulmonares/metabolismo , Metformina/farmacologia , Receptor de Morte Celular Programada 1/metabolismo , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Células A549 , Animais , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/metabolismo , Antineoplásicos/metabolismo , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Técnicas de Silenciamento de Genes , Humanos , Proteína 1 Associada a ECH Semelhante a Kelch/metabolismo , Metformina/metabolismo , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Fator 2 Relacionado a NF-E2/genética , Fator 2 Relacionado a NF-E2/metabolismo , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais , Ativação Transcricional , Regulação para Cima
20.
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol ; 319(1): H203-H212, 2020 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32502374

RESUMO

High-altitude (>2,500 m) residence increases the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) due, in part, to reduced uterine artery blood flow and impaired myometrial artery (MA) vasodilator response. A role for the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in protecting against hypoxia-associated IUGR is suggested by genomic and transcriptomic studies in humans and functional studies in mice. AMPK is a hypoxia-sensitive metabolic sensor with vasodilatory properties. Here we hypothesized that AMPK-dependent vasodilation was increased in MAs from high versus low-altitude (<1,700 m) Colorado women with appropriate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies and reduced in IUGR pregnancies regardless of altitude. Vasoreactivity studies showed that, in AGA pregnancies, MAs from high-altitude women were more sensitive to vasodilation by activation of AMPK with A769662 due chiefly to increased endothelial nitric oxide production, whereas MA responses to AMPK activation in the low-altitude women were endothelium independent. MAs from IUGR compared with AGA pregnancies had blunted vasodilator responses to acetylcholine at high altitude. We concluded that 1) blunted vasodilator responses in IUGR pregnancies confirm the importance of MA vasodilation for normal fetal growth and 2) the increased sensitivity to AMPK activation in AGA pregnancies at high altitude suggests that AMPK activation helped maintain MA vasodilation and fetal growth. These results highlight a novel mechanism for vasodilation of MAs under conditions of chronic hypoxia and suggest that AMPK activation could provide a therapy for increasing uteroplacental blood flow and improving fetal growth in IUGR pregnancies.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) impairs infant well- being and increases susceptibility to later-in-life diseases for mother and child. Our study reveals a novel role for AMPK in vasodilating the myometrial artery (MA) from women residing at high altitude (>2,500 m) with appropriate for gestational age pregnancies but not in IUGR pregnancies at any altitude.


Assuntos
Doença da Altitude/metabolismo , Artérias/metabolismo , Retardo do Crescimento Fetal/metabolismo , Miométrio/irrigação sanguínea , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Vasodilatação , Adulto , Doença da Altitude/fisiopatologia , Artérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Artérias/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Retardo do Crescimento Fetal/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Óxido Nítrico/metabolismo , Gravidez , Pironas/farmacologia , Tiofenos/farmacologia
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