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1.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5065, 2020 10 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33033237

RESUMO

The type VI protein secretion system (T6SS) is a powerful needle-like machinery found in Gram-negative bacteria that can penetrate the cytosol of receiving cells in milliseconds by physical force. Anchored by its membrane-spanning complex (MC) and a baseplate (BP), the T6SS sheath-tube is assembled in a stepwise process primed by TssA and terminated by TagA. However, the molecular details of its assembly remain elusive. Here, we systematically examined the initiation and termination of contractile and non-contractile T6SS sheaths in MC-BP, tssA and tagA mutants by fluorescence microscopy. We observe long pole-to-pole sheath-tube structures in the non-contractile MC-BP defective mutants but not in the Hcp tube or VgrG spike mutants. Combining overexpression and genetic mutation data, we demonstrate complex effects of TssM, TssA and TagA interactions on T6SS sheath-tube dynamics. We also report promiscuous interactions of TagA with multiple T6SS components, similar to TssA. Our results demonstrate that priming of the T6SS sheath-tube assembly is not dependent on TssA, nor is the assembly termination dependent on the distal end TssA-TagA interaction, and highlight the tripartite control of TssA-TssM-TagA on sheath-tube initiation and termination.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Sistemas de Secreção Tipo VI/metabolismo , Vibrio cholerae/metabolismo , Proteínas de Bactérias/química , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Proteínas de Membrana/metabolismo , Viabilidade Microbiana , Modelos Biológicos , Mutação/genética , Ligação Proteica , Domínios Proteicos
2.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5078, 2020 10 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33033266

RESUMO

Metabolic engineering facilitates chemical biosynthesis by rewiring cellular resources to produce target compounds. However, an imbalance between cell growth and bioproduction often reduces production efficiency. Genetic code expansion (GCE)-based orthogonal translation systems incorporating non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins by reassigning non-canonical codons to ncAAs qualify for balancing cellular metabolism. Here, GCE-based cell growth and biosynthesis balance engineering (GCE-CGBBE) is developed, which is based on titrating expression of cell growth and metabolic flux determinant genes by constructing ncAA-dependent expression patterns. We demonstrate GCE-CGBBE in genome-recoded Escherichia coli Δ321AM by precisely balancing glycolysis and N-acetylglucosamine production, resulting in a 4.54-fold increase in titer. GCE-CGBBE is further expanded to non-genome-recoded Bacillus subtilis to balance growth and N-acetylneuraminic acid bioproduction by titrating essential gene expression, yielding a 2.34-fold increase in titer. Moreover, the development of ncAA-dependent essential gene expression regulation shows efficient biocontainment of engineered B. subtilis to avoid unintended proliferation in nature.


Assuntos
Acetilglucosamina/metabolismo , Bacillus subtilis/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Vias Biossintéticas , Escherichia coli/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Ácido N-Acetilneuramínico/metabolismo , Bacillus subtilis/metabolismo , Proliferação de Células , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Código Genético , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Engenharia Metabólica , Análise do Fluxo Metabólico , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/genética , RNA de Transferência/genética , Tirosina/metabolismo
3.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4226, 2020 08 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32839450

RESUMO

Intercellular signaling is indispensable for single cells to form complex biological structures, such as biofilms, tissues and organs. The genetic tools available for engineering intercellular signaling, however, are quite limited. Here we exploit the chemical diversity of biological small molecules to de novo design a genetic toolbox for high-performance, multi-channel cell-cell communications and biological computations. By biosynthetic pathway design for signal molecules, rational engineering of sensing promoters and directed evolution of sensing transcription factors, we obtain six cell-cell signaling channels in bacteria with orthogonality far exceeding the conventional quorum sensing systems and successfully transfer some of them into yeast and human cells. For demonstration, they are applied in cell consortia to generate bacterial colony-patterns using up to four signaling channels simultaneously and to implement distributed bio-computation containing seven different strains as basic units. This intercellular signaling toolbox paves the way for engineering complex multicellularity including artificial ecosystems and smart tissues.


Assuntos
Comunicação Celular/genética , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Transdução de Sinais/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Escherichia coli/genética , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Células HEK293 , Humanos , Microscopia de Fluorescência , Mutação , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4214, 2020 08 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32843632

RESUMO

Stomata are epidermal structures that modulate gas exchanges between plants and the atmosphere. The formation of stomata is regulated by multiple developmental and environmental signals, but how these signals are coordinated to control this process remains unclear. Here, we showed that the conserved energy sensor kinase SnRK1 promotes stomatal development under short-day photoperiod or in liquid culture conditions. Mutation of KIN10, the catalytic α-subunit of SnRK1, results in the decreased stomatal index; while overexpression of KIN10 significantly induces stomatal development. KIN10 displays the cell-type-specific subcellular location pattern. The nuclear-localized KIN10 proteins are highly enriched in the stomatal lineage cells to phosphorylate and stabilize SPEECHLESS, a master regulator of stomatal formation, thereby promoting stomatal development. Our work identifies a module links connecting the energy signaling and stomatal development and reveals that multiple regulatory mechanisms are in place for SnRK1 to modulate stomatal development in response to changing environments.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Arabidopsis/genética , Arabidopsis/genética , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Estômatos de Plantas/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/metabolismo , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Microscopia Confocal , Mutação , Fosforilação , Fotoperíodo , Estômatos de Plantas/citologia , Estômatos de Plantas/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Estabilidade Proteica , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
5.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4259, 2020 08 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32848156

RESUMO

The plasma membrane is the interface through which cells interact with their environment. Membrane proteins are embedded in the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and their function in this context is often linked to their specific location and dynamics within the membrane. However, few methods are available to manipulate membrane protein location at the single-molecule level. Here, we use fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) to track membrane molecules and to control their movement. FMNPs allow single-particle tracking (SPT) at 10 nm and 5 ms spatiotemporal resolution, and using a magnetic needle, we pull membrane components laterally with femtonewton-range forces. In this way, we drag membrane proteins over the surface of living cells. Doing so, we detect barriers which we could localize to the submembrane actin cytoskeleton by super-resolution microscopy. We present here a versatile approach to probe membrane processes in live cells via the magnetic control of membrane protein motion.


Assuntos
Nanopartículas de Magnetita , Proteínas de Membrana/metabolismo , Citoesqueleto de Actina/metabolismo , Animais , Linhagem Celular , Chlorocebus aethiops , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Campos Magnéticos , Lipídeos de Membrana/metabolismo , Microscopia de Fluorescência , Nanotecnologia , Imagem Individual de Molécula/métodos
6.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3881, 2020 08 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32753572

RESUMO

Cells typically respond to chemical or physical perturbations via complex signaling cascades which can simultaneously affect multiple physiological parameters, such as membrane voltage, calcium, pH, and redox potential. Protein-based fluorescent sensors can report many of these parameters, but spectral overlap prevents more than ~4 modalities from being recorded in parallel. Here we introduce the technique, MOSAIC, Multiplexed Optical Sensors in Arrayed Islands of Cells, where patterning of fluorescent sensor-encoding lentiviral vectors with a microarray printer enables parallel recording of multiple modalities. We demonstrate simultaneous recordings from 20 sensors in parallel in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), and we describe responses to metabolic and pharmacological perturbations. Together, these results show that MOSAIC can provide rich multi-modal data on complex physiological responses in multiple cell types.


Assuntos
Técnicas Biossensoriais/métodos , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes Induzidas/metabolismo , Microscopia de Fluorescência/métodos , Miócitos Cardíacos/metabolismo , Imagem Óptica/métodos , Potenciais de Ação/efeitos dos fármacos , Antagonistas Adrenérgicos beta/farmacologia , Técnicas Biossensoriais/instrumentação , Cálcio/química , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Células HEK293 , Humanos , Peróxido de Hidrogênio/farmacologia , Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes Induzidas/citologia , Mitocôndrias/metabolismo , Miócitos Cardíacos/citologia , Miócitos Cardíacos/fisiologia , Imagem Óptica/instrumentação , Oxidantes/farmacologia , Oxirredução/efeitos dos fármacos , Propanolaminas/farmacologia
7.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000762, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760088

RESUMO

Centrosomes, the main microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) of metazoan cells, contain an older "mother" and a younger "daughter" centriole. Stem cells either inherit the mother or daughter-centriole-containing centrosome, providing a possible mechanism for biased delivery of cell fate determinants. However, the mechanisms regulating centrosome asymmetry and biased centrosome segregation are unclear. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and live-cell imaging, we show in fly neural stem cells (neuroblasts) that the mitotic kinase Polo and its centriolar protein substrate Centrobin (Cnb) accumulate on the daughter centriole during mitosis, thereby generating molecularly distinct mother and daughter centrioles before interphase. Cnb's asymmetric localization, potentially involving a direct relocalization mechanism, is regulated by Polo-mediated phosphorylation, whereas Polo's daughter centriole enrichment requires both Wdr62 and Cnb. Based on optogenetic protein mislocalization experiments, we propose that the establishment of centriole asymmetry in mitosis primes biased interphase MTOC activity, necessary for correct spindle orientation.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/genética , Centríolos/metabolismo , Centrossomo/metabolismo , Proteínas de Drosophila/genética , Drosophila melanogaster/genética , Mitose , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Animais , Animais Geneticamente Modificados , Proteínas de Bactérias/genética , Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Centríolos/ultraestrutura , Centrossomo/ultraestrutura , Proteínas de Drosophila/metabolismo , Drosophila melanogaster/citologia , Drosophila melanogaster/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Drosophila melanogaster/metabolismo , Embrião não Mamífero , Regulação da Expressão Gênica no Desenvolvimento , Genes Reporter , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Interfase , Proteínas Luminescentes/genética , Proteínas Luminescentes/metabolismo , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/metabolismo , Células-Tronco Neurais/citologia , Células-Tronco Neurais/metabolismo , Optogenética/métodos , Fosforilação , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais
8.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4285, 2020 08 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32855390

RESUMO

Plant hormone cytokinins are perceived by a subfamily of sensor histidine kinases (HKs), which via a two-component phosphorelay cascade activate transcriptional responses in the nucleus. Subcellular localization of the receptors proposed the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as a principal cytokinin perception site, while study of cytokinin transport pointed to the plasma membrane (PM)-mediated cytokinin signalling. Here, by detailed monitoring of subcellular localizations of the fluorescently labelled natural cytokinin probe and the receptor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE 4 (CRE1/AHK4) fused to GFP reporter, we show that pools of the ER-located cytokinin receptors can enter the secretory pathway and reach the PM in cells of the root apical meristem, and the cell plate of dividing meristematic cells. Brefeldin A (BFA) experiments revealed vesicular recycling of the receptor and its accumulation in BFA compartments. We provide a revised view on cytokinin signalling and the possibility of multiple sites of perception at PM and ER.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Citocininas/metabolismo , Retículo Endoplasmático/metabolismo , Corantes Fluorescentes/química , Proteínas Quinases/metabolismo , Receptores de Superfície Celular/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/citologia , Arabidopsis/genética , Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/genética , Brefeldina A/farmacologia , Citocininas/química , Corantes Fluorescentes/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Meristema/citologia , Meristema/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Proteínas Quinases/genética , Receptores de Superfície Celular/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos
9.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4284, 2020 08 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32855409

RESUMO

Cytokinins are mobile multifunctional plant hormones with roles in development and stress resilience. Although their Histidine Kinase receptors are substantially localised to the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular sites of cytokinin perception and importance of spatially heterogeneous cytokinin distribution continue to be debated. Here we show that cytokinin perception by plasma membrane receptors is an effective additional path for cytokinin response. Readout from a Two Component Signalling cytokinin-specific reporter (TCSn::GFP) closely matches intracellular cytokinin content in roots, yet we also find cytokinins in extracellular fluid, potentially enabling action at the cell surface. Cytokinins covalently linked to beads that could not pass the plasma membrane increased expression of both TCSn::GFP and Cytokinin Response Factors. Super-resolution microscopy of GFP-labelled receptors and diminished TCSn::GFP response to immobilised cytokinins in cytokinin receptor mutants, further indicate that receptors can function at the cell surface. We argue that dual intracellular and surface locations may augment flexibility of cytokinin responses.


Assuntos
Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Citocininas/metabolismo , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Adenina/análogos & derivados , Adenina/farmacologia , Arabidopsis/citologia , Arabidopsis/efeitos dos fármacos , Arabidopsis/genética , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/genética , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Líquido Extracelular/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Histidina Quinase/genética , Histidina Quinase/metabolismo , Mutação , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Transdução de Sinais
10.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2713, 2020 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32483127

RESUMO

Despite their rapidly-expanding therapeutic potential, human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cell therapies continue to have serious safety risks. Transplantation of hPSC-derived cell populations into preclinical models has generated teratomas (tumors arising from undifferentiated hPSCs), unwanted tissues, and other types of adverse events. Mitigating these risks is important to increase the safety of such therapies. Here we use genome editing to engineer a general platform to improve the safety of future hPSC-derived cell transplantation therapies. Specifically, we develop hPSC lines bearing two drug-inducible safeguards, which have distinct functionalities and address separate safety concerns. In vitro administration of one small molecule depletes undifferentiated hPSCs >106-fold, thus preventing teratoma formation in vivo. Administration of a second small molecule kills all hPSC-derived cell-types, thus providing an option to eliminate the entire hPSC-derived cell product in vivo if adverse events arise. These orthogonal safety switches address major safety concerns with pluripotent cell-derived therapies.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Cultura de Células/métodos , Diferenciação Celular/genética , Edição de Genes/métodos , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes/metabolismo , Transplante de Células-Tronco/métodos , Animais , Sobrevivência Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Sobrevivência Celular/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Humanos , Camundongos Endogâmicos NOD , Camundongos Knockout , Camundongos SCID , Proteína Homeobox Nanog/genética , Proteína Homeobox Nanog/metabolismo , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes/citologia , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes/efeitos dos fármacos , Bibliotecas de Moléculas Pequenas/farmacologia , Tacrolimo/análogos & derivados , Tacrolimo/farmacologia , Teratoma/genética , Teratoma/metabolismo , Teratoma/prevenção & controle
11.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2876, 2020 06 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513994

RESUMO

Precise gene editing aims at generating single-nucleotide modifications to correct or model human disease. However, precision editing with nucleases such as CRIPSR-Cas9 has seen limited success due to poor efficiency and limited practicality. Here, we establish a fluorescent DNA repair assay in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to visualize and quantify the frequency of DNA repair outcomes during monoallelic and biallelic targeting. We found that modulating both DNA repair and cell cycle phase via defined culture conditions and small molecules synergistically enhanced the frequency of homology-directed repair (HDR). Notably, targeting in homozygous reporter cells results in high levels of editing with a vast majority of biallelic HDR outcomes. We then leverage efficient biallelic HDR with mixed ssODN repair templates to generate heterozygous mutations. Synergistic gene editing represents an effective strategy to generate precise genetic modifications in human iPS cells.


Assuntos
Ciclo Celular , Reparo do DNA , Edição de Genes , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes Induzidas/citologia , Células-Tronco Pluripotentes Induzidas/metabolismo , Alelos , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Sequência de Bases , Resposta ao Choque Frio , Fluorescência , Loci Gênicos , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/química , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Homozigoto , Humanos , Mutação/genética
12.
J Chromatogr A ; 1624: 461227, 2020 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32540069

RESUMO

Affinity chromatography is generally regarded as a powerful tool allowing the single step purification of recombinant proteins with high purity and yields. However, for most protein products, affinity purification methods for industrial applications are not readily available, mainly due to the lack of specific and robust natural counterparts that could function as affinity ligands. In this study, we explored the applicability of nanobody-based peptide-tag immunorecognition systems as a platform for affinity chromatography. Two typical nanobodies (BC2-nb and Syn2-nb) that are capable of recognizing specifically a particular peptide-tag, were prepared through prokaryotic expression and proved to be able to bind with nanomolar affinity to their cognate tag fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Through an epoxy-based immobilization reaction, the two nanobodies were coupled on a Sepharose CL-6B matrix under the same conditions. The remaining antigen binding activity of the immobilized BC2-nb and Syn2-nb was determined to be 83.1% and 42.9%, yielding the resins with the dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of 21.4 mg/mL and 5.9 mg/mL, respectively. The immobilized affinity ligands exhibited high binding specificity towards their respective target peptides, yielding a product purity above 90% directly from crude bacterial lysates in one single chromatographic step. However, for the both affinity complexes, desorption has been found difficult, and effective recovery of the bound products could be only achieved with competitive elution or after employing harsh conditions such as 10 mM NaOH solution, which will compromise the reuse cycles of the affinity resins. This study shows the potential of nanobody-based affinity chromatography for efficient purification of recombinant proteins especially from complex feedstocks and reveals the primary issues to be addressed to develop a successful application.


Assuntos
Cromatografia de Afinidade/métodos , Peptídeos/imunologia , Anticorpos de Domínio Único/imunologia , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Anticorpos Imobilizados/química , Anticorpos Imobilizados/imunologia , Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Pressão , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Cinética , Peptídeos/química , Peptídeos/isolamento & purificação , Anticorpos de Domínio Único/genética , Anticorpos de Domínio Único/metabolismo
13.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0235116, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32569321

RESUMO

Here, we examine known GTPase regulators of vesicle trafficking events to assess whether they affect endothelial cell (EC) lumen and tube formation. We identify novel roles for the small GTPases Rab3A, Rab3B, Rab8A, Rab11A, Rab27A, RalA, RalB and caveolin-1 in co-regulating membrane trafficking events that control EC lumen and tube formation. siRNA suppression of individual GTPases such as Rab3A, Rab8A, and RalB markedly inhibit tubulogenesis, while greater blockade is observed with combinations of siRNAs such as Rab3A and Rab3B, Rab8A and Rab11A, and RalA and RalB. These combinations of siRNAs also disrupt very early events in lumen formation including the formation of intracellular vacuoles. In contrast, knockdown of the endocytosis regulator, Rab5A, fails to inhibit EC tube formation. Confocal microscopy and real-time videos reveal that caveolin-1 strongly labels intracellular vacuoles and localizes to the EC apical surface as they fuse to form the luminal membrane. In contrast, Cdc42 and Rab11A localize to a perinuclear, subapical region where intracellular vacuoles accumulate and fuse during lumen formation. Our new data demonstrates that EC tubulogenesis is coordinated by a series of small GTPases to control polarized membrane trafficking events to generate, deliver, and fuse caveolin-1-labeled vacuoles to create the apical membrane surface.


Assuntos
Caveolina 1/metabolismo , Células Endoteliais da Veia Umbilical Humana/metabolismo , Vacúolos/metabolismo , Proteínas rab de Ligação ao GTP/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Colágeno/metabolismo , Exocitose , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Humanos , Modelos Biológicos , Transporte Proteico , RNA Interferente Pequeno/metabolismo , Proteínas rac de Ligação ao GTP/metabolismo , Proteínas ral de Ligação ao GTP/metabolismo , Quinases da Família src/metabolismo
14.
Science ; 368(6497): 1386-1392, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32554597

RESUMO

The nucleus contains diverse phase-separated condensates that compartmentalize and concentrate biomolecules with distinct physicochemical properties. Here, we investigated whether condensates concentrate small-molecule cancer therapeutics such that their pharmacodynamic properties are altered. We found that antineoplastic drugs become concentrated in specific protein condensates in vitro and that this occurs through physicochemical properties independent of the drug target. This behavior was also observed in tumor cells, where drug partitioning influenced drug activity. Altering the properties of the condensate was found to affect the concentration and activity of drugs. These results suggest that selective partitioning and concentration of small molecules within condensates contributes to drug pharmacodynamics and that further understanding of this phenomenon may facilitate advances in disease therapy.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/farmacologia , Núcleo Celular/metabolismo , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos , Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias/metabolismo , Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/genética , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Proteínas Cromossômicas não Histona/genética , Proteínas Cromossômicas não Histona/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Humanos , Subunidade 1 do Complexo Mediador/genética , Subunidade 1 do Complexo Mediador/metabolismo , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/metabolismo , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Fatores de Processamento de Serina-Arginina/genética , Fatores de Processamento de Serina-Arginina/metabolismo , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
15.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0234430, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32511274

RESUMO

Excess presence of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as well as of the focal adhesion protein complexes are associated with increased proliferation, migratory, and invasive behavior of cancer cells. A cross-regulation between HER2 and integrin signaling pathways has been found, but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether HER2 colocalizes with focal adhesion complexes on breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2. For this purpose, vinculin or talin green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins, both key constituents of focal adhesions, were expressed in breast cancer cells. HER2 was either extracellularly or intracellularly labeled with fluorescent quantum dots nanoparticles (QDs). The cell-substrate interface was analyzed at the location of the focal adhesions by means of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy or correlative fluorescence- and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Expression of HER2 at the cell-substrate interface was only observed upon intracellular labeling, and was heterogeneous with both HER2-enriched and -low regions. In contrast to an expected enrichment of HER2 at focal adhesions, an anti-correlated expression pattern was observed for talin and HER2. Our findings suggest a spatial anti-correlation between HER2 and focal adhesion complexes for adherent cells.


Assuntos
Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Adesões Focais/metabolismo , Receptor ErbB-2/metabolismo , Análise Espacial , Adesão Celular , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Membrana Celular/ultraestrutura , Adesões Focais/ultraestrutura , Genes Reporter , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/genética , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Humanos , Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão e Varredura , Microscopia de Fluorescência , Receptor ErbB-2/análise , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/análise , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes de Fusão/metabolismo , Talina/análise , Talina/genética , Talina/metabolismo , Vinculina/análise , Vinculina/genética , Vinculina/metabolismo
16.
J Vis Exp ; (159)2020 05 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32510495

RESUMO

Vaccinia virus (VACV) was instrumental in eradicating variola virus (VARV), the causative agent of smallpox, from nature. Since its first use as a vaccine, VACV has been developed as a vector for therapeutic vaccines and as an oncolytic virus. These applications take advantage of VACV's easily manipulated genome and broad host range as an outstanding platform to generate recombinant viruses with a variety of therapeutic applications. Several methods have been developed to generate recombinant VACV, including marker selection methods and transient dominant selection. Here, we present a refinement of a host range selection method coupled with visual identification of recombinant viruses. Our method takes advantage of selective pressure generated by the host antiviral protein kinase R (PKR) coupled with a fluorescent fusion gene expressing mCherry-tagged E3L, one of two VACV PKR antagonists. The cassette, including the gene of interest and the mCherry-E3L fusion is flanked by sequences derived from the VACV genome. Between the gene of interest and mCherry-E3L is a smaller region that is identical to the first ~150 nucleotides of the 3' arm, to promote homologous recombination and loss of the mCherry-E3L gene after selection. We demonstrate that this method permits efficient, seamless generation of rVACV in a variety of cell types without requiring drug selection or extensive screening for mutant viruses.


Assuntos
Vetores Genéticos/administração & dosagem , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Rim/metabolismo , Infecções por Poxviridae/metabolismo , Poxviridae/genética , eIF-2 Quinase/metabolismo , Animais , Células Cultivadas , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Humanos , Rim/citologia , Rim/virologia , Infecções por Poxviridae/virologia , Coelhos , Vírus Vaccinia/genética
17.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2781, 2020 06 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32493900

RESUMO

Mutations disrupting regulatory T (Treg) cell function can cause IPEX and IPEX-related disorders, but whether established disease can be reversed by correcting these mutations is unclear. Treg-specific deletion of the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 impairs Treg cell activation and causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. Here, we show with a reversible knockout model that re-expression of Brg1, in conjunction with the severe endogenous proinflammatory environment, can convert defective Treg cells into powerful, super-activated Treg cells (SuperTreg cells) that can resolve advanced autoimmunity,  with  Brg1 re-expression in a minor fraction of Treg cells sufficient for the resolution in some cases. SuperTreg cells have enhanced trafficking and regulatory capabilities, but become deactivated as the inflammation subsides, thus avoiding excessive immune suppression. We propose a simple, robust yet safe gene-editing-based therapy for IPEX and IPEX-related disorders that exploits the defective Treg cells and the inflammatory environment pre-existing in the patients.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/congênito , Diarreia/imunologia , Doenças Genéticas Ligadas ao Cromossomo X/imunologia , Doenças do Sistema Imunitário/congênito , Linfócitos T Reguladores/imunologia , Alelos , Animais , Citocinas/metabolismo , DNA Helicases/deficiência , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/imunologia , Feminino , Regulação da Expressão Gênica/efeitos dos fármacos , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Doenças do Sistema Imunitário/imunologia , Ativação Linfocitária/imunologia , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , Proteínas Nucleares/deficiência , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas c-akt/metabolismo , Receptores CXCR3/metabolismo , Fator de Transcrição STAT1/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/efeitos dos fármacos , Análise de Sobrevida , Linfócitos T Reguladores/efeitos dos fármacos , Tamoxifeno/farmacologia , Fatores de Transcrição/deficiência
18.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2798, 2020 06 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32493925

RESUMO

Mediator 12 (MED12) and MED13 are components of the Mediator multi-protein complex, that facilitates the initial steps of gene transcription. Here, in an Arabidopsis mutant screen, we identify MED12 and MED13 as positive gene regulators, both of which contribute broadly to morc1 de-repressed gene expression. Both MED12 and MED13 are preferentially required for the expression of genes depleted in active chromatin marks, a chromatin signature shared with morc1 re-activated loci. We further discover that MED12 tends to interact with genes that are responsive to environmental stimuli, including light and radiation. We demonstrate that light-induced transient gene expression depends on MED12, and is accompanied by a concomitant increase in MED12 enrichment during induction. In contrast, the steady-state expression level of these genes show little dependence on MED12, suggesting that MED12 is primarily required to aid the expression of genes in transition from less-active to more active states.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/genética , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas , Proteínas Repressoras/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/efeitos da radiação , Proteínas de Arabidopsis/genética , Cromatina/metabolismo , Metilação de DNA/genética , Metilação de DNA/efeitos da radiação , Epigênese Genética/efeitos da radiação , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas/efeitos da radiação , Genes de Plantas , Genes Supressores , Loci Gênicos , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Luz , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Proteínas Repressoras/genética , Regulação para Cima/genética , Regulação para Cima/efeitos da radiação
19.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2789, 2020 06 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32493961

RESUMO

RNA-binding proteins play key roles in regulation of gene expression via recognition of structural features in RNA molecules. Here we apply a quantitative RNA pull-down approach to 186 evolutionary conserved RNA structures and report 162 interacting proteins. Unlike global RNA interactome capture, we associate individual RNA structures within messenger RNA with their interacting proteins. Of our binders 69% are known RNA-binding proteins, whereas some are previously unrelated to RNA binding and do not harbor canonical RNA-binding domains. While current knowledge about RNA-binding proteins relates to their functions at 5' or 3'-UTRs, we report a significant number of them binding to RNA folds in the coding regions of mRNAs. Using an in vivo reporter screen and pulsed SILAC, we characterize a subset of mRNA-RBP pairs and thus connect structural RNA features to functionality. Ultimately, we here present a generic, scalable approach to interrogate the increasing number of RNA structural motifs.


Assuntos
Sequência Conservada , Evolução Molecular , Conformação de Ácido Nucleico , RNA Fúngico/química , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Regiões 3' não Traduzidas/genética , Regiões 5' não Traduzidas/genética , Sequência de Bases , Sequência Conservada/genética , Epistasia Genética , Genes Reporter , Genoma Fúngico , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Motivos de Nucleotídeos/genética , Biossíntese de Proteínas , Proteoma/metabolismo , RNA Mensageiro/genética , RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/metabolismo , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
20.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2796, 2020 06 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32493965

RESUMO

Cell fate decisions involved in vascular and hematopoietic embryonic development are still poorly understood. An ETS transcription factor Etv2 functions as an evolutionarily conserved master regulator of vasculogenesis. Here we report a single-cell transcriptomic analysis of hematovascular development in wild-type and etv2 mutant zebrafish embryos. Distinct transcriptional signatures of different types of hematopoietic and vascular progenitors are identified using an etv2ci32Gt gene trap line, in which the Gal4 transcriptional activator is integrated into the etv2 gene locus. We observe a cell population with a skeletal muscle signature in etv2-deficient embryos. We demonstrate that multiple etv2ci32Gt; UAS:GFP cells differentiate as skeletal muscle cells instead of contributing to vasculature in etv2-deficient embryos. Wnt and FGF signaling promote the differentiation of these putative multipotent etv2 progenitor cells into skeletal muscle cells. We conclude that etv2 actively represses muscle differentiation in vascular progenitors, thus restricting these cells to a vascular endothelial fate.


Assuntos
Vasos Sanguíneos/citologia , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Músculo Esquelético/citologia , Análise de Célula Única , Células-Tronco/metabolismo , Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/deficiência , Peixe-Zebra/genética , Animais , Animais Geneticamente Modificados , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Diferenciação Celular/genética , Movimento Celular , Embrião não Mamífero/metabolismo , Fatores de Crescimento de Fibroblastos/metabolismo , Proteínas de Fluorescência Verde/metabolismo , Resposta ao Choque Térmico , Modelos Biológicos , Mutação/genética , Somitos/metabolismo , Transcrição Genética , Via de Sinalização Wnt , Peixe-Zebra/embriologia , Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/genética , Proteínas de Peixe-Zebra/metabolismo
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