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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 18(1): 75, 2020 10 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33028347

RESUMO

Peripartum deaths remain significantly high in low- and middle-income countries, including Kenya. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted essential services, which could lead to an increase in maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, the lockdowns, curfews, and increased risk for contracting COVID-19 may affect how women access health facilities. SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that requires a community-centred response, not just hospital-based interventions. In this prolonged health crisis, pregnant women deserve a safe and humanised birth that prioritises the physical and emotional safety of the mother and the baby. There is an urgent need for innovative strategies to prevent the deterioration of maternal and child outcomes in an already strained health system. We propose strengthening community-based midwifery to avoid unnecessary movements, decrease the burden on hospitals, and minimise the risk of COVID-19 infection among women and their newborns.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Cuidado do Lactente/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde Materna/organização & administração , Tocologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil , Recém-Nascido , Quênia/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Gravidez
2.
Can J Surg ; 63(5): E418-E421, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33009901

RESUMO

SUMMARY: The Canadian Network for International Surgery (CNIS) hosted a workshop in May of 2020 with a goal of critically evaluating Trauma Team Training courses. The workshop was held virtually because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Twenty-three participants attended from 8 countries: Canada, Guyana, Kenya, Nigeria, Switzerland, Tanzania, Uganda and the United States. More participants were able to attend the virtual meeting than the traditional in-person meetings. Web-based videoconference software was used, participants presented prerecorded PowerPoint videos, and questions were raised using a written chat. The review proved successful, with discussions and recommendations for improvements surrounding course quality, lecture content, skills sessions, curriculum variations and clinical practical scenarios. The CNIS's successful experience conducting an online curriculum review involving international participants may prove useful to others proceeding with collaborative projects during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Congressos como Assunto/organização & administração , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Currículo , Cirurgia Geral/educação , Cooperação Internacional , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Canadá/epidemiologia , Congressos como Assunto/normas , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Cirurgia Geral/métodos , Guiana/epidemiologia , Humanos , Controle de Infecções/organização & administração , Controle de Infecções/normas , Quênia/epidemiologia , Nigéria/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Suíça/epidemiologia , Tanzânia/epidemiologia , Uganda/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Comunicação por Videoconferência/organização & administração , Comunicação por Videoconferência/normas , Ferimentos e Lesões/cirurgia
3.
BMC Med ; 18(1): 316, 2020 10 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33012285

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many low- and middle-income countries have implemented control measures against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, it is not clear to what extent these measures explain the low numbers of recorded COVID-19 cases and deaths in Africa. One of the main aims of control measures is to reduce respiratory pathogen transmission through direct contact with others. In this study, we collect contact data from residents of informal settlements around Nairobi, Kenya, to assess if control measures have changed contact patterns, and estimate the impact of changes on the basic reproduction number (R0). METHODS: We conducted a social contact survey with 213 residents of five informal settlements around Nairobi in early May 2020, 4 weeks after the Kenyan government introduced enhanced physical distancing measures and a curfew between 7 pm and 5 am. Respondents were asked to report all direct physical and non-physical contacts made the previous day, alongside a questionnaire asking about the social and economic impact of COVID-19 and control measures. We examined contact patterns by demographic factors, including socioeconomic status. We described the impact of COVID-19 and control measures on income and food security. We compared contact patterns during control measures to patterns from non-pandemic periods to estimate the change in R0. RESULTS: We estimate that control measures reduced physical contacts by 62% and non-physical contacts by either 63% or 67%, depending on the pre-COVID-19 comparison matrix used. Masks were worn by at least one person in 92% of contacts. Respondents in the poorest socioeconomic quintile reported 1.5 times more contacts than those in the richest. Eighty-six percent of respondents reported a total or partial loss of income due to COVID-19, and 74% reported eating less or skipping meals due to having too little money for food. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 control measures have had a large impact on direct contacts and therefore transmission, but have also caused considerable economic and food insecurity. Reductions in R0 are consistent with the comparatively low epidemic growth in Kenya and other sub-Saharan African countries that implemented similar, early control measures. However, negative and inequitable impacts on economic and food security may mean control measures are not sustainable in the longer term.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Infecções por Coronavirus , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa/prevenção & controle , Relações Interpessoais , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/economia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Pandemias/economia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/economia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Isolamento Social , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0228366, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866142

RESUMO

The role of questing ticks in the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases in Kenya's Maasai Mara National Reserve (MMNR), an ecosystem with intensified human-wildlife-livestock interactions, remains poorly understood. We surveyed the diversity of questing ticks, their blood-meal hosts, and tick-borne pathogens to understand potential effects on human and livestock health. By flagging and hand-picking from vegetation in 25 localities, we collected 1,465 host-seeking ticks, mostly Rhipicephalus and Amblyomma species identified by morphology and molecular analysis. We used PCR with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and sequencing to identify Anaplasma, Babesia, Coxiella, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Theileria pathogens and blood-meal remnants in 231 tick pools. We detected blood-meals from humans, wildebeest, and African buffalo in Rh. appendiculatus, goat in Rh. evertsi, sheep in Am. gemma, and cattle in Am. variegatum. Rickettsia africae was detected in Am. gemma (MIR = 3.10) that had fed on sheep and in Am. variegatum (MIR = 250) that had fed on cattle. We found Rickettsia spp. in Am. gemma (MIR = 9.29) and Rh. evertsi (MIR = 200), Anaplasma ovis in Rh. appendiculatus (MIR = 0.89) and Rh. evertsi (MIR = 200), Anaplasma bovis in Rh. appendiculatus (MIR = 0.89), and Theileria parva in Rh. appendiculatus (MIR = 24). No Babesia, Ehrlichia, or Coxiella pathogens were detected. Unexpectedly, species-specific Coxiella sp. endosymbionts were detected in all tick genera (174/231 pools), which may affect tick physiology and vector competence. These findings show that ticks from the MMNR are infected with zoonotic R. africae and unclassified Rickettsia spp., demonstrating risk of African tick-bite fever and other spotted-fever group rickettsioses to locals and visitors. The protozoan pathogens identified may also pose risk to livestock production. The diverse vertebrate blood-meals of questing ticks in this ecosystem including humans, wildlife, and domestic animals, may amplify transmission of tick-borne zoonoses and livestock diseases.


Assuntos
Infestações por Carrapato/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Carrapatos/patogenicidade , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Babesia , Bovinos , Doenças dos Bovinos/microbiologia , Coxiella , Ecossistema , Ehrlichia , Humanos , Ixodidae/microbiologia , Quênia/epidemiologia , Rhipicephalus , Rickettsia , Ovinos , Theileria , Infestações por Carrapato/veterinária , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia , Carrapatos/parasitologia , Zoonoses
5.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237656, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866167

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Preterm birth is the primary driver of neonatal mortality worldwide, but it is defined by gestational age (GA) which is challenging to accurately assess in low-resource settings. In a commitment to reducing preterm birth while reinforcing and strengthening facility data sources, the East Africa Preterm Birth Initiative (PTBi-EA) chose eligibility criteria that combined GA and birth weight. This analysis evaluated the quality of the GA data as recorded in maternity registers in PTBi-EA study facilities and the strength of the PTBi-EA eligibility criteria. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of maternity register data from March-September 2016. GA data from 23 study facilities in Migori, Kenya and the Busoga Region of Uganda were evaluated for completeness (variable present), consistency (recorded versus calculated GA), and plausibility (falling within the 3rd and 97th birth weight percentiles for GA of the INTERGROWTH-21st Newborn Birth Weight Standards). Preterm birth rates were calculated using: 1) recorded GA <37 weeks, 2) recorded GA <37 weeks, excluding implausible GAs, 3) birth weight <2500g, and 4) PTBi-EA eligibility criteria of <2500g and between 2500g and 3000g if the recorded GA is <37 weeks. RESULTS: In both countries, GA was the least recorded variable in the maternity register (77.6%). Recorded and calculated GA (Kenya only) were consistent in 29.5% of births. Implausible GAs accounted for 11.7% of births. The four preterm birth rates were 1) 14.5%, 2) 10.6%, 3) 9.6%, 4) 13.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Maternity register GA data presented quality concerns in PTBi-EA study sites. The PTBi-EA eligibility criteria of <2500g and between 2500g and 3000g if the recorded GA is <37 weeks accommodated these concerns by using both birth weight and GA, balancing issues of accuracy and completeness with practical applicability.


Assuntos
Coleta de Dados/normas , Idade Gestacional , Serviços de Saúde Materna/organização & administração , Nascimento Prematuro/epidemiologia , Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos , Peso ao Nascer , Coleta de Dados/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil , Recém-Nascido de Peso Extremamente Baixo ao Nascer , Lactente Extremamente Prematuro , Recém-Nascido , Quênia/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde Materna/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravidez , Nascimento Prematuro/prevenção & controle , Melhoria de Qualidade , Sistema de Registros/normas , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Uganda/epidemiologia
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 703, 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32977759

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Treatment of gonorrhea is complicated by the development of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) to the antibiotics recommended for treatment. Knowledge on types of plasmids and the antibiotic resistance genes they harbor is useful in monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance. In Kenya, studies on gonococcal antimicrobial resistance are few and data on plasmid mediated drug resistance is limited. The present study characterizes plasmid mediated resistance in N. gonorrhoeae isolates recovered from Kenya between 2013 and 2018. METHODS: DNA was extracted from 36 sub-cultured GC isolates exhibiting varying drug resistance profiles. Whole genome sequencing was done on Illumina MiSeq platform and reads assembled de-novo using CLC Genomics Workbench. Genome annotation was performed using Rapid Annotation Subsystem Technology. Comparisons in identified antimicrobial resistance determinants were done using Bioedit sequence alignment editor. RESULTS: Twenty-four (66.7%) isolates had both ß-lactamase (TEM) and TetM encoding plasmids. 8.3% of the isolates lacked both TEM and TetM plasmids and had intermediate to susceptible penicillin and tetracycline MICs. Twenty-six (72%) isolates harbored TEM encoding plasmids. 25 of the TEM plasmids were of African type while one was an Asian type. Of the 36 isolates, 31 (86.1%) had TetM encoding plasmids, 30 of which harbored American TetM, whereas 1 carried a Dutch TetM. All analyzed isolates had non-mosaic penA alleles. All the isolates expressing TetM were tetracycline resistant (MIC> 1 mg/L) and had increased doxycycline MICs (up to 96 mg/L). All the isolates had S10 ribosomal protein V57M amino acid substitution associated with tetracycline resistance. No relation was observed between PenB and MtrR alterations and penicillin and tetracycline MICs. CONCLUSION: High-level gonococcal penicillin and tetracycline resistance in the sampled Kenyan regions was found to be mediated by plasmid borne blaTEM and tetM genes. While the African TEM plasmid, TEM1 and American TetM are the dominant genotypes, Asian TEM plasmid, a new TEM239 and Dutch TetM have emerged in the regions.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/genética , Gonorreia/tratamento farmacológico , Gonorreia/epidemiologia , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genética , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Plasmídeos/genética , Resistência a Tetraciclina/genética , Tetraciclina/uso terapêutico , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Gonorreia/microbiologia , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/isolamento & purificação , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma , beta-Lactamases/genética
7.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(15): 8226-8231, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32767354

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the climate has played a role in the COVID-19 outbreak, we compared virus lethality in countries closer to the Equator with others. Lethality in European territories and in territories of some nations with a non-temperate climate was also compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lethality was calculated as the rate of deaths in a determinate moment from the outbreak of the pandemic out of the total of identified positives for COVID-19 in a given area/nation, based on the COVID-John Hopkins University website. Lethality of countries located within the 5th parallels North/South on 6 April and 6 May 2020, was compared with that of all the other countries. Lethality in the European areas of The Netherlands, France and the United Kingdom was also compared to the territories of the same nations in areas with a non-temperate climate. RESULTS: A lower lethality rate of COVID-19 was found in Equatorial countries both on April 6 (OR=0.72 CI 95% 0.66-0.80) and on May 6 (OR=0.48, CI 95% 0.47-0.51), with a strengthening over time of the protective effect. A trend of higher risk in European vs. non-temperate areas was found on April 6, but a clear difference was evident one month later: France (OR=0.13, CI 95% 0.10-0.18), The Netherlands (OR=0.5, CI 95% 0.3-0.9) and the UK (OR=0.2, CI 95% 0.01-0.51). This result does not seem to be totally related to the differences in age distribution of different sites. CONCLUSIONS: The study does not seem to exclude that the lethality of COVID-19 may be climate sensitive. Future studies will have to confirm these clues, due to potential confounding factors, such as pollution, population age, and exposure to malaria.


Assuntos
Clima , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Estações do Ano , Tempo (Meteorologia) , Betacoronavirus , Brunei/epidemiologia , Burundi/epidemiologia , Congo/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Equador/epidemiologia , Guiné Equatorial/epidemiologia , Europa (Continente) , França/epidemiologia , Gabão/epidemiologia , Humanos , Ilhas do Oceano Índico/epidemiologia , Indonésia/epidemiologia , Quênia/epidemiologia , Malásia/epidemiologia , Melanesia/epidemiologia , Micronésia/epidemiologia , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Papua Nova Guiné/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Ruanda/epidemiologia , Samoa/epidemiologia , São Tomé e Príncipe/epidemiologia , Seicheles/epidemiologia , Singapura/epidemiologia , Somália/epidemiologia , Timor-Leste/epidemiologia , Clima Tropical , Uganda/epidemiologia , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
8.
Afr J AIDS Res ; 19(2): 147-155, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32780676

RESUMO

HIV prevalence among truckers in Africa is high and testing rates suboptimal. With numerous African countries having approved HIV self-testing kits, more information on how to design acceptable and accessible self-testing programs for high-risk populations is necessary. We explored views about self-testing via in-depth interviews with 24 truckers participating in a randomised controlled trial who refused HIV testing. A social-ecological lens was used to guide data analysis and frame study findings. While most participants said that they would use an HIV self-test, perceived barriers and facilitators were identified at multiple levels. Many participants noted lack of time to test or obtain a self-test kit as a major barrier (intrapersonal) and varied in their views about self-testing with a partner (interpersonal). Participants offered programmatic/policy recommendations, suggesting that they preferred accessing self-test kits in settings where training could be provided. Participants believed they should be able to pick up multiple test kits at the same time and that the test kits should be free or low cost. These study findings will help guide the design of self-testing programs for truckers and other mobile populations.


Assuntos
Condução de Veículo , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Adulto , Condução de Veículo/psicologia , Condução de Veículo/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Autoadministração , Parceiros Sexuais
9.
Afr J AIDS Res ; 19(2): 117-122, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32780680

RESUMO

The HIV/AIDS pandemic is compounded by the continued stigmatization of the virus/disease and of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Employing structuration theory, this study sought to examine the perceptions of Kenyans toward their government's efforts to curtail HIV/AIDS as well as their attitudes toward PLWHA. Data for this study were collected using an open-ended online survey. In total, 103 participants (25.3%) completed the survey. We used snowball sampling to select prospective participants known to the researcher; they were sent a link to the survey via email or direct message on a social networking site like Facebook or WhatsApp, and were asked to share the survey with people in their social circles. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings revealed that some participants had confidence in the Kenyan government's efforts to address the HIV/AIDS pandemic, while others showed no confidence in government-led initiatives. Consistent with previous research, this study found that stigma towards HIV/ AIDS and PLWHA still exists. Practical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Pandemias/legislação & jurisprudência , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Percepção Social , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/epidemiologia , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/prevenção & controle , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Programas Governamentais , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estigma Social , Estereotipagem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
10.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(8)2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32839197

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic calls for precision public health reflecting our improved understanding of who is the most vulnerable and their geographical location. We created three vulnerability indices to identify areas and people who require greater support while elucidating health inequities to inform emergency response in Kenya. METHODS: Geospatial indicators were assembled to create three vulnerability indices; Social VulnerabilityIndex (SVI), Epidemiological Vulnerability Index (EVI) and a composite of the two, that is, Social Epidemiological Vulnerability Index (SEVI) resolved at 295 subcounties in Kenya. SVI included 19 indicators that affect the spread of disease; socioeconomic deprivation, access to services and population dynamics, whereas EVI comprised 5 indicators describing comorbidities associated with COVID-19 severe disease progression. The indicators were scaled to a common measurement scale, spatially overlaid via arithmetic mean and equally weighted. The indices were classified into seven classes, 1-2 denoted low vulnerability and 6-7, high vulnerability. The population within vulnerabilities classes was quantified. RESULTS: The spatial variation of each index was heterogeneous across Kenya. Forty-nine northwestern and partly eastern subcounties (6.9 million people) were highly vulnerable, whereas 58 subcounties (9.7 million people) in western and central Kenya were the least vulnerable for SVI. For EVI, 48 subcounties (7.2 million people) in central and the adjacent areas and 81 subcounties (13.2 million people) in northern Kenya were the most and least vulnerable, respectively. Overall (SEVI), 46 subcounties (7.0 million people) around central and southeastern were more vulnerable, whereas 81 subcounties (14.4 million people) were least vulnerable. CONCLUSION: The vulnerability indices created are tools relevant to the county, national government and stakeholders for prioritisation and improved planning. The heterogeneous nature of the vulnerability indices underpins the need for targeted and prioritised actions based on the needs across the subcounties.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Saúde Pública , Populações Vulneráveis , Betacoronavirus , Comorbidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Análise Espacial , Populações Vulneráveis/etnologia , Populações Vulneráveis/estatística & dados numéricos
11.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008473, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32841228

RESUMO

Despite growing evidence that infants and very young children can be infected with schistosomes, the epidemiological features and risk factors are not well described in this age group. We aimed to assess the prevalence of S. mansoni infection in children under two years of age from a population with a known high burden of infection in school-aged children and adults and thus inform the need for interventions in this potentially vulnerable age group. In a cross-sectional study in Mbita Sub-county, along the east coast of Lake Victoria, Western Kenya, we enrolled 361 children aged 6-23 months. The prevalence of S. mansoni infection was detected using the Kato-Katz stool examination and a point-of-care test for urinary circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA) (Rapid Medical Diagnostics, Pretoria, South Africa). Three-hundred and five (305) children had complete data of whom 276 (90.5%, 95%CI: 86.6-93.5) children were positive for S. mansoni by the POC-CCA test, while 11 (3.6%, 95%CI: 1.8-6.4) were positive by the Kato-Katz method. All Kato-Katz positive cases were also positive by the POC-CCA test. In multivariable analysis, only geographical area, Rusinga West (AOR = 7.1, 95%CI: 1.4-35.2, P = 0.02), was associated with S. mansoni infection using Kato-Katz test. Independent associations for POC-CCA positivity included age, (12-17 months vs 6-11 months; AOR = 7.8, 95%CI: 1.8-32.6, P = 0.002) and breastfeeding in the previous 24 hours (AOR = 3.4, 95%CI: 1.3-9.0, P = 0.009). We found a potentially very high prevalence of S. mansoni infection among children under two years of age based on POC-CCA test results in Mbita Sub-county, Kenya, which if confirmed strongly supports the need to include infants in public health strategies providing universal prophylactic treatment in high burden settings. Further research is required to determine the accuracy of diagnostic tools to detect light infection among very young children and possible long-term health impacts.


Assuntos
Esquistossomose mansoni/epidemiologia , Esquistossomose mansoni/parasitologia , Anti-Helmínticos/administração & dosagem , Anti-Helmínticos/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Praziquantel/administração & dosagem , Praziquantel/uso terapêutico , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Esquistossomose mansoni/prevenção & controle
12.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008616, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32853202

RESUMO

Podoconiosis is a type of tropical lymphedema that causes massive swelling of the lower limbs. The disease is associated with both economic insecurity, due to long-term morbidity-related loss of productivity, and intense social stigma. The geographical distribution and burden of podoconiosis in Africa are uncertain. We applied statistical modelling to the most comprehensive database compiled to date to predict the environmental suitability of podoconiosis in the African continent. By combining climate and environmental data and overlaying population figures, we predicted the environmental suitability and human population at risk of podoconiosis in Africa. Environmental suitability for podoconiosis was predicted in 29 African countries. In the year 2020, the total population in areas suitable for podoconiosis is estimated at 114.5 million people, (95% uncertainty interval: 109.4-123.9) with 16.9 million in areas suitable for both lymphatic filariasis and podoconiosis. Of the total 5,712 implementation units (typically second administrative-level units, such as districts) defined by the World Health Organization in Africa, 1,655 (29.0%) were found to be environmentally suitable for podoconiosis. The majority of implementation units with high environmental suitability are located in Angola (80, 4.8%), Cameroon (170, 10.3%), the DRC (244, 14.7%), Ethiopia (495, 29.9%), Kenya (217, 13.1%), Uganda (116, 7.0%) and Tanzania (112, 6.8%). Of the 1,655 environmentally suitable implementation units, 960 (58.0%) require more detailed community-level mapping. Our estimates provide key evidence of the population at risk and geographical extent of podoconiosis in Africa, which will help decision-makers to better plan more integrated intervention programmes.


Assuntos
Elefantíase/epidemiologia , África/epidemiologia , Angola/epidemiologia , Camarões/epidemiologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , República Democrática do Congo/epidemiologia , Filariose Linfática/epidemiologia , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Previsões , Geografia , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Morbidade , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Tanzânia/epidemiologia , Uganda/epidemiologia
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 611, 2020 Aug 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32811467

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The poliovirus has been targeted for eradication since 1988. Kenya reported its last case of indigenous Wild Poliovirus (WPV) in 1984 but suffered from an outbreak of circulating Vaccine-derived Poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) in 2018. We aimed to describe Kenya's polio surveillance performance 2016-2018 using WHO recommended polio surveillance standards. METHODS: Retrospective secondary data analysis was conducted using Kenyan AFP surveillance case-based database from 2016 to 2018. Analyses were carried out using Epi-Info statistical software (version 7) and mapping was done using Quantum Geographic Information System (GIS) (version 3.4.1). RESULTS: Kenya reported 1706 cases of AFP from 2016 to 2018. None of the cases were confirmed as poliomyelitis. However, 23 (1.35%) were classified as polio compatible. Children under 5 years accounted for 1085 (63.6%) cases, 937 (55.0%) cases were boys, and 1503 (88.1%) cases had received three or more doses of Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV). AFP detection rate substantially increased over the years; however, the prolonged health workers strike in 2017 negatively affected key surveillance activities. The mean Non-Polio (NP-AFP) rate during the study period was 2.87/ 100,000 children under 15 years, and two adequate specimens were collected for 1512 (88.6%) AFP cases. Cumulatively, 31 (66.0%) counties surpassed target for both WHO recommended AFP quality indicators. CONCLUSIONS: The performance of Kenya's AFP surveillance system surpassed the minimum WHO recommended targets for both non-polio AFP rate and stool adequacy during the period studied. In order to strengthen the country's polio free status, health worker's awareness on AFP surveillance and active case search should be strengthened in least performing counties to improve case detection. Similar analyses should be done at the sub-county level to uncover underperformance that might have been hidden by county level analysis.


Assuntos
Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Paralisia/epidemiologia , Poliomielite/epidemiologia , Poliomielite/prevenção & controle , Poliovirus/imunologia , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Fezes/virologia , Feminino , Sistemas de Informação Geográfica , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Paralisia/virologia , Vacina Antipólio Oral/efeitos adversos , Vigilância da População , Estudos Retrospectivos , Software
14.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237745, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32817627

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the second most common female reproductive cancer after breast cancer with 84% of the cases in developing countries. A high uptake of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and screening, and early diagnosis leads to a reduction of incidence and mortality rates. Yet uptake of screening is low in Sub-Saharan Africa and there is an increasing number of women presenting for treatment with advanced disease. Nine women in their twenties die from cervical cancer in Kenya every day. This paper presents the biopsychosocial risk factors that impact on cervical cancer knowledge among Kenyan women aged 15 to 24 years. The findings will highlight opportunities for early interventions to prevent the worrying prediction of an exponential increase by 50% of cervical cancer incidences in the younger age group by 2034. METHODS: Data from the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) was analysed using complex sample logistic regression to assess biopsychosocial risk factors of knowledge of cervical cancer among young women aged 15 to 24 years (n = 5398). FINDINGS: Close to one third of the participants were unaware of cervical cancer with no difference between participants aged 15-19 years (n = 2716) and those aged 20-24 years (n = 2691) (OR = 1; CI = 0.69-1.45). Social predisposing factors, such as lack of education; poverty; living further from a health facility; or never having taken a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test, were significantly associated with lack of awareness of cervical cancer (p<0.001). Young women who did not know where to obtain condoms had an OR of 2.12 (CI 1.72-2.61) for being unaware of cervical cancer. Psychological risk factors, such as low self-efficacy about seeking medical help, and an inability to refuse unsafe sex with husband or partner, perpetuated the low level of awareness about cervical cancer (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A considerable proportion of young women in Kenya are unaware of cervical cancer which is associated with a variety of social and psychological factors. We argue that the high prevalence of cervical cancer and poor screening rates will continue to prevail among older women if issues that affect young women's awareness of cervical cancer are not addressed. Given that the Kenyan youth are exposed to HPV due to early sexual encounters and a high prevalence of HIV, targeted interventions are urgently needed to increase the uptake of HPV vaccination and screening.


Assuntos
Infecções por Papillomavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Papillomavirus/psicologia , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/diagnóstico , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Detecção Precoce de Câncer , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Modelos Logísticos , Infecções por Papillomavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Papillomavirus/virologia , Fatores de Risco , Autoeficácia , Parceiros Sexuais , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/epidemiologia , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/virologia , Vacinação/métodos , Esfregaço Vaginal , Adulto Jovem
15.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237913, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32817630

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In November 2016, the Kenya National Vaccines and Immunization Programme conducted an assessment of missed opportunities for vaccination (MOV) using the World Health Organization (WHO) MOV methodology. A MOV includes any contact with health services during which an eligible individual does not receive all the vaccine doses for which he or she is eligible. METHODS: The MOV assessment in Kenya was conducted in 10 geographically diverse counties, comprising exit interviews with caregivers and knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) surveys with health workers. On the survey dates, which covered a 4-day period in November 2016, all health workers and caregivers visiting the selected health facilities with children <24 months of age were eligible to participate. Health facilities (n = 4 per county) were purposively selected by size, location, ownership, and performance. We calculated the proportion of MOV among children eligible for vaccination and with documented vaccination histories (i.e., from a home-based record or health facility register), and stratified MOV by age and reason for visit. Timeliness of vaccine doses was also calculated. RESULTS: We conducted 677 age-eligible children exit interviews and 376 health worker KAP surveys. Of the 558 children with documented vaccination histories, 33% were visiting the health facility for a vaccination visit and 67% were for other reasons. A MOV was seen in 75% (244/324) of children eligible for vaccination with documented vaccination histories, with 57% (186/324) receiving no vaccinations. This included 55% of children visiting for a vaccination visit and 93% visiting for non-vaccination visits. Timeliness for multi-dose vaccine series doses decreased with subsequent doses. Among health workers, 25% (74/291) were unable to correctly identify the national vaccination schedule for vaccines administered during the first year of life. Among health workers who reported administering vaccines as part of their daily work, 39% (55/142) reported that they did not always have the materials they needed for patients seeking immunization services, such as vaccines, syringes, and vaccination recording documents. CONCLUSIONS: The MOV assessment in Kenya highlighted areas of improvement that could reduce MOV. The results suggest several interventions including standardizing health worker practices, implementing an orientation package for all health workers, and developing a stock management module to reduce stock-outs of vaccines and vaccination-related supplies. To improve vaccination coverage and equity in all counties in Kenya, interventions to reduce MOV should be considered as part of an overall immunization service improvement plan.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Serviços de Saúde , Vacinação/normas , Vacinas/uso terapêutico , Cuidadores/psicologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Agentes Comunitários de Saúde , Feminino , Instalações de Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Programas de Imunização/normas , Esquemas de Imunização , Lactente , Entrevistas como Assunto , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Cobertura Vacinal/normas , Organização Mundial da Saúde
16.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008440, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32745137

RESUMO

Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a major public health challenge, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In Kenya, mortality rates are high (20-25%) unless prompt treatment is instituted. The most common serotypes are Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). In a 5 year case-control study in children residing in the Mukuru informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya, a total of 4201 blood cultures from suspected iNTS cases and 6326 fecal samples from age-matched controls were studied. From the laboratory cultures we obtained a total of 133 S. Typhimurium isolates of which 83(62.4%) came from cases (53 blood and 30 fecal) and 50(37.6%) from controls (fecal). A total of 120 S. Enteritidis consisted of 70(58.3%) from cases (43 blood and 27 fecal) and 50(41.7%) from controls (fecal). The S. Typhimurium population fell into two distinct ST19 lineages constituting 36.1%, as well as ST313 lineage I (27.8%) and ST313 lineage II (36.1%) isolates. The S. Enteritidis isolates fell into the global epidemic lineage (46.6%), the Central/Eastern African lineage (30.5%), a novel Kenyan-specific lineage (12.2%) and a phylogenetically outlier lineage (10.7%). Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed a high level of relatedness between NTS from blood and stool originating from cases and controls, indicating a common source pool. Multidrug resistance was common throughout, with 8.5% of such isolates resistant to extended spectrum beta lactams. The high rate of asymptomatic carriage in the population is a concern for transmission to vulnerable individuals and this group could be targeted for vaccination if an iNTS vaccine becomes available.


Assuntos
Infecções por Salmonella/epidemiologia , Infecções por Salmonella/microbiologia , Salmonella enteritidis/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Pré-Escolar , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/genética , Fezes/microbiologia , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Lactente , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Filogenia , Áreas de Pobreza , Infecções por Salmonella/sangue , Salmonella enteritidis/isolamento & purificação
18.
Glob Public Health ; 15(10): 1430-1442, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32816628

RESUMO

This paper uses empirical data collected from 117 female sex workers living in informal settlements in Nairobi and 15 healthcare providers to highlight specific effects of COVID-19 and related restrictions on healthcare access for the sex workers. We highlight the existing gender and health inequalities that have now been reinforced by the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, we focus on the most concerning healthcare needs for the sex workers including HIV prevention, care and treatment and sexual and reproductive healthcare. Our study findings reveal that the various restrictions imposed by the government to help curb the spread of COVID-19 to a large extent made it difficult for the sex workers to access their healthcare needs. The paper discusses the challenges of healthcare service delivery reflecting on some innovative and pioneering responses from health care providers to address the emergency situation.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Profissionais do Sexo , Adolescente , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pesquisa Qualitativa
19.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237221, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785257

RESUMO

Estimating incidence from cross-sectional data sources is both important to the understanding of the HIV epidemic and challenging from a methodological standpoint. We develop a new incidence estimator that measures the size of the undiagnosed population and the amount of time spent undiagnosed in order to infer incidence and transmission rates. The estimator is calculated using commonly collected information on testing history and HIV status and, thus, can be deployed in many HIV surveys without additional cost. If ART biomarker status and/or viral load information is available, the estimator can be adjusted for biases in self-reported testing history. The performance of the estimator is explored in two large surveys in Kenya, where we find our point estimates to be consistent with assay-derived estimates, with much smaller standard errors.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/transmissão , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Incidência , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Carga Viral
20.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 487, 2020 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32646433

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic diversity of ABO blood, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and haemoglobin type and their ability to protect against malaria vary geographically, ethnically and racially. No study has been carried out in populations resident in malaria regions in western Kenya. METHOD: A total of 574 malaria cases (severe malaria anaemia, SMA = 137 and non-SMA = 437) seeking treatment at Vihiga County and Referral Hospital in western Kenya, were enrolled and screened for ABO blood group, G6PD deficiency and haemoglobin genotyped in a hospital-based cross-sectional study. RESULT: When compared to blood group O, blood groups A, AB and B were not associated with SMA (P = 0.380, P = 0.183 and P = 0.464, respectively). Further regression analysis revealed that the carriage of the intermediate status of G6PD was associated with risk to SMA (OR = 1.52, 95%CI = 1.029-2.266, P = 0.035). There was, however, no association between AS and SS with severe malaria anaemia. Co-occurrence of both haemoglobin type and G6PD i.e. the AA/intermediate was associated with risk to SMA (OR = 1.536, 95%CI = 1.007-2.343, P = 0.046) while the carriage of the AS/normal G6PD was associated with protection against SMA (OR = 0.337, 95%CI = 0.156-0.915, P = 0.031). CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate that blood group genotypes do not have influence on malaria disease outcome in this region. Children in Vihiga with blood group O have some protection against malaria. However, the intermediate status of G6PD is associated with risk of SMA. Further, co-inheritance of sickle cell and G6PD status are important predictors of malaria disease outcome. This implies combinatorial gene function in influencing disease outcome.


Assuntos
Sistema ABO de Grupos Sanguíneos/genética , Genótipo , Deficiência de Glucosefosfato Desidrogenase/genética , Glucosefosfato Desidrogenase/sangue , Hemoglobinas/genética , Malária Falciparum/sangue , Malária Falciparum/epidemiologia , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Quênia/epidemiologia , Malária Falciparum/parasitologia , Masculino , Fenótipo , Plasmodium falciparum/isolamento & purificação , Polimorfismo Genético , Risco , Traço Falciforme/genética
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