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1.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1508, 2019 Nov 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31718590

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Noise exposure is considered a stressor that may potentially exert negative health effects among the exposed individuals. On a population basis, the most prevalent and immediate response to noise is annoyance, which is an individually experienced phenomenon that may activate physiological stress-responses and result in both physical and mental symptoms. Health implications of traffic noise have been investigated thoroughly, but not of neighbour noise. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between neighbour noise annoyance and eight different physical and mental health symptoms. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2017 were used. The present study included a random sample of 3893 adults living in multi-storey housing. Information on neighbour noise annoyance and various health symptoms (e.g. pain in various body parts, headache, sleeping problems, depression, and anxiety) during the past two weeks was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. The question on neighbour noise annoyance and health symptoms, respectively, had three possible response options: 'Yes, very annoyed/bothered', 'Yes, slightly annoyed/bothered', 'No'. The associations between neighbour noise annoyance and very bothering physical and mental health symptoms were investigated using multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: Being very annoyed by neighbour noise was significantly associated with higher odds of being very bothered by all eight health symptoms (adjusted OR = 1.73-3.32, all p-values < 0.05) compared to individuals not annoyed by noise from neighbours. Statistically significant interactions were observed between sex and two of the eight health symptoms. Among women, a strong association was observed between neighbour noise annoyance and being very bothered by pain or discomfort in the shoulder or neck, and in the arms, hands, legs, knees, hips or joints. Among men, no associations were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings from this study, neighbour noise annoyance is strongly associated with eight different physical and mental health symptoms. Future studies are encouraged to 1) determine the direction of causality using a longitudinal design, 2) explore the biological mechanisms explaining the sex-specific impact of neighbour noise annoyance on symptoms of musculoskeletal pain or discomfort and the other outcomes as well.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental , Habitação , Ruído/efeitos adversos , Características de Residência , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Ansiedade/etiologia , Estudos Transversais , Dinamarca , Depressão/etiologia , Feminino , Cefaleia/etiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Razão de Chances , Dor/etiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/etiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
2.
Int J Occup Environ Med ; 10(4): 174-184, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31586382

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whole-body vibration (WBV) and mental workload (MWL) are common stressors among drivers who attempt to control numerous variables while driving a car, bus, or train. OBJECTIVE: To examine the individual and combined effects of the WBV and MWL on the autonomic nervous system. METHODS: ECG of 24 healthy male students was recorded using NeXus-4 while performing two difficulty levels of a computerized dual task and when they were exposing to WBV (intensity 0.5 m/s2; frequency 3-20 Hz). Each condition was examined for 5 min individually and combined. Inter-beat intervals were extracted from ECG records. The time-domain and frequency-domain heart rate variability parameters were then extracted from the inter-beat intervals data. RESULTS: A significant (p=0.008) increase was observed in the mean RR interval while the participants were exposed to WBV; there was a significant (p=0.02) reduction in the mean RR interval while the participants were performing the MWL. WBV (p=0.02) and MWL significantly (p<0.001) increased the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals with a moderate-to-large effect size. All active periods increased the low-frequency component and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio. However, only the WBV significantly increased the highfrequency component. A significant (p=0.01) interaction was observed between the WBV and MWL on low-frequency component and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio. CONCLUSION: Exposure to WBV and MWL can dysregulate the autonomic nervous system. WBV stimulates both sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system; MWL largely affects sympathetic nervous system. Both variables imbalance the sympatho-vagal control as well.


Assuntos
Condução de Veículo , Sistema Nervoso Autônomo/fisiologia , Processos Mentais/fisiologia , Vibração , Carga de Trabalho , Adulto , Condução de Veículo/psicologia , Condução de Veículo/estatística & dados numéricos , Frequência Cardíaca/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Ruído Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Ruído Ocupacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/estatística & dados numéricos , Exposição Ocupacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Projetos Piloto , Estudantes , Carga de Trabalho/psicologia , Carga de Trabalho/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31546974

RESUMO

Noise legislation in Austria does not provide an assessment of the cumulative effect of noise from different sources. The desire of citizens for a total noise assessment is getting stronger. Within the pilot project "Gesamtlärmbetrachtung" (Total Noise Investigation) Innsbruck, data from 1031 face-to-face interviews were correlated with exposure data from road, rail and air traffic noise. The interviews were selected in clusters according to the exposure combinations of these three sources. In addition to exposure-response relationships, it has also been found that the annoyance response to air and rail traffic noise is independent of the background noise from road traffic. The total noise annoyance response shows a cumulative effect in each source considered. From the source specific exposure-response relationships, a total noise assessment model based on the annoyance equivalents model was developed. This model is more suitable than the dominant source model and thus also considerable for legal application.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/estatística & dados numéricos , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Adulto , Aeronaves , Animais , Áustria , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ruído , Projetos Piloto , Ferrovias
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31311086

RESUMO

Unlike the other WHO evidence reviews, the systematic review on birth outcomes could not provide a quantitative estimate of the effect of environmental noise. With that in mind, we aimed to update it with additional studies published through to 12 May, 2019 to allow for a formal meta-analysis of the association of residential road traffic noise with birth weight, low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), and preterm birth (PTB). The quality effects and random effects estimators were used for meta-analysis and the robustness of findings was tested in several sensitivity analyses. Nine studies were included in the qualitative synthesis, from which we extracted seven estimates for birth weight (n = 718,136 births) and LBW (n = 620,221), and five for SGA (n = 547,256) and PTB (n = 74,609). We found -8.26 g (95% CI: -20.61 g, 4.10 g) (I2 = 87%) lower birth weight associated with a 10 dB(A) increase in day-evening-night noise level (Lden), and this effect became significant in sensitivity analyses. No evidence of significant effects was found for LBW (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.23) (I2 = 49%), SGA (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.21) (I2 = 90%), or PTB (OR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.27) (I2 = 69%). The quality of evidence for continuous birth weight was graded as "moderate", while for the other outcomes it was deemed "very low". Finally, we discuss limitations of the risk of bias assessment criteria employed by Nieuwenhuijsen et al.


Assuntos
Peso ao Nascer , Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso , Recém-Nascido Pequeno para a Idade Gestacional , Exposição Materna/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Nascimento Prematuro/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Gravidez , Fatores de Risco
6.
Environ Int ; 129: 525-537, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31158598

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence is emerging that poor mental health is associated with the environmental exposures of surrounding green, air pollution and traffic noise. Most studies have evaluated only associations of single exposures with poor mental health. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate associations of combined exposure to surrounding green, air pollution and traffic noise with poor mental health. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we linked data from a Dutch national health survey among 387,195 adults including questions about psychological distress, based on the Kessler 10 scale, to an external database on registered prescriptions of anxiolytics, hypnotics & sedatives and antidepressants. We added data on residential surrounding green in a 300 m and a 1000 m buffer based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and a land-use database (TOP10NL), modeled annual average air pollutant concentrations (including particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) and modeled road- and rail-traffic noise (Lden and Lnight) to the survey. We used logistic regression to analyze associations of surrounding green, air pollution and traffic noise exposure with poor mental health. RESULTS: In single exposure models, surrounding green was inversely associated with poor mental health. Air pollution was positively associated with poor mental health. Road-traffic noise was only positively associated with prescription of anxiolytics, while rail-traffic noise was only positively associated with psychological distress. For prescription of anxiolytics, we found an odds ratio [OR] of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.92) per interquartile range [IQR] increase in NDVI within 300 m, an OR of 1.14 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.19) per IQR increase in NO2 and an OR of 1.07 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.11) per IQR increase in road-traffic noise. In multi exposure analyses, associations with surrounding green and air pollution generally remained but attenuated. Joint odds ratios [JOR], based on the Cumulative Risk Index (CRI) method, of combined exposure to air pollution, traffic noise and decreased surrounding green were higher than the ORs of single exposure models. Associations of environmental exposures with poor mental health differed somewhat by age. CONCLUSIONS: Studies including only one of these three correlated exposures may overestimate the influence of poor mental health attributed to the studied exposure, while underestimating the influence of combined environmental exposures.


Assuntos
Poluentes Atmosféricos/efeitos adversos , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental , Saúde Mental , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Habitação , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Dióxido de Nitrogênio/análise , Material Particulado/análise
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31086115

RESUMO

Many epidemiological studies find that people exposed to aircraft, road or railway traffic noise are at increased risk of illness, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression. It is unclear how the combined exposure to these different types of traffic noise affects disease risks. This study addresses this question with a large secondary data-based case-control study ("NORAH disease risk study"). The Akaike information criterion (AIC) is used to compare two different models estimating the disease risks of combined traffic noise. In comparison with the conventional energetic addition of noise levels, the multiplication of CVD risks as well as depression risks reveals a considerably better model fit as expressed by much lower AIC values. This is also the case when risk differences between different types of traffic noise are taken into account by applying supplements or reductions to the single traffic noise pressure levels in order to identify the best fitting energetic addition model. As a consequence, the conventionally performed energetic addition of noise levels might considerably underestimate the health risks of combined traffic noise. Based on the NORAH disease risk study, "epidemiological risk multiplication" seems to provide a better estimate of the health risks of combined traffic noise exposures compared to energetic addition. If confirmed in further studies, these results should imply consequences for noise protection measures as well as for traffic planning.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Teóricos
8.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 116(14): 237-244, 2019 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31092311

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There have been many individual studies on the question whether air- craft noise is a risk factor for stroke, but until now there has not been any summary of the current state of the evidence of adequately high methodological quality. METHODS: In a systematic review and meta-analysis (PROSPERO registry number CRD42013006004), we evaluated the relation between address-based aircraft noise exposure and the incidence of stroke. A systematic literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and BIOSIS databases including publications up to August 2017. Two of the authors, working independently of each other, screened the titles, abstracts, and full texts for eligible articles and evaluated the quality of the included studies on a three-level scale. The change of risk per 10 dB increase in the weighted mean aircraft noise level (LDEN) was calculated. LDEN is a noise level indicator with additional weighting of evening and nighttime noise. RESULTS: Of the nine studies that met the inclusion criteria, seven were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis indicated a relative stroke risk of 1.013 (95% confidence interval, [0.998; 1.028]) per 10 dB increase in LDEN, corresponding with an estimated 1.3% increase in the risk of stroke for each additional 10 dB of aircraft noise. The underlying studies were of poor to medium quality. The analyses of the studies included adjustments for various combinations of confounders, including age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis indicates that aircraft noise increases the risk of stroke, even if the overall finding just fails to reach statistical significance. The differing measures of exposure in the included studies, the lack of differentiation be- tween ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and the lack of consideration of maximum noise levels are all factors that may have led to a marked underestimation of the risk of stroke.


Assuntos
Aeronaves , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Humanos , Fatores de Risco
9.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 116(14): 245-250, 2019 04 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31092312

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Traffic noise can induce chronic stress reactions and thereby elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease. The responsible pathophysiological mechanisms are as yet unclear. METHODS: This review is based on publications retrieved by a selective search in PubMed for epidemiological and experimental studies (2007-2018) on the relation between noise and the risk of cardiovascular disease. The search terms were "noise AND cardiovascular effects" and "noise cardiovascular effects." RESULTS: Epidemiological studies have shown that noise caused by air, road, and rail traffic has a dose-dependent association with elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A current meta-analysis commissioned by the World Health Organization concludes that road-traffic noise elevates the incidence of coronary heart disease by 8% per 10 dB(A) increase starting at 50 dB(A) (95% confidence interval [1,01; 1,15]). Traffic noise at night causes fragmentation of sleep, elevation of stress hormone levels, and oxidative stress. These factors can promote the development of vascular dysfunction (endothelial dysfunction) and high blood pressure, which, in turn, elevate the cardiovascular risk. CONCLUSION: Traffic noise, and air-traffic noise in particular, is an important cardiovascular risk factor that has not been sufficiently studied to date. Preventive measures are needed to protect the population from the harmful effects of noise on health.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Incidência , Fatores de Risco
10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30917492

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Air, road, and railway traffic, the three major sources of traffic noise, have been reported to differently impact on annoyance. However, these findings may not be transferable to physiological reactions during sleep which are considered to decrease nighttime recovery and might mediate long-term negative health effects. Studies on awakenings from sleep indicate that railway noise, while having the least impact on annoyance, may have the most disturbing properties on sleep compared to aircraft noise. This study presents a comparison between the three major traffic modes and their probability to cause awakenings. In combining acoustical and polysomnographical data from three laboratory studies sample size and generalizability of the findings were increased. METHODS: Data from three laboratory studies were pooled, conducted at two sites in Germany (German Aerospace Center, Cologne, and Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund). In total, the impact of 109,836 noise events on polysomnographically assessed awakenings was analyzed in 237 subjects using a random intercept logistic regression model. RESULTS: The best model fit according to the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) included different acoustical and sleep parameters. After adjusting for these moderators results showed that the probability to wake up from equal maximum A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPL) increased in the order aircraft < road < railway noise, the awakening probability from road and railway noise being not significantly different (p = 0.988). At 70 dB SPL, it was more than 7% less probable to wake up due to aircraft noise than due to railway noise. CONCLUSIONS: The three major traffic noise sources differ in their impact on sleep. The order with which their impact increased was inversed compared to the order that was found in annoyance surveys. It is thus important to choose the correct concept for noise legislation, i.e., physiological sleep metrics in addition to noise annoyance for nighttime noise protection.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Sono , Acústica , Adulto , Idoso , Aeronaves , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Veículos Automotores , Polissonografia , Ferrovias , Adulto Jovem
11.
Occup Environ Med ; 76(4): 201-207, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30804165

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence from longitudinal studies on transportation noise from different sources and development of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVES: This cohort study assessed associations between exposure to noise from road traffic, railway or aircraft and incidence of IHD and stroke. METHODS: In a cohort of 20 012 individuals from Stockholm County, we estimated long-term residential exposure to road traffic, railway and aircraft noise. National Patient and Cause-of-Death Registers were used to identify IHD and stroke events. Information on risk factors was obtained from questionnaires and registers. Adjusted HR for cardiovascular outcomes related to source-specific noise exposure were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: No clear or consistent associations were observed between transportation noise and incidence of IHD or stroke. However, noise exposure from road traffic and aircraft was related to IHD incidence in women, with HR of 1.11 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.22) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.44) per 10 dB Lden, respectively. For both sexes taken together, we observed a particularly high risk of IHD in those exposed to all three transportation noise sources at≥45 dB Lden, with a HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.06 to 2.32), and a similar tendency for stroke (HR 1.42; 95% CI 0.87 to 2.32). CONCLUSION: No overall associations were observed between transportation noise exposure and incidence of IHD or stroke. However, there appeared to be an increased risk of IHD in women exposed to road traffic or aircraft noise as well as in those exposed to multiple sources of transportation noise.


Assuntos
Incidência , Isquemia Miocárdica/epidemiologia , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Isquemia Miocárdica/etiologia , Ruído/efeitos adversos , Fatores de Risco , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/etiologia , Suécia/epidemiologia
12.
Br Med Bull ; 129(1): 13-23, 2019 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30615073

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Roads facilitate trade, development and communication, as well as spread illness and disease, but since mass car use began, the disbenefits, including injuries, pollution and physical inactivity have been significantly magnified. Electric cars are now being seen by many as the solution to the problems associated with internal combustion engine cars. SOURCES OF DATA: This article reviews existing literature to determine the extent to which a switch to electrification can solve many of the problems that cars have wrought. AREAS OF AGREEMENT: It concludes that there may be some benefits in rural areas, where public transport is poor. AREAS OF CONTROVERSY: However, it also argues that even in rural areas it may be better to invest in public transport for many, rather than electric car infrastructure for some. It is clear that even for air quality, where electric cars are suggested to offer benefits these are unlikely to be as great as has been suggested. Overall, the negative health consequences of electric cars seem likely to be at least those of internal combustion engine cars.


Assuntos
Automóveis , Eletricidade , Saúde Pública , Acidentes de Trânsito/estatística & dados numéricos , Poluição do Ar/efeitos adversos , Mudança Climática , Exercício , Humanos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/prevenção & controle , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Saúde da População Rural , Emissões de Veículos/prevenção & controle , Emissões de Veículos/toxicidade , Ferimentos e Lesões/epidemiologia , Ferimentos e Lesões/prevenção & controle
13.
Environ Int ; 123: 399-406, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30622064

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological research on transportation noise uses different exposure assessment strategies based on façade point estimates or regulatory noise maps. The degree of exposure measurement error and subsequent potentially biased risk estimates related to exposure definition is unclear. We aimed to evaluate associations between transportation noise exposure and myocardial infarction (MI) mortality considering: assumptions about residential floor, façade point selection (loudest, quietest, nearest), façade point vs. noise map estimates, and influence of averaging exposure at coarser spatial scales (e.g. in ecological health studies). METHODS: Lden from the façade points were assigned to >4 million eligible adults in the Swiss National Cohort for the best match residential floor (reference), middle floor, and first floor. For selected floors, the loudest and quietest exposed façades per dwelling, plus the nearest façade point to the residential geocode, were extracted. Exposure was also assigned from 10 × 10 m noise maps, using "buffers" from 50 to 500 m derived from the maps, and by aggregating the maps to larger areas. Associations between road traffic and railway noise and MI mortality were evaluated by multi-pollutant Cox regression models, adjusted for aircraft noise, NO2 and socio-demographic confounders, following individuals from 2000 to 2008. Bias was calculated to express differences compared to the reference. RESULTS: Hazard ratios (HRs) for the best match residential floor were 1.05 (1.02-1.07) and 1.03 (1.01-1.05) per IQR (11.3 and 15.0 dB) for road traffic and railway noise, respectively. In most situations, comparing the alternative exposure definitions to this reference resulted in attenuated HRs. For example, assuming everyone resided on the middle or everyone on first floor introduced little bias (%Bias in excess risk: -1.9 to 4.4 road traffic and -4.4 to 10.7 railway noise). Using the noise grids generated a bias of approximately -26% for both sources. Averaging the maps at a coarser spatial scale led to bias from -19.4 to -105.1% for road traffic and 17.6 to -34.3% for railway noise and inflated the confidence intervals such that some HRs were no longer statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Changes in spatial scale introduced more bias than changes in residential floor. Use of noise maps to represent residential exposure may underestimate noise-induced health effects, in particular for small-scale heterogeneously distributed road traffic noise in urban settings.


Assuntos
Exposição Ambiental/análise , Infarto do Miocárdio/mortalidade , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Aeronaves , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Habitação , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/etiologia , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Medição de Risco , Suíça/epidemiologia , Transportes
14.
Behav Sleep Med ; 17(4): 502-513, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29172716

RESUMO

Background: Exposure to aircraft noise has been shown to have adverse effects on health, particularly on sleep. Exposure to nighttime aircraft noise clearly affects sleep architecture, as well as subjective sleep quality. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and subjective sleep quality in the population living near airports in France. Methods: A total of 1,244 individuals older than 18 and living near three French airports (Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Lyon-Saint-Exupéry, and Toulouse-Blagnac) were randomly selected to participate in the study. Information on sleep as well as health, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors was collected by means of a face-to-face questionnaire performed at their place of residence by an interviewer. For each participant, aircraft noise exposure was estimated at home using noise maps. Logistic regression models were used with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Aircraft noise exposure was significantly associated with a short total sleep time (TST; ≤ 6 h) and with the feeling of tiredness while awakening in the morning. An increase of 10 dB(A) in aircraft noise level at night was associated with an OR of 1.63 (95% CI: 1.15-2.32) for a short TST and an OR of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.00-1.54) for the feeling of tiredness while awakening in the morning. Conclusions: These findings contribute to the overall evidence suggesting that aircraft noise exposure at nighttime may decrease the subjective amount and quality of sleep.


Assuntos
Aeronaves , Aeroportos/estatística & dados numéricos , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/estatística & dados numéricos , Sono/fisiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
15.
Eur J Public Health ; 29(2): 377-379, 2019 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30052879

RESUMO

Noise annoyance may reflect a pro-participatory attitude towards public information and consultation according to the European Environmental Noise Directive. However, noise annoyance is also indicative of a stress response to perceived uncontrollable noise exposure. Using cross-sectional data on a sample of elderly citizens (n = 1772), we investigated whether the value residents ascribed to being able to control noise exposure at home moderated the potential indirect effect of road traffic noise on annoyance through perceived noise control. Our results confirmed the presence of such a moderated mediation, which may justify studying the impact of residents' valuing perceived noise control on participation readiness.


Assuntos
Ruído dos Transportes/estatística & dados numéricos , Percepção , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/prevenção & controle , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores Socioeconômicos
16.
Int J Hyg Environ Health ; 222(2): 221-229, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30316691

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although there is growing evidence that depressed mood is affected by road traffic noise, previous results are not fully consistent. Furthermore, to our knowledge, no previous research has assessed ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in the association of noise exposure with depressed mood. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between road traffic noise with depressed mood and to determine to what extent this association varies between ethnic and socioeconomic groups. METHOD: We investigated cross-sectional data collected between 2011 and 2015 from 23,293 HELIUS participants (18-70 years) living in Amsterdam. Our study included five different ethnic groups (Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, South-Asian Surinamese and African Surinamese origin). All respondents were linked by their residential postal code to geographic data on road traffic noise levels (24 h noise average in A-weighted decibels [dB(A)]). Noise was categorized into five categories (45-54 dB(A), 55-59 dB(A), 60-64 dB(A), 65-69 dB(A), ≥70 dB(A)) and high noise exposure was defined as noise levels ≥65 dB(A). Depressed mood was defined as a sum-score of ≥10 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Logistic regression was performed to assess the relationship between road traffic noise and depressed mood. Multilevel analyses were used to take into account the clustering of observations within neighbourhoods. Lastly, logistic regression analyses were applied to estimate relative risks for depressed mood per different ethnic and socioeconomic groups exposed to high noise exposure ≥65 dB(A) compared to <65 dB(A). Analyses were adjusted for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders. RESULTS: Exposure to ≥70 dB(A) compared to the reference group of 45-54 dB(A) showed a significant positive association with depressed mood (OR: 1.65, 95% CI 1.10, 2.48). Participants exposed to 60-64 dB(A) showed a significantly lower odds ratio of 0.82 (95% CI 0.70, 0.97) compared to the reference group. We observed no differences between ethnic groups in the association of high noise exposure ≥65 dB(A) with depressed mood. Regarding socioeconomic groups, results were different for the medium-low educated group and unemployed group only. CONCLUSION: This study adds new evidence regarding a positive association between high road traffic noise exposure and depressed mood in residential settings. We found no evidence for systematic ethnic or socioeconomic inequalities regarding this association.


Assuntos
Depressão/etnologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Adolescente , Adulto , Afeto , Idoso , Cidades/epidemiologia , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Características de Residência , Classe Social , Adulto Jovem
17.
Environ Pollut ; 245: 558-567, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30469126

RESUMO

Exposure to nocturnal freight train vibrations may impact sleep, but exposure-response relationships are lacking. The European project CargoVibes evaluated sleep disturbance both in the field and in the laboratory and provides unique data, as measures of response and exposure metrics are comparable. This paper therefore provides data on exposure-response relationships of vibration and sleep disturbance and compares the relationships evaluated in the laboratory and the field. Two field studies (one in Poland and one in the Netherlands) with 233 valid respondents in total, and three laboratory studies in Sweden with a total of 59 subjects over 350 person-nights were performed. The odds ratios (OR) of sleep disturbance were analyzed in relation to nighttime vibration exposure by ordinal logit regression, adjusting for moderating factors common for the studies. Outcome specific fractions were calculated for eleven sleep outcomes and supported comparability between the field and laboratory settings. Vibration exposure was significantly associated with sleep disturbance, OR = 3.51 (95% confidence interval 2.6-4.73) denoting a three and a half times increase in the odds of sleep disturbance with one unit increased 8 h nighttime log10 Root Mean Square vibration. The results suggest no significant difference between field and laboratory settings OR = 1.37 (0.59-3.19). However, odds of sleep disturbance were higher in the Netherlands as compared to Sweden, indicating unexplained differences between study populations or countries, possibly related to cultural and contextual differences and uncertainties in exposure assessments. Future studies should be carefully designed to record explanatory factors in the field and enhance ecological validity in the laboratory. Nevertheless, the presented combined data set provides a first set of exposure response relationships for vibration-induced sleep disturbance, which are useful when considering public health outcomes among exposed populations.


Assuntos
Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Ferrovias , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília , Vibração/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Países Baixos , Polônia , Sono/fisiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Suécia , Adulto Jovem
18.
Noise Health ; 20(96): 171-177, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30516170

RESUMO

Introduction: The aim of the study was to determine whether those who are noise sensitive are more adversely affected by airport noise than those who are not noise sensitive. Participants and Methods: One area was very close to Wellington International Airport and the other was distant from the airport and any other major sources of noise such as motorways and railways. Noise sensitivity was self-rated on a three-point scale as follows: non-noise sensitive, moderately noise sensitive, or highly noise sensitive. Statistical analysis consisted of analyses of variance using the domains of the WHOQOL score with the year, area (airport or the control), and noise sensitivity as covariates. Results: Noise-sensitive people were found to have a significantly poorer HRQOL than others when they lived near an airport, but not when they lived in the control area. The same effect was present at both of the time points investigated, suggesting that it is a general finding. Discussion: This finding is consistent with similar studies using the WHOQOL-BREF for investigating noise from road traffic, suggesting consistency in effect across transport noise sources.


Assuntos
Aeroportos , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Transtornos da Personalidade/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Percepção Auditiva , Feminino , Geografia , Habitação , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia , Transtornos da Personalidade/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
19.
Noise Health ; 20(96): 199-211, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30516173

RESUMO

Introduction: Noise and noise sensitivity have negative effects on mental health and are not well-studied in children and adolescents. In this study, we investigated these effects in the aforementioned population with respect to sociodemographic variables and environmental factors. Materials and Methods: In this population-based study conducted in two large cities in South Korea, 918 elementary and middle-school students were included. After direct measurements at the selected sites, a noise map was created using an interpolation method. The road traffic noise of the participants' residential areas was calculated based on this noise map. Noise sensitivity was assessed on an 11-point Likert scale. Using multivariate logistic regression, we investigated the relationship among noise, noise sensitivity, and the Child Behavior Checklist. Further analyses were performed subdividing the data according to household income levels. Results: Noise sensitivity was significantly associated with internalizing, externalizing, and total behavioral problems. Noise was positively associated with total behavioral problems. In the low-income group, the degree of association with problem behaviors was higher, whereas the relationship between noise sensitivity and externalization problems disappeared in the high-income group. Conclusion: Noise and noise sensitivity are negatively associated with the mental health of children and adolescents, particularly in low-income groups. The findings of this study suggest that noise sensitivity and socioeconomic status should be considered in coping with negative effects of noise in children and adolescents.


Assuntos
Transtornos do Comportamento Infantil/psicologia , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos , Comportamento Problema/psicologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Criança , Comportamento Infantil/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pobreza/psicologia , República da Coreia , Fatores Socioeconômicos
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30513834

RESUMO

The new WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region have recommendations for limiting noise exposure associated with adverse health effects. The limits are said to be based on a systematic review of existing evidence. This paper gives a systematic assessment of the presented evidence with respect to annoyance from aircraft noise. The new guidelines have been based on the results from a selection of existing aircraft noise studies. This paper demonstrates that a similar selection of other existing post-2000 studies will yield very different results. In addition, the validity of the presented evidence has been questioned as some of the referenced studies have not been conducted according to standardized methods, and the selection of respondents is not representative of the general airport population.


Assuntos
Aeronaves , Exposição Ambiental/prevenção & controle , Fidelidade a Diretrizes , Ruído dos Transportes/prevenção & controle , Organização Mundial da Saúde , Aeroportos , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Guias como Assunto , Humanos , Ruído dos Transportes/efeitos adversos
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