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1.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 78(1): 1630233, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31199204

RESUMO

Historically, heart health was approached holistically by First Nations (FN) peoples, which was integrated into daily living. Caring for the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of individuals, community, family, and the living environment was integral. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada demonstrates the decimation of health practices through governmental policy to destroy the cultural foundations of FN peoples. Relational systems and ways of living were outlawed, and the health of FN people suffered. A digital storytelling study collaborated with Manitoba FN women with lived experience of caring for a biomedical-diagnosed heart condition. The objective was to identify concepts, language, and experiences of heart health among FN women. Six women created five digital stories; four are available publically online. Themes addressed by the storytellers include: changes to diet and lifestyle, related health conditions, experiences with healthcare system, residential schools, and relationships with children and grandchildren. The intersection of Western and FN knowledges heard in the women's stories suggests heart health knowledge and care is embedded within historical and social contexts. Insights into the non-dichotomous relationship between FN and biomedical knowledge of heart health, along with their conceptualisations of heart, suggests historical and social roots underlying heart health issues First Nations women face.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Cardiopatias/etnologia , Índios Norte-Americanos/psicologia , Regiões Árticas , Dieta/etnologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estilo de Vida/etnologia , Manitoba , Narração
2.
Infant Behav Dev ; 55: 100-111, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31002987

RESUMO

Given the large numbers of families with more than one child, understanding similarities and differences in siblings' behaviors and in parents' interactions with their sibling infants is an important goal for advancing more representative developmental science. This study employed a within-family design to examine mean-level consistency and individual-order agreement in 5-month-old sibling behaviors and maternal parenting practices with their firstborns and secondborns (ns = 61 mothers and 122 infants). Each infant was seen independently with mother. Firstborn infants were more social with their mothers and engaged in more exploration with objects than secondborn infants; firstborn and secondborn infants' behaviors were correlated for smiling, distress communication, and efficiency of exploration. Mothers engaged in more physical encouragement, social exchange, didactic interaction, material provisioning, and language with their firstborns than with their secondborns. Notably, only maternal nurturing (e.g., feeding, holding) did not differ in mean level when mothers were with their two infants. However, mean differences in mothers' social exchange and material provisioning with their two children attenuated to nonsignificance when controlling for differences in siblings' behaviors. Individual-order agreement of mothers' behaviors with firstborn and secondborn infants (across an average of almost 3 years) was only moderate. These findings suggest that mother-firstborn interactions may differ from mother-secondborn interactions. Future research should move beyond studying mother-firstborn dyads to understand broader family and developmental processes.


Assuntos
Ordem de Nascimento/psicologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/psicologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/etnologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia , Adulto , Criança , Educação Infantil/etnologia , Educação Infantil/psicologia , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Comportamento do Lactente/etnologia , Comportamento do Lactente/psicologia , Masculino , Comportamento Materno/fisiologia , Comportamento Materno/psicologia , Irmãos/psicologia , Estados Unidos/etnologia
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30934779

RESUMO

Rates of diabetes are high in many communities of Pacific Island peoples, including people from Fiji. This qualitative study explores knowledge and attitudes towards diabetes among i-Taukei Fijians to facilitate the cultural tailoring of diabetes prevention and management programs for this community. Fijians aged 26 to 71 years (n = 15), residing in Australia, participated in semi-structured interviews; 53% (n = 8) were male. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, then thematically analyzed. Diabetes is recognized as an important and increasing health problem requiring action in the i-Taukei Fijian community. Widespread support for culturally appropriate lifestyle interventions utilizing existing societal structures, like family networks and church groups, was apparent. These structures were also seen as a crucial motivator for health action. Intervention content suggestions included diabetes risk awareness and education, as well as skills development to improve lifestyle behaviors. Leveraging existing social structures and both faith and family experiences of diabetes within the Fijian community may help convert increased awareness and understanding into lifestyle change. Ongoing in-community support to prevent and manage diabetes was also regarded as important. We recommend building upon experience from prior community-based interventions in other high-risk populations, alongside our findings, to assist in developing tailored diabetes programs for Fijians.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/etnologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Estilo de Vida/etnologia , Adulto , Idoso , Austrália/epidemiologia , Conscientização , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Fiji/etnologia , Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Percepção , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Fatores Socioeconômicos
4.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol ; 25(1): 65-72, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30714768

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Recently, there has been a call to better understand Latino health and arrive at effective approaches for achieving health equity via research focusing on the association between cultural factors and health. This study examined whether familism, a cultural value that emphasizes warm and close family relationships, would attenuate the negative effects that perceived stress, a psychological process that can worsen health, can have on two physical health indicators- number of health conditions and bodily pain. METHOD: Latina mothers (n = 85, Mage = 52.68, SD = 6.60) with Type 2 diabetes and their daughters (n = 86, Mage = 27.69, SD = 7.61) whose weight put them at risk for also developing the condition were recruited to take part in a larger intervention study aimed at improving weight loss/dietary intake. Participants completed measures of familism, perceived stress, health conditions, and bodily pain. RESULTS: Results indicated that in the daughters, familism and perceived stress interacted to predict health conditions and bodily pain. As familism decreased, stress was associated with more health conditions and more bodily pain. These interactions were not significant for the mothers. CONCLUSIONS: First, familism has the potential to buffer the negative effect of stress in ways that are protective for health among Latinas at risk for diabetes. Second, this buffering effect has boundary conditions, suggesting that a better understanding is needed of how, for whom, and under what circumstances familism can be beneficial for health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Equidade em Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia , Núcleo Familiar/psicologia , Adulto , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etnologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevenção & controle , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Relações Mãe-Filho/etnologia , Mães , Apoio Social , Adulto Jovem
5.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 44(2): 80-85, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30807326

RESUMO

There is a growing Orthodox Jewish population in the United States and Canada. Many Orthodox Jewish families have a large number of children and choose to breastfeed. The Orthodox Jew observes Jewish laws and customs literally as dictated by the Torah. Orthodox Jews consult a rabbi or posek before making most major life decisions, including matters related to breastfeeding to ensure adherence to religious law. Cultural practices applicable to the Orthodox Jewish family related to the provision of human milk and breastfeeding when a sick newborn may require special care and continued hospitalization after the mother has been discharged are presented. Guidelines for preconception lactation counseling for families are provided to tailor nursing care to meet the individual needs of each Orthodox Jewish infant and family. Special considerations related to pumping schedule, use of mechanisms such as timers for breast pumps, and discussions with religious leader about the saving of colostrum and/or milk when an infant is critically ill will be addressed. To provide culturally sensitive and appropriate counseling related to the provision of human milk and breastfeeding, nurses need to be culturally aware of the specific needs of the Orthodox Jewish family. Clinical implications and suggestions are provided.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno/psicologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Fidelidade a Diretrizes/normas , Judaísmo/psicologia , Adulto , Aleitamento Materno/etnologia , Aleitamento Materno/métodos , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/normas , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Relações Mãe-Filho/etnologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia , Fatores de Risco
6.
J Cross Cult Gerontol ; 34(1): 51-65, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30666497

RESUMO

The purpose of this study is to explore the cultural context of family religiosity/spirituality among Korean-American elderly families, and how this changed after families immigrated to the USA. Fifty one first-generation Korean-Americans participated in one or two hour, in-depth interviews in Korean at a participant's home or church. These included 27 older adults and 24 family members living together or within a radius of one-hour transit time from their elders, residing in the Southeastern United States. A thematic and interpretive method was used to analyze transcribed interviews. Three themes were identified that explained the cultural context of family religiosity/spirituality: (a) traditional family religious rituals, (b) church oriented routines, and (c) family collectivism. The participants did not distinguish 'religiosity' and 'spirituality' during the interviews. The findings suggest that the family religiosity/spirituality of the participants was influenced by the traditional family religious values, which were shaped by Korean culture. The traditional religions of Shamanism, Buddhism, and Confucianism are prevalent in Asian countries. Thus, the findings of this study may help healthcare professionals identify the cultural contexts of spirituality/religiosity of Asian immigrant families in order to provide holistic care.


Assuntos
Família , Religião , Espiritualidade , Idoso , Americanos Asiáticos/psicologia , Diversidade Cultural , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Família/etnologia , Família/psicologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos
7.
Eur J Public Health ; 29(2): 208-213, 2019 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30204883

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Diabetes type 2 is more prevalent in people from ethnic minorities in the Netherlands, and outcomes of care are worse compared with other Dutch people. Dieticians experience difficulties in managing these groups in self-management and adherence to dietary advice. The aim of this study was to explore the views regarding a healthy diet and dietetic care among ethnic minority type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were held with 12 migrants with diabetes from Turkey, Morocco, Iraq and Curacao, who visited a dietician. Inclusion went on until saturation was reached. The interview guide was based on the Attitudes, Social influence and self-Efficacy (ASE) model and Kleinman's explanatory model of illness. Interviews were held in the language preferred by the respondent. Transcripts were coded and thematically analyzed. RESULTS: Several respondents expected a more rigorous, directive and technical approach of the dietician. All respondents acknowledged the importance of a healthy diet. What they considered healthy was determined by culturally influenced ideas about health benefits of specific foods. Important hindrances for dietary change were lack of self-efficacy and social support. Social influences were experienced both as supportive and a hindrance. CONCLUSIONS: Migrant diabetic patients' opinions about healthy food are determined by culturally influenced ideas rather than by dietary guidelines. Dutch dietary care is not tailored to the needs of these patients and should take into account migrants' expectations, cultural differences in dietary habits and specifically address the role of family.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etnologia , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Grupos Minoritários/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Dieta/etnologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Países Baixos , Cooperação do Paciente/etnologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Autogestão , Apoio Social
8.
J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care ; 14(4): 291-314, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30457447

RESUMO

For over 40 years, the Hmong have sought refuge in the United States; however, many Hmong elders continue to honor healthcare and end-of-life beliefs and rituals that they practiced in their home country. With little knowledge by the general public and healthcare systems about these beliefs and rituals, healthcare professionals may struggle to provide the Hmong community with culturally-sensitive care. This study sought to address this gap by conducting in-depth face-to-face interviews with 12 Animist and 8Christian Hmong elders born in Southeast Asia, who now reside in the United States. Results provided insights regarding the heterogeneity among these Hmong elders concerning their end-of-life beliefs and rituals. Both Animist and Christian respondents believed family should provide care at end of life. Animist Hmong elders reported the importance of Shamanistic rituals such as soul calling or spiritual offering while Christian Hmong elders believed in the power of prayers. Healthcare providers need to assess Hmong elders' preferences for care at end of life, be open to the inclusion of traditional healers in their care and/or decision-making, and understand preferences of family and community members' involvement in care at the end of life.


Assuntos
Americanos Asiáticos/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Religião , Assistência Terminal/organização & administração , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Ásia Sudeste/etnologia , Estudos Transversais , Competência Cultural , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Preferência do Paciente/etnologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
Dev Psychopathol ; 30(5): 1589-1609, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30451135

RESUMO

Familism values are conceptualized as a key source of resilience for Latino adolescents' psychosocial adjustment. The current study addressed the developmental progression and correlates of familism within the context of the transition to adolescent motherhood. Participants were 191 Mexican-origin pregnant adolescents (15 to 18 years of age at first pregnancy; Mage = 16.76 years; SD = 0.98) who were having their first child. Adolescents completed interviews during their third trimester of pregnancy and annually for 5 years after (Waves 1 through 6). We examined changes in familism values across the transition to adolescent motherhood and the moderating role of age at pregnancy. Moderation analyses revealed differences in familism trajectories for younger versus older adolescents. We also examined whether familism values were related to family relationship dynamics (i.e., adolescents' relationships with their own mother figures) and adolescents' psychosocial adjustment, respectively, using multilevel models to test both between-person and within-person associations. Adolescents' stronger familism values were related to adolescent-mother figure warmth and conflict, coparenting communication, and three dimensions of social support from mother figures, but no associations emerged for coparental conflict, adolescents' depressive symptoms, or self-esteem. Discussion addresses these findings in the context of culturally grounded models of ethnic-racial minority youth development and psychopathology.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Americanos Mexicanos/psicologia , Mães/psicologia , Gravidez na Adolescência/psicologia , Valores Sociais , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente/etnologia , Comportamento do Adolescente/psicologia , Depressão/etnologia , Depressão/psicologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Gravidez , Gravidez na Adolescência/etnologia , Autoimagem , Apoio Social
10.
Dev Psychopathol ; 30(5): 1779-1796, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30259820

RESUMO

Culturally linked family influences during adolescence are important predictors of health and well-being for Latino youth, yet few studies have examined whether these familial influences are associated with indicators of typical physiological stress processes. Following a cultural neurobiology framework, we examined the role of family in the everyday lives of Latino adolescents (N = 209; Mage = 18.10; 85.1% Mexican descent; 64.4% female) by investigating familism values and perceptions of parent support as well as daily family assistance behaviors in relation to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis diurnal patterns, indexed by salivary cortisol five times a day for 3 weekdays. Three-level growth curve analyses revealed that perceptions of parental support were associated with greater cortisol awakening responses, whereas familism values were not associated with diurnal cortisol patterns. In day-to-day analyses, assisting family during the day (compared to not assisting family) was associated with lower waking cortisol levels and flatter diurnal slopes the next day. Our findings highlight the dynamic associations and multiple time courses between cultural values and behaviors, daily experiences, and physiological stress processes for Latino adolescents. Further, we identified important cultural risk and promotive factors associated with physiological regulation in daily life and potential pathways toward health outcomes in adulthood.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Relações Familiares , Hispano-Americanos , Hidrocortisona/metabolismo , Sistema Hipotálamo-Hipofisário/metabolismo , Sistema Hipófise-Suprarrenal/metabolismo , Apoio Social , Adolescente , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Relações Pais-Filho/etnologia , Saliva
11.
Dev Psychopathol ; 30(5): 1715-1728, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30168407

RESUMO

Poor family cohesion and elevated adolescent aggression are associated with greater alcohol use in adolescence and early adulthood. In addition, evocative gene-environment correlations (rGEs) can underlie the interplay between offspring characteristics and negative family functioning, contributing to substance use. Gene-environment interplay has rarely been examined in racial/ethnic minority populations. The current study examined adolescents' polygenic risk scores for aggression in evocative rGEs underlying aggression and family cohesion during adolescence, their contributions to alcohol use in early adulthood (n = 479), and differences between Mexican American and European American subsamples. Results suggest an evocative rGE between polygenic risk scores, aggression, and low family cohesion, with aggression contributing to low family cohesion over time. Greater family cohesion was associated with lower levels of alcohol use in early adulthood and this association was stronger for Mexican American adolescents compared to European American adolescents. Results are discussed with respect to integration of culture and racial/ethnic minority samples into genetic research and implications for alcohol use.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Agressão , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Relações Familiares , Americanos Mexicanos , Herança Multifatorial , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente/etnologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Americanos Mexicanos/genética , Americanos Mexicanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Consumo de Álcool por Menores/etnologia , Estados Unidos
14.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol ; 24(3): 453-458, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29389148

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate whether acculturation to U.S. culture is associated with greater posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology through diminished family cohesion among Latinos living with HIV on the U.S.-Mexico border. METHOD: Baseline survey data were analyzed from a sample of Latinos seeking HIV care from a publicly funded HIV clinic in El Paso, Texas. We used a regression-based bootstrapping approach to test our mediation hypothesis. RESULTS: A total of 248 Latinos living with HIV completed the survey, with 96.4% being of Mexican descent, 19.4% female (gender self-identification), and 63.7% nonheterosexual (sexual orientation self-identification). Family cohesion mediated the relationship between U.S. acculturation and PTSD symptom scores (a1 ⁎ b1 = .03, 95% confidence interval [.01-.06]), an effect independent of acculturation to Latino culture. CONCLUSIONS: Acculturation to U.S. culture may negatively impact mental health through weakening family bonds in this vulnerable population. (PsycINFO Database Record


Assuntos
Aculturação , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Saúde Mental , Americanos Mexicanos/psicologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Adulto , Características Culturais , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/etiologia , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Humanos , Masculino , México , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Texas , Estados Unidos
15.
Nutrients ; 10(1)2018 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29320461

RESUMO

Although there are numerous studies on binge eating behavior in the Western countries, studies on this behavior in Malaysia are still limited. Therefore, this cross-sectional study aimed to determine the risk factors associated with binge eating behavior among adolescents in Malaysia. The study included 356 adolescents (42.7% males and 57.3% females), aged 13 to 16 years. They completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic and socioeconomic backgrounds, frequency of family meals, family meal environments, family cohesion, perception of body size, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, perfectionistic self-presentation, and binge eating behavior. Furthermore, their weight, height, and waist circumference were measured. It was found that 14.0% of the participants engaged in binge eating behavior (15.2% in females and 12.5% in males). Additionally, it was identified that high levels of depressive symptoms, high levels of body dissatisfaction, poor family cohesion, and low self-esteem were significantly contributed to binge eating behavior after controlling for sex (adjusted R² = 0.165, F = 15.056, p < 0.001). The findings may suggest that improving the relationships between family members, along with eliminating adolescents' negative emotions could help in the prevention of binge eating behavior among adolescents. The identified modifiable risk factors should be incorporated into binge eating preventive programs to increase the effectiveness of the programs.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , Bulimia/psicologia , Comportamento Alimentar , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente/etnologia , Fatores Etários , Imagem Corporal , Bulimia/diagnóstico , Bulimia/etnologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/diagnóstico , Depressão/etnologia , Depressão/psicologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Comportamento Alimentar/etnologia , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Humanos , Malásia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Senso de Coerência , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
J Youth Adolesc ; 47(1): 105-120, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29030790

RESUMO

Latino youth have higher rates of educational and mental health difficulties compared to peers from other racial/ethnic groups. To understand the factors related to such maladjustment, a mediational model linking youth report of parent-youth acculturation gaps to prospective changes (from spring to fall semester) in youth report of academic performance, depressive symptoms and alcohol use via youth report of parent-youth conflict and family cohesion, was studied in a sample of 248 U.S.-and foreign-born Latino youth (Mage = 15.21 years; 50% female; 67% U.S.-born). Parent-youth acculturation gaps were associated with changes in youth academic performance across two semesters via their negative impact on family functioning. For U.S.-born youth, parent-youth acculturation gaps were also linked to changes in alcohol use via parent-adolescent conflict. Results provide some support for the acculturative gap hypotheses while unique findings across nativity groups suggest that such individual-level characteristics may serve as important sources of variation for Latino youth.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico/etnologia , Aculturação , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/etnologia , Depressão/etnologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/etnologia , Desempenho Acadêmico/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Estados Unidos
17.
J Youth Adolesc ; 47(1): 207-221, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28986744

RESUMO

Gender identity felt pressure is negatively associated with adjustment indices, including self-esteem, among children and early adolescents, and both gender and ethnic-racial identity felt pressure are negatively associated with self-esteem among young adults. This study explored the longitudinal associations between gender identity and ethnic-racial identity felt pressure from family and peers to behave in either gender or race/ethnic-accordant ways, and self-esteem among a sample of 750 (49.2% female) African American (n = 194) and Latino/a youth (n = 556) (M = 12.10 years, SD = .97 years). For African Americans, the results revealed significant negative longitudinal associations between (a) ethnic-racial identity felt pressure from family at Time 1 and self-esteem at Time 2 and (b) ethnic-racial identity felt pressure from peers at Time 1 and self-esteem at Time 2, controlling for self-esteem at Time 1. These associations were not found among Latinos/as, nor were associations found between gender identity felt pressure from peers or family and self-esteem. The findings are discussed by drawing on the gender identity and ethnic-racial identity literatures.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Identidade de Gênero , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Grupo Associado , Autoimagem , Identificação Social , Adolescente , Criança , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino
18.
Fam Process ; 57(4): 1029-1048, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29034460

RESUMO

This study tests the psychometric properties of multiple survey items and scales that are either underused or newly developed to assess familism among Asian Americans. Using data collected from 150 Filipino and 188 Korean American parents (mostly mothers) in the Midwest region in 2013, the measures were examined for validity and reliability for each group and, when appropriate, for cross-cultural equivalence across the groups. Several scales and their items showed high quality psychometric properties and are ready for use to more accurately assess family process of each target group and to conduct comparative analyses. The findings also show that, contrary to the expectation, Filipino American families express more traditional aspects of familism than do Korean American families, and are more likely to reinforce traditional familism beliefs and behaviors among their children. This study reinforces a need for more empirical- and subgroup-specific research effort.


Assuntos
Relações Familiares/psicologia , Pais/psicologia , Valores Sociais/etnologia , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Aculturação , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Americanos Asiáticos , Comparação Transcultural , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Meio-Oeste dos Estados Unidos , Filipinas/etnologia , Psicometria , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , República da Coreia/etnologia
19.
Fam Process ; 57(4): 996-1011, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29238961

RESUMO

Rates of international migration are increasing, which raises the question of how migration might influence couple relationship standards and impact on the standards of migrants forming intercultural relationships. We compared relationship standards in n = 286 Chinese living in Hong Kong, China, with standards in n = 401 Chinese migrants to a Western country (Australia) by administering the Chinese-Western Intercultural Couple Standards Scale (CWICSS). We also compared these two groups to n = 312 Westerners living in Australia. We first tested the structural invariance of the CWICSS across the three samples with a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis. There was marginal but acceptable fit of a model of two positively correlated latent factors: Couple Bond (with four indicators, such as demonstration of love and caring) and Family Responsibility (also with four indicators, such as extended family relations and preserving face). Within the limitations of the study, results suggest migration is associated predominantly with differences in women's, but not men's, relationship standards. Migrant Chinese women show alignment of Couple Bond standards with Western standards, and divergence of Family Responsibility standards from Western standards. Discussion focused on how migration and intercultural relationship experiences might differentially influence various domains of relationship standards, gender differences in migration effects on standards, and the implications for working with culturally diverse couples.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , Características da Família/etnologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Migrantes/psicologia , Aculturação , Adulto , Austrália , Comparação Transcultural , Emigração e Imigração , Análise Fatorial , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Feminino , Hong Kong/etnologia , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
20.
Hum Nat ; 29(1): 65-89, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29222651

RESUMO

Under poor circumstances, co-residence of a grandmother is generally considered to be beneficial for (grand)children. Empirical evidence does not unequivocally support this expectation and suggests that the grandmother's importance depends on the family's circumstances. We study the relationship between grandmother's co-residence and children's schooling in sub-Saharan Africa under a broad range of circumstances. Results make clear that the effect of a co-residing grandmother varies but is almost always positive. Grandmothers over age 60 are most effective in helping their (grand)children. They are particularly important for girls, and when the mother is deceased or not living in the household. Grandmothers are less effective in situations with few opportunities, as in very poor regions or in communities with few schooling opportunities. Our findings indicate that providing support to grandmothers should not be overlooked when designing policies aimed at strengthening the position of women and children in the sub-Saharan African context.


Assuntos
Educação Infantil/etnologia , Educação , Relações Familiares/etnologia , Avós , Pobreza , Adolescente , África ao Sul do Saara/etnologia , Idoso , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
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