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1.
Br J Radiol ; 93(1105): 20190340, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31596121

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare key characteristics of interventional radiology (IR) training in the UK with four other English-speaking countries (USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand) and summarise requirements for training. METHODS: Main features examined were career pathway and requirements, examinations required, specific competition for IR and the process of applying for training as an international medical graduate. Data were collected from official governing body publications, literature and personal experience. RESULTS: Several differences were highlighted, including length of training (ranging from 6 to 9 years after medical school), length of IR-specific training (ranging from 1 to 3 years) and examinations required (USA and Canada have additional IR-specific examinations). The level of competition is generally high, in all countries. CONCLUSIONS: With the demand for IR services set to increase over the next few years, it is crucial that more IR specialists are trained to meet this demand. Awareness of training structures in other countries can highlight opportunity and pitfalls, and help ensure the number of highly trained interventional radiologists in the UK continues to grow.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Austrália , Canadá , Escolha da Profissão , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Nova Zelândia , Reino Unido , Estados Unidos
2.
R I Med J (2013) ; 102(6): 19-23, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31398963

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: In the transition to the integrated interventional radiology residency model, residency websites are important resources of program information for prospective applicants. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the availability and comprehensiveness of integrated interventional radiology residency websites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A complete list of programs participating in the 2018 integrated interventional radiology match was collected using the online Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database and Electronic Residency Application Service. Residency program websites were evaluated for the presence of 19 variables related to resident education and recruitment, and the percent comprehensiveness of each website was calculated based on the number of variables present. The effect of program size and geographic region on website availability and comprehensiveness was assessed. RESULTS: Of the 69 programs participating in the 2018 match, 18 (26%) programs did not have any locatable website. Of the 51 programs with websites, 30 (59%) had stand-alone interventional radiology websites distinct from the associated diagnostic radiology website. Large programs were more likely to have a residency website than small programs (91% versus 54%, p=0.001). Across all categories, the mean website comprehensiveness was 33%. Mean website comprehensiveness of programs in the Midwest (43%) and Northeast (37%) was significantly greater than mean website comprehensiveness of programs in the West (19%) (p=0.005). CONCLUSION: Overall, 1 in 4 integrated interventional radiology residency programs did not have locatable websites. Many integrated interventional radiology residency websites lack important content variables. Efforts should be made to improve the residency websites and digital training resources for prospective interventional radiology applicants and to help showcase programs in the best light.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Internet , Internato e Residência , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos
3.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 213(4): 785-791, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31414883

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE. This article introduces key concepts of inequity as they apply to interventional radiology, from both the patient and the physician perspectives, to ultimately improve the health care of all patients. CONCLUSION. By directing society's efforts toward addressing health care disparities, our specialty may begin to establish trust and partnerships with populations that are disproportionately affected and those that have been historically exploited and disenfranchised by medicine in the name of innovation. Although we may look to close the equity gap by understanding health care disparities as they pertain to our patient populations, a closer examination of barriers of entry into medicine for underrepresented minorities reveals numerous disparities across race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.


Assuntos
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Radiologia Intervencionista , Grupos de Populações Continentais , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários , Defesa do Paciente , Preconceito , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação
4.
Diagn Interv Radiol ; 25(5): 375-379, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31358487

RESUMO

PURPOSE: We aimed to assess the awareness of interventional radiology (IR) among medical students, and to evaluate an IR curriculum in China. METHODS: Between the academic years of 2008 and 2016, 517 third-year medical undergraduates, who successfully applied for an IR curriculum, received a survey related to IR before taking the course. Final exams were conducted after the IR course. RESULTS: A total of 355 of the 517 medical students (68.67%) answered the survey; 81.97% of the respondents had heard of IR, 40.28% believed they understood what IR is, but no one was familiar with IR. The four most common pathways for medical students to acquire IR knowledge were via new media (e.g., internet, apps) (42.82%), a teacher/textbook (36.90%), a friend (32.68%), and traditional media (26.48%). The most familiar interventional procedures to respondents were percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, 78.59%) and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE, 44.51%). The results of the survey also indicated that 68.45% of the respondents wanted to learn about IR, but that only 47 male students (13.24%) considered a career in IR. The pass rate of the IR course final exam was 87.04%, i.e., 87.04% of the students successfully completed the course and final exam. CONCLUSION: The IR knowledge of medical students in China is worse than that of European medical students. We suggest that providing medical students with general information about IR in the media, as well as via teaching and textbooks in medical school, requires prompt and significant attention. An IR curriculum is beneficial for increasing the IR knowledge of undergraduates.


Assuntos
Conscientização , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Currículo , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , China , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia
5.
Diagn Interv Radiol ; 25(5): 368-374, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31348005

RESUMO

PURPOSE: We aimed to analyze transradial access (TRA) learning curve on patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization, investigating the relationship between procedural volumes and various benchmarks of procedural success. METHODS: We enrolled 60 consecutive patients who received two unilobar hepatic chemoembolizations within a 4-week interval performed by a single interventional radiologist, highly-trained in conventional transfemoral access (TFA) procedures, but without any previous practical experience in TRA procedures and with a preliminary 2-day theoretical training only. Consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled and analyzed in 3 groups: A (cases 1 to 20), B (cases 21 to 40), and C (cases 41 to 60). All patients underwent one hepatic chemoembolization using TRA and the other one using TFA in random order. All TFA procedures performed by the same operator in the same series of patients were considered as the control group. Primary endpoint was to analyze the relationship between TRA procedure operator experience and benchmarks of procedural success, to define the optimal procedural learning curve. RESULTS: Technical success was obtained in all patients, with a crossover rate (radial to femoral access) of 0%. An association between incremental TRA operator experience (in terms of performed procedures) and decrease of preparation, puncture, fluoroscopy, and total examination times was observed. Similarly, inverse associations between incremental TRA operator experience and contrast medium (CM) volumes (P < 0.001) and radiation dose (RD) values (in terms of RAK - Reference Air Kerma) (P < 0.001) were also observed. Compared with TFA, CM volumes and RD values were significantly higher only in group A (cases 1-20). Procedure success remained high in all TRA groups and no significant association between TRA incremental experience and postprocedural outcomes was found. Higher postprocedural complaints at the access route and more limitations in performing basic activities were recorded after TFA vs. TRA (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: TRA catheterizations can be safely performed in patients treated for liver cancer embolization after a relatively short training in controlled conditions and with a better performance in comparison with TFA. Operator proficiency improves with greater TRA experience, with a threshold needed to overcome the learning curve represented by about 20 procedures.


Assuntos
Quimioembolização Terapêutica/métodos , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Curva de Aprendizado , Neoplasias Hepáticas/terapia , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
6.
Clin Imaging ; 57: 30-34, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31102780

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To understand factors influencing the choice and ranking of Interventional Radiology (IR) training programs among a cohort of medical students and diagnostic radiology residents pursuing careers in IR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An IRB approved, 34 question online survey (surveymonkey.com) evaluated the impact of twenty-two different factors and demographics on IR training program selection for medical students and residents. The factors analyzed included programmatic features, location characteristics, academic reputation, program size, benefits/financial incentives, emphasis on clinical care, and future job opportunities. Comparison of Likert scale responses between medical students and residents were performed by using unpaired two-sample t-tests. RESULTS: 181 (145 male, 35 female) individuals responded to the survey, 74 medical students (40.9%) and 107 residents (59.1%). Medical students and residents both selected variety of IR cases as the most important and highest rated factor when choosing an IR program. Medical students ranked availability of a mentor (p = .03), inpatient consultation service (p = .003), outpatient clinic experience (p = .003), and ICU rotation experience (p < .001) significantly higher. Residents rated job placement/accomplishments of prior fellows (p = .03) and opinion of spouse/significant others (p = .002) significantly higher than medical students. CONCLUSIONS: The top rated factors are similar among medical students and residents however medical students value the clinical aspects of the program (ICU experience, inpatient consultation service, outpatient clinic) more than residents. Residents placed more value on job placement opportunities in selecting an IR program.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Internato e Residência , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Adulto , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Motivação , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
7.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 42(10): 1459-1465, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31069466

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The role of interventional radiology (IR) in health care is rapidly expanding in the United Kingdom (UK). However, the presence of IR in the current undergraduate curriculum is lacking. PURPOSE: This study investigates the awareness, knowledge and perceptions of IR in undergraduates through the clinical years of medical school to suggest future interventions. METHODS: A total of 360 questionnaires, designed to test undergraduates' knowledge of, and exposure to, IR were distributed over a 14-day period in a UK medical institution. RESULTS: Of the 312 respondents (86.7%), the majority had never formally shadowed a radiologist (65.4%) or encountered teaching from an interventional radiologist (54.5%). Most students (88.5%) felt their knowledge of IR was lower than other specialties. Students' knowledge of IR procedures did not statistically increase through the clinical years. Students were most cognisant of vascular procedures and least aware of IR's role in oncology. Only 10.9% would consider a career in IR, with 39.7% citing the lack of knowledge and 18.6% citing patient contact as the top reasons for this. CONCLUSION: Current students have poor exposure to IR through the undergraduate curriculum. Consequently, there is no increase in knowledge of IR clinical practice through the clinical years. Multi-level interventions, incorporating universities and radiological societies are required to increase undergraduate awareness and promote IR as a career. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3, Local non-random sample.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Currículo/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Conscientização , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido
9.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 30(6): 922-927, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31126603

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To generate 3-dimensional (3D) printed ultrasound (US)-compatible vascular models (3DPVAM) and test them for noninferiority in training medical students in femoral artery access. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 3DPVAM of normal femoral artery (FA) anatomy was developed from an anonymized computerized tomography (CT) examination. Students were randomized to a 3DPVAM or a commercial model (CM) simulation experience (SE) for US-guided FA access. Students completed a pre-SE questionnaire ranking their self-confidence in accessing the artery on a 5-point Likert scale. A standardized SE was administered by interventional radiology faculty or trainees. Students completed a post-SE questionnaire ranking comfort with FA access on a Likert scale. Student questionnaire results from the 3DPVAM group were compared with those from the CM group by using chi-square, Wilcoxon signed-rank, and noninferiority analyses. RESULTS: Twenty-six and twenty-three students were randomized to 3DPVAM and commercial model training, respectively. A total of 76.9% of 3DPVAM trainees and 82.6% of CM trainees did not feel confident performing FA access prior to the SE. In both groups, training increased student confidence by 2 Likert points (3DPVAM: P < 0.001; CM P < 0.001). The confidence increase in 3DPVAM trainees was noninferior to that in CM trainees (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Generation of a custom-made 3DPVAM is feasible, producing comparable subjective training outcomes to those of CM. Custom-made 3D-printed training models, including incorporation of more complex anatomical configurations, could be used to instruct medical students in procedural skills.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Periférico/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Artéria Femoral/diagnóstico por imagem , Modelos Anatômicos , Modelos Cardiovasculares , Impressão Tridimensional , Radiografia Intervencionista/métodos , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Estudantes de Medicina , Competência Clínica , Angiografia por Tomografia Computadorizada , Currículo , Humanos , Punções
11.
Health Phys ; 117(1): 76-83, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31136364

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Cardiac interventional practitioners need to be appropriately informed regarding radiation dose quantities and risks. Communicating benefit-risk information to patients requires attention as specified in Basic Safety Standards Directive 2013/59/Eurotom. This study investigated the awareness of procedural radiation dose levels and the impact of personal training experience in communicating ionizing radiation benefit-risks to patients. METHODOLOGY: A questionnaire, consisting of 28 questions, was distributed directly to adult and pediatric interventional cardiology specialists at specialized cardiovascular imaging centers in Dublin, Ireland and Milan, Italy. RESULTS: A total of 18 interventional cardiologists (senior registrar to consultant grades with between 2 y to over 21 y experience in cardiac imaging) participated. The majority of participants (n = 17) stated that parents of pediatric and adult patients should be informed of the potential benefits and risk. All participants indicated they had radiation safety training; however, 50% had not received training in radiation examination benefit-risk communication. Despite this, 77.8% (n = 14) participants indicated a high confidence level in successfully explaining risks and/or benefits of cardiac imaging procedures. When asked to estimate effective dose (ED) values for common cardiac imaging procedures less than 50% identified appropriate dose ranges. All participants underestimated procedural dose values based on recent European data. 50% (n = 9) participants answered all questions correctly for a number of true or false radiation risk statements. CONCLUSION: Benefit-risk communication training deficits and inaccurate understanding of radiation dose levels was identified. Further research and training to support clinicians using radiation on a daily basis is required.


Assuntos
Cardiologia/educação , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Exposição Ocupacional/análise , Padrões de Prática Médica/normas , Exposição à Radiação/efeitos adversos , Lesões por Radiação/prevenção & controle , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Comunicação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Doses de Radiação , Lesões por Radiação/etiologia , Proteção Radiológica , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg ; 14(11): 1993-2003, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31006107

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Currently, there is a worldwide shift toward competency-based medical education. This necessitates the use of automated skills assessment methods during self-guided interventions training. Making assessment methods that are transparent and configurable will allow assessment to be interpreted into instructional feedback. The purpose of this work is to develop and validate skills assessment methods in ultrasound-guided interventions that are transparent and configurable. METHODS: We implemented a method based upon decision trees and a method based upon fuzzy inference systems for technical skills assessment. Subsequently, we validated these methods for their ability to predict scores of operators on a 25-point global rating scale in ultrasound-guided needle insertions and their ability to provide useful feedback for training. RESULTS: Decision tree and fuzzy rule-based assessment performed comparably to state-of-the-art assessment methods. They produced median errors (on a 25-point scale) of 1.7 and 1.8 for in-plane insertions and 1.5 and 3.0 for out-of-plane insertions, respectively. In addition, these methods provided feedback that was useful for trainee learning. Decision tree assessment produced feedback with median usefulness 7 out of 7; fuzzy rule-based assessment produced feedback with median usefulness 6 out of 7. CONCLUSION: Transparent and configurable assessment methods are comparable to the state of the art and, in addition, can provide useful feedback. This demonstrates their value in self-guided interventions training curricula.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Árvores de Decisões , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Cirurgia Assistida por Computador/educação , Ultrassonografia/métodos , Humanos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
13.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 30(6): 956-960, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30878359

RESUMO

Integrating interventional radiology (IR) into clinical practice faces challenges in emerging countries in Asia and Africa. Overcoming them requires innovative solutions customized to local needs. After an in-depth gap analysis of these challenges, we began an organized skill development initiative in late 2015 offering radiologists and their supporting staff fully paid scholarships for IR training. Its concept, structure, and progress are reported here. This initiative covered 8 countries, IR specialists (n = 51), senior residents (n = 24), and 15 educational events (training institute [n = 3]; participating countries [n = 12]). This initiative is intended to develop a global network of trained personnel who can support IR programs in challenging locations of emerging countries.


Assuntos
Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde , Países em Desenvolvimento , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Radiografia Intervencionista , Radiologistas/educação , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde/organização & administração , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/organização & administração , Humanos , Curva de Aprendizado , Radiologistas/organização & administração , Radiologia Intervencionista/organização & administração
14.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 30(4): 594-600, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824305

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To describe the implementation and efficacy of electronic capture of interventional radiology (IR) group peer review performed during morning rounds in an academic institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Peer-review submissions 24 months before (July 2012 through June 2014) and 24 months after (July 2014 through June 2016) implementation of an electronic group IR peer review were evaluated. Electronic IR peer review assessed clinical decision-making, patient care, and technique appropriateness by using the following responses: agree, acceptable alternative, or inappropriate. Complications, near-misses, and learning opportunities were also noted, and explanations were provided in the comments. An IR attending physician documented the consensus discussion via an online form or mobile app. RESULTS: After implementation of electronic capture of IR group peer reviews, 9.5% of all IR procedures (773 of 8,152) were reviewed, compared with 0.9% (63 of 7,152) before the implementation (P < .0001). On average, 3.4 ± 0.5 IR attending physicians participated in each review, and 17.3 ± 9.7 IR cases were reviewed per month by each attending physician. Peers fully agreed with the chosen technique in 729 of 773 cases (94.3%) and noted an acceptable alternative technique in 40 of 773 (5.2%). In 4 cases (0.5%), the chosen technique was rated as inappropriate. Peers fully agreed with chosen clinical decision-making and patient care in 765 of 773 cases (99%), with 8 cases (1%) deemed as acceptable alternatives. Learning opportunities were documented in 9.6% of cases (74 of 773). CONCLUSIONS: Electronic IR-specific group peer review captures the clinical decision-making process, patient outcomes, technical appropriateness, and short-term complications and may provide practice-improvement solutions.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem , Revisão dos Cuidados de Saúde por Pares , Radiologistas/educação , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Visitas com Preceptor , Competência Clínica , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Consenso , Controle de Formulários e Registros , Formulários como Assunto , Humanos , Fluxo de Trabalho
15.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 30(4): 584-588.e2, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824306

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To evaluate the evolving representation of women in the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the available gender demographic data of various SIR subgroups between 2008 and 2017 was performed. The gender makeup of the following groups was analyzed: SIR membership, SIR Executive Council members and officers, Annual Meeting invited speakers, committee chairs, Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR) first and senior authors, JVIR editorial board, IR Quarterly (IRQ) authors, and active interventional radiology (IR) residents and fellows. RESULTS: From 2008 to 2017, the percentage of female representation in SIR members doubled (from 6% to 13.1%). In the same period, female representation also significantly increased in Executive Council members (0% to 20%) and officers (0% to 50%), SIR Annual Meeting presenters (5.1% to 15.4%), and JVIR first authors (10% to 14.5%) and senior authors (7.1% to 11.9%). From 2012 to 2017, there were increases in female representation among SIR committee chairs (21% to 28%) and IRQ authors (4.5% to 27%). However, the percentage of female IR residents and fellows did not significantly change between 2008 and 2017 (11% vs 16.2%; P = .51). CONCLUSIONS: Women interventional radiologists are underrepresented within SIR, representing only 9.2% of active IR physicians. There has been a steady increase in female representation within most areas of SIR evaluated in this study. Although these trends are reassuring, efforts toward increasing recruitment and retention of women in IR need to improve in light of the infancy of IR as a residency program.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Médicas/tendências , Radiologistas/tendências , Radiologia Intervencionista/tendências , Sexismo/tendências , Especialização/tendências , Mulheres Trabalhadoras , Congressos como Assunto/tendências , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Radiologistas/educação , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sociedades Médicas/tendências , Mulheres Trabalhadoras/educação
16.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 30(4): 589-593.e3, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30910181

RESUMO

Opportunities for interventional radiology (IR) education and exposure remain limited at medical institutions without a local IR presence, thereby excluding a medical student population with potential to pursue careers in IR or become referring providers to IR. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a Webinar-based IR elective as an educational tool for outreach to US medical schools lacking local preclinical IR exposure. Our early results indicate that a Webinar-based IR lecture series can serve as an effective method for educating future physicians about the field of IR and when to consult IR for patient management.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Instrução por Computador/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Internet , Radiologistas/educação , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Especialização , Estudantes de Medicina , Currículo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
17.
Rofo ; 191(6): 547-552, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês, Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30754054

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The example of university radiology/neuroradiology illustrates how high-tech angiography simulators can be used meaningfully in teaching, clinical training and research. MATERIALS AND METHODS/TECHNICAL BASICS: A VIST LAB simulator (Mentice, Gothenburg, Sweden), which has been continuously developed both in terms of software and hardware, has been in use since 2013. Recently, the simulator has been integrated into the angiography suite Azurion (Philips, Amsterdam, Netherlands). RESULTS/AREAS OF APPLICATION: In student education there is the possibility for intensive examination of cerebrovascular diseases and their therapy in small group lessons. The training of beginners in diagnostic and interventional angiography begins mandatorily on the simulator. Research questions are the proof of validity and the training effect, but also the influence on patient safety and the possible cost reduction of an intervention. CONCLUSION: As a result of continuous further development in recent years, simulators are now very well suited for both student teaching and beginner medical training. In the future, even experienced interventionalists could benefit from further technical advances, which should also be driven by academic research. Possible effects would be the reduction of examination times, complications and costs. KEY POINTS: · Angiography simulators are useful in teaching students, medical training and research.. · Linking a simulator to an angiography suite increases the degree of reality even further.. · Real patient cases can be practiced and thus patient safety can be increased.. · Future developments should also increase the benefit for experienced interventionalists.. · Integration of simulators into certification programs (e. g. DEGIR) is to be targeted in the future.. CITATION FORMAT: · Kreiser K, Gehling K, Zimmer C. Simulation in Angiography - Experiences from 5 Years Teaching, Training, and Research. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2019; 191: 547 - 552.


Assuntos
Angiografia , Simulação por Computador , Capacitação em Serviço , Neurorradiografia , Simulação de Paciente , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Ensino , Angiografia/tendências , Currículo/tendências , Educação Médica/tendências , Previsões , Alemanha , Humanos , Capacitação em Serviço/tendências , Neurorradiografia/tendências , Radiologia Intervencionista/tendências , Pesquisa/educação , Pesquisa/tendências , Ensino/tendências
19.
Tech Vasc Interv Radiol ; 22(1): 26-31, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30765072

RESUMO

Advanced practice registered nurses, such as Nurse Practitioners (NPs), can be found working in a variety of settings. Niche practices, such as Interventional Radiology, are highly specialized areas and are often specialties in which few NPs get to orient through during their graduate nursing program clinical rotations. For the NP transitioning into an Interventional Radiology practice, formal on-the-job orientation and training can assist in gaining specialty-based knowledge and competencies in performing interventional procedures. Simulation-based training of the NP helps with critical thinking skills and developing techniques to safely perform minimally invasive procedures. A step-by-step approach via a simulation environment helps the NP learn image guidance, develop hand-eye coordination and become proficient in procedure techniques. Simulation-based education introduces the concept of repetitive practice resulting in the NP gaining confidence in performing procedures while decreasing performance anxiety. The result is a competent NP who can safely perform minimally invasive procedures.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Enfermagem/métodos , Profissionais de Enfermagem/educação , Radiografia Intervencionista , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Treinamento por Simulação , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Humanos , Curva de Aprendizado , Segurança do Paciente
20.
Tech Vasc Interv Radiol ; 22(1): 3-6, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30765073

RESUMO

Interventional Radiology (IR) incorporates a unique set of technical skills such as ultrasound-guided needle placement, inferior vena cava filter placement, and wire/catheter exchange, which are not easily attained in other aspects of medical training. Simple, low cost models can allow medical students and residents to attain these skills in a low risk setting. These simulated tasks will ultimately combine to improve preparedness of trainees during patient procedures allowing them to advance more quickly through the training paradigm without patient risk. Many commercially available devices may be cost prohibitive, so low cost solutions are presented.


Assuntos
Orçamentos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Radiografia Intervencionista , Radiologia Intervencionista , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/economia , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/economia , Desenho de Equipamento , Humanos , Curva de Aprendizado , Radiografia Intervencionista/economia , Radiografia Intervencionista/instrumentação , Radiologia Intervencionista/economia , Radiologia Intervencionista/educação , Radiologia Intervencionista/instrumentação , Estudantes de Medicina
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