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1.
Indian J Med Microbiol ; 38(2): 210-212, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883935

RESUMO

Recent emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and subsequent containment procedures have impacted the world as never seen before. Therefore, there is considerable curiosity about the genome evolution related to the origin, transmission and vaccine impact of this virus. We have analysed genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 isolated from Indian patients to gain an in-depth understanding of genomic evolution and transmission in India. Phylogenetic analysis and mutation profiling revealed major lineages being evolved by characteristic mutations. As the mutation frequency in spike protein is comparatively lesser, the candidate vaccines expected to have wide coverage worldwide including India.


Assuntos
Antígenos Virais/genética , Betacoronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Genoma Viral , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Vacinas Virais/genética , Animais , Antígenos Virais/imunologia , Antígenos Virais/metabolismo , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Eutérios/virologia , Evolução Molecular , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Mutação , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/imunologia , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/metabolismo , Vacinas Virais/biossíntese , Vacinas Virais/imunologia
2.
Rev Esp Salud Publica ; 942020 Sep 30.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32994390

RESUMO

In the midst of the SARS-CoV-2 public-health pandemic emergency, it is important to understand its zoonotic origin and how an animal virus finally infects humans. Identifying the circumstances in which a virus jumps species boundaries to infect humans so productively is objective of this work and will help us to determine the epidemiology and pathogenisis of this agent. Nowadays, it is known that bats serve as reservoir hosts for virus progenitor, but determine the possibility of a potential intermediate host of SARS-CoV-2 is still a challenge. Scientific investigations stablish the natural selection theory as the most probable (natural selection in an animal host before zoonotic transfer or acquired mutations in humans following crossing species barrier). It is necessary to find out how SARS-CoV-2 emerged, its rapidly spreads within a community and the optimal context in which this virus binds to human receptor. One Health is a multisectoral, collaborative and transdisciplinary approach which allows a cooperative working between animal and human health that will help us to introduce some possible control measures that might reduce the spread of the virus; improving sanitary management, identifying new outbreaks and preventing future zoonotic and pandemic events.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Quirópteros/virologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Seleção Genética , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/virologia
3.
Viruses ; 12(9)2020 09 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933150

RESUMO

Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses capable of causing respiratory, enteric, or systemic diseases in a variety of mammalian hosts that vary in clinical severity from subclinical to fatal. The host range and tissue tropism are largely determined by the coronaviral spike protein, which initiates cellular infection by promoting fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Companion animal coronaviruses responsible for causing enteric infection include feline enteric coronavirus, ferret enteric coronavirus, canine enteric coronavirus, equine coronavirus, and alpaca enteric coronavirus, while canine respiratory coronavirus and alpaca respiratory coronavirus result in respiratory infection. Ferret systemic coronavirus and feline infectious peritonitis virus, a mutated feline enteric coronavirus, can lead to lethal immuno-inflammatory systemic disease. Recent human viral pandemics, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and most recently, COVID-19, all thought to originate from bat coronaviruses, demonstrate the zoonotic potential of coronaviruses and their potential to have devastating impacts. A better understanding of the coronaviruses of companion animals, their capacity for cross-species transmission, and the sharing of genetic information may facilitate improved prevention and control strategies for future emerging zoonotic coronaviruses. This article reviews the clinical, epidemiologic, virologic, and pathologic characteristics of nine important coronaviruses of companion animals.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Coronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Animais , Camelídeos Americanos/virologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos/virologia , Quirópteros/virologia , Coronavirus/classificação , Coronavirus/genética , Coronavirus/fisiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/virologia , Cães/virologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/epidemiologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/virologia , Furões/virologia , Variação Genética , Doenças dos Cavalos/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/virologia , Cavalos/virologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Humanos , RNA Viral/genética , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/fisiologia , Replicação Viral , Zoonoses
4.
Biomolecules ; 10(9)2020 09 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933047

RESUMO

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is causing a pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The worldwide transmission of COVID-19 from human to human is spreading like wildfire, affecting almost every country in the world. In the past 100 years, the globe did not face a microbial pandemic similar in scale to COVID-19. Taken together, both previous outbreaks of other members of the coronavirus family (severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) and middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV)) did not produce even 1% of the global harm already inflicted by COVID-19. There are also four other CoVs capable of infecting humans (HCoVs), which circulate continuously in the human population, but their phenotypes are generally mild, and these HCoVs received relatively little attention. These dramatic differences between infection with HCoVs, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 raise many questions, such as: Why is COVID-19 transmitted so quickly? Is it due to some specific features of the viral structure? Are there some specific human (host) factors? Are there some environmental factors? The aim of this review is to collect and concisely summarize the possible and logical answers to these questions.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Coronavirus/patogenicidade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Fatores Etários , Animais , Betacoronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Síndrome da Liberação de Citocina/etiologia , Síndrome da Liberação de Citocina/fisiopatologia , Surtos de Doenças , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Feminino , Saúde Global , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno , Humanos , Masculino , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/patogenicidade , Especificidade de Órgãos , Peptídeo Hidrolases/fisiologia , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/fisiologia , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Receptores Virais/fisiologia , Fatores de Risco , Vírus da SARS/patogenicidade , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia , Proteínas Virais/fisiologia , Tropismo Viral , Virulência , Internalização do Vírus
5.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 358, 2020 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957995

RESUMO

COVID-19 caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) originated in Wuhan (Hubei province, China) during late 2019. It has spread across the globe affecting nearly 21 million people with a toll of 0.75 million deaths and restricting the movement of most of the world population during the past 6 months. COVID-19 became the leading health, economic, and humanitarian challenge of the twenty-first century. In addition to the considerable COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in humans, several cases of SARS-CoV-2 infections in animal hosts (dog, cat, tiger, lion, and mink) have been reported. Thus, the concern of pet owners is increasing. Moreover, the dynamics of the disease requires further explanation, mainly concerning the transmission of the virus from humans to animals and vice versa. Therefore, this study aimed to gather information about the reported cases of COVID-19 transmission in animals through a literary review of works published in scientific journals and perform genomic and phylogenetic analyses of SARS-CoV-2 isolated from animal hosts. Although many instances of transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 have been reported, caution and further studies are necessary to avoid the occurrence of maltreatment in animals, and to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of the disease in the environment, humans, and animals. Future research in the animal-human interface can help formulate and implement preventive measures to combat the further transmission of COVID-19.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Zoonoses/transmissão , Criação de Animais Domésticos , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Gatos , Coronavirus/classificação , Coronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Cães , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Vison/virologia , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Exposição Ocupacional , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Pesquisa Médica Translacional , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
7.
Med Sci (Paris) ; 36(8-9): 783-796, 2020.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32773024

RESUMO

SARS-CoV-2 is a new human coronavirus (CoV), which emerged in People's Republic of China at the end of 2019 and is responsible for the global Covid-19 pandemic that caused more than 540 000 deaths in six months. Understanding the origin of this virus is an important issue and it is necessary to determine the mechanisms of its dissemination in order to be able to contain new epidemics. Based on phylogenetic inferences, sequence analysis and structure-function relationships of coronavirus proteins, informed by the knowledge currently available, we discuss the different scenarios evoked to account for the origin - natural or synthetic - of the virus. On the basis of currently available data, it is impossible to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 is the result of a natural zoonotic emergence or an accidental escape from experimental strains. Regardless of its origin, the study of the evolution of the molecular mechanisms involved in the emergence of this pandemic virus is essential to develop therapeutic and vaccine strategies.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Coronavirus/classificação , Evolução Molecular , Pandemias , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , RNA Viral/genética , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Derramamento de Material Biológico , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronaviridae/transmissão , Infecções por Coronaviridae/veterinária , Infecções por Coronaviridae/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças , Mutação com Ganho de Função , Genoma Viral , HIV/genética , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Humanos , Mamíferos/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Vírus Reordenados/genética , Alinhamento de Sequência , Homologia de Sequência de Aminoácidos , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/química , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/fisiologia , Zoonoses
8.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237129, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32776964

RESUMO

Outbreaks of emerging coronaviruses in the past two decades and the current pandemic of a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that emerged in China highlight the importance of this viral family as a zoonotic public health threat. To gain a better understanding of coronavirus presence and diversity in wildlife at wildlife-human interfaces in three southern provinces in Viet Nam 2013-2014, we used consensus Polymerase Chain Reactions to detect coronavirus sequences. In comparison to previous studies, we observed high proportions of positive samples among field rats (34.0%, 239/702) destined for human consumption and insectivorous bats in guano farms (74.8%, 234/313) adjacent to human dwellings. Most notably among field rats, the odds of coronavirus RNA detection significantly increased along the supply chain from field rats sold by traders (reference group; 20.7% positivity, 39/188) by a factor of 2.2 for field rats sold in large markets (32.0%, 116/363) and 10.0 for field rats sold and served in restaurants (55.6%, 84/151). Coronaviruses were also detected in rodents on the majority of wildlife farms sampled (60.7%, 17/28). These coronaviruses were found in the Malayan porcupines (6.0%, 20/331) and bamboo rats (6.3%, 6/96) that are raised on wildlife farms for human consumption as food. We identified six known coronaviruses in bats and rodents, clustered in three Coronaviridae genera, including the Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammacoronaviruses. Our analysis also suggested either mixing of animal excreta in the environment or interspecies transmission of coronaviruses, as both bat and avian coronaviruses were detected in rodent feces on wildlife farms. The mixing of multiple coronaviruses, and their apparent amplification along the wildlife supply chain into restaurants, suggests maximal risk for end consumers and likely underpins the mechanisms of zoonotic spillover to people.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Coronavirus/genética , Carne/virologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Fezes/virologia , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Humanos , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , Porcos-Espinhos/virologia , RNA Viral/genética , Ratos , Risco , Vietnã/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/diagnóstico , Zoonoses/virologia
9.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008363, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32790716

RESUMO

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains an important public health issue worldwide causing substantial morbidity and mortality. The Indian subcontinent accounted for up to 90% of the global VL burden in the past but made significant progress during recent years and is now moving towards elimination. However, to achieve and sustain elimination of VL, knowledge gaps on infection reservoirs and transmission need to be addressed urgently. Xenodiagnosis is the most direct way for testing the infectiousness of hosts to the vectors and can be used to investigate the dynamics and epidemiology of Leishmania donovani transmission. There are, however, several logistic and ethical issues with xenodiagnosis that need to be addressed before its application on human subjects. In the current Review, we discuss the critical knowledge gaps in VL transmission and the role of xenodiagnosis in disease transmission dynamics along with its technical challenges. Establishment of state of the art xenodiagnosis facilities is essential for the generation of much needed evidence in the VL elimination initiative.


Assuntos
Leishmaniose Visceral/diagnóstico , Leishmaniose Visceral/transmissão , Phlebotomus/parasitologia , Xenodiagnóstico , Animais , Ásia , Doenças Assintomáticas , Reservatórios de Doenças/parasitologia , Humanos , Leishmania donovani/fisiologia
10.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008251, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32853251

RESUMO

Yersinia pestis, the bacterial causative agent of plague, remains an important threat to human health. Plague is a rodent-borne disease that has historically shown an outstanding ability to colonize and persist across different species, habitats, and environments while provoking sporadic cases, outbreaks, and deadly global epidemics among humans. Between September and November 2017, an outbreak of urban pneumonic plague was declared in Madagascar, which refocused the attention of the scientific community on this ancient human scourge. Given recent trends and plague's resilience to control in the wild, its high fatality rate in humans without early treatment, and its capacity to disrupt social and healthcare systems, human plague should be considered as a neglected threat. A workshop was held in Paris in July 2018 to review current knowledge about plague and to identify the scientific research priorities to eradicate plague as a human threat. It was concluded that an urgent commitment is needed to develop and fund a strong research agenda aiming to fill the current knowledge gaps structured around 4 main axes: (i) an improved understanding of the ecological interactions among the reservoir, vector, pathogen, and environment; (ii) human and societal responses; (iii) improved diagnostic tools and case management; and (iv) vaccine development. These axes should be cross-cutting, translational, and focused on delivering context-specific strategies. Results of this research should feed a global control and prevention strategy within a "One Health" approach.


Assuntos
Doenças Negligenciadas/prevenção & controle , Peste/prevenção & controle , Yersinia pestis , Animais , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Reservatórios de Doenças/microbiologia , Humanos , Insetos Vetores , Madagáscar/epidemiologia , Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia , Peste/epidemiologia , Peste/transmissão , Roedores , Sifonápteros
11.
Am J Hum Genet ; 107(3): 381-402, 2020 09 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32814065

RESUMO

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic raises many scientific and clinical questions. These include how host genetic factors affect disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. New work is emerging related to SARS-CoV-2; previous work has been conducted on other coronaviruses that affect different species. We reviewed the literature on host genetic factors related to coronaviruses, systematically focusing on human studies. We identified 1,832 articles of potential relevance. Seventy-five involved human host genetic factors, 36 of which involved analysis of specific genes or loci; aside from one meta-analysis, all were candidate-driven studies, typically investigating small numbers of research subjects and loci. Three additional case reports were described. Multiple significant loci were identified, including 16 related to susceptibility (seven of which identified protective alleles) and 16 related to outcomes (three of which identified protective alleles). The types of cases and controls used varied considerably; four studies used traditional replication/validation cohorts. Among other studies, 30 involved both human and non-human host genetic factors related to coronavirus, 178 involved study of non-human (animal) host genetic factors related to coronavirus, and 984 involved study of non-genetic host factors related to coronavirus, including involving immunopathogenesis. Previous human studies have been limited by issues that may be less impactful now, including low numbers of eligible participants and limited availability of advanced genomic methods; however, these may raise additional considerations. We outline key genes and loci from animal and human host genetic studies that may bear investigation in the study of COVID-19. We also discuss how previous studies may direct current lines of inquiry.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Pneumonia Viral/genética , Animais , Betacoronavirus , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Humanos , Pandemias , Receptores Virais/genética , Especificidade da Espécie
12.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 202: 111015, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32800237

RESUMO

The risk of newly emerging diseases is constantly present in a world where changes occur significantly in climatic, commercial, and ecological conditions, in addition to the development of biomedical investigations in new situations. An epidemic respiratory disease instigated by a new coronavirus was initially identified in and has resulted in the current global dissemination. This viral strain and its related disease has been termed "SARS-CoV-2" and "coronavirus disease 2019" (abbreviated "COVID-19" or "2019-nCoV"), respectively, which is transmitted simply between individuals. The World Health Organization (WHO) announced the COVID-19 outburst as a pandemic on March 11, which necessitates a cooperative endeavour globally for mitigating the spread of COVID-19. The absence of previous, and minimum present-day information, particularly concerning the path of contagion have precluded the control of this disease. The present article, therefore, describes the SARS-CoV-2 paths of contagion such as drinking water, solid waste, sewer water, ambient air, and the rest of emerging likely paths.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças , Exposição Ambiental , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/metabolismo , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/análise , Humanos , Pandemias , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/metabolismo , Pneumonia Viral/metabolismo , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Organização Mundial da Saúde
13.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0232305, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785271

RESUMO

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) that cause severe disease predominantly carry the toxin gene variant stx2a. However, the role of Shiga toxin in the ruminant reservoirs of this zoonotic pathogen is poorly understood and strains that cause severe disease in humans (HUSEC) likely constitute a small and atypical subset of the overall STEC flora. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of stx2a in samples from cattle and to isolate and characterize stx2a-positive E. coli. In nationwide surveys in Sweden and Norway samples were collected from individual cattle or from cattle herds, respectively. Samples were tested for Shiga toxin genes by real-time PCR and amplicon sequencing and stx2a-positive isolates were whole genome sequenced. Among faecal samples from Sweden, stx1 was detected in 37%, stx2 in 53% and stx2a in 5% and in skin (ear) samples in 64%, 79% and 2% respectively. In Norway, 79% of the herds were positive for stx1, 93% for stx2 and 17% for stx2a. Based on amplicon sequencing the most common stx2 types in samples from Swedish cattle were stx2a and stx2d. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 39 stx2a-positive isolates collected from both countries revealed substantial diversity with 19 different sequence types. Only a few classical LEE-positive strains similar to HUSEC were found among the stx2a-positive isolates, notably a single O121:H19 and an O26:H11. Lineages known to include LEE-negative HUSEC were also recovered including, such as O113:H21 (sequence type ST-223), O130:H11 (ST-297), and O101:H33 (ST-330). We conclude that E. coli encoding stx2a in cattle are ranging from strains similar to HUSEC to unknown STEC variants. Comparison of isolates from human HUS cases to related STEC from the ruminant reservoirs can help identify combinations of virulence attributes necessary to cause HUS, as well as provide a better understanding of the routes of infection for rare and emerging pathogenic STEC.


Assuntos
Bovinos/microbiologia , Toxina Shiga II/genética , Escherichia coli Shiga Toxigênica/genética , Animais , Reservatórios de Doenças/microbiologia , Infecções por Escherichia coli/epidemiologia , Infecções por Escherichia coli/microbiologia , Variação Genética , Genoma Bacteriano , Síndrome Hemolítico-Urêmica/epidemiologia , Síndrome Hemolítico-Urêmica/microbiologia , Humanos , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus , Noruega/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Escherichia coli Shiga Toxigênica/citologia , Escherichia coli Shiga Toxigênica/isolamento & purificação , Suécia/epidemiologia , Virulência/genética , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia
14.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0236278, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32841247

RESUMO

Rabies is a lethal viral disease and dogs are the major disease reservoir in the Philippines. Spatio-temporal variations in environmental factors are known to affect disease dynamics. Some rabies-affected countries considered investigating the role of weather components in driving rabies cases and it has helped them to strategize their control efforts. In this study, cointegration analysis was conducted between the monthly reported rabies cases and the weather components, such as temperature and precipitation, to verify the effect of weather components on rabies incidence in Davao City, Philippines. With the Engle-Granger cointegration tests, we found that rabies cases are cointegrated into each of the weather components. It was further validated, using the Granger causality test, that each weather component predicts the rabies cases and not vice versa. Moreover, we performed the Johansen cointegration test to show that the weather components simultaneously affect the number of rabies cases, which allowed us to estimate a vector-error correction model for rabies incidence as a function of temperature and precipitation. Our analyses showed that canine rabies in Davao City was weather-sensitive, which implies that rabies incidence could be projected using established long-run relationship among reported rabies cases, temperature, and precipitation. This study also provides empirical evidence that can guide local health officials in formulating preventive strategies for rabies control and eradication based on weather patterns.


Assuntos
Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Cães/virologia , Monitorização de Parâmetros Ecológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Raiva/epidemiologia , Tempo (Meteorologia) , Animais , Causalidade , Cidades/estatística & dados numéricos , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Previsões/métodos , Humanos , Incidência , Modelos Estatísticos , Filipinas/epidemiologia , Raiva/prevenção & controle , Raiva/virologia , Vírus da Raiva , Análise Espaço-Temporal
15.
Pathog Dis ; 78(6)2020 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32840560

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a viral pneumonia, responsible for the recent pandemic, and originated from Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The causative agent of the outbreak was identified as coronavirus and designated as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS- CoV-2). Few years back, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS- CoV) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) were reported to be highly pathogenic and caused severe infections in humans. In the current situation SARS-CoV-2 has become the third highly pathogenic coronavirus that is responsible for the present outbreak in human population. At the time of this review, there were more than 14 007 791 confirmed COVID-19 patients which associated with over 597 105 deaths in more then 216 countries across the globe (as reported by World Health Organization). In this review we have discussed about SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARC-CoV-2, their reservoirs, role of spike proteins and immunogenicity. We have also covered the diagnosis, therapeutics and vaccine status of SARS-CoV-2.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/patologia , Animais , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Humanos , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/efeitos dos fármacos , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/genética , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio/imunologia , Pandemias , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/metabolismo , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/tratamento farmacológico , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/imunologia , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/metabolismo , Zoonoses/virologia
16.
Med Hypotheses ; 143: 110121, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32759006

RESUMO

SARS-CoV-2 incidence and mortality in Europe have shown wide variation. Northern Italy in particular the Lombardy region, north-eastern French regions, Switzerland and Belgium were amongst the hardest hit, while the central and southern Italian regions, all the Balkan countries from Slovenia to Greece and the Islands of Malta and Cyprus had much fewer cases and deaths per capita, and deaths per number of cases. Differences in public health measures, and health care delivery, in the author's opinion, can only partly explain the difference. The geographical distribution of Phlebotomus sand-flies and the relative distribution of arthropod borne diseases Leishmaniasis and Phlebovirus infections especially the Sicilian Sandfly fever group corresponds to most areas of low prevalence of SARS-CoV-2. A hypothesis is proposed whereby repeated arthropod or sandfly vector infection of humans by novel viruses of zoonotic origins carrying bat or mammalian RNA/DNA, such as phleboviruses may have resulted in the development of an effective evolutionary immune response to most novel zoonotic viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 by means of survival of the fittest possibly over many generations. This process probably ran in parallel and concurrent with the progressive evolution of novel coronaviruses which spread from one mammalian species to another. Other possible, but less likely mechanisms for the role of sandfly meals within a much shorter time frame may have led to, (i) previous exposure and infection of humans with the SARS-Cov-2 virus itself, or a closely related corona virus in the previous decades, or (ii) exposure of human populations to parts coronavirus protein namely either S or more likely N protein carried mechanically by arthropods, but without clinical disease causing direct immunity or (iii) by causing infection with other arthropod borne viruses which could carry bat DNA/RNA and have similar functional proteins resulting in an immediate cross-reactive immune response rather than by natural selection. The Evidence possibly supporting or disputing this hypothesis is reviewed, however the major problem with the hypothesis is that to date no coronavirus has ever been isolated from arthropods. Such a hypothesis can only be supported by research investigating the possible biological relationship of arthropods and coronaviruses where paradoxically they may be promoting immunity rather than disease.


Assuntos
Arbovirus/imunologia , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Imunidade Coletiva , Insetos Vetores/virologia , Pandemias , Phlebotomus/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Animais , Anticorpos Antivirais/análise , Conflitos Armados , Artrópodes/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Reações Cruzadas , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno , Humanos , Incidência , Itália , Mamíferos/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vírus da Febre do Flebótomo Napolitano/imunologia , Seleção Genética , Especificidade da Espécie , Proteínas Virais/imunologia , Zoonoses
17.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237780, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845922

RESUMO

Modeling the behavior of zoonotic pandemic threats is a key component of their control. Many emerging zoonoses, such as SARS, Nipah, and Hendra, mutated from their wild type while circulating in an intermediate host population, usually a domestic species, to become more transmissible among humans, and this transmission route will only become more likely as agriculture and trade intensifies around the world. Passage through an intermediate host enables many otherwise rare diseases to become better adapted to humans, and so understanding this process with accurate mathematical models is necessary to prevent epidemics of emerging zoonoses, guide policy interventions in public health, and predict the behavior of an epidemic. In this paper, we account for a zoonotic disease mutating in an intermediate host by introducing a new mathematical model for disease transmission among three species. We present a model of these disease dynamics, including the equilibria of the system and the basic reproductive number of the pathogen, finding that in the presence of biologically realistic interspecies transmission parameters, a zoonotic disease with the capacity to mutate in an intermediate host population can establish itself in humans even if its R0 in humans is less than 1. This result and model can be used to predict the behavior of any zoonosis with an intermediate host and assist efforts to protect public health.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/microbiologia , Modelos Biológicos , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Animais , Animais Domésticos/microbiologia , Animais Selvagens/microbiologia , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/patogenicidade , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/microbiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/prevenção & controle , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Vetores de Doenças , Especificidade de Hospedeiro/genética , Humanos , Taxa de Mutação , Vírus/genética , Vírus/patogenicidade , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Zoonoses/transmissão
18.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008573, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32841248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis has gained much attention in Sri Lanka since its large outbreak in 2008. However, most of the cases were clinically diagnosed and information on Leptospira genotypes and serotypes currently prevailing in the country is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively analyzed 24 Leptospira strains from human patients as well as isolated and characterized three Leptospira strains from black rats using the microscopic agglutination test with antisera for 19 serovars and multilocus sequence typing. The isolates were identified as Leptospira borgpetersenii sequence types (STs) 143 and 144; L. interrogans STs 30, 34, 43, 44, 74, 75, 80, 308, 313, 314, 316, and 317; and L. kirschneri ST318. Six of the 15 STs were identified for the first time in this study. Five serogroups such as Autumnalis, Grippotyphosa, Hebdomadis, Javanica, and Pyrogenes were detected among the isolates. Contrary to previous studies, various genotypes including novel STs were isolated during an outbreak in Southern Province. L. borgpetersenii serogroup Javanica ST143 was isolated both from a human and black rat. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study revealed that genetically diverse Leptospira strains currently circulate in Sri Lanka: some genotypes have been circulating and others have emerged recently, which may explain the recent surge of leptospirosis patients with varying clinical manifestations and frequent outbreaks of leptospirosis. Black rats were identified as the source of infection for humans, but reservoir animals for other genotypes remain unknown.


Assuntos
Genótipo , Leptospira/classificação , Leptospira/genética , Leptospira/isolamento & purificação , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Testes de Aglutinação , Animais , Criança , DNA Bacteriano/análise , Reservatórios de Doenças , Feminino , Humanos , Leptospirose/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Sorogrupo , Sorotipagem , Sri Lanka/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
19.
Arch Virol ; 165(10): 2291-2299, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32754877

RESUMO

The multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis; M. natalensis) serves as the main reservoir for the zoonotic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV), and this has led to considerable investigation into the distribution of LASV and other related arenaviruses in this host species. In contrast to the situation with arenaviruses, the presence of other viruses in M. natalensis remains largely unexplored. In this study, herpesviruses and polyomaviruses were identified and partially characterized by PCR methods, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. In tissues sampled from M. natalensis populations in Côte d'Ivoire and Mali, six new DNA viruses (four betaherpesviruses, one gammaherpesvirus and one polyomavirus) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis based on glycoprotein B amino acid sequences showed that the herpesviruses clustered with cytomegaloviruses and rhadinoviruses of multiple rodent species. The complete circular genome of the newly identified polyomavirus was amplified by PCR. Amino acid sequence analysis of the large T antigen or VP1 showed that this virus clustered with a known polyomavirus from a house mouse (species Mus musculus polyomavirus 1). These two polyomaviruses form a clade with other rodent polyomaviruses, and the newly identified virus represents the third known polyomavirus of M. natalensis. This study represents the first identification of herpesviruses and the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in M. natalensis. In contrast to arenaviruses, we anticipate that these newly identified viruses represent a low zoonotic risk due to the normally highly restricted specificity of members of these two DNA virus families to their individual mammalian host species.


Assuntos
Genoma Viral , Infecções por Herpesviridae/epidemiologia , Herpesviridae/genética , Filogenia , Infecções por Polyomavirus/epidemiologia , Polyomavirus/genética , Doenças dos Roedores/epidemiologia , África ao Sul do Saara/epidemiologia , Animais , Antígenos Virais de Tumores/genética , Proteínas do Capsídeo/genética , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Herpesviridae/classificação , Herpesviridae/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Herpesviridae/virologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Tipagem Molecular , Murinae/virologia , Polyomavirus/classificação , Polyomavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Polyomavirus/virologia , Doenças dos Roedores/virologia , Proteínas do Envelope Viral/genética
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