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1.
World Neurosurg ; 133: e874-e892, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31541754

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The increasing challenges facing the training of future neurosurgeons have led to continued development of simulation-based training, particularly for neurosurgical subspecialties. The simulators must be scientifically validated to fully assess their benefit and determine their educational effects. In this second part, we aim to identify the available simulators for spine, pediatric neurosurgery, interventional neuroradiology, and nontechnical skills, assess their validity, and determine their effectiveness. METHODS: Both Medline and Embase were searched for English language articles that validate simulation models for neurosurgery. Each study was screened according to the Messick validity framework, and rated in each domain. The McGaghie model of translational outcomes was then used to determine a level of effectiveness for each simulator or training course. RESULTS: Overall, 114 articles for 108 simulation-based training models or courses were identified. These articles included 24 for spine simulators, 3 for nontechnical skills, 10 for 9 pediatric neurosurgery simulators, and 12 for 11 interventional neuroradiology simulators. Achieving the highest rating for each validity domain were 3 models for content validity; 16 for response processes; 1 for internal structure; 2 for relations to other variables; and only 1 for consequences. For translational outcomes, 2 training courses achieved a level of effectiveness of >2, showing skills transfer beyond the simulator environment. CONCLUSIONS: With increasing simulators, there is a need for more validity studies and attempts to investigate translational outcomes to the operating theater when using these simulators. Nontechnical skills training is notably lacking, despite demand within the field.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos/educação , Treinamento por Simulação/métodos , Medula Espinal/cirurgia , Coluna Vertebral/cirurgia , Criança , Humanos , Radiologia/educação
3.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 70(4): 337-343, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31561924

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine medical students' and radiologists' attitude toward radiology electives at a distributed medical school and identify specific areas for improvement. METHODS: During a single academic year, both students and faculty preceptors were surveyed anonymously following a senior radiology elective. The survey was based on an established theoretical framework for studying the educational environment which takes into account domains: (1) goal orientation, (2) organization/regulation, and (3) relationships. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to determine if there was any difference between the overall satisfaction of students and preceptors, responses from the different elective sites and students' ratings of the domains. Statistical significance was set at P < .05. Thematic analysis was performed on the narrative comments to identify specific challenges. RESULTS: The response rate was 82.0% for students (95/116) and 19.5% (31/159) for radiologists. There was no difference in responses based on elective site. Overall, the elective was viewed positively by both groups however students rated their experience as significantly better than their preceptors (P = .0012). Students viewed the relationships domain more positively than both the other two (goal orientation, P = .0001; organization/regulation, P = .0038). Thematic analysis identified that the student challenges were lack of autonomy, structured teaching, and preceptor continuity and the preceptor challenges were ambiguous learning objectives/expectations and insufficient resources. CONCLUSIONS: The radiology elective challenges identified in this study provide educators with specific areas to target when updating radiology electives. A better elective experience may improve students' radiology knowledge and attitude towards the specialty as well as radiologists' interest in teaching.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Radiologistas/psicologia , Radiologia/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
4.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 161(4): 705-713, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31284833

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of 2-dimensional (2D) illustrations and 3-dimensonal (3D)-printed anatomic models of the frontal sinuses according to the International Frontal Sinus Anatomy Classification in the education of otolaryngology and radiology residents. STUDY DESIGN: A crossover study design with half of the study participants randomized to the 2D illustration intervention first and the other half randomized to the 3D-printed model first. SETTING: Regularly scheduled resident didactic lectures at a tertiary care center. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-one otolaryngology and radiology residents were assessed with pre- and postintervention questionnaires that included subjective and objective methods of assessment. RESULTS: Overall, there was a statistically significant improvement in total number of answers correct and in confidence score between the pre- and postintervention assessments (P < .0001). The primary outcome of order of intervention (ie, 2D → 3D vs 3D → 2D) did not result in statistically significant differences in postevaluation scores. In regard to the secondary outcome of learner preference for educational modality, radiology residents favored the 2D illustrations to understand anatomic relationships, while otolaryngology residents preferred the 3D model to be more helpful in surgical planning (P = .0075). CONCLUSION: There is no difference between 2D-illustrated and 3D-printed International Frontal Sinus Anatomy Classification anatomic models in overall educational outcome, despite the preference of learners. Together, these models can be used as helpful tools in frontal sinus education for otolaryngology and radiology trainees.


Assuntos
Seio Frontal/anatomia & histologia , Internato e Residência , Ilustração Médica , Modelos Anatômicos , Otolaringologia/educação , Impressão Tridimensional , Radiologia/educação , Estudos Cross-Over , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 213(3): 644-650, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31287725

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare the effectiveness of practical radiology learning by medical students in a 3D virtual world versus the real world. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Two hundred fifteen 3rd-year medical students were randomized into two groups to attend the same workshop on abdominal radiography interpretation in a virtual world classroom (VW group) and in real life (RL group). Pre- and post-training knowledge tests consisting of 12 multiple choice questions were performed at the beginning of the workshop and 2 months later. RESULTS. Fifty-four of 107 and five of 108 students refused to attend their respective group, resulting in the participation of 53 students (VW group) and 103 students (RL group) in this study. No significant differences were found between groups in the tests taken before (VW group, mean [± SD], 4.5 ± 1.8 points; RL group, 4.0 ± 1.3 points) and after (VW group, 6.2 ± 1.2; RL group, 6.0 ± 1.7 points) training. CONCLUSION. Radiology education in a 3D virtual classroom fosters participatory learning and results in similar acquisition of interpretive skills as a traditional face-to-face classroom. Virtual worlds allow the performance of online activities to learn interpretive skills with guaranteed success in learning similar to that of conventional activities. Additionally, the relative lack of identity in the virtual workshops makes students less afraid to speak and more participatory.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Radiografia Abdominal , Radiologia/educação , Realidade Virtual , Avaliação Educacional , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
6.
Eur Radiol ; 29(12): 6439-6442, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31273458

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Temporal subtraction of CT (TS) images improves detection of newly developed bone metastases (BM). We sought to determine whether TS improves detection of BM by radiology residents as well. METHODS: We performed an observer study using a previously reported dataset, consisting of 60 oncology patients, each with previous and current CT images. TS images were calculated using in-house software. Four residents independently interpreted twice the 60 sets of CT images, without and with TS. They identified BM by marking suspicious lesions likely to be BM. Lesion-based sensitivity and number of false positives per patient were calculated. Figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated. Detectability of BM, with and without TS, was compared between radiology residents and board-certified radiologists, as published previously. RESULTS: FOM of residents significantly improved by implementing TS (p value < 0.0001). Lesion-based sensitivity, false positives per patients, and FOM were 40.8%, 0.121, and 0.657, respectively, without TS, and 58.1%, 0.0958, and 0.796, respectively, with TS. These findings were comparable with the previously published values for board-certified radiologists without TS (58.0%, 0.19, and 0.758, respectively). CONCLUSION: The detectability of BM by residents improved markedly by implementing TS and reached that of board-certified radiologists without TS. KEY POINTS: • Detectability of bone metastases on CT by residents improved significantly when using temporal subtraction of CT (TS). • Detections by residents with TS and board-certified radiologists without TS were comparable. • TS is useful for residents as it is for board-certified radiologists.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Ósseas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Ósseas/secundário , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Interpretação de Imagem Assistida por Computador/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/métodos , Algoritmos , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Técnica de Subtração
7.
Br J Radiol ; 92(1103): 20190389, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31322909

RESUMO

In the era of personalized medicine, the emphasis of health care is shifting from populations to individuals. Artificial intelligence (AI) is capable of learning without explicit instruction and has emerging applications in medicine, particularly radiology. Whereas much attention has focused on teaching radiology trainees about AI, here our goal is to instead focus on how AI might be developed to better teach radiology trainees. While the idea of using AI to improve education is not new, the application of AI to medical and radiological education remains very limited. Based on the current educational foundation, we highlight an AI-integrated framework to augment radiology education and provide use case examples informed by our own institution's practice. The coming age of "AI-augmented radiology" may enable not only "precision medicine" but also what we describe as "precision medical education," where instruction is tailored to individual trainees based on their learning styles and needs.


Assuntos
Inteligência Artificial , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Teorema de Bayes , Competência Clínica/normas , Humanos , Treinamento por Simulação , Ensino , Materiais de Ensino
8.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 70(3): 320-326, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31300315

RESUMO

PURPOSE: There is a lack of evidence for developing radiology mobile apps for medical students. This study identifies the characteristics which students perceive as most valuable to teaching radiology with mobile apps (m-learning). METHODS: An online anonymous survey was administered to second- to fourth-year medical students at a single institution. The survey, which was based on established theoretical framework, collected students' preferred content organization, content presentation, and delivery strategies. The Copeland method was used to rank student preferences and a 2-tailed t test was used to determine if student responses were related to their clinical experience, with statistical significance at P < .05. RESULTS: The response rate was 25.6% (163/635). For content organization, image interpretation (66.9%), imaging anatomy (61.3%), and common pathological conditions (50.3%) were selected as the most important. For content presentation, quizzes (49.1%) and case presentations (46.0%) were selected as the most useful. Students with clinical experience rated algorithms as more important (P < .01) and quizzes as less important (P = .03). For delivery strategies, ease of use (92.6%), navigation (90.8%), and gestural design (74.8%) were deemed the most applicable. CONCLUSION: This study documents medical students' preferences for m-learning in radiology. Although learner preferences are not the only feature to consider in the development of educational technology, these provide the initial framework for radiologists wishing to develop and incorporate mobile apps into their teaching.


Assuntos
Instrução por Computador/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Aplicativos Móveis , Radiologia/educação , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudantes de Medicina , Adulto Jovem
9.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 69(6): 864-868, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31201393

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge, attitudes, practices and perceptions of healthcare professionals regarding use of portable gadgets in daily clinical practice and for academic purposes. METHODS: The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was performed at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from February to March, 2015, and comprised healthcare professionals recruited using convenience-based sampling. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Items in the instrument pertained to use of portable gadgets, knowledge of radiology applications and perceptions regarding benefits/drawbacks of such gadgets. 'Portable gadgets' referred to any handheld electronic device, such as mobile phones, tablet or personal digital assistants. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. RESULTS: Of the 100 subjects, 38(38%) were radiology residents, 34(34%) consultant radiologists 28(28%) were radiographers. The overall mean age was 32.7}8.66 years. Overall, 80 (80%) subjects possessed a portable gadget. Although 64(64%) participants commonly used the gadgets for clinical and academic activities, only 46(46%) had heard of radiology smartphone applications. Majority 80(80%) preferred hardcopies for studying books as opposed to digital formats. However, 78(78%) believed that portable gadgets had a positive impact on their clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: Portable gadgets were being used by a substantial proportion of healthcare professionals for clinical and academic activities.


Assuntos
Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Computadores de Mão , Internato e Residência , Radiologistas , Smartphone , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Aplicativos Móveis , Paquistão , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto , Radiologia/educação , Leitura , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
10.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 213(3): 485-489, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31166759

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE. Since the American Board of Radiology (ABR) instituted its new board certification pathway, our residency program has had more residents fail the core examination than was typical with the prior pathway. We performed a single-center retrospective study to evaluate predictors of ABR core examination failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Data regarding U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) steps 1 and 2, ACR diagnostic radiology in-training examinations, the number of image interpretations, academic degree (doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy), status as an American or foreign medical graduate, and Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society status were gathered and evaluated through logistic regression and generalized additive logistic regression. Data were gathered for all residents who took the ABR core examination from 2013 to 2017. RESULTS. Six of 30 residents (20%) failed the ABR core examination on the first attempt. The ACR in-training examination scores for 1st- and 3rd-year residents were significantly related to ABR core examination failure (p = 0.027 and p = 0.035, respectively), with significant nonlinearity (p = 0.037 and p = 0.033, respectively). The suggested baseline percentile score was the 30th percentile for 1st-year residents and the 20th percentile for 3rd-year residents. USMLE step 1 and 2 scores were significantly related to ABR core examination failure (p = 0.041 and p = 0.043, respectively), without significant nonlinearity (p = 0.35 and p = 0.09, respectively). However, residents with scores of less than 220 on USMLE steps 1 and 2 seemed to be at risk. CONCLUSION. Low scores on USMLE steps 1 and 2 and 1st- and 3rd-year ACR in-training examinations were associated with ABR core examination failure. If validated more broadly, these cutoffs may serve as predictors of ABR core examination failure and may facilitate identification and remediation of at-risk residents.


Assuntos
Avaliação Educacional , Radiologia/educação , Certificação , Previsões , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Estados Unidos
11.
J Allied Health ; 48(2): e65-e68, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31167021

RESUMO

Interprofessional education (IPE) among healthcare students of different programs provides a foundation for learning how to work effectively as a team. Combining IPE and simulation gives students the chance to interact with each other while caring for a patient in a safe setting. Adding IPE to established curriculum for healthcare disciplines poses significant challenges: synchronizing student schedules, low student and faculty buy-in, lack of administrative support, outdated equipment and technology, and inadequate space. This paper describes a process of incorporating IPE simulations into established curricula for nursing, radiologic science, and respiratory care students. Following the simulations, students (n=98) were asked to respond to their experience via survey questionnaire. The results suggested that IPE simulation activities were effective and enjoyable learning opportunities that meet the IPE core competencies of improving teamwork, communication, mutual respect of values and ethics, and learning of others' roles and responsibilities. In conclusion, when a structured framework for IPE is lacking, it still appears to be a meaningful learning activity and worth the efforts of interdisciplinary faculty.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Relações Interprofissionais , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Treinamento por Simulação/organização & administração , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação em Enfermagem/organização & administração , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Modelos Educacionais , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Pneumonia/terapia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Radiologia/educação , Terapia Respiratória/educação , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/terapia
12.
J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 63(4): 454-460, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31134754

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Junior doctors are typically responsible for requesting and interpreting diagnostic imaging studies. European studies have highlighted the paucity of radiology teaching leading to junior doctors feeling underprepared for clinical practice involving radiology. There is a lack of published data on the experiences of Australian medical students and junior doctors. This study aimed to describe the experiences of interns in Western Australia to establish whether they felt prepared for clinical practice by the radiology teaching they received at medical school and beyond. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study involved a needs analysis questionnaire. The study population included all interns currently employed by Fiona Stanley Hospital (n = 121). RESULTS: Radiology teaching at medical school was reportedly mostly informal and infrequent. More than half felt this was inadequate (52%). Current teaching was also reportedly infrequent and 31% reported receiving no radiology teaching in their current rotation. The interns reported requesting high volumes of diagnostic imaging with 66% reporting requesting imaging once a day or more frequently. The overwhelming majority stated their clinical practice would benefit from additional teaching in radiology (98%). CONCLUSION: This study has demonstrated a paucity of radiology teaching provided to interns in a large Australian teaching hospital. As they request and interpret high volumes of diagnostic imaging, skills in this domain are paramount in the provision of safe, effective and timely patient care. The results are being used in the design and implementation of a high-quality radiology teaching programme to improve junior doctors' skill and develop the radiologist-clinical referrer interface.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Competência Clínica , Internato e Residência , Radiologia/educação , Adulto , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Austrália Ocidental , Adulto Jovem
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 122, 2019 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31046749

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During residency, radiology residents learn to interpret volumetric radiological images. The development of their competence for volumetric image interpretation, as opposed to 2D image reading, is not completely understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how competence for volumetric image interpretation develops in radiology residents and how this compares with competence development for 2D image interpretation, by studying resident scores on image-based items in digital radiology tests. METHODS: We reviewed resident scores on volumetric and 2D image-based test items in 9 consecutive semi-annual digital radiology tests that were carried out from November 2013 to April 2018. We assessed percentage-correct sum scores for all test items about volumetric images and for all test items about 2D images in each test as well as for all residents across the 9 tests (i.e. 4.5 years of test materials). We used a paired t-test to analyze whether scores differed between volumetric and 2D image-based test items in individual residents in postgraduate year (PGY) 0-5, subdivided in 10 half-year phases (PGY 0-0.5, 0.5-1.0, 1.0-1.5 et cetera). RESULTS: The percentage-correct scores on volumetric and 2D image-based items showed a comparable trend of development, increasing in the first half of residency and flattening off in the second half. Chance-corrected scores were generally lower in volumetric than in 2D items (on average 1-5% points). In PGY 1.5-4.5, this score difference was statistically significant (p-values ranging from 0.02 to < 0.001), with the largest difference found in PGY 2.5 (mean: 5% points; 95% CI: -7.3 - -3.4). At the end of training in PGY 5, there was no statistically significant score difference between both item types. CONCLUSIONS: The development of competence in volumetric image interpretation fits a similar curvilinear growth curve during radiology residency as 2D image interpretation competence in digital radiology tests. Although residents performed significantly lower on volumetric than 2D items in PGY 1.5-4.5, we consider the magnitude of this difference as relatively small for our educational setting and we suggest that throughout radiology training there are no relevant differences in the development of both types of competences, as investigated by digital radiology tests.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Internato e Residência , Intensificação de Imagem Radiográfica , Radiologia/educação , Currículo , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Garantia da Qualidade dos Cuidados de Saúde , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
14.
Acad Radiol ; 26(1): 101-113, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30929697

RESUMO

Teaching is one of the important roles of an academic radiologist. Therefore, it is important that radiologists are taught how to effectively educate and, in turn, to act as role models of these skills to trainees. This is reinforced by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education which has the requirement that all residents who interact with and teach medical students must undergo training in effective methods of teaching. Radiologists are likely familiar with the traditional didactic lecture-type teaching format. However, there are many newer innovative teaching methods that could be added to the radiologist's teaching repertoire, which could be used to enhance the traditional lecture format. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Noninterpretive Skills therefore presents a review of several innovative teaching methods, which include the use of audience response technology, long-distance teaching, the flipped classroom, and active learning.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Capacitação de Professores , Ensino , Educação a Distância , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas
15.
Clin Imaging ; 55: 181-187, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30965182

RESUMO

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Interpreting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be an overwhelming and challenging task for trainees, particularly when post processing, synthesizing and interpreting data from multiple language paradigms. Currently, there is no established best method for teaching fMRI interpretation to new trainees. The purpose of our study is to compare the use of combined task activation display (CTAD) and conventional display of fMRI language paradigms as an effective method to teach fMRI to the introductory learner. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Following IRB approval, 43 unique cases (with 10 repeat cases to assess intra-reader variability) were identified based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Eight radiology trainees, without prior exposure to fMRI, were asked to determine language lateralization based on activation of Wernicke's area, Broca's area, and the pre-supplementary motor area. Prior to trainee interpretation, a 15-minute training session was conducted to describe the expected anatomic locations of the language centers. Trainees were asked to determine language dominance using either the CTAD or conventional methods. Following a 6-week washout period, the same eight trainees were asked to interpret the cases using the opposite interpretation approach. RESULTS: Interpreting fMRI with the CTAD method significantly increased trainee accuracy (85.4% vs 70.9% p < 0.001) and trainee confidence (4.3 vs 3.6 p < 0.001), while decreasing time to interpretation (mean difference of 29 min), and intra-reader variability when compared to the conventional approach. CONCLUSION: Combined task activation display is an effective method to teach fMRI to introductory learners.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Adulto , Mapeamento Encefálico/métodos , Mapeamento Encefálico/normas , Córtex Cerebral/fisiologia , Competência Clínica/normas , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Feminino , Lateralidade Funcional/fisiologia , Humanos , Linguagem , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/normas , Masculino , Radiologistas/educação , Radiologistas/normas , Ensino
16.
Radiology ; 291(3): 570-580, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30990383

RESUMO

Advances in virtual immersive and augmented reality technology, commercially available for the entertainment and gaming industry, hold potential for education and clinical use in medicine and the field of medical imaging. Radiology departments have begun exploring the use of these technologies to help with radiology education and clinical care. The purpose of this review article is to summarize how three institutions have explored using virtual and augmented reality for radiology.


Assuntos
Realidade Aumentada , Radiografia/métodos , Radiologia/educação , Realidade Virtual , Comunicação , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Smartphone
17.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(4): 533-544, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009280

RESUMO

There is a lack of consensus among educators regarding the ideal structure of radiology training in veterinary medicine. Research in the medical field suggests that early integration has positive short- and long-term impacts on student interest in radiology. This study evaluated the effect of a new radiology course in the first year of the veterinary curriculum. Authors hypothesized that students taught radiology in years 1 and 2 would have greater interest in and appreciation for the specialty of radiology and would perform better on tests of basic knowledge of medical imaging principles, entry-level image interpretation, and anatomy identification than students who were not taught until year 2. An online questionnaire was administered to different classes of students after completion of their radiology courses. Students with early and increased radiology training were significantly more likely to respond that radiology was more interesting than other veterinary specialties. Unexpectedly, students with early and increased training performed significantly better than students with less and later training on only one out of nine content knowledge questions, though they did perform significantly better on additional knowledge questions compared to students with only early exposure. This suggests early and increased training in radiology may increase student interest in and appreciation for the specialty, but may not lead to increased short-term knowledge retention compared to a traditional curriculum format.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Radiologia , Especialização , Estudantes de Medicina , Animais , Currículo , Humanos , Radiologia/educação , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
Radiol Med ; 124(8): 721-727, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30953314

RESUMO

The changes introduced with Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom will require European Member States adapt their regulations, procedures and equipment to the new high standards of radiation safety. These new requirements will have an impact, in particular, on the radiology community (including medical physics experts) and on industry. Relevant changes include new definitions, a new dose limit for the eye lens, non-medical imaging exposures, procedures in asymptomatic individuals, the use and regular review of diagnostic reference levels (including interventional procedures), dosimetric information in imaging systems and its transfer to the examination report, new requirements on responsibilities, the registry and analysis of accidental or unintended exposure and population dose evaluation (based on age and gender distribution). Furthermore, the Directive emphasises the need for justification of medical exposure (including asymptomatic individuals), introduces requirements concerning patient information and strengthens those for recording and reporting doses from radiological procedures, the use of diagnostic reference levels, the availability of dose-indicating devices and the improved role and support of the medical physics experts in imaging.


Assuntos
Exposição Ocupacional/legislação & jurisprudência , Exposição à Radiação/legislação & jurisprudência , Proteção Radiológica/legislação & jurisprudência , Doenças Assintomáticas , Emergências , União Europeia , Física Sanitária/legislação & jurisprudência , Física Sanitária/normas , Humanos , Cristalino/efeitos da radiação , Exposição Ocupacional/normas , Doses de Radiação , Exposição à Radiação/classificação , Exposição à Radiação/prevenção & controle , Exposição à Radiação/normas , Proteção Radiológica/instrumentação , Proteção Radiológica/normas , Radiologia/educação , Radiologia/instrumentação , Radiologia/legislação & jurisprudência , Radiologia/normas , Padrões de Referência , Segurança/legislação & jurisprudência , Segurança/normas
19.
Pediatr Radiol ; 49(4): 526-530, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30923885

RESUMO

Peer learning represents a shift away from traditional peer review. Peer learning focuses on improvement of diagnostic performance rather than on suboptimal performance. The shift in focus away from random selection and toward identification of cases with valuable teaching points can encourage more active radiologist engagement in the learning process. An effective peer learning program relies on a trusting environment that lessens the fear of embarrassment or punitive action. Here we describe the shortcomings of traditional peer review, and the benefits of peer learning. We also provide tips for a successful peer learning program and examples of implementation.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Erros de Diagnóstico/prevenção & controle , Segurança do Paciente , Pediatria/educação , Revisão por Pares , Garantia da Qualidade dos Cuidados de Saúde , Radiologia/educação , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Melhoria de Qualidade
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