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3.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-47327

RESUMO

Serviço de perguntas e respostas do site da FEBRASGO, especializado no tema COVID-19, que visa orientar os profissionais de saúde.


Assuntos
Ginecologia , Serviços de Informação , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-19619

RESUMO

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a humanitarian emergency, which started in Wuhan in China in early December 2019, brought into the notice of the authorities in late December, early January 2020, and, after investigation, was declared as an emergency in the third week of January 2020. The WHO declared this as Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) on 31th of January 2020, and finally a pandemic on 11th March 2020. As of March 24th, 2020, the virus has caused a casualty of over 16,600 people worldwide with more than 380,000 people confirmed as infected by it, of which more than 10,000 cases are serious. Mainly based on Chinese newspapers, social media and other digital platform data, this paper analyzes the timeline of the key actions taken by the government and people over three months in five different phases. It found that although there was an initial delay in responding, a unique combination of strong governance, strict regulation, strong community vigilance and citizen participation, and wise use of big data and digital technologies, were some of the key factors in China's efforts to combat this virus. Being inviable and non-measurable (unlike radioactive exposure), appropriate and timely information is very important to form the basic foundation of mitigation and curative measures. Infodemic, as it is termed by WHO, is a key word, where different stakeholder's participation, along with stricter regulation, is required to reduce the impact of fake news in this information age and social media. Although different countries will need different approaches, focusing on its humanitarian nature and addressing infodemic issues are the two critical factors for future global mitigation efforts.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Serviços de Informação , Internet , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Política Pública , Mídias Sociais , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/economia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Ciência de Dados , Bases de Dados Factuais , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Mortalidade , Pandemias/economia , Pneumonia Viral/economia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Saúde Pública , Quarentena/economia , Quarentena/psicologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/virologia
5.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(2): e18444, 2020 04 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-40248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The internet has become an important source of health information for users worldwide. The novel coronavirus caused a pandemic search for information with broad dissemination of false or misleading health information. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality and readability of online information about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was a trending topic on the internet, using validated instruments and relating the quality of information to its readability. METHODS: The search was based on the term "Wuhan Coronavirus" on the Google website (February 6, 2020). At the search time, the terms "COVID-19" or "SARS-CoV-2" (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) did not exist. Critical analysis was performed on the first 110 hits using the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct (HONcode), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark, the DISCERN instrument, and Google ranking. RESULTS: The first 110 websites were critically analyzed, and only 1.8% (n=2) of the websites had the HONcode seal. The JAMA benchmark showed that 39.1% (n=43) of the websites did not have any of the categories required by this tool, and only 10.0% (11/110) of the websites had the four quality criteria required by JAMA. The DISCERN score showed that 70.0% (n=77) of the websites were evaluated as having a low score and none were rated as having a high score. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhealth personnel and the scientific community need to be aware about the quality of the information they read and produce, respectively. The Wuhan coronavirus health crisis misinformation was produced by the media, and the misinformation was obtained by users from the internet. The use of the internet has a risk to public health, and, in cases like this, the governments should be developing strategies to regulate health information on the internet without censuring the population. By February 6, 2020, no quality information was available on the internet about COVID-19.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Compreensão , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Coronavirus , Internet , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Serviços de Informação , Leitura
6.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(2): e18444, 2020 04 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47556

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The internet has become an important source of health information for users worldwide. The novel coronavirus caused a pandemic search for information with broad dissemination of false or misleading health information. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality and readability of online information about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was a trending topic on the internet, using validated instruments and relating the quality of information to its readability. METHODS: The search was based on the term "Wuhan Coronavirus" on the Google website (February 6, 2020). At the search time, the terms "COVID-19" or "SARS-CoV-2" (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) did not exist. Critical analysis was performed on the first 110 hits using the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct (HONcode), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark, the DISCERN instrument, and Google ranking. RESULTS: The first 110 websites were critically analyzed, and only 1.8% (n=2) of the websites had the HONcode seal. The JAMA benchmark showed that 39.1% (n=43) of the websites did not have any of the categories required by this tool, and only 10.0% (11/110) of the websites had the four quality criteria required by JAMA. The DISCERN score showed that 70.0% (n=77) of the websites were evaluated as having a low score and none were rated as having a high score. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhealth personnel and the scientific community need to be aware about the quality of the information they read and produce, respectively. The Wuhan coronavirus health crisis misinformation was produced by the media, and the misinformation was obtained by users from the internet. The use of the internet has a risk to public health, and, in cases like this, the governments should be developing strategies to regulate health information on the internet without censuring the population. By February 6, 2020, no quality information was available on the internet about COVID-19.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Compreensão , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Coronavirus , Internet , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Serviços de Informação , Leitura
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32235433

RESUMO

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a humanitarian emergency, which started in Wuhan in China in early December 2019, brought into the notice of the authorities in late December, early January 2020, and, after investigation, was declared as an emergency in the third week of January 2020. The WHO declared this as Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) on 31th of January 2020, and finally a pandemic on 11th March 2020. As of March 24th, 2020, the virus has caused a casualty of over 16,600 people worldwide with more than 380,000 people confirmed as infected by it, of which more than 10,000 cases are serious. Mainly based on Chinese newspapers, social media and other digital platform data, this paper analyzes the timeline of the key actions taken by the government and people over three months in five different phases. It found that although there was an initial delay in responding, a unique combination of strong governance, strict regulation, strong community vigilance and citizen participation, and wise use of big data and digital technologies, were some of the key factors in China's efforts to combat this virus. Being inviable and non-measurable (unlike radioactive exposure), appropriate and timely information is very important to form the basic foundation of mitigation and curative measures. Infodemic, as it is termed by WHO, is a key word, where different stakeholder's participation, along with stricter regulation, is required to reduce the impact of fake news in this information age and social media. Although different countries will need different approaches, focusing on its humanitarian nature and addressing infodemic issues are the two critical factors for future global mitigation efforts.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Serviços de Informação , Internet , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Política Pública , Mídias Sociais , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/economia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Ciência de Dados , Bases de Dados Factuais , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Mortalidade , Pandemias/economia , Pneumonia Viral/economia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Saúde Pública , Quarentena/economia , Quarentena/psicologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/virologia
8.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(2): e18444, 2020 04 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32250960

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The internet has become an important source of health information for users worldwide. The novel coronavirus caused a pandemic search for information with broad dissemination of false or misleading health information. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality and readability of online information about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was a trending topic on the internet, using validated instruments and relating the quality of information to its readability. METHODS: The search was based on the term "Wuhan Coronavirus" on the Google website (February 6, 2020). At the search time, the terms "COVID-19" or "SARS-CoV-2" (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) did not exist. Critical analysis was performed on the first 110 hits using the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct (HONcode), the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark, the DISCERN instrument, and Google ranking. RESULTS: The first 110 websites were critically analyzed, and only 1.8% (n=2) of the websites had the HONcode seal. The JAMA benchmark showed that 39.1% (n=43) of the websites did not have any of the categories required by this tool, and only 10.0% (11/110) of the websites had the four quality criteria required by JAMA. The DISCERN score showed that 70.0% (n=77) of the websites were evaluated as having a low score and none were rated as having a high score. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhealth personnel and the scientific community need to be aware about the quality of the information they read and produce, respectively. The Wuhan coronavirus health crisis misinformation was produced by the media, and the misinformation was obtained by users from the internet. The use of the internet has a risk to public health, and, in cases like this, the governments should be developing strategies to regulate health information on the internet without censuring the population. By February 6, 2020, no quality information was available on the internet about COVID-19.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Compreensão , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Coronavirus , Internet , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Serviços de Informação , Leitura
9.
Cent Eur J Public Health ; 28(1): 82-84, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228824

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: About four million people are affected by rare diseases in Germany and 30 million in the EU. In 2013, a national action plan for people with rare diseases was adopted in Germany which is also aimed at improving the information situation and better gathering of information for affected patients and their families. Since then, various sources of information and medical care structures have been made available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the state of knowledge about information sources and health care centres for rare diseases among those affected. METHODS: The study was carried out as anonymous survey among the member associations of the German Alliance for Chronic Rare Diseases (German acronym ACHSE e. V.). For this, a questionnaire was developed which in addition to questions on gender, age and disease comprised free text input referring to knowledge of health care centres or expert centres and source of information on rare diseases in Germany. RESULTS: A total of 484 individuals suffering from 96 different rare diseases participated in the survey. Of these, 74.47% are aware of medical or dental care centres for treatment of their types of rare disease; 69.31% use self-help groups as a source of information, only a few respondents know government-sponsored "se-atlas" and "Orphanet". CONCLUSION: The majority of the respondents know medical care centres, most participants use self-help groups as information source, however, government-supported portals are largely unknown so that there is a need for further information in this regard.


Assuntos
Instalações de Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Serviços de Informação , Doenças Raras/terapia , Alemanha , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0230416, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32320428

RESUMO

Efforts to make research results open and reproducible are increasingly reflected by journal policies encouraging or mandating authors to provide data availability statements. As a consequence of this, there has been a strong uptake of data availability statements in recent literature. Nevertheless, it is still unclear what proportion of these statements actually contain well-formed links to data, for example via a URL or permanent identifier, and if there is an added value in providing such links. We consider 531, 889 journal articles published by PLOS and BMC, develop an automatic system for labelling their data availability statements according to four categories based on their content and the type of data availability they display, and finally analyze the citation advantage of different statement categories via regression. We find that, following mandated publisher policies, data availability statements become very common. In 2018 93.7% of 21,793 PLOS articles and 88.2% of 31,956 BMC articles had data availability statements. Data availability statements containing a link to data in a repository-rather than being available on request or included as supporting information files-are a fraction of the total. In 2017 and 2018, 20.8% of PLOS publications and 12.2% of BMC publications provided DAS containing a link to data in a repository. We also find an association between articles that include statements that link to data in a repository and up to 25.36% (± 1.07%) higher citation impact on average, using a citation prediction model. We discuss the potential implications of these results for authors (researchers) and journal publishers who make the effort of sharing their data in repositories. All our data and code are made available in order to reproduce and extend our results.


Assuntos
Descoberta do Conhecimento , Publicações , Pesquisa , Humanos , Serviços de Informação , Fator de Impacto de Revistas
15.
PLoS One ; 15(2): e0228392, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32084163

RESUMO

This paper evaluates a method of generating a unique dataset that has been underused-a Freedom of Information (FOI) request. The UK's FOI Act came into force in 2005, allowing the public to make requests of publicly held data. We set out to understand the determinants of the quality responses to FOI requests. We also explain how requests can be made and provide suggestions to construct effective data-driven requests. We applied for data on hate crime from all police forces and on uptake of maternity leave from all universities. We find that observable characteristics of the local area, police force and universities neither determine whether the request was fulfilled, nor the speed of response, suggesting that the data from these FOI requests are representative of the institutions from which they were requested.


Assuntos
Acesso à Informação/legislação & jurisprudência , Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Coleta de Dados/normas , Ódio , Serviços de Informação/normas , Pesquisadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Polícia , Preconceito , Relações Raciais , Ciências Sociais
16.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 44: 101700, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32007695

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons for non-use of a national cancer society's cancer information services among people experiencing cancer. METHOD: This study used a qualitative design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 17 participants who had not previously utilised the Cancer Society's information services. Data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. RESULTS: The key themes to emerge from the date were 'living in the here and now' and 'awareness of the Cancer Society'. For most participants, not utilising cancer information services was a means of coping with the initial diagnosis and the impact of treatment. Those who progressed to being ready to seek information identified the multi-disciplinary team as the primary source of trusted information, with particular mention of cancer nurse specialists. For participants with children, their role as a parent was central in how they managed their diagnosis. The majority of participants lacked awareness of the range of services provided by the Cancer Society. CONCLUSIONS: Reasons for non-use of cancer information services were identified as: readiness to seek information and a lack of knowledge of the Cancer Societies' services. Cancer information services need to continue make a concerted effort to enhance visibility and awareness of its services to optimise patient engagement.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Aprendizagem da Esquiva , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Serviços de Informação/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Irlanda , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
17.
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique ; 68(2): 99-107, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32037129

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Concern about health misinformation is longstanding, especially on the Internet. METHODS: Using agent-based models, we considered the effects of such misinformation on a norovirus outbreak, and some methods for countering the possible impacts of "good" and "bad" health advice. The work explicitly models spread of physical disease and information (both online and offline) as two separate but interacting processes. The models have multiple stochastic elements; repeat model runs were made to identify parameter values that most consistently produced the desired target baseline scenario. Next, parameters were found that most consistently led to a scenario when outbreak severity was clearly made worse by circulating poor quality disease prevention advice. Strategies to counter "fake" health news were tested. RESULTS: Reducing bad advice to 30% of total information or making at least 30% of people fully resistant to believing in and sharing bad health advice were effective thresholds to counteract the negative impacts of bad advice during a norovirus outbreak. CONCLUSION: How feasible it is to achieve these targets within communication networks (online and offline) should be explored.


Assuntos
Infecções por Caliciviridae/epidemiologia , Comunicação , Surtos de Doenças , Letramento em Saúde , Internet , Norovirus/fisiologia , Análise de Sistemas , Acesso à Informação , Infecções por Caliciviridae/transmissão , Infecções por Caliciviridae/virologia , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/organização & administração , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/estatística & dados numéricos , Letramento em Saúde/organização & administração , Letramento em Saúde/normas , Letramento em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Serviços de Informação/organização & administração , Serviços de Informação/normas , Registros Públicos de Dados de Cuidados de Saúde
18.
Exp Parasitol ; 209: 107813, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31830462

RESUMO

The European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) is a funding organization for the creation of research networks. These networks support collaboration and networking among scientists across Europe and thereby give impetus to research advancements and innovation. One of the most important mechanisms of COST actions are the short-term scientific missions (STSM), which are a funding mechanism that enables scientists, particularly those earlier in their careers, to visit an institution or laboratory in another COST Member state in order to learn techniques that will enhance their skills and improve the scientific knowledge of their institution. The European Network for Foodborne Parasites (Euro-FBP; FA1408) was a COST Action that ended in early 2019, which brought together different experts with knowledge and interest on a broad spectrum of different foodborne parasites of relevance in Europe. In the course of the Euro-FBP COST Action, 32 such STSM occurred. This article provides a short overview of the short-term scientific missions that were approved during this action, as well as the relation of these actions to several relevant socio-economic parameters. The subjects of these STSM, the majority of which were concerned with detection techniques, probably reflect the priorities for research skills on foodborne parasites in Europe.


Assuntos
Parasitologia de Alimentos , Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos/parasitologia , Serviços de Informação , Doenças Parasitárias , Pesquisa , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Parasitologia de Alimentos/economia , Humanos , Serviços de Informação/economia , Serviços de Informação/tendências , Masculino , Doenças Parasitárias/diagnóstico , Doenças Parasitárias/parasitologia , Doenças Parasitárias/transmissão , Pesquisa/economia
19.
BMC Res Notes ; 12(1): 801, 2019 Dec 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31829258

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Classification of textual file formats is a topic of interest in network forensics. There are a few publicly available datasets of files with textual formats. Therewith, there is no public dataset for file fragments of textual file formats. So, a big research challenge in file fragment classification of textual file formats is to compare the performance of the developed methods over the same datasets. DATA DESCRIPTION: In this study, we present a dataset that contains file fragments of five textual file formats: Binary file format for Word 97-Word 2003, Microsoft Word open XML format, portable document format, rich text file, and standard text document. This dataset contains the file fragments in three different languages: English, Persian, and Chinese. For each pair of file format and language, 1500 file fragments are provided. So, the dataset of file fragments contains 22,500 file fragments.


Assuntos
Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Classificação , Serviços de Informação , Idioma , Software , Processamento de Texto
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