Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 242
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0272800, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36327277

RESUMO

Providing consumers with product-specific environmental impact information for food products (ecolabels) may promote more sustainable purchasing, needed to meet global environmental targets. Two UK studies investigated the effectiveness of different ecolabels using an experimental online supermarket platform. Study 1 (N = 1051 participants) compared three labels against control (no label), while Study 2 (N = 4979) tested four designs against control. Study 1 found significant reductions in the environmental impact score (EIS) for all labels compared to control (labels presented: values for four environmental indicators [-3.9 percentiles, 95%CIs: -5.2,-2.6]; a composite score [taking values from A to E; -3.9, 95%CIs: -5.2,-2.5]; or both together [-3.2, 95%CIs: -4.5,-1.9]). Study 2 showed significant reductions in EIS compared to control for A-E labels [-2.3, 95%CIs: -3.0,-1.5], coloured globes with A-E scores [-3.2, 95%CIs:-3.9,-2.4], and red globes highlighting 'worse' products [-3.2, 95%CIs:-3.9,-2.5]. There was no evidence that green globes highlighting 'better' products were effective [-0.5, 95%CIs:-1.3,0.2]. Providing ecolabels is a promising intervention to promote the selection of more sustainable products.


Assuntos
Rotulagem de Alimentos , Supermercados , Humanos , Comportamento do Consumidor , Alimentos , Preferências Alimentares , Meio Ambiente , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
2.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1946, 2022 10 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36266681

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to determine the impact of two nudge interventions on customers' produce purchases at a rural Canadian grocery store. A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used. Sales data were gathered before and after the staggered implementation of two nudge-based interventions to encourage produce purchases: grocery cart dividers to encourage shoppers to fill one-third of their cart with produce and grocery cart plaques with information about how many fruits and vegetables were typically purchased in the store. The proportion of total sales accounted for by produce was compared between baseline and implementation of the first intervention (Phase 1), between implementation of the first intervention and the addition of the second intervention (Phase 2), and between baseline and post-implementation of both interventions together. There was a 5% relative increase (0.5% absolute increase) in produce spending between baseline and post-implementation of both interventions (10.3% to 10.8%, p < 0.001, 95% CI 0.2%, 0.7%). Intervention phase-specific produce spending showed no significant change in the percentage of produce spending from baseline to Phase 1 of the intervention, and an 8% relative increase (0.8% absolute increase) in the percentage of produce spending from Phase 1 to Phase 2 of the intervention (10.3% to 11.1%, p < 0.001, 95% CI 0.5, 1.1%). Simple, low-cost nudge interventions were effective at increasing the proportion of total grocery spend on produce. This study also demonstrated that partnerships with local businesses can promote healthier food choices in rural communities in Canada.


Assuntos
Normas Sociais , Supermercados , Humanos , Comportamento de Escolha , Promoção da Saúde , Canadá
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36293910

RESUMO

A major advantage of online organic produce shopping is the fact that it saves energy and reduces emissions otherwise generated by customers during their time spent on the road and while shopping. Organic products in general positively impact sustainability, the environment, and the regions of their origin along with the social changes in these regions and further rural development. Moreover, these products positively impact the perceived health benefits and quality of food labeled as organic. The Czech Republic has currently seen a rise in organic food purchasing and supply trends. This study maps the factors possibly influencing consumers' decision to go shopping for organic food online. Observed factors include the following demographic characteristics of consumers (respondents): gender, age, education, household income, number of children in the household and number of household members. A total of 757 respondents from the Czech Republic from September 2020 to December 2020 took part in the research. Logistic regression, used for data processing, identified the statistically significant effects of education, income and number of household members on online purchases. These conclusions were confirmed by a detailed contingency tables analysis, including the almost monotonous trend of the dependencies, with only minor deviations in a maximum of one category. The strongest influence of some categories on the emergence of partial dependencies was found by residue analysis. The research confirmed that the frequency of online grocery shopping increases significantly with increasing education and income of respondents and decreases with increasing the number of household members. Most respondents apparently shop for groceries online because of time savings, better product choice and more convenient and easier search.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Preferências Alimentares , Criança , Humanos , Supermercados , República Tcheca/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Comportamento do Consumidor
4.
PLoS Med ; 19(10): e1004114, 2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36197915

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Excess consumption of salt is linked to an increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The United Kingdom has had a comprehensive salt reduction programme since 2003, setting a series of progressively lower, product-specific reformulation targets for the food industry, combined with advice to consumers to reduce salt. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in the sales-weighted mean salt content of grocery foods sold through retail between 2015 and 2020 by category and company. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Information for products, including salt content (g/100 g), was collected online from retailer websites for 6 consecutive years (2015 to 2020) and was matched with brand-level retail sales data from Euromonitor for 395 brands. The sales-weighted mean salt content and total volume of salt sold were calculated by category and company. The mean salt content of included foods fell by 0.05 g/100 g, from 1.04 g/100 g in 2015 to 0.90 g/100 g in 2020, equivalent to -4.2% (p = 0.13). The categories with the highest salt content in 2020 were savoury snacks (1.6 g/100 g) and cheese (1.6 g/100 g), and the categories that saw the greatest reductions in mean salt content over time were breakfast cereals (-16.0%, p = 0.65); processed beans, potatoes, and vegetables (-10.6%, p = 0.11); and meat, seafood, and alternatives (-9.2%, p = 0.56). The total volume of salt sold fell from 2.41 g per person per day to 2.25 g per person per day, a reduction of 0.16 g or 6.7% (p = 0.54). The majority (63%) of this decrease was attributable to changes in mean salt content, with the remaining 37% accounted for by reductions in sales. Across the top 5 companies in each of 9 categories, the volume of salt sold decreased in 26 and increased in 19 cases. This study is limited by its exclusion of foods purchased out of the home, including at restaurants, cafes, and takeaways. It also does not include salt added at the table, or that naturally occurring in foods, meaning the findings underrepresent the population's total salt intake. The assumption was also made that the products matched with the sales data were entirely representative of the brand, which may not be the case if products are sold exclusively in convenience stores or markets, which are not included in this database. CONCLUSIONS: There has been a small decline in the salt content of foods and total volume of salt sold between 2015 and 2020, but observed changes were not statistically significant so could be due to random variations over time. We suggest that mandatory reporting of salt sales by large food companies would increase the transparency of how individual businesses are progressing towards the salt reduction targets.


Assuntos
Cloreto de Sódio na Dieta , Supermercados , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Alimentos , Restaurantes , Reino Unido
5.
Int J Food Sci Nutr ; 73(8): 1067-1079, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36273815

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the range and nutrient profile of processed alternative protein "convenience" products available in Australia from 2014 to 2021. Product data were extracted from FoodTrack™, an established database of packaged supermarket products. Eligible products were grouped into subcategories: (i) tofu products; (ii) legume products; and (iii) plant-based meats. Nutrient composition was assessed from the products' nutrition information panel. The number of alternative protein products in supermarkets more than doubled between 2014 and 2021 (+130%). On average, products were available for 2.2 years (range 1-7 years). Generally, tofu products had the highest contents of saturated fat and sodium, legume products had the highest contents of carbohydrates, sugar and fibre, and plant-based meats had the highest contents of protein and total fat (per 100 g). This study found large variation in the nutrient composition of these products, highlighting the importance of reformulation and consumer education in the future.


Assuntos
Nutrientes , Supermercados , Valor Nutritivo , Austrália , Carne , Rotulagem de Alimentos
6.
Public Health Nutr ; 25(11): 3204-3214, 2022 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36073024

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore changes in plant-based and meat product sales during and after implementation of a multi-component in-store intervention implemented by a major UK food retailer. Secondary objectives included exploring differences by store format and area affluence. DESIGN: The intervention increased the visibility, accessibility, affordability and availability of a selection of plant-based products. Unit sales of plant-based and meat products during the intervention (January 2021) were compared with pre- (November 2020) and post-intervention (February and March 2021). Non-meat product sales were assessed as a control. Negative binomial mixed models were used to explore sales changes and differences by store format or affluence. SETTING: The intervention was applied in a real-world supermarket setting during Veganuary. PARTICIPANTS: Stores that applied the full intervention (n 154) were included for analysis. Weekly sales data for each store were obtained from the retailer. RESULTS: Average weekly unit sales of plant-based products increased significantly (57 %) during the intervention period (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1·52 (95 % CI1·51, 1·55)). Plant-based product sales decreased post-intervention but remained 15 % higher than pre-intervention (IRR 1·13 (95 % CI 1·12, 1·14)). There was no significant change in meat sales according to time period. The increase in plant-based product sales was greatest at superstores (58 %), especially those located in below average affluence areas (64 %). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that increasing visibility, accessibility, affordability and availability of plant-based products led to increased sales, with evidence of lasting effects. No significant changes in meat sales were observed. Variation according to store format and area affluence indicates targeted intervention approaches are needed.


Assuntos
Comércio , Supermercados , Preferências Alimentares , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Humanos , Carne
7.
Food Res Int ; 160: 111724, 2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36076415

RESUMO

Fruit softening is enzyme mediated degradation process determined by the action of cell wall modifying enzymes. Present study evaluated the combined effects of chitosan (CH) and salicylic acid (SA) coatings in modulation of fruit softening enzymes in Punjab Beauty pear (Pyrus pyrifolia × Pyrus communis) fruit stored under cold (0-1 °C and 90-95 % RH) and supermarket (20-22 °C and 80-85 % RH) conditions. Composite CH + SA coatings reduced mass loss and retained fruit firmness throughout the 67 and 20 days storage period. In addition, CH + SA prevented membrane damage by suppressing the electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation as compared to CH or SA alone. CH 2.0 % + SA 2.0 mM coating efficiently delayed the cell wall degrading enzymatic activities including pectin methylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG) and cellulase associated with fruit softening up to 60 and 15 days storage period in cold and supermarket conditions, respectively.


Assuntos
Quitosana , Pyrus , Quitosana/metabolismo , Frutas/metabolismo , Pyrus/metabolismo , Ácido Salicílico , Supermercados
8.
Salud Publica Mex ; 64(3, may-jun): 280-289, 2022 Jun 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36130400

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify the behavioral and normative believes factors that might have major influence on the decision to buy packaged foods in urban Mexican families. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study in four urban cities of Mexico. Participants responded a self-administered questionnaire (n=3 340) outside of randomly selected supermarkets. A factor analysis was performed to identify what were the main behavioral and normative believes explaining consumers' decision when buying packaged foods. RESULTS: Three factors explained the behavioral beliefs: the quality assessment of packaged foods explained 61% of the variance, products that maintain weight explained 25%, and the emotional experience with foods explained 13%. Three factors explained the normative beliefs: expectations of chil-dren and partner explained 46% of the variance, expectations from the participants' closest friends 23%, and expectation from other family members explained 14%. CONCLUSION: Behavioral and normative beliefs related to assessing the qual-ity of foods and meeting family expectations respectively are the main beliefs factors affecting consumers' packaged food purchase decisions in urban consumers.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Consumidor , Supermercados , Estudos Transversais , Alimentos , Humanos , México
9.
Nutrients ; 14(18)2022 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36145165

RESUMO

Online grocery shopping has expanded rapidly in the U.S., yet little is known about the retailer's perceptions of online grocery services, which can aid in the expansion of services. Furthermore, many barriers to online grocery utilization persist across geographic areas, especially among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-authorized retailers. This study captured perceived barriers and facilitators of online grocery shopping for managers of SNAP-authorized retailers. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with managers (n = 23) of grocery stores/supermarkets in urban and rural areas across four different states: TN, KY, NC, and NY. Grocery store managers offering online ordering (n = 15) and managers from brick-and-mortar stores without online services (n = 8) participated in the interviews. Three primary themes emerged among managers offering online ordering: (1) order fulfillment challenges, (2) perceived customer barriers, and (3) perceived customer benefits. Among managers at brick-and-mortar locations without online services, four major themes emerged: (1) thoughts on implementing online shopping, (2) COVID-19 pandemic impacts, (3) competition with other stores, and (4) benefits of maintaining brick-and-mortar shopping. This study provides a deeper understanding of retailers' experience and perceptions of online grocery services among stores authorized to accept SNAP benefits. This perspective is necessary to inform policies and enhance the evolving virtual food marketplace for SNAP customers.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Assistência Alimentar , Comércio , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Humanos , Pandemias , Supermercados
10.
JAMA Intern Med ; 182(9): 965-973, 2022 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35913728

RESUMO

Importance: Calorie labels for prepared (ie, ready-to-eat) foods are required in large chain food establishments in the US. Large evaluations in restaurants suggest small declines in purchases of prepared foods after labeling, but to the authors' knowledge, no studies have examined how this policy influences supermarket purchases. Objective: To estimate changes in calories purchased from prepared foods and potential packaged substitutes compared with control foods after calorie labeling of prepared foods in supermarkets. Design, Setting, and Participants: This controlled interrupted time series compared sales 2 years before labeling implementation (April 2015-April 2017) with sales 7 months after labeling implementation (May 2017-December 2017). Data from 173 supermarkets from a supermarket chain with locations in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont were analyzed from March 2020 to May 2022. Intervention: Implementation of calorie labeling of prepared foods in April 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: Purchased items were classified as prepared foods, potential packaged substitutes for prepared foods, or all other (ie, control) foods. The primary outcome was mean weekly calories per transaction purchased from prepared foods, and the secondary outcome was mean weekly calories per transaction purchased from similar packaged items (for substitution analyses). Analyses of prepared and packaged foods were stratified by food category (bakery, entrées and sides, or deli meats and cheeses). Results: Among the included 173 supermarkets, calorie labeling was associated with a mean 5.1% decrease (95% CI, -5.8% to -4.4%) in calories per transaction purchased from prepared bakery items and an 11.0% decrease (95% CI, -11.9% to -10.1%) from prepared deli items, adjusted for changes in control foods; no changes were observed for prepared entrées and sides (change = 0.3%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 3.0%). Labeling was also associated with decreased calories per transaction purchased from packaged bakery items (change = -3.9%; 95% CI, -4.3% to -3.6%), packaged entrées and sides (change = -1.2%; 95% CI, -1.4% to -0.9%), and packaged deli items (change = -2.1%; 95% CI, -2.4% to -1.7%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this longitudinal study of supermarkets, calorie labeling of prepared foods was associated with small to moderate decreases in calories purchased from prepared bakery and deli items without evidence of substitution to similar packaged foods.


Assuntos
Rotulagem de Alimentos , Supermercados , Ingestão de Energia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Políticas , Restaurantes
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 857754, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35991079

RESUMO

There is evidence of the association between different retail stores and food consumption, yet research is still limited in low- and medium-income countries, where the context of the food retail environment is different from that observed in high-income countries. Specifically, less is known about how convenience and small grocery stores, which offer products with immediate access, are associated with the diet as a whole. The present study assessed the association between density of convenience and small grocery stores and diet quality in adults from the Mexico City Representative Diabetes Survey 2015. A final sample size of 1,023 adults aged 20-69 years was analyzed. The density of stores was measured using Euclidean buffers within 500 meters of each participant's home. The Mexican Alternate Healthy Eating Index (MxAHEI) was used to assess diet quality. Multivariable Poisson models were used to test the association of convenience and small grocery stores densities with the MxAHEI. Although our results were not statistically significant, we observed a lower diet quality score among adults from Mexico City living in areas with a higher density of small grocery and convenience stores. More research is needed on the influence of environmental food retail on food consumption.


Assuntos
Abastecimento de Alimentos , Supermercados , Adulto , Comércio , Estudos Transversais , Dieta , Humanos , México , Características de Residência
12.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1502, 2022 08 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35932051

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Price discount is an unregulated obesogenic environmental risk factor for the purchasing of unhealthy food, including Sugar Sweetened Beverages (SSB). Sales of price discounted food items are known to increase during the period of discounting. However, the presence and extent of the lagged effect of discounting, a sustained level of sales after discounting ends, is previously unaccounted for. We investigated the presence of the lagged effect of discounting on the sales of five SSB categories, which are soda, fruit juice, sport and energy drink, sugar-sweetened coffee and tea, and sugar-sweetened drinkable yogurt. METHODS: We fitted distributed lag models to weekly volume-standardized sales and percent discounting generated by a supermarket in Montreal, Canada between January 2008 and December 2013, inclusive (n = 311 weeks). RESULTS: While the sales of SSB increased during the period of discounting, there was no evidence of a prominent lagged effect of discounting in four of the five SSB; the exception was sports and energy drinks, where a posterior mean of 28,459 servings (95% credible interval: 2661 to 67,253) of excess sales can be attributed to the lagged effect in the target store during the 6 years study period. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that studies that do not account for the lagged effect of promotions may not fully capture the effect of price discounting for some food categories.


Assuntos
Bebidas Adoçadas com Açúcar , Bebidas/efeitos adversos , Bebidas Gaseificadas/efeitos adversos , Comércio , Comportamento do Consumidor , Humanos , Açúcares , Supermercados
14.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11491, 2022 07 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35798785

RESUMO

Foodborne outbreaks represent a significant public health burden. Outbreak investigations are often challenging and time-consuming, and most outbreak vehicles remain unidentified. The development of alternative investigative strategies is therefore needed. Automated analysis of Consumer Purchase Data (CPD) gathered by retailers represents one such alternative strategy. CPD-aided investigations do not require trawling questionnaires to create a hypothesis and can provide analytical measures of association by direct data analysis. Here, we used anonymized CPD from 920,384 customers enrolled in Norway's largest supermarket loyalty program to simulate foodborne outbreaks across a range of different parameters and scenarios. We then applied a logistic regression model to calculate an odds ratio for each of the different possible food vehicles. By this method, we were able to identify outbreak vehicles with a 90% accuracy within a median of 6 recorded case-patients. The outbreak vehicle identification rate declined significantly when using data from only one of two retailers involved in a simulated outbreak. Performance was also reduced in simulations that restricted analysis from product ID to the product group levels accessible by trawling questionnaires. Our results show that-assuming agreements are in place with major retailers-CPD collection and analysis can solve foodborne outbreaks originating from supermarkets both more rapidly and accurately than than questionnaire-based methods and might provide a significant enhancement to current outbreak investigation methods.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos , Comportamento do Consumidor , Surtos de Doenças , Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos/epidemiologia , Humanos , Saúde Pública , Supermercados
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1423, 2022 Jul 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35883174

RESUMO

Current supermarket price promotions are likely to encourage unhealthy diets, leading some governments to recently endorse restrictions on price promotions for unhealthy food and beverages. However, little is known about the likely industry response to policy action in this area. The aim of this study was to understand how potential government policies targeting food and beverage price promotions in supermarkets are perceived by food industry stakeholders in Australia. Twelve semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with current and former employees of major food manufacturers and food retailers as well as other industry experts with experience related to price promotion practices in the Australian supermarket setting. Data were analysed deductively based on Lewin's organisational change theories and inductively to highlight forces that might drive or restrain change.From an industry perspective, forces likely to create industry opposition to implementation of price promotion policy included: fear of losing competitive advantage; potential financial loss for food retailers and their suppliers; a perception that restrictions on price promotions for unhealthy products will not impact health; and a perception of increased financial cost to consumers. Forces perceived to drive implementation of a policy that would benefit public health included: mandatory regulation; extensive compliance monitoring; support for promoting healthy products; consumer education; and sufficient lead time and support from retailers for implementation. These forces, and the way in which they interact, need to be actively considered as part of efforts to change the healthiness of food and beverage price promotions in supermarkets.


Assuntos
Comércio , Supermercados , Austrália , Bebidas , Alimentos , Indústria Alimentícia , Humanos , Políticas
17.
Int J Food Microbiol ; 379: 109835, 2022 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35863148

RESUMO

Plasmid-borne colistin resistance is considered one of the most complex public health concerns worldwide. Several studies reported the presence of the mcr-1.1 harboring Salmonella from the foodstuffs worldwide; still, there is a knowledge gap about the occurrence of these isolates in the Middle East. In this study, we report an mcr-1.1-mediated colistin resistance in two multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. Minnesota (denoted as Sal_2 and Sal_10), with both being also extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) producing. These isolates have been recovered from two independent samples out of 315 chilled chicken meat tested from retail supermarkets in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis, both isolates belonged to the same Sequence Type (ST) ST548. They shared the same genes encoding resistance to the following antimicrobials: polymyxin (mcr-1.1), phenicol (floR), quinolone (qnrB19), aminoglycoside (aac(6')-Iaa), tetracycline (tet(A)), and sulfonamide (sul2). However, the isolates featured different patterns of ß-lactamase resistance genes, which included blaCTX-M-55 (ESBL-ß-lactamase) and blaCMY-2 (AmpC-ß-lactamase) in the isolate Sal_2, and blaTEM-215 (ESBL-ß-lactamase) in the isolate Sal_10. WGS analysis inferred that both S. Minnesota isolates in this study carry an IncX4 plasmid harboring the mcr-1.1 variant. To understand the possible origin of the two mcr-1.1 carrying S. Minnesota isolated from retail chicken meat in this study, we conducted a phylogenomic analysis using available genomes of S. enterica, which harbored mcr-1.1 gene (n = 240, from the Middle East and Asian countries) deposited in the NCBI database. We found that Sal_2 and Sal_10 independently clustered together with other isolates detected in China, mainly from the chicken origin and to a lesser extent from human clinical origin. The finding of mcr-producing colistin-resistant strains in retail chicken meat warrants a more comprehensive One Health investigations involving strains from animals, retail food chains, and human clinical isolates at the national level in the UAE.


Assuntos
Colistina , Proteínas de Escherichia coli , Animais , Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Galinhas/genética , Colistina/farmacologia , Escherichia coli/genética , Proteínas de Escherichia coli/genética , Genômica , Humanos , Carne/análise , Plasmídeos/genética , Salmonella/genética , Supermercados , beta-Lactamases/genética
18.
Appetite ; 176: 106100, 2022 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35660077

RESUMO

Fruits and vegetable (FVs) consumption is an essential determinant of health, and intake is strongly patterned by socioeconomic status (SES). Inside grocery store interventions have increasingly been explored to promote healthier diets, especially for people with lower SES. This study describes how the supermarket chain Kiwi used a combination of in-store interventions to increase annual sales of FVs between 2012 and 2020. In particular, this study examined how sales developed in counties with different demographic characteristics (e.g., education, income, overweight and obesity, and self-reported FVs consumption level) in order to evaluate whether the effect differs between different populations. The primary outcome measurement was annual volume sales, adjusted for new stores opening and closing during the study period, also called like-for-like sales. The study has used a descriptive study design. The chain used interventions such as better placement, promoting healthy foods, giving out discounts, and placing "on the go" FVs and cups with portioned FVs at the cash registry. Results show that like-for-like volume sales of FVs grew by 34.1% during the study period. The increase was especially strong for vegetables, which increased by 41.8%, compared to fruits and berries, which increased by 25%. Sales increased for all eleven counties in Norway. Using the Spearman correlation, a moderately positive association was found between the number of overweight or obese people in counties and the development in FVs sales. To conclude, in-store interventions positively impacted FVs sales. More research in an experimental context is needed to determine if interventions may reduce the socioeconomic gap in FVs consumption.


Assuntos
Frutas , Verduras , Comércio , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Humanos , Renda , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/prevenção & controle , Supermercados
19.
Am J Health Promot ; 36(8): 1346-1349, 2022 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35704689

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Compare computer-based virtual reality (CBVR) and voice-over PowerPoint (PP) grocery store tours (GST) on adult nutrition literacy (NL) and healthful food purchasing self-efficacy (HFPSE). DESIGN: Participants (n = 68) recruited from University worksite wellness program and randomly assigned to CBVR or PP (CBVR = 35; PP = 33). INTERVENTION: Four-week culinary/nutrition education program. Initial three weeks provided identical education for both groups. Week four implemented GST intervention using CBVR or PP. MEASURES: NL and HFPSE surveys before, after, and three-months post from the start of program. ANALYSIS: Intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis with RMANOVA (95% confidence intervals [CI] and effect sizes) to examine change in NL and HFPSE between CBVR and PP groups over 4-week intervention and 3-month retention period. RESULTS: 43 of 68 participants [CBVR (n = 19) and PP (n = 24)] were included in analyses. Both groups significantly improved HFPSE over time (P<.001, CBVR = 46.23% PP = 33.34%), but there were no differences between groups (P = .21) or group by time interaction (P = .31). NL did not change for either group (P = .83, CBVR = 1.11%; PP = .12%) nor were there differences between groups (P = .07). CONCLUSIONS: CBVR and PP GST significantly improved and maintained higher HFPSE scores.


Assuntos
Autoeficácia , Realidade Virtual , Adulto , Humanos , Educação em Saúde , Promoção da Saúde , Supermercados
20.
Nutrients ; 14(12)2022 Jun 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35745125

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Most people in Australia buy most of their food in supermarkets. Marketing techniques promoting healthy foods in supermarkets can be important to encourage healthy eating at a population level. Shelf tags that highlight the healthiness of products have been identified as one such promising initiative. The aim of this study was to assess changes in the healthiness of foods sold in an Australian supermarket chain following implementation of a shelf tag intervention based on the Australian Health Star Rating (HSR) system. METHODS: A controlled, non-randomised trial was undertaken in seven supermarkets (intervention: n = 3; control: n = 4) of a single chain in Victoria, Australia, over 12 weeks (4 weeks baseline, 8 weeks intervention period) between August and November 2015. The intervention involved provision of a shelf tag indicating the HSR of all packaged products that scored 4.5 or 5 stars ('high-HSR products') using the Australian HSR system. Posters indicating the healthiness of fresh fruits and vegetables (not eligible for an HSR rating, as they are not packaged) were also installed. Weekly per store sales data were provided by the retailer. In an intention-to-treat analysis (with intervention status of individual products based on their eligibility to be tagged), the proportion (%) of all 'high-HSR' packaged food sold and the volume of key nutrients (saturated fat, total fat, sodium, total sugar, protein, carbohydrates and energy) per 100 g sold were assessed. Difference-in-difference analyses were conducted to determine the difference between intervention and control stores in terms of mean outcomes between baseline and intervention periods. Customer exit surveys (n = 304) were conducted to evaluate awareness and use of the shelf tags and posters. RESULTS: The proportion of 'high-HSR products' sold increased in the intervention period compared to the baseline period in each of the three intervention stores (average increase of 0.49%, 95% CI: -0.02, 0.99), compared to a decrease of -0.15% (-0.46, 0.15) in control stores (p = 0.034). The overall increase in intervention compared to control stores (difference-in-difference) of 0.64% represents an 8.2% increase in the sales of 'high-HSR products'. Sales of total sugar, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates, sodium, protein and total energy in packaged food all decreased significantly more in intervention stores compared to control stores. Sales of fresh fruits and vegetables decreased in intervention stores compared to control stores. Customer surveys found that 34.4% noticed the shelf tags. Of those who noticed the tags, 58% believed the shelf tags influenced their purchases. CONCLUSIONS: With this study, we found that the use of shelf tags that highlight the healthiest packaged foods in a supermarket setting showed promise as a mechanism to improve the healthiness of purchases. Opportunities to scale up the intervention warrant exploration, with further research needed to assess the potential impact of the intervention on overall population diets over the longer term.


Assuntos
Rotulagem de Alimentos , Supermercados , Carboidratos , Comércio , Humanos , Valor Nutritivo , Sódio , Açúcares , Vitória
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...