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1.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4906, 2020 09 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32999292

RESUMO

The CRISPR-Cas12a RNA-guided complexes have tremendous potential for nucleic acid detection but are limited to the picomolar detection limit without an amplification step. Here, we develop a platform with engineered crRNAs and optimized conditions that enabled us to detect various clinically relevant nucleic acid targets with higher sensitivity, achieving a limit of detection in the femtomolar range without any target pre-amplification step. By extending the 3'- or 5'-ends of the crRNA with different lengths of ssDNA, ssRNA, and phosphorothioate ssDNA, we discover a self-catalytic behavior and an augmented rate of LbCas12a-mediated collateral cleavage activity as high as 3.5-fold compared to the wild-type crRNA and with significant improvement in specificity for target recognition. Particularly, the 7-mer DNA extension to crRNA is determined to be universal and spacer-independent for enhancing the sensitivity and specificity of LbCas12a-mediated nucleic acid detection. We perform a detailed characterization of our engineered ENHANCE system with various crRNA modifications, target types, reporters, and divalent cations. With isothermal amplification of SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-LAMP, the modified crRNAs are incorporated in a paper-based lateral flow assay that can detect the target with up to 23-fold higher sensitivity within 40-60 min.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Betacoronavirus/genética , Proteínas Associadas a CRISPR/metabolismo , Endodesoxirribonucleases/metabolismo , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/métodos , RNA Viral/isolamento & purificação , Transativadores/metabolismo , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Sistemas CRISPR-Cas , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Repetições Palindrômicas Curtas Agrupadas e Regularmente Espaçadas , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , DNA de Cadeia Simples , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , RNA Guia/genética , RNA Viral/genética
2.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(9): e1008878, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32946535

RESUMO

As an obligate intracellular pathogen, host cell invasion is paramount to Chlamydia trachomatis proliferation. While the mechanistic underpinnings of this essential process remain ill-defined, it is predicted to involve delivery of prepackaged effector proteins into the host cell that trigger plasma membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal reorganization. The secreted effector proteins TmeA and TarP, have risen to prominence as putative key regulators of cellular invasion and bacterial pathogenesis. Although several studies have begun to unravel molecular details underlying the putative function of TarP, the physiological function of TmeA during host cell invasion is unknown. Here, we show that TmeA employs molecular mimicry to bind to the GTPase binding domain of N-WASP, which results in recruitment of the actin branching ARP2/3 complex to the site of chlamydial entry. Electron microscopy revealed that TmeA mutants are deficient in filopodia capture, suggesting that TmeA/N-WASP interactions ultimately modulate host cell plasma membrane remodeling events necessary for chlamydial entry. Importantly, while both TmeA and TarP are necessary for effective host cell invasion, we show that these effectors target distinct pathways that ultimately converge on activation of the ARP2/3 complex. In line with this observation, we show that a double mutant suffers from a severe entry defect nearly identical to that observed when ARP3 is chemically inhibited or knocked down. Collectively, our study highlights both TmeA and TarP as essential regulators of chlamydial invasion that modulate the ARP2/3 complex through distinct signaling platforms, resulting in plasma membrane remodeling events that are essential for pathogen uptake.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Chlamydia trachomatis , Proteína Neuronal da Síndrome de Wiskott-Aldrich/metabolismo , Complexo 2-3 de Proteínas Relacionadas à Actina/genética , Complexo 2-3 de Proteínas Relacionadas à Actina/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/genética , Membrana Celular/patologia , Chlamydia trachomatis/genética , Chlamydia trachomatis/metabolismo , Chlamydia trachomatis/patogenicidade , Células HeLa , Humanos , Mutação , Domínios Proteicos , Pseudópodes/genética , Pseudópodes/metabolismo , Proteína Neuronal da Síndrome de Wiskott-Aldrich/genética
3.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(9): e1008852, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960931

RESUMO

Enzymatic inactivation of Rho-family GTPases by the glucosyltransferase domain of Clostridioides difficile Toxin B (TcdB) gives rise to various pathogenic effects in cells that are classically thought to be responsible for the disease symptoms associated with C. difficile infection (CDI). Recent in vitro studies have shown that TcdB can, under certain circumstances, induce cellular toxicities that are independent of glucosyltransferase (GT) activity, calling into question the precise role of GT activity. Here, to establish the importance of GT activity in CDI disease pathogenesis, we generated the first described mutant strain of C. difficile producing glucosyltransferase-defective (GT-defective) toxin. Using allelic exchange (AE) technology, we first deleted tcdA in C. difficile 630Δerm and subsequently introduced a deactivating D270N substitution in the GT domain of TcdB. To examine the role of GT activity in vivo, we tested each strain in two different animal models of CDI pathogenesis. In the non-lethal murine model of infection, the GT-defective mutant induced minimal pathology in host tissues as compared to the profound caecal inflammation seen in the wild-type and 630ΔermΔtcdA (ΔtcdA) strains. In the more sensitive hamster model of CDI, whereas hamsters in the wild-type or ΔtcdA groups succumbed to fulminant infection within 4 days, all hamsters infected with the GT-defective mutant survived the 10-day infection period without primary symptoms of CDI or evidence of caecal inflammation. These data demonstrate that GT activity is indispensable for disease pathogenesis and reaffirm its central role in disease and its importance as a therapeutic target for small-molecule inhibition.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias , Toxinas Bacterianas , Clostridium difficile , Enterocolite Pseudomembranosa , Glucosiltransferases , Animais , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Toxinas Bacterianas/genética , Toxinas Bacterianas/metabolismo , Clostridium difficile/enzimologia , Clostridium difficile/genética , Clostridium difficile/patogenicidade , Cricetinae , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Enterocolite Pseudomembranosa/enzimologia , Enterocolite Pseudomembranosa/genética , Enterocolite Pseudomembranosa/patologia , Feminino , Deleção de Genes , Glucosiltransferases/genética , Glucosiltransferases/metabolismo , Masculino , Camundongos
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4817, 2020 09 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32968056

RESUMO

Lysozymes are among the best-characterized enzymes, acting upon the cell wall substrate peptidoglycan. Here, examining the invasive bacterial periplasmic predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, we report a diversified lysozyme, DslA, which acts, unusually, upon (GlcNAc-) deacetylated peptidoglycan. B. bacteriovorus are known to deacetylate the peptidoglycan of the prey bacterium, generating an important chemical difference between prey and self walls and implying usage of a putative deacetyl-specific "exit enzyme". DslA performs this role, and ΔDslA strains exhibit a delay in leaving from prey. The structure of DslA reveals a modified lysozyme superfamily fold, with several adaptations. Biochemical assays confirm DslA specificity for deacetylated cell wall, and usage of two glutamate residues for catalysis. Exogenous DslA, added ex vivo, is able to prematurely liberate B. bacteriovorus from prey, part-way through the predatory lifecycle. We define a mechanism for specificity that invokes steric selection, and use the resultant motif to identify wider DslA homologues.


Assuntos
Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus/enzimologia , Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus/metabolismo , Muramidase/química , Muramidase/metabolismo , Periplasma/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus/genética , Parede Celular , Escherichia coli , Regulação Bacteriana da Expressão Gênica , Modelos Moleculares , Muramidase/genética , Mutação , Peptidoglicano/metabolismo , Fenótipo , Conformação Proteica , Especificidade por Substrato
5.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008822, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866204

RESUMO

Shigella flexneri invades host cells by entering within a bacteria-containing vacuole (BCV). In order to establish its niche in the host cytosol, the bacterium ruptures its BCV. Contacts between S. flexneri BCV and infection-associated macropinosomes (IAMs) formed in situ have been reported to enhance BCV disintegration. The mechanism underlying S. flexneri vacuolar escape remains however obscure. To decipher the molecular mechanism priming the communication between the IAMs and S. flexneri BCV, we performed mass spectrometry-based analysis of the magnetically purified IAMs from S. flexneri-infected cells. While proteins involved in host recycling and exocytic pathways were significantly enriched at the IAMs, we demonstrate more precisely that the S. flexneri type III effector protein IpgD mediates the recruitment of the exocyst to the IAMs through the Rab8/Rab11 pathway. This recruitment results in IAM clustering around S. flexneri BCV. More importantly, we reveal that IAM clustering subsequently facilitates an IAM-mediated unwrapping of the ruptured vacuole membranes from S. flexneri, enabling the naked bacterium to be ready for intercellular spread via actin-based motility. Taken together, our work untangles the molecular cascade of S. flexneri-driven host trafficking subversion at IAMs to develop its cytosolic lifestyle, a crucial step en route for infection progression at cellular and tissue level.


Assuntos
Disenteria Bacilar , Shigella flexneri , Transdução de Sinais , Vacúolos , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Disenteria Bacilar/genética , Disenteria Bacilar/metabolismo , Células HeLa , Humanos , Shigella flexneri/genética , Shigella flexneri/metabolismo , Shigella flexneri/patogenicidade , Vacúolos/genética , Vacúolos/metabolismo , Vacúolos/microbiologia , Fatores de Virulência/genética , Fatores de Virulência/metabolismo , Proteínas rab de Ligação ao GTP/genética , Proteínas rab de Ligação ao GTP/metabolismo
6.
S Afr Med J ; 110(8): 783-790, 2020 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880307

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) among babies born in developing countries are higher than among those born in resource-rich countries, as a result of suboptimal infection prevention and control (IPC) practices. Following two reported deaths of neonates with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs), we conducted an outbreak investigation in a neonatal unit of a regional hospital in Gauteng Province, South Africa. OBJECTIVES: To confirm an outbreak of K. pneumoniae BSIs and assess the IPC programme in the neonatal unit. METHODS: We calculated total and organism-specific BSI incidence risks for culture-confirmed cases in the neonatal unit for baseline and outbreak periods. We conducted a clinical record review for a subset of cases with K. pneumoniae BSI that had been reported to the investigating team by the neonatal unit. An IPC audit was performed in different areas of the neonatal unit. We confirmed species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility, and used polymerase chain reaction for confirmation of carbapenemase genes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for typing of submitted clinical isolates. RESULTS: From January 2017 to August 2018, 5 262 blood cultures were submitted, of which 11% (560/5 262) were positive. Of 560 positive blood cultures, 52% (n=292) were positive for pathogenic organisms associated with healthcare-associated BSIs. K. pneumoniae comprised the largest proportion of these cases (32%; 93/292). The total incidence risk of healthcare-associated BSI for the baseline period (January 2017 - March 2018) was 6.8 cases per 100 admissions, and that for the outbreak period (April - September 2018) was 10.1 cases per 100 admissions. The incidence risk of K. pneumoniae BSI for the baseline period was 1.6 cases per 100 admissions, compared with 5.0 cases per 100 admissions during the outbreak period. Average bed occupancy for the entire period was 118% (range 101 - 133%), that for the baseline period was 117%, and that for the outbreak period was 121%. In a subset of 12 neonates with K. pneumoniae bacteraemia, the median (interquartile range (IQR)) gestational age at birth was 27 (26 - 29) weeks, and the median (IQR) birth weight was 1 100 (880 - 1 425) g. Twelve bloodstream and 31 colonising K. pneumoniae isolates were OXA-48-positive. All isolates were genetically related by PFGE analysis (89% similarity). Inadequate IPC practices were noted, including suboptimal adherence to aseptic technique and hand hygiene (57% overall score in the neonatal intensive care unit), with poor monitoring and reporting of antimicrobial use (pharmacy score 55%). CONCLUSIONS: Overcrowding and inadequate IPC and antimicrobial stewardship contributed to a large outbreak of BSIs caused by genetically related carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolates in the neonatal unit.


Assuntos
Bacteriemia/microbiologia , Infecção Hospitalar/microbiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Unidades Hospitalares , Infecções por Klebsiella/epidemiologia , Gestão de Antimicrobianos , Bacteriemia/epidemiologia , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Auditoria Clínica , Infecção Hospitalar/epidemiologia , Aglomeração , Humanos , Incidência , Recém-Nascido , Controle de Infecções , Klebsiella pneumoniae/enzimologia , Klebsiella pneumoniae/isolamento & purificação , Programas Médicos Regionais , África do Sul/epidemiologia , beta-Lactamases/metabolismo
7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4501, 2020 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32908132

RESUMO

Streptovaricin C is a naphthalenic ansamycin antibiotic structurally similar to rifamycins with potential anti-MRSA bioactivities. However, the formation mechanism of the most fascinating and bioactivity-related methylenedioxy bridge (MDB) moiety in streptovaricins is unclear. Based on genetic and biochemical evidences, we herein clarify that the P450 enzyme StvP2 catalyzes the MDB formation in streptovaricins, with an atypical substrate inhibition kinetics. Furthermore, X-ray crystal structures in complex with substrate and structure-based mutagenesis reveal the intrinsic details of the enzymatic reaction. The mechanism of MDB formation is proposed to be an intramolecular nucleophilic substitution resulting from the hydroxylation by the heme core and the keto-enol tautomerization via a crucial catalytic triad (Asp89-His92-Arg72) in StvP2. In addition, in vitro reconstitution uncovers that C6-O-methylation and C4-O-acetylation of streptovaricins are necessary prerequisites for the MDB formation. This work provides insight for the MDB formation and adds evidence in support of the functional versatility of P450 enzymes.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Sistema Enzimático do Citocromo P-450/metabolismo , Streptomyces/metabolismo , Estreptovaricina/análogos & derivados , Acetilação , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/ultraestrutura , Biocatálise , Cristalografia por Raios X , Sistema Enzimático do Citocromo P-450/genética , Sistema Enzimático do Citocromo P-450/ultraestrutura , Ensaios Enzimáticos , Metilação , Mutagênese Sítio-Dirigida , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Proteínas Recombinantes/ultraestrutura , Estreptovaricina/biossíntese , Estreptovaricina/química , Estreptovaricina/metabolismo
8.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4522, 2020 09 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32908144

RESUMO

A unique, protective cell envelope contributes to the broad drug resistance of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Here we use transposon insertion sequencing to identify A. baumannii mutants displaying altered susceptibility to a panel of diverse antibiotics. By examining mutants with antibiotic susceptibility profiles that parallel mutations in characterized genes, we infer the function of multiple uncharacterized envelope proteins, some of which have roles in cell division or cell elongation. Remarkably, mutations affecting a predicted cell wall hydrolase lead to alterations in lipooligosaccharide synthesis. In addition, the analysis of altered susceptibility signatures and antibiotic-induced morphology patterns allows us to predict drug synergies; for example, certain beta-lactams appear to work cooperatively due to their preferential targeting of specific cell wall assembly machineries. Our results indicate that the pathogen may be effectively inhibited by the combined targeting of multiple pathways critical for envelope growth.


Assuntos
Infecções por Acinetobacter/tratamento farmacológico , Acinetobacter baumannii/genética , Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Proteínas de Bactérias/antagonistas & inibidores , Infecção Hospitalar/tratamento farmacológico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/genética , Infecções por Acinetobacter/microbiologia , Acinetobacter baumannii/efeitos dos fármacos , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Parede Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Parede Celular/genética , Parede Celular/metabolismo , Infecção Hospitalar/microbiologia , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Elementos de DNA Transponíveis/genética , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/efeitos dos fármacos , Sinergismo Farmacológico , Humanos , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Mutação
9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4554, 2020 09 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32917865

RESUMO

Non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) enzymes form modular assembly-lines, wherein each module governs the incorporation of a specific monomer into a short peptide product. Modules are comprised of one or more key domains, including adenylation (A) domains, which recognise and activate the monomer substrate; condensation (C) domains, which catalyse amide bond formation; and thiolation (T) domains, which shuttle reaction intermediates between catalytic domains. This arrangement offers prospects for rational peptide modification via substitution of substrate-specifying domains. For over 20 years, it has been considered that C domains play key roles in proof-reading the substrate; a presumption that has greatly complicated rational NRPS redesign. Here we present evidence from both directed and natural evolution studies that any substrate-specifying role for C domains is likely to be the exception rather than the rule, and that novel non-ribosomal peptides can be generated by substitution of A domains alone. We identify permissive A domain recombination boundaries and show that these allow us to efficiently generate modified pyoverdine peptides at high yields. We further demonstrate the transferability of our approach in the PheATE-ProCAT model system originally used to infer C domain substrate specificity, generating modified dipeptide products at yields that are inconsistent with the prevailing dogma.


Assuntos
Monofosfato de Adenosina/metabolismo , Peptídeos/química , Peptídeos/metabolismo , Domínios Proteicos , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Domínio Catalítico , Embaralhamento de DNA , Modelos Moleculares , Família Multigênica , Oligopeptídeos/química , Oligopeptídeos/metabolismo , Peptídeo Sintases/genética , Peptídeo Sintases/metabolismo , Conformação Proteica , Pseudomonas , Especificidade por Substrato
10.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1267: 45-58, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894476

RESUMO

In this chapter, we will focus on ParABS: an apparently simple, three-component system, required for the segregation of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. We will specifically describe how biophysical measurements combined with physical modeling advanced our understanding of the mechanism of ParABS-mediated complex assembly, segregation and positioning.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Segregação de Cromossomos , Cromossomos Bacterianos/metabolismo , Posicionamento Cromossômico , DNA Bacteriano/metabolismo , Plasmídeos/metabolismo
11.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(9): e1008867, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925969

RESUMO

Surface attachment, an early step in the colonization of multiple host environments, activates the virulence of the human pathogen P. aeruginosa. However, the downstream toxins that mediate surface-dependent P. aeruginosa virulence remain unclear, as do the signaling pathways that lead to their activation. Here, we demonstrate that alkyl-quinolone (AQ) secondary metabolites are rapidly induced upon surface association and act directly on host cells to cause cytotoxicity. Surface-induced AQ cytotoxicity is independent of other AQ functions like quorum sensing or PQS-specific activities like iron sequestration. We further show that packaging of AQs in outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) increases their cytotoxicity to host cells but not their ability to stimulate downstream quorum sensing pathways in bacteria. OMVs lacking AQs are significantly less cytotoxic, suggesting these molecules play a role in OMV cytotoxicity, in addition to their previously characterized role in OMV biogenesis. AQ reporters also enabled us to dissect the signal transduction pathways downstream of the two known regulators of surface-dependent virulence, the quorum sensing receptor, LasR, and the putative mechanosensor, PilY1. Specifically, we show that PilY1 regulates surface-induced AQ production by repressing the AlgR-AlgZ two-component system. AlgR then induces RhlR, which can induce the AQ biosynthesis operon under specific conditions. These findings collectively suggest that the induction of AQs upon surface association is both necessary and sufficient to explain surface-induced P. aeruginosa virulence.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Infecções por Pseudomonas/metabolismo , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Quinolonas/farmacologia , Percepção de Quorum/efeitos dos fármacos , Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos , Fatores de Virulência/metabolismo , Células A549 , Animais , Humanos , Camundongos , Infecções por Pseudomonas/patologia , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/metabolismo , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/patogenicidade
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(33): 19720-19730, 2020 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732435

RESUMO

The synthesis of quinolinic acid from tryptophan is a critical step in the de novo biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) in mammals. Herein, the nonheme iron-based 3-hydroxyanthranilate-3,4-dioxygenase responsible for quinolinic acid production was studied by performing time-resolved in crystallo reactions monitored by UV-vis microspectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. Seven catalytic intermediates were kinetically and structurally resolved in the crystalline state, and each accompanies protein conformational changes at the active site. Among them, a monooxygenated, seven-membered lactone intermediate as a monodentate ligand of the iron center at 1.59-Å resolution was captured, which presumably corresponds to a substrate-based radical species observed by EPR using a slurry of small-sized single crystals. Other structural snapshots determined at around 2.0-Å resolution include monodentate and subsequently bidentate coordinated substrate, superoxo, alkylperoxo, and two metal-bound enol tautomers of the unstable dioxygenase product. These results reveal a detailed stepwise O-atom transfer dioxygenase mechanism along with potential isomerization activity that fine-tunes product profiling and affects the production of quinolinic acid at a junction of the metabolic pathway.


Assuntos
3-Hidroxiantranilato 3,4-Dioxigenase/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Cupriavidus/enzimologia , 3-Hidroxiantranilato 3,4-Dioxigenase/genética , 3-Hidroxiantranilato 3,4-Dioxigenase/metabolismo , Animais , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Domínio Catalítico , Cristalização , Cristalografia por Raios X , Cupriavidus/química , Cupriavidus/genética , Cinética , Lactonas/química , Lactonas/metabolismo , Modelos Moleculares , Especificidade por Substrato
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(33): 19705-19712, 2020 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32747579

RESUMO

Photosystem II (PS II) captures solar energy and directs charge separation (CS) across the thylakoid membrane during photosynthesis. The highly oxidizing, charge-separated state generated within its reaction center (RC) drives water oxidation. Spectroscopic studies on PS II RCs are difficult to interpret due to large spectral congestion, necessitating modeling to elucidate key spectral features. Herein, we present results from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations on the largest PS II RC model reported to date. This model explicitly includes six RC chromophores and both the chlorin phytol chains and the amino acid residues <6 Å from the pigments' porphyrin ring centers. Comparing our wild-type model results with calculations on mutant D1-His-198-Ala and D2-His-197-Ala RCs, our simulated absorption-difference spectra reproduce experimentally observed shifts in known chlorophyll absorption bands, demonstrating the predictive capabilities of this model. We find that inclusion of both nearby residues and phytol chains is necessary to reproduce this behavior. Our calculations provide a unique opportunity to observe the molecular orbitals that contribute to the excited states that are precursors to CS. Strikingly, we observe two high oscillator strength, low-lying states, in which molecular orbitals are delocalized over ChlD1 and PheD1 as well as one weaker oscillator strength state with molecular orbitals delocalized over the P chlorophylls. Both these configurations are a match for previously identified exciton-charge transfer states (ChlD1 +PheD1 -)* and (PD2 +PD1 -)*. Our results demonstrate the power of TDDFT as a tool, for studies of natural photosynthesis, or indeed future studies of artificial photosynthetic complexes.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Cianobactérias/metabolismo , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema II/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Clorofila/química , Clorofila/metabolismo , Cianobactérias/química , Cianobactérias/genética , Cinética , Modelos Moleculares , Fotossíntese , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema II/genética , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema II/metabolismo
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(33): 19731-19736, 2020 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32759207

RESUMO

Cyanobacteriochromes are photoreceptors in cyanobacteria that exhibit a wide spectral coverage and unique photophysical properties from the photoinduced isomerization of a linear tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, we integrate femtosecond-resolved fluorescence and transient-absorption methods and unambiguously showed the significant solvation dynamics occurring at the active site from a few to hundreds of picoseconds. These motions of local water molecules and polar side chains are continuously convoluted with the isomerization reaction, leading to a nonequilibrium processes with continuous active-site motions. By mutations of critical residues at the active site, the modified local structures become looser, resulting in faster solvation relaxations and isomerization reaction. The observation of solvation dynamics is significant and critical to the correct interpretation of often-observed multiphasic dynamic behaviors, and thus the previously invoked ground-state heterogeneity may not be relevant to the excited-state isomerization reaction.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Cianobactérias/metabolismo , Fotorreceptores Microbianos/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Domínio Catalítico , Cianobactérias/química , Cianobactérias/genética , Isomerismo , Cinética , Fotorreceptores Microbianos/genética , Fotorreceptores Microbianos/metabolismo
15.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4196, 2020 08 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32826907

RESUMO

Cells utilise specialized polymerases from the Primase-Polymerase (Prim-Pol) superfamily to maintain genome stability. Prim-Pol's function in genome maintenance pathways including replication, repair and damage tolerance. Mycobacteria contain multiple Prim-Pols required for lesion repair, including Prim-PolC that performs short gap repair synthesis during excision repair. To understand the molecular basis of Prim-PolC's gap recognition and synthesis activities, we elucidated crystal structures of pre- and post-catalytic complexes bound to gapped DNA substrates. These intermediates explain its binding preference for short gaps and reveal a distinctive modus operandi called Synthesis-dependent Template Displacement (STD). This mechanism enables Prim-PolC to couple primer extension with template base dislocation, ensuring that the unpaired templating bases in the gap are ushered into the active site in an ordered manner. Insights provided by these structures establishes the molecular basis of Prim-PolC's gap recognition and extension activities, while also illuminating the mechanisms of primer extension utilised by closely related Prim-Pols.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/química , DNA Primase/química , Reparo do DNA , Replicação do DNA , DNA Polimerase Dirigida por DNA/química , DNA/química , Mycobacterium/genética , Mycobacterium/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Sequência de Bases , Sítios de Ligação , Domínio Catalítico , Cristalografia por Raios X , DNA/metabolismo , DNA Primase/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/química , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , DNA Polimerase Dirigida por DNA/metabolismo , Modelos Moleculares , Conformação Proteica , Domínios e Motivos de Interação entre Proteínas
16.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008708, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785266

RESUMO

The intestinal pathogen Clostridioides difficile exhibits heterogeneity in motility and toxin production. This phenotypic heterogeneity is achieved through phase variation by site-specific recombination via the DNA recombinase RecV, which reversibly inverts the "flagellar switch" upstream of the flgB operon. A recV mutation prevents flagellar switch inversion and results in phenotypically locked strains. The orientation of the flagellar switch influences expression of the flgB operon post-transcription initiation, but the specific molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of spontaneous suppressor mutants in the non-motile, non-toxigenic recV flg OFF background that regained motility and toxin production. The restored phenotypes corresponded with increased expression of flagellum and toxin genes. The motile suppressor mutants contained single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in rho, which encodes the bacterial transcription terminator Rho factor. Analyses using transcriptional reporters indicate that Rho contributes to heterogeneity in flagellar gene expression by preferentially terminating transcription of flg OFF mRNA within the 5' leader sequence. Additionally, Rho is important for initial colonization of the intestine in a mouse model of infection, which may in part be due to the sporulation and growth defects observed in the rho mutants. Together these data implicate Rho factor as a regulator of gene expression affecting phase variation of important virulence factors of C. difficile.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Toxinas Bacterianas/metabolismo , Infecções por Clostridium/microbiologia , Clostridium difficile/metabolismo , Flagelos/metabolismo , Fator Rho/metabolismo , Animais , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Toxinas Bacterianas/genética , Clostridium difficile/genética , Clostridium difficile/patogenicidade , Feminino , Flagelos/genética , Regulação Bacteriana da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Óperon , Fator Rho/genética , Virulência
17.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008740, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32822429

RESUMO

Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is an important posttranscriptional event in eukaryotes; however, many features remain largely unexplored in prokaryotes. This study focuses on a serine-to-proline recoding event (S128P) that originated in the mRNA of fliC, which encodes a flagellar filament protein; the editing event was observed in RNA-seq samples exposed to oxidative stress. Using Sanger sequencing, we show that the S128P editing event is induced by H2O2. To investigate the in vivo interaction between RNAs and TadA, which is the principal enzyme for A-to-I editing, genome-wide RNA immunoprecipitation-coupled high-throughput sequencing (iRIP-Seq) analysis was performed using HA-tagged TadA from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola. We found that TadA can bind to the mRNA of fliC and the binding motif is identical to that previously reported by Bar-Yaacov and colleagues. This editing event increased motility and enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress due to changes in flagellar filament structure, which was modelled in 3D and measured by TEM. The change in filament structure due to the S128P mutant increased biofilm formation, which was measured by the 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy. RNA-seq revealed that a gene cluster that contributes to siderophore biosynthesis and Fe3+ uptake was upregulated in S128P compared with WT. Based on intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and an oxidative stress survival assay, we found that this gene cluster can contribute to the reduction of the Fenton reaction and increases biofilm formation and bacterial virulence. This oxidative stress response was also confirmed in Pseudomonas putida. Overall, our work demonstrates that A-to-I RNA editing plays a role in bacterial pathogenicity and adaptation to oxidative stress.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Edição de RNA , Xanthomonas/genética , Xanthomonas/metabolismo , Adenosina/genética , Adenosina/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Peróxido de Hidrogênio/farmacologia , Inosina/genética , Inosina/metabolismo , Estresse Oxidativo/efeitos dos fármacos , Doenças das Plantas/microbiologia , Virulência/efeitos dos fármacos , Xanthomonas/efeitos dos fármacos , Xanthomonas/patogenicidade
18.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008734, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32853279

RESUMO

AMPylation, the post-translational modification with adenosine monophosphate (AMP), is catalyzed by effector proteins from a variety of pathogens. Legionella pneumophila is thus far the only known pathogen that, in addition to encoding an AMPylase (SidM/DrrA), also encodes a deAMPylase, called SidD, that reverses SidM-mediated AMPylation of the vesicle transport GTPase Rab1. DeAMPylation is catalyzed by the N-terminal phosphatase-like domain of SidD. Here, we determined the crystal structure of full length SidD including the uncharacterized C-terminal domain (CTD). A flexible loop rich in aromatic residues within the CTD was required to target SidD to model membranes in vitro and to the Golgi apparatus within mammalian cells. Deletion of the loop (Δloop) or substitution of its aromatic phenylalanine residues rendered SidD cytosolic, showing that the hydrophobic loop is the primary membrane-targeting determinant of SidD. Notably, deletion of the two terminal alpha helices resulted in a CTD variant incapable of discriminating between membranes of different composition. Moreover, a L. pneumophila strain producing SidDΔloop phenocopied a L. pneumophila ΔsidD strain during growth in mouse macrophages and displayed prolonged co-localization of AMPylated Rab1 with LCVs, thus revealing that membrane targeting of SidD via its CTD is a critical prerequisite for its ability to catalyze Rab1 deAMPylation during L. pneumophila infection.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/microbiologia , Legionella pneumophila/enzimologia , Doença dos Legionários/microbiologia , Monofosfato de Adenosina/metabolismo , Animais , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Feminino , Complexo de Golgi/metabolismo , Humanos , Legionella pneumophila/química , Legionella pneumophila/genética , Camundongos , Domínios Proteicos
19.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237474, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32857767

RESUMO

The effective treatment of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infection has been limited and required novel potential agents. Due to the novel drug development crisis, using old antimicrobial agents and combination therapy have been highlighted. This study focused on fosfomycin which inhibits cell wall synthesis and has potential activity on Enterobacteriaceae. We evaluated fosfomycin activity against carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae and characterized fosfomycin resistance mechanisms. Fosfomycin revealed effective activity against only 31.8% of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolates. The major resistance mechanism was FosA3 production. The co-occurrence of FosA3 overexpression with the mutation of glpT (or loss of glpT) and/or uhpT was mediated high-level resistance (MIC>256 mg/L) to fosfomycin. Moreover, fosA3 silenced in sixteen fosfomycin-susceptible isolates and the plasmid carrying fosA3 of these isolates increased 32- to 64-fold of fosfomycin MICs in Escherichia coli DH5α transformants. The in vitro activity of fosfomycin combination with amikacin by checkerboard assay showed synergism and no interaction in six (16.2%) and sixteen isolates (43.3%), respectively. No antagonism of fosfomycin and amikacin was observed. Notably, the silence of aac (6)'-Ib and aphA6 was observed in amikacin-susceptible isolates. Our study suggests that the combination of fosfomycin and amikacin may be insufficient for the treatment of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolates.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/genética , Fosfomicina/farmacologia , Klebsiella pneumoniae/efeitos dos fármacos , beta-Lactamases/metabolismo , Amicacina/farmacologia , Substituição de Aminoácidos , Proteínas de Bactérias/antagonistas & inibidores , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Humanos , Infecções por Klebsiella/microbiologia , Infecções por Klebsiella/patologia , Klebsiella pneumoniae/enzimologia , Klebsiella pneumoniae/isolamento & purificação , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/genética , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/metabolismo , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Plasmídeos/genética , Plasmídeos/metabolismo , RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo , beta-Lactamases/genética
20.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000762, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760088

RESUMO

Centrosomes, the main microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) of metazoan cells, contain an older "mother" and a younger "daughter" centriole. Stem cells either inherit the mother or daughter-centriole-containing centrosome, providing a possible mechanism for biased delivery of cell fate determinants. However, the mechanisms regulating centrosome asymmetry and biased centrosome segregation are unclear. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and live-cell imaging, we show in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts) that the mitotic kinase Polo and its centriolar protein substrate Centrobin (Cnb) accumulate on the daughter centriole during mitosis, thereby generating molecularly distinct mother and daughter centrioles before interphase. Cnb's asymmetric localization, potentially involving a direct relocalization mechanism, is regulated by Polo-mediated phosphorylation, whereas Polo's daughter centriole enrichment requires both Wdr62 and Cnb. Based on optogenetic protein mislocalization experiments, we propose that the establishment of centriole asymmetry in mitosis primes biased interphase MTOC activity, necessary for correct spindle orientation.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/genética , Centríolos/metabolismo , Centrossomo/metabolismo , Proteínas de Drosophila/genética , Drosophila melanogaster/genética , Mitose , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Animais , Animais Geneticamente Modificados , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Centríolos/ultraestrutura , Centrossomo/ultraestrutura , Proteínas de Drosophila/metabolismo , Drosophila melanogaster/citologia , Drosophila melanogaster/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Drosophila melanogaster/metabolismo , Embrião não Mamífero , Regulação da Expressão Gênica no Desenvolvimento , Genes Reporter , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Interfase , Proteínas Luminescentes/genética , Proteínas Luminescentes/metabolismo , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/metabolismo , Células-Tronco Neurais/citologia , Células-Tronco Neurais/metabolismo , Optogenética/métodos , Fosforilação , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
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