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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32854416

RESUMO

The Sun Exposure and Protection Index (SEPI) is a brief instrument for scoring of sun exposure habits and propensity to increase sun protection, previously validated in English and in Swedish, as well as in two different outdoor sun intensity environments (Australia and Northern Europe). The aim of the present study was to study reliability and validity of a German translated version of the SEPI to be used in German-speaking populations. Data was collected at University of Flensburg and at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences from November 2018 to April 2019. Participants (n = 205) filled out the SEPI and also a selection of corresponding questions from the Austrian Vienna UV Questionnaire in German. After three weeks, the participants filled out the SEPI once again in order to assess test-retest stability. Of the 205 participants completing the baseline questionnaire, 135 participants completed it once again after three weeks. Internal consistency, by Cronbach's alpha, for the baseline responses was 0.70 (95% C.I: 0.63-0.76) for SEPI part 1 (sun exposure habits) and 0.72 (95% C.I: 0.66-0.78) for part 2 (propensity to increase sun protection). Test-retest stability was high, with weighted Kappa >0.6 for all items but one, and the instrument correlated well with the previously validated German-language UV Skin Risk Survey Questionnaire. In conclusion, the German version of SEPI can reliably be used for mapping of individual sun exposure patterns.


Assuntos
Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Luz Solar/efeitos adversos , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Alemanha , Humanos , Idioma , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Traduções
4.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 44(3): 208-214, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32459394

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Schools are an important setting for skin cancer prevention. An intervention for implementation of school sun safety policy, Sun Safety Schools (SSS), was evaluated. METHODS: Primary schools (n=118) in California school districts that had already adopted a sun safety policy were enrolled in a study with a randomised controlled design. Half of the schools were randomised to SSS intervention (N=58). Parents completed an online post-test. RESULTS: More parents in intervention schools received information about sun safety (mean=26.3%, sd=3.1%, p=0.017) and children more frequently wore sun-protective clothing when not at school (mean=2.93, sd=0.03, p=0.033) than in control schools (mean=18.0%, sd=2.5%; mean=2.83, sd=0.03, respectively). In schools where principals reported implementing sun safety practices, parents reported that children spent less time outdoors at midday (mean=14.78 hours, sd=0.25, p=0.033) and fewer were sunburned (mean=12.7%, sd=1.1%, p=0.009) than in non-implementing schools (M=16.3 hours, sd=0.67; mean=21.2%, sd=3.8%, respectively). Parents who received sun safety information (mean=3.08, sd=0.04, p=0.008) reported more child sun protection than parents not receiving information (mean=2.96, sd=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: A school district sun protection policy and support for implementation increased dissemination of sun safety information to parents and student sun safety. Implications for public health: Technical assistance for sun safety policies may increase sun protection of children.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Pais , Serviços de Saúde Escolar/organização & administração , Estudantes/psicologia , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Luz Solar/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Austrália , Criança , Feminino , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Política Organizacional , Avaliação de Processos em Cuidados de Saúde , Instituições Acadêmicas , Raios Ultravioleta/efeitos adversos
5.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0233220, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32428021

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation increases the risk of skin cancer and other conditions. SMS text reminders may be a useful tool to improve sun protection habits due to its massive reach, low cost, and accessibility. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of SMS text reminders in promoting sun protection habits. METHODS: We performed a systematic search in PubMed, Central Cochrane Library, and Scopus; following the PRISMA recommendations to perform systematic reviews. We included RCTs published up to December 2018, which evaluated the benefits and harms of SMS text reminders to improve sun protection habits. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed whenever possible. The certainty of the evidence was assessed for RCTs estimates using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The study protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42018091661). RESULTS: Five RCTs were included in this review. When pooled, the studies found no effect of SMS text reminders in "sunburn anytime during follow-up" (two studies, risk ratio: 0.93; 95% confidence interval: 0.83-1.05). Contradictory results were obtained for sunscreen use (three RCTs) and sun protection habits (two RCTs), however, they could not be meta-analyzed because outcomes were measured differently across studies. The certainty of the evidence was very low for these three outcomes according to GRADE methodology. CONCLUSIONS: RCTs that assessed effects of SMS text reminders did not find a significant benefit on objective outcomes, such as having a sunburn, sunscreen use and composite score of sun protection habits. Since certainty of the evidence was very low, future high-quality studies are needed to reach a conclusion regarding the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO (CRD42018091661).


Assuntos
Sistemas de Alerta/tendências , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Envio de Mensagens de Texto/tendências , Telefone Celular/tendências , Hábitos , Humanos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Protetores Solares/farmacologia , Raios Ultravioleta/efeitos adversos
7.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 131, 2020 Jan 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32000743

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People increase their risk of melanoma unless they are protected from the harmful effects of sun exposure during childhood and adolescence. We aimed to assess the feasibility of a three-component sun protection intervention- presentation, action planning, and SMS messages - and trial parameters. METHODS: This feasibility wait-list trial was conducted in the United Kingdom in 2018. Students aged 13-15 years were eligible. Feasibility outcomes were collected for recruitment rates; data availability rates for objective measurements of melanin and erythema using a Mexameter and self-reported sunburn occurrences, severity and body location, tanning, sun protection behaviours and Skin Self-Examination (SSE) collected before (baseline) and after the school summer holidays (follow-up); intervention reach, adherence, perceived impact and acceptability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics; qualitative data were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Five out of eight schools expressing an interest in participating with four allocated to act as intervention and one control. Four parents/carers opted their child out of the study. Four hundred and eighty-seven out of 724 students on the school register consented to the study at baseline (67%). Three hundred and eighty-five were in intervention group schools. Objective skin measurements were available for 255 (66%) of the intervention group at baseline and 237 (61%) of the group at follow up. Melanin increased; erythema decreased. Complete self-report data were available for 247 (64%) students in the intervention group. The number of students on the school register who attended the presentation and given the booklet was 379 (98%) and gave their mobile phone number was 155 (40%). No intervention component was perceived as more impactful on sun protection behaviours. Adolescents did not see the relevance of sun protection in the UK or for their age group. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to use a Mexameter to measure skin colour in adolescents. Erythema (visible redness) lasts no more than three days and its measurement before and after a six week summer holiday may not yield relevant or meaningful data. A major challenge is that adolescents do not see the relevance of sun protection and SSE. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number ISRCTN11141528. Date registered 0/2/03/2018; last edited 31/05/2018. Retrospectively registered.


Assuntos
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Melanoma/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Luz Solar/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Intenção , Masculino , Melanoma/epidemiologia , Medição de Risco , Autorrelato , Autoexame/psicologia , Autoexame/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Banho de Sol/psicologia , Banho de Sol/estatística & dados numéricos , Queimadura Solar/epidemiologia , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Envio de Mensagens de Texto , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Listas de Espera
8.
Photochem Photobiol Sci ; 19(3): 382-389, 2020 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32010915

RESUMO

To examine the impact of sun exposure on human health, accurate measures of past sun exposure are required. We investigated how young adults' recall of childhood sun-related behaviours compares with parent-reported measures collected during childhood. The Kidskin-Young Adult Myopia Study (KYAMS) is a follow-up of the Kidskin Study, a sun-protection intervention study conducted from 1995-2001. KYAMS participants, aged 25-30 years, reported time in sun, and use of hats and sunscreen, for each year from ages 5-26 years (n = 244). Using weighted kappa, we assessed agreement between these data and corresponding variables derived from the Kidskin Study parent questionnaires completed when KYAMS participants were aged 6-12 years. Ordinal logistic regression was used to test the association between self-reported sun-behaviours and corresponding parent-reported data. We found slight agreement between self-reported and parent-reported data for all sun-behaviour measures except hat use at 12 years. KYAMS recall of time in sun at 8-12 years was not associated with Kidskin Study parent-reported responses after adjustment for current time in sun. Recall of higher hat and sunscreen use was associated with higher parent-reported hat and sunscreen use (OR[hat] = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16, 1.62; OR[sunscreen] = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48). However, KYAMS self-reported data were unable to predict corresponding parent-reported responses. Group data from retrospective recall of sun-related behaviours may be of limited value in studying the relationship between sun exposure and health outcomes; however, individual data are likely of little use.


Assuntos
Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Luz Solar , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(1): e18078, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31895765

RESUMO

Sun protection early in life is an essential issue for primary prevention of skin cancers. The Il Sole per Amico was an educational campaign among 66 Italian primary schools. A total of 12,188 questionnaires were completed at baseline. Overall, 9.4% children reported >1 sunburn during the last year and 44.7% parents a use of sunlamps. Independent factors associated with sunburns were: age, lower level of parents' education, light eye and skin color, freckles, nevi on arms, intense sun exposure during the last year, sporadic use of sunscreens, and parental use of sunlamps. A total of 7280 (59.7%) questionnaires were completed at the end of the educational intervention. No significant difference was documented about behavior between the pre- and post-intervention periods. A significant reduction was instead found in both prevalence of recent sunburns and total number of sunburn episodes after comparison with the data obtained by identical questionnaire in the same geographic areas in the "Sole Si Sole No" project in 2001.


Assuntos
Queimadura Solar/epidemiologia , Protetores Solares/administração & dosagem , Criança , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Itália , Masculino , Pais/psicologia , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31947667

RESUMO

Skin cancer, which is increasing exceedingly worldwide, is substantially preventable by reducing unprotected exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Several comprehensive interventions targeting sun protection behaviors among children and adolescents in various outdoor settings have been developed; however, there is a lack of insight on stand-alone effectiveness of environmental elements. To compose future skin cancer prevention interventions optimally, identification of effective environmental components is necessary. Hence, an extensive systematic literature search was conducted, using four scientific databases and one academic search engine. Seven relevant studies were evaluated based on stand-alone effects of various types of environmental sun safety interventions on socio-cognitive determinants, sun protection behaviors, UVR exposure, and incidence of sunburns and nevi. Free provision of sunscreen was most often the environmental component of interest, however showing inconsistent results in terms of effectiveness. Evidence regarding shade provision on shade-seeking behavior was most apparent. Even though more research is necessary to consolidate the findings, this review accentuates the promising role of environmental components in skin cancer prevention interventions and provides directions for future multi-component sun safety interventions targeted at children and adolescents in various outdoor settings.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Criança , Humanos , Raios Ultravioleta
13.
Health Promot J Austr ; 31(1): 84-92, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30980690

RESUMO

ISSUE ADDRESSED: Skin cancer affects nearly one in three Australians. As a preventable disease there have been many public awareness campaigns targeting skin cancer knowledge and sun protection in Australia in the last 30 years to increase knowledge of the disease and how to prevent it. Despite higher incidence and mortality of skin cancer in regional Australia and adults over 65 years though, little research exists examining this high-risk population's skin cancer knowledge and sun behaviours, with most previous research conducted in urban Australia or overseas. This study aimed to examine adults' skin cancer knowledge, sun behaviours and demographic factors in a regional Australian town. METHODS: Cross-sectional study design was utilised. Adult patients of a Mudgee General Practice (n = 179, 18-89 years) completed a survey based on their skin cancer knowledge and sun behaviours. Chi-squared tests were used to analyse responses. RESULTS: Poor non-melanoma skin cancer awareness, risky sun behaviours and inadequate sun protection behaviours were found. Males and those at greatest current risk of skin cancer in Australia, those over 60 years, had the poorest skin cancer knowledge and were least likely to recognise skin cancer or use some sun protection measures. CONCLUSIONS: Greater non-melanoma skin cancer and sun protection education and research is needed, particularly targeting older and male Australians. SO WHAT?: The findings suggest rural men and older Australians would benefit from more targeted campaigns and education to increase their skin cancer awareness and use of sun protection in order to minimise future skin cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Roupa de Proteção , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Protetores Solares , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Cancer Educ ; 35(2): 312-320, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30637576

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to analyse the sun exposure habits of elite aquatics athletes, together with their sunburn history and skin examination habits, taking into account differences by sex and between sports. A cross-sectional health survey was conducted at world championship events during which elite surfers, windsurfers and Olympic sailors from 30 different countries were invited to participate. The athletes were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire focused on sun protection habits, sun exposure and sports practices. The survey was completed by 240 athletes, 171 men (71.3%) and 69 women (28.8%), with a mean age of 22 years (SD 5.86) and skin phototypes I (6.3%), II (3.3%), III (22.0%), IV (32.5%), V (9.2%) and VI (1.7%). There were significant differences between male and female athletes in skin self-examination (p < 0.001) and in the use of sunglasses (p < 0.001). In sunburn history during the last season, there were significant differences (p < 0.001) among the three sports analysed, in both sexes. The mean rate of sunburn during the previous season was 76.7%, and 27.5% of participants reported having experienced three or more sunburns that lasted at least 1 day. This type of athlete is at high risk of sunburn and hence of future skin cancer. However, there is a general lack of awareness of this risk. This study highlights the need to inform such athletes and to raise awareness of the dangers, through educational interventions on the importance of protecting against sunburn in order to reduce the future incidence of skin cancer.


Assuntos
Atletas/psicologia , Hábitos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Higiene da Pele/psicologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Adolescente , Adulto , Atletas/educação , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Higiene da Pele/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/psicologia , Espanha/epidemiologia , Queimadura Solar/epidemiologia , Queimadura Solar/psicologia , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
15.
Psychooncology ; 29(1): 148-155, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31520429

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Melanoma preventive interventions for children with familial risk are critically needed because ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and sunburn occurrence early in life are the primary modifiable risk factors for melanoma. The current study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a new, family-focused telehealth intervention for children with familial risk for melanoma and their parents. The study also explored changes in child sun protection and risk behaviors, sunburn occurrence, and objectively measured UVR exposure. METHODS: This was a prospective study with a single-group design (n = 21 parent-child dyads, children ages 8-17). Dyads were asked to participate in three in-person assessments and three live video teleconference intervention sessions. RESULTS: The intervention was feasibly delivered, and the intervention content was acceptable to parents and children. The intervention was associated with improvements in child use of certain sun protection strategies over time and declines in child UVR exposure. CONCLUSIONS: A telehealth-delivered,family-focused melanoma preventive intervention was feasibly delivered and was acceptable to parent-child dyads. Future melanoma preventive interventions for this at-risk population could incorporate eHealth technologies to facilitate improvements in use of sun protection and monitoring of UVR exposure. This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT02846714.


Assuntos
Educação em Saúde/métodos , Melanoma/prevenção & controle , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Telemedicina/métodos , Raios Ultravioleta/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Melanoma/psicologia , Projetos Piloto , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/psicologia , Queimadura Solar/psicologia , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico
16.
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed ; 36(2): 83-89, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31508854

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Analysis of Internet search trends has been performed to evaluate interest in sun protection, artificial tanning, and skin cancers among the public, particularly in Western countries. This observational study aimed to investigate the relative popularity of search terms relating to sun protection, sunburn, skin cancers, and tanning used in Google Trends® in three South-East Asian countries (Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia). METHODS: The relevant search terms were queried using the Google Trends® in each location and worldwide. The search volume indices were compared between locations and over a time period from January 1, 2004, to January 31, 2019. Correlations between "sunblock" and "sunburn" as well as "sunblock" and search terms relating to skin cancers ("skin cancer," "melanoma," "basal cell carcinoma," and "squamous cell carcinoma") were evaluated. RESULTS: The favored search term relating to sun protection in this region was "sunblock" despite the term itself being a misnomer. The relative popularity of searches for "sunblock" also showed an increase over time and was generally higher compared with interest in sunburn, skin cancers, and artificial tanning practices. Positive correlations were noted between "sunblock" and "sunburn" in Malaysia and "sunblock" and "melanoma" in Singapore. CONCLUSION: Insights into search trends may assist public health promotion to raise awareness regarding sun protection and skin cancers in the region by targeting commonly used terms for each geographical location.


Assuntos
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Internet , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Singapura
17.
Patient Educ Couns ; 103(2): 309-314, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31522897

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Past research suggests a large number of adults feel overwhelmed by the amount of cancer information - a phenomenon labeled cancer information overload (CIO). The current study examines whether CIO is discriminant from other negative message perceptions (reactance, information avoidance) and related to sun safe behaviors. METHODS: U.S. adults (N = 2,219) completed survey questions assessing CIO, dispositional reactance, defensive/information avoidance, sun safe behavior, and knowledge. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that CIO was discriminant from dispositional reactance, information avoidance, and defensive avoidance, and individuals with higher overload were more likely to tan, less likely to have an annual checkup with a healthcare provider, and less knowledgeable about sun safe protection. Unexpectedly, individuals with higher CIO were more likely to wear wide-brimmed hats. CONCLUSION: CIO is distinct from reactance and avoidance, and related to performance/knowledge of sun safe behaviors, and receiving annual healthcare checkups. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The correlation between CIO and sun safe behavior differs by behavior; a pattern which suggests practitioners might benefit from adapting their communication strategy based on the target population and behavior.


Assuntos
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
18.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 82(4): 869-877, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31542406

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Beach vacations are high-risk settings for overexposure to ultraviolet radiation. OBJECTIVE: To compare the sunburn protective efficacy of SPF 50+ and SPF 100+ sunscreens under actual use at the beach. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, single-center, split-body/face study of 55 healthy individuals. Each participant applied both sunscreens to randomized sides of the face/body for up to 5 consecutive days. Blinded clinical evaluation of erythema by a single grader and objective instrumental assessments, colorimetry, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were performed the morning after each sun exposure. RESULTS: After 5 days, 31 (56%) participants had more sunburn on the SPF 50+ side compared to 4 (7%) on the SPF 100+ side. Overall, mean erythema intensity showed statistically significantly less erythema on the SPF 100+ side compared with the SPF 50+ side. The first observation of sunburn exclusively on the SPF 50+ side occurred after 1 day of sun exposure, whereas that for SPF 100+ occurred after 3 days of sun exposure. LIMITATIONS: Only initial sunscreen application was monitored, only 1 participant with skin phototype I was recruited, and participants were recruited from a local beach area. CONCLUSION: SPF 100+ was significantly more effective in protecting against ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and sunburn than SPF 50+ in actual use in a beach vacation setting.


Assuntos
Fator de Proteção Solar , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Protetores Solares/administração & dosagem , Adolescente , Adulto , Colorimetria , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Análise Espectral , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
20.
J Dermatolog Treat ; 31(4): 403-405, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30889998

RESUMO

While sunscreen is effective prevention for skin cancer, public sunscreen use and compliance are low. Identifying factors affecting sunscreen use and barriers to compliance are important to understand in order to increase sunscreen use, especially among high-risk individuals. We conducted a single institution survey of 429 dermatology clinic patients to better understand patients' barriers to sunscreen use. Overall several personal barriers to sunscreen use included dislike of feel or appearance of sunscreen (33.7%) and time constraints (15.3%). The cost was a barrier to use in 16.4% of cases underscoring the importance for dermatologists to consider socioeconomic barriers to sunscreen use and provide cost-effective sun protection counseling to patients whenever possible. Dermatologists recommending sunscreen use was associated with a higher rate of use of sunscreen (p < .001) highlighting the important role of sun protective counseling by the dermatologist.


Assuntos
Cooperação do Paciente , Neoplasias Cutâneas/prevenção & controle , Protetores Solares/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Queimadura Solar/prevenção & controle , Inquéritos e Questionários
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