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1.
BMC Bioinformatics ; 22(1): 430, 2021 Sep 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34496745

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Essential proteins have great impacts on cell survival and development, and played important roles in disease analysis and new drug design. However, since it is inefficient and costly to identify essential proteins by using biological experiments, then there is an urgent need for automated and accurate detection methods. In recent years, the recognition of essential proteins in protein interaction networks (PPI) has become a research hotspot, and many computational models for predicting essential proteins have been proposed successively. RESULTS: In order to achieve higher prediction performance, in this paper, a new prediction model called TGSO is proposed. In TGSO, a protein aggregation degree network is constructed first by adopting the node density measurement method for complex networks. And simultaneously, a protein co-expression interactive network is constructed by combining the gene expression information with the network connectivity, and a protein co-localization interaction network is constructed based on the subcellular localization data. And then, through integrating these three kinds of newly constructed networks, a comprehensive protein-protein interaction network will be obtained. Finally, based on the homology information, scores can be calculated out iteratively for different proteins, which can be utilized to estimate the importance of proteins effectively. Moreover, in order to evaluate the identification performance of TGSO, we have compared TGSO with 13 different latest competitive methods based on three kinds of yeast databases. And experimental results show that TGSO can achieve identification accuracies of 94%, 82% and 72% out of the top 1%, 5% and 10% candidate proteins respectively, which are to some degree superior to these state-of-the-art competitive models. CONCLUSIONS: We constructed a comprehensive interactive network based on multi-source data to reduce the noise and errors in the initial PPI, and combined with iterative methods to improve the accuracy of necessary protein prediction, and means that TGSO may be conducive to the future development of essential protein recognition as well.


Assuntos
Biologia Computacional , Mapas de Interação de Proteínas , Algoritmos , Mapeamento de Interação de Proteínas , Proteínas/genética , Proteínas/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34445244

RESUMO

Optogenetic switches allow light-controlled gene expression with reversible and spatiotemporal resolution. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, optogenetic tools hold great potential for a variety of metabolic engineering and biotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the modular optimization of the fungal light-oxygen-voltage (FUN-LOV) system, an optogenetic switch based on photoreceptors from the fungus Neurospora crassa. We also describe new switch variants obtained by replacing the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (DBD) of FUN-LOV with nine different DBDs from yeast transcription factors of the zinc cluster family. Among the tested modules, the variant carrying the Hap1p DBD, which we call "HAP-LOV", displayed higher levels of luciferase expression upon induction compared to FUN-LOV. Further, the combination of the Hap1p DBD with either p65 or VP16 activation domains also resulted in higher levels of reporter expression compared to the original switch. Finally, we assessed the effects of the plasmid copy number and promoter strength controlling the expression of the FUN-LOV and HAP-LOV components, and observed that when low-copy plasmids and strong promoters were used, a stronger response was achieved in both systems. Altogether, we describe a new set of blue-light optogenetic switches carrying different protein modules, which expands the available suite of optogenetic tools in yeast and can additionally be applied to other systems.


Assuntos
Proteínas Fúngicas , Microrganismos Geneticamente Modificados , Neurospora crassa/genética , Optogenética , Fotorreceptores Microbianos , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Proteínas Fúngicas/biossíntese , Proteínas Fúngicas/genética , Microrganismos Geneticamente Modificados/genética , Microrganismos Geneticamente Modificados/metabolismo , Neurospora crassa/metabolismo , Fotorreceptores Microbianos/biossíntese , Fotorreceptores Microbianos/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
3.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(15): 8535-8555, 2021 09 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34358317

RESUMO

Gene deletion and gene expression alteration can lead to growth defects that are amplified or reduced when a second mutation is present in the same cells. We performed 154 genetic interaction mapping (GIM) screens with query mutants related with RNA metabolism and estimated the growth rates of about 700 000 double mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The tested targets included the gene deletion collection and 900 strains in which essential genes were affected by mRNA destabilization (DAmP). To analyze the results, we developed RECAP, a strategy that validates genetic interaction profiles by comparison with gene co-citation frequency, and identified links between 1471 genes and 117 biological processes. In addition to these large-scale results, we validated both enhancement and suppression of slow growth measured for specific RNA-related pathways. Thus, negative genetic interactions identified a role for the OCA inositol polyphosphate hydrolase complex in mRNA translation initiation. By analysis of suppressors, we found that Puf4, a Pumilio family RNA binding protein, inhibits ribosomal protein Rpl9 function, by acting on a conserved UGUAcauUA motif located downstream the stop codon of the RPL9B mRNA. Altogether, the results and their analysis should represent a useful resource for discovery of gene function in yeast.


Assuntos
Genes Fúngicos , RNA Fúngico/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Alelos , Deleção de Genes , Pleiotropia Genética , Fosfatos de Inositol/metabolismo , Iniciação Traducional da Cadeia Peptídica , Estabilidade de RNA , RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/fisiologia , Proteínas Ribossômicas/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/fisiologia
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34445460

RESUMO

Yeast phenotypes associated with the lack of wobble uridine (U34) modifications in tRNA were shown to be modulated by an allelic variation of SSD1, a gene encoding an mRNA-binding protein. We demonstrate that phenotypes caused by the loss of Deg1-dependent tRNA pseudouridylation are similarly affected by SSD1 allelic status. Temperature sensitivity and protein aggregation are elevated in deg1 mutants and further increased in the presence of the ssd1-d allele, which encodes a truncated form of Ssd1. In addition, chronological lifespan is reduced in a deg1 ssd1-d mutant, and the negative genetic interactions of the U34 modifier genes ELP3 and URM1 with DEG1 are aggravated by ssd1-d. A loss of function mutation in SSD1, ELP3, and DEG1 induces pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes, including sensitivity against target of rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor drug and cell wall stress by calcofluor white. Additivity in ssd1 deg1 double mutant phenotypes suggests independent roles of Ssd1 and tRNA modifications in TOR signaling and cell wall integrity. However, other tRNA modification defects cause growth and drug sensitivity phenotypes, which are not further intensified in tandem with ssd1-d. Thus, we observed a modification-specific rather than general effect of SSD1 status on phenotypic variation in tRNA modification mutants. Our results highlight how the cellular consequences of tRNA modification loss can be influenced by protein targeting specific mRNAs.


Assuntos
Transferases Intramoleculares/deficiência , Processamento Pós-Transcricional do RNA/genética , RNA Fúngico , RNA de Transferência , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Variação Biológica da População , Transferases Intramoleculares/genética , RNA Fúngico/genética , RNA Fúngico/metabolismo , RNA de Transferência/genética , RNA de Transferência/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
5.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5005, 2021 08 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34408140

RESUMO

Embryonic aneuploidy from mis-segregation of chromosomes during meiosis causes pregnancy loss. Proper disjunction of homologous chromosomes requires the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1 and MLH3, essential in mice for fertility. Variants in these genes can increase colorectal cancer risk, yet the reproductive impacts are unclear. To determine if MLH1/3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations could cause reproductive abnormalities, we use computational predictions, yeast two-hybrid assays, and MMR and recombination assays in yeast, selecting nine MLH1 and MLH3 variants to model in mice via genome editing. We identify seven alleles causing reproductive defects in mice including female subfertility and male infertility. Remarkably, in females these alleles cause age-dependent decreases in litter size and increased embryo resorption, likely a consequence of fewer chiasmata that increase univalents at meiotic metaphase I. Our data suggest that hypomorphic alleles of meiotic recombination genes can predispose females to increased incidence of pregnancy loss from gamete aneuploidy.


Assuntos
Aborto Espontâneo/genética , Aneuploidia , Perda do Embrião/genética , Proteína 1 Homóloga a MutL/genética , Proteínas MutL/genética , Aborto Espontâneo/metabolismo , Aborto Espontâneo/fisiopatologia , Alelos , Animais , Troca Genética , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA , Perda do Embrião/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Recombinação Homóloga , Humanos , Tamanho da Ninhada de Vivíparos , Masculino , Meiose , Camundongos , Proteína 1 Homóloga a MutL/metabolismo , Proteínas MutL/metabolismo , Gravidez , Reprodução , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34445202

RESUMO

The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most widely used model organisms for investigating various aspects of basic cellular functions that are conserved in human cells. This organism, as well as human cells, can modulate its metabolism in response to specific growth conditions, different environmental changes, and nutrient depletion. This adaptation results in a metabolic reprogramming of specific metabolic pathways. Mitochondrial carriers play a fundamental role in cellular metabolism, connecting mitochondrial with cytosolic reactions. By transporting substrates across the inner membrane of mitochondria, they contribute to many processes that are central to cellular function. The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes 35 members of the mitochondrial carrier family, most of which have been functionally characterized. The aim of this review is to describe the role of the so far identified yeast mitochondrial carriers in cell metabolism, attempting to show the functional connections between substrates transport and specific metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and amino acids synthesis. Analysis of the literature reveals that these proteins transport substrates involved in the same metabolic pathway with a high degree of flexibility and coordination. The understanding of the role of mitochondrial carriers in yeast biology and metabolism could be useful for clarifying unexplored aspects related to the mitochondrial carrier network. Such knowledge will hopefully help in obtaining more insight into the molecular basis of human diseases.


Assuntos
Mitocôndrias/metabolismo , Proteínas de Transporte da Membrana Mitocondrial/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Transporte Biológico Ativo , Mitocôndrias/genética , Proteínas de Transporte da Membrana Mitocondrial/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34445649

RESUMO

Protein aggregation is associated with a growing list of human diseases. A substantial fraction of proteins in eukaryotic proteomes constitutes a proteostasis network-a collection of proteins that work together to maintain properly folded proteins. One of the overarching functions of the proteostasis network is the prevention or reversal of protein aggregation. How proteins aggregate in spite of the anti-aggregation activity of the proteostasis machinery is incompletely understood. Exposed hydrophobic patches can trigger degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a key branch of the proteostasis network. However, in a recent study, we found that model glycine (G)-rich or glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich prion-like domains differ in their susceptibility to detection and degradation by this system. Here, we expand upon this work by examining whether the features controlling the degradation of our model prion-like domains generalize broadly to G-rich and Q/N-rich domains. Experimentally, native yeast G-rich domains in isolation are sensitive to the degradation-promoting effects of hydrophobic residues, whereas native Q/N-rich domains completely resist these effects and tend to aggregate instead. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that native G-rich domains from yeast and humans tend to avoid degradation-promoting features, suggesting that the proteostasis network may act as a form of selection at the molecular level that constrains the sequence space accessible to G-rich domains. However, the sensitivity or resistance of G-rich and Q/N-rich domains, respectively, was not always preserved in their native protein contexts, highlighting that proteins can evolve other sequence features to overcome the intrinsic sensitivity of some LCDs to degradation.


Assuntos
Agregados Proteicos/fisiologia , Proteoma/metabolismo , Proteostase , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/química , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4951, 2021 08 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34400637

RESUMO

The polyadenosine tail (poly[A]-tail) is a universal modification of eukaryotic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). In budding yeast, Pap1-synthesized mRNA poly(A) tails enhance export and translation, whereas Trf4/5-mediated polyadenylation of ncRNAs facilitates degradation by the exosome. Using direct RNA sequencing, we decipher the extent of poly(A) tail dynamics in yeast defective in all relevant exonucleases, deadenylases, and poly(A) polymerases. Predominantly ncRNA poly(A) tails are 20-60 adenosines long. Poly(A) tails of newly transcribed mRNAs are 50 adenosine long on average, with an upper limit of 200. Exonucleolysis by Trf5-assisted nuclear exosome and cytoplasmic deadenylases trim the tails to 40 adenosines on average. Surprisingly, PAN2/3 and CCR4-NOT deadenylase complexes have a large pool of non-overlapping substrates mainly defined by expression level. Finally, we demonstrate that mRNA poly(A) tail length strongly responds to growth conditions, such as heat and nutrient deprivation.


Assuntos
Poli A/metabolismo , Polinucleotídeo Adenililtransferase/metabolismo , RNA/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , RNA Polimerases Dirigidas por DNA/genética , RNA Polimerases Dirigidas por DNA/metabolismo , Exossomos/metabolismo , Poliadenilação , Polinucleotídeo Adenililtransferase/genética , RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo , RNA não Traduzido/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4975, 2021 08 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34404791

RESUMO

Plant cell wall hydrolysates contain not only sugars but also substantial amounts of acetate, a fermentation inhibitor that hinders bioconversion of lignocellulose. Despite the toxic and non-consumable nature of acetate during glucose metabolism, we demonstrate that acetate can be rapidly co-consumed with xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The co-consumption leads to a metabolic re-configuration that boosts the synthesis of acetyl-CoA derived bioproducts, including triacetic acid lactone (TAL) and vitamin A, in engineered strains. Notably, by co-feeding xylose and acetate, an enginered strain produces 23.91 g/L TAL with a productivity of 0.29 g/L/h in bioreactor fermentation. This strain also completely converts a hemicellulose hydrolysate of switchgrass into 3.55 g/L TAL. These findings establish a versatile strategy that not only transforms an inhibitor into a valuable substrate but also expands the capacity of acetyl-CoA supply in S. cerevisiae for efficient bioconversion of cellulosic biomass.


Assuntos
Parede Celular/metabolismo , Engenharia Metabólica , Polissacarídeos/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Acetilcoenzima A/metabolismo , Biomassa , Reatores Biológicos , Fermentação , Lignina , Pironas/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Vitamina A/metabolismo , Xilose/metabolismo
11.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5107, 2021 08 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34429425

RESUMO

The ability to design a protein to bind specifically to a target RNA enables numerous applications, with the modular architecture of the PUF domain lending itself to new RNA-binding specificities. For each repeat of the Pumilio-1 PUF domain, we generate a library that contains the 8,000 possible combinations of amino acid substitutions at residues critical for RNA contact. We carry out yeast three-hybrid selections with each library against the RNA recognition sequence for Pumilio-1, with any possible base present at the position recognized by the randomized repeat. We use sequencing to score the binding of each variant, identifying many variants with highly repeat-specific interactions. From these data, we generate an RNA binding code specific to each repeat and base. We use this code to design PUF domains against 16 RNAs, and find that some of these domains recognize RNAs with two, three or four changes from the wild type sequence.


Assuntos
Ligação Proteica , Domínios Proteicos , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/metabolismo , RNA/metabolismo , Sítios de Ligação , Cristalografia por Raios X , Modelos Moleculares , Conformação Proteica , RNA/química , Motivos de Ligação ao RNA , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/química , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
12.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5094, 2021 08 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34429433

RESUMO

Ribosome profiling measures genome-wide translation dynamics at sub-codon resolution. Cycloheximide (CHX), a widely used translation inhibitor to arrest ribosomes in these experiments, has been shown to induce biases in yeast, questioning its use. However, whether such biases are present in datasets of other organisms including humans is unknown. Here we compare different CHX-treatment conditions in human cells and yeast in parallel experiments using an optimized protocol. We find that human ribosomes are not susceptible to conformational restrictions by CHX, nor does it distort gene-level measurements of ribosome occupancy, measured decoding speed or the translational ramp. Furthermore, CHX-induced codon-specific biases on ribosome occupancy are not detectable in human cells or other model organisms. This shows that reported biases of CHX are species-specific and that CHX does not affect the outcome of ribosome profiling experiments in most settings. Our findings provide a solid framework to conduct and analyze ribosome profiling experiments.


Assuntos
Cicloeximida/farmacologia , Ribossomos/química , Ribossomos/efeitos dos fármacos , Ribossomos/metabolismo , Animais , Viés , Códon/metabolismo , Células HEK293 , Humanos , Camundongos , Biossíntese de Proteínas/efeitos dos fármacos , Inibidores da Síntese de Proteínas/farmacologia , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Especificidade da Espécie
13.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4769, 2021 08 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34362905

RESUMO

Beyond its role in mitochondrial bioenergetics, Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone) serves as a key membrane-embedded antioxidant throughout the cell. However, how CoQ is mobilized from its site of synthesis on the inner mitochondrial membrane to other sites of action remains a longstanding mystery. Here, using a combination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetics, biochemical fractionation, and lipid profiling, we identify two highly conserved but poorly characterized mitochondrial proteins, Ypl109c (Cqd1) and Ylr253w (Cqd2), that reciprocally affect this process. Loss of Cqd1 skews cellular CoQ distribution away from mitochondria, resulting in markedly enhanced resistance to oxidative stress caused by exogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids, whereas loss of Cqd2 promotes the opposite effects. The activities of both proteins rely on their atypical kinase/ATPase domains, which they share with Coq8-an essential auxiliary protein for CoQ biosynthesis. Overall, our results reveal protein machinery central to CoQ trafficking in yeast and lend insights into the broader interplay between mitochondria and the rest of the cell.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Ubiquinona/análogos & derivados , Ubiquinona/metabolismo , Antioxidantes/metabolismo , Lipídeos , Mitocôndrias/metabolismo , Membranas Mitocondriais/metabolismo , Proteínas Mitocondriais/metabolismo , Estresse Oxidativo , Fosfotransferases/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética
14.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4750, 2021 08 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34362907

RESUMO

Budding yeast Dpb4 (POLE3/CHRAC17 in mammals) is a highly conserved histone fold protein that is shared by two protein complexes: the chromatin remodeler ISW2/hCHRAC and the DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) holoenzyme. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Dpb4 forms histone-like dimers with Dls1 in the ISW2 complex and with Dpb3 in the Pol ε complex. Here, we show that Dpb4 plays two functions in sensing and processing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Dpb4 promotes histone removal and DSB resection by interacting with Dls1 to facilitate the association of the Isw2 ATPase to DSBs. Furthermore, it promotes checkpoint activation by interacting with Dpb3 to facilitate the association of the checkpoint protein Rad9 to DSBs. Persistence of both Isw2 and Rad9 at DSBs is enhanced by the A62S mutation that is located in the Dpb4 histone fold domain and increases Dpb4 association at DSBs. Thus, Dpb4 exerts two distinct functions at DSBs depending on its interactors.


Assuntos
Quebras de DNA de Cadeia Dupla , DNA Polimerase II/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Adenosina Trifosfatases/metabolismo , Montagem e Desmontagem da Cromatina , DNA/metabolismo , Dano ao DNA , Reparo do DNA , Histonas/metabolismo , Mutação , Fatores de Transcrição
15.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4790, 2021 08 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34373465

RESUMO

Eukaryotic organisms play an important role in industrial biotechnology, from the production of fuels and commodity chemicals to therapeutic proteins. To optimize these industrial systems, a mathematical approach can be used to integrate the description of multiple biological networks into a single model for cell analysis and engineering. One of the most accurate models of biological systems include Expression and Thermodynamics FLux (ETFL), which efficiently integrates RNA and protein synthesis with traditional genome-scale metabolic models. However, ETFL is so far only applicable for E. coli. To adapt this model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed yETFL, in which we augmented the original formulation with additional considerations for biomass composition, the compartmentalized cellular expression system, and the energetic costs of biological processes. We demonstrated the ability of yETFL to predict maximum growth rate, essential genes, and the phenotype of overflow metabolism. We envision that the presented formulation can be extended to a wide range of eukaryotic organisms to the benefit of academic and industrial research.


Assuntos
Genoma , Engenharia Metabólica , Redes e Vias Metabólicas , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Biomassa , Biotecnologia , Simulação por Computador , Escherichia coli/genética , Regulação Fúngica da Expressão Gênica , Glucose , Modelos Biológicos , Fenótipo , Termodinâmica
16.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4696, 2021 08 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34349113

RESUMO

Productive ribosomal RNA (rRNA) compaction during ribosome assembly necessitates establishing correct tertiary contacts between distant secondary structure elements. Here, we quantify the response of the yeast proteome to low temperature (LT), a condition where aberrant mis-paired RNA folding intermediates accumulate. We show that, at LT, yeast cells globally boost production of their ribosome assembly machinery. We find that the LT-induced assembly factor, Puf6, binds to the nascent catalytic RNA-rich subunit interface within the 60S pre-ribosome, at a site that eventually loads the nuclear export apparatus. Ensemble Förster resonance energy transfer studies show that Puf6 mimics the role of Mg2+ to usher a unique long-range tertiary contact to compact rRNA. At LT, puf6 mutants accumulate 60S pre-ribosomes in the nucleus, thus unveiling Puf6-mediated rRNA compaction as a critical temperature-regulated rescue mechanism that counters rRNA misfolding to prime export competence.


Assuntos
Núcleo Celular/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/metabolismo , Subunidades Ribossômicas Maiores de Eucariotos/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Transporte Ativo do Núcleo Celular , Temperatura Baixa , GTP Fosfo-Hidrolases/metabolismo , Mutação , Ligação Proteica , Domínios e Motivos de Interação entre Proteínas , Proteoma/metabolismo , Dobramento de RNA , Precursores de RNA/química , Precursores de RNA/metabolismo , RNA Ribossômico/química , RNA Ribossômico/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/química , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/genética , Subunidades Ribossômicas Maiores de Eucariotos/química , Ribossomos/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/fisiologia , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/química , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética
17.
Molecules ; 26(16)2021 Aug 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34443564

RESUMO

The higher alcohols 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol are a group of yeast-derived compounds that have been shown to affect the aroma and flavour of fermented beverages. Five variants of the industrial wine strain AWRI796, previously isolated due to their elevated production of the 'rose-like aroma' compound 2-phenylethanol, were characterised during pilot-scale fermentation of a Chardonnay juice. We show that these variants not only increase the concentration of 2-phenylethanol but also modulate the formation of the higher alcohols tryptophol, tyrosol, and methionol, as well as other volatile sulfur compounds derived from methionine, highlighting the connections between yeast nitrogen and sulfur metabolism during fermentation. We also investigate the development of these compounds during wine storage, focusing on the sulfonation of tryptophol. Finally, the sensory properties of wines produced using these strains were quantified at two time points, unravelling differences produced by biologically modulating higher alcohols and the dynamic changes in wine flavour over aging.


Assuntos
Álcoois/análise , Odorantes/análise , Paladar , Vinho/análise , Fermentação , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Fatores de Tempo , Compostos Orgânicos Voláteis/análise
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34360748

RESUMO

Research on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has yielded fundamental discoveries on highly conserved biological pathways and yeast remains the best-studied eukaryotic cell in the world. Studies on the mitotic cell cycle and the discovery of cell cycle checkpoints in budding yeast has led to a detailed, although incomplete, understanding of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. In multicellular eukaryotic organisms, uncontrolled aberrant cell division is the defining feature of cancer. Some of the most successful classes of anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agents are mitotic poisons. Mitotic poisons are thought to function by inducing a mitotic spindle checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest, via the assembly of the highly conserved mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), leading to apoptosis. Even in the presence of mitotic poisons, some cancer cells continue cell division via 'mitotic slippage', which may correlate with a cancer becoming refractory to mitotic poison chemotherapeutic treatments. In this review, knowledge about budding yeast cell cycle control is explored to suggest novel potential drug targets, namely, specific regions in the highly conserved anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunits Apc1 and/or Apc5, and in a specific N-terminal region in the APC/C co-factor cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20), which may yield molecules which block 'mitotic slippage' only in the presence of mitotic poisons.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/farmacologia , Apoptose , Pontos de Checagem do Ciclo Celular , Mitose , Neoplasias , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Animais , Antineoplásicos/química , Apoptose/efeitos dos fármacos , Apoptose/genética , Pontos de Checagem do Ciclo Celular/efeitos dos fármacos , Pontos de Checagem do Ciclo Celular/genética , Ensaios de Seleção de Medicamentos Antitumorais , Humanos , Mitose/efeitos dos fármacos , Mitose/genética , Neoplasias/genética , Neoplasias/metabolismo , Venenos/química , Venenos/farmacologia , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo
19.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4918, 2021 08 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34389719

RESUMO

Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) are highly unstable and susceptible to rearrangement due to their repetitive nature and active transcriptional status. Sequestration of rDNA in the nucleolus suppresses uncontrolled recombination. However, broken repeats must be first released to the nucleoplasm to allow repair by homologous recombination. Nucleolar release of broken rDNA repeats is conserved from yeast to humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we show that DNA damage induces phosphorylation of the CLIP-cohibin complex, releasing membrane-tethered rDNA from the nucleolus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Downstream of phosphorylation, SUMOylation of CLIP-cohibin is recognized by Ufd1 via its SUMO-interacting motif, which targets the complex for disassembly through the Cdc48/p97 chaperone. Consistent with a conserved mechanism, UFD1L depletion in human cells impairs rDNA release. The dynamic and regulated assembly and disassembly of the rDNA-tethering complex is therefore a key determinant of nucleolar rDNA release and genome integrity.


Assuntos
Nucléolo Celular/genética , Reparo do DNA , DNA Ribossômico/genética , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Proteínas Modificadoras Pequenas Relacionadas à Ubiquitina/genética , Proteína com Valosina/genética , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/genética , Proteínas de Ciclo Celular/metabolismo , Nucléolo Celular/metabolismo , Dano ao DNA , DNA Ribossômico/metabolismo , Humanos , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Proteínas de Membrana/metabolismo , Mutação , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/metabolismo , Fosforilação , Ligação Proteica , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Proteínas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Proteínas Modificadoras Pequenas Relacionadas à Ubiquitina/metabolismo , Sumoilação , Técnicas do Sistema de Duplo-Híbrido , Proteína com Valosina/metabolismo
20.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2351: 289-303, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34382196

RESUMO

Interactions between regulatory proteins and specific genomic regions are critical for all chromatin-based processes, including transcription, DNA replication, and DNA repair. Genome-wide mapping of such interactions is most commonly performed with chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq), but a number of orthogonal methods employing targeted enzymatic activity have also been introduced. We previously described a genome-wide implementation of chromatin endogenous cleavage (ChEC-Seq), wherein a protein of interest is fused to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) to enable targeted, calcium-dependent genomic cleavage. Here, we describe the ChEC-Seq protocol for use in budding yeast though it can be used in other organisms in conjunction with appropriate methods for introduction of an MNase fusion protein.


Assuntos
Sequenciamento de Cromatina por Imunoprecipitação/métodos , Cromatina/genética , Cromatina/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Saccharomycetales/genética , Saccharomycetales/metabolismo
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