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1.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008780, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866188

RESUMO

Ubiquitin like protein 5 (UBL5) interacts with other proteins to regulate their function but differs from ubiquitin and other UBLs because it does not form covalent conjugates. Ubiquitin and most UBLs mediate the degradation of target proteins through the 26S proteasome but it is not known if UBL5 can also do that. Here we found that the UBL5s of rice and Nicotiana benthamiana interacted with rice stripe virus (RSV) p3 protein. Silencing of NbUBL5s in N. benthamiana facilitated RSV infection, while UBL5 overexpression conferred resistance to RSV in both N. benthamiana and rice. Further analysis showed that NbUBL5.1 impaired the function of p3 as a suppressor of silencing by degrading it through the 26S proteasome. NbUBL5.1 and OsUBL5 interacted with RPN10 and RPN13, the receptors of ubiquitin in the 26S proteasome. Furthermore, silencing of NbRPN10 or NbRPN13 compromised the degradation of p3 mediated by NbUBL5.1. Together, the results suggest that UBL5 mediates the degradation of RSV p3 protein through the 26S proteasome, a previously unreported plant defense strategy against RSV infection.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Complexo de Endopeptidases do Proteassoma/metabolismo , Proteólise , Proteínas Repressoras/metabolismo , Tenuivirus/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , Ubiquitinas/metabolismo , Proteínas Virais/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Complexo de Endopeptidases do Proteassoma/genética , Proteínas Repressoras/genética , Tenuivirus/genética , Tabaco/genética , Ubiquitinas/genética , Proteínas Virais/genética
2.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4393, 2020 09 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32879321

RESUMO

Rcr3 is a secreted protease of tomato that is targeted by fungal effector Avr2, a secreted protease inhibitor of the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum. The Avr2-Rcr3 complex is recognized by receptor-like protein Cf-2, triggering hypersensitive cell death (HR) and disease resistance. Avr2 also targets Rcr3 paralog Pip1, which is not required for Avr2 recognition but contributes to basal resistance. Thus, Rcr3 acts as a guarded decoy in this interaction, trapping the fungus into a recognition event. Here we show that Rcr3 evolved > 50 million years ago (Mya), whereas Cf-2 evolved <6Mya by co-opting the pre-existing Rcr3 in the Solanum genus. Ancient Rcr3 homologs present in tomato, potato, eggplants, pepper, petunia and tobacco can be inhibited by Avr2 with the exception of tobacco Rcr3. Four variant residues in Rcr3 promote Avr2 inhibition, but the Rcr3 that co-evolved with Cf-2 lacks three of these residues, indicating that the Rcr3 co-receptor is suboptimal for Avr2 binding. Pepper Rcr3 triggers HR with Cf-2 and Avr2 when engineered for enhanced inhibition by Avr2. Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) is a natural null mutant carrying Rcr3 and Pip1 alleles with deleterious frame-shift mutations. Resurrected NbRcr3 and NbPip1 alleles were active proteases and further NbRcr3 engineering facilitated Avr2 inhibition, uncoupled from HR signalling. The evolution of a receptor co-opting a conserved pathogen target contrasts with other indirect pathogen recognition mechanisms.


Assuntos
Cladosporium , Resistência à Doença/genética , Peptídeo Hidrolases/genética , Imunidade Vegetal/genética , Solanum , Tabaco , Cladosporium/genética , Cladosporium/metabolismo , Cladosporium/patogenicidade , Evolução Molecular , Proteínas Fúngicas/metabolismo , Genes de Plantas , Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita , Peptídeo Hidrolases/metabolismo , Filogenia , Doenças das Plantas/microbiologia , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Inibidores de Proteases/metabolismo , Solanum/genética , Solanum/metabolismo , Solanum/microbiologia , Tabaco/genética , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/microbiologia
3.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 3847, 2020 07 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32737299

RESUMO

Reporter systems are routinely used in plant genetic engineering and functional genomics research. Most such plant reporter systems cause accumulation of foreign proteins. Here, we demonstrate a protein-independent reporter system, 3WJ-4 × Bro, based on a fluorescent RNA aptamer. Via transient expression assays in both Escherichia coli and Nicotiana benthamiana, we show that 3WJ-4 × Bro is suitable for transgene identification and as an mRNA reporter for expression pattern analysis. Following stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana, 3WJ-4 × Bro co-segregates and co-expresses with target transcripts and is stably inherited through multiple generations. Further, 3WJ-4 × Bro can be used to visualize virus-mediated RNA delivery in plants. This study demonstrates a protein-independent reporter system that can be used for transgene identification and in vivo dynamic analysis of mRNA.


Assuntos
Aptâmeros de Nucleotídeos/genética , Arabidopsis/genética , Brassica/genética , Engenharia Genética/métodos , RNA Mensageiro/genética , Tabaco/genética , Aptâmeros de Nucleotídeos/química , Aptâmeros de Nucleotídeos/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Compostos de Benzil/química , Brassica/metabolismo , Fluorescência , Corantes Fluorescentes/química , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Genes Reporter , Imidazolinas/química , Folhas de Planta/genética , Folhas de Planta/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , RNA Mensageiro/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , Transformação Genética
4.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0236246, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32804956

RESUMO

K+ is an essential nutrient for plant growth and is responsible for many important physiological processes. K+ deficiency leads to crop yield losses, and overexpression of K+ transporter genes has been proven to be an effective way to resolve this problem. However, current research on the overexpression of K+ transporter genes is limited to plant sources. TrkH is a bacterial K+ transporter whose function generally depends on the regulation of TrkA. To date, whether TrkH can improve K+ uptake in eukaryotic organisms is still unknown. In this study, a novel MbtrkH gene was cloned from marine microbial metagenomic DNA. Functional complementation and K+-depletion analyses revealed that MbTrkH functions in K+ uptake in the K+-deficient yeast strain CY162. Moreover, K+-depletion assays revealed that MbtrkH overexpression improves plant K+ uptake. K+ hydroponic culture experiments showed that, compared with WT tobacco lines, MbtrkH transgenic tobacco lines had significantly greater fresh weights, dry weights and K+ contents. These results indicate that MbTrkH promotes K+ uptake independently of TrkA in eukaryotes and provide a new strategy for improving K+-use efficiency in plants.


Assuntos
Organismos Aquáticos/genética , Potássio/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolismo , Água do Mar/microbiologia , Tabaco/metabolismo , Clonagem Molecular , Metagenoma , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas/genética , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas/metabolismo , Canais de Potássio/genética , Canais de Potássio/metabolismo , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Tabaco/genética
5.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000830, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32810128

RESUMO

Plants are attacked by herbivores, which often specialize on different tissues, and in response, have evolved sophisticated resistance strategies that involve different types of chemical defenses frequently targeted to different tissues. Most known phytohormones have been implicated in regulating these defenses, with jasmonates (JAs) playing a pivotal role in complex regulatory networks of signaling interactions, often generically referred to as "cross talk." The newly identified class of phytohormones, strigolactones (SLs), known to regulate the shoot architecture, remain unstudied with regard to plant-herbivore interactions. We explored the role of SL signaling in resistance to a specialist weevil (Trichobaris mucorea) herbivore of the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, that attacks the root-shoot junction (RSJ), the part of the plant most strongly influenced by alterations in SL signaling (increased branching). As SL signaling shares molecular components, such as the core F-box protein MORE AXILLARY GROWTH 2 (MAX2), with another new class of phytohormones, the karrikins (KARs), which promote seed germination and seedling growth, we generated transformed lines, individually silenced in the expression of NaMAX2, DWARF 14 (NaD14: the receptor for SL) and CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 7 (NaCCD7: a key enzyme in SL biosynthesis), and KARRIKIN INSENSITIVE 2 (NaKAI2: the KAR receptor). The mature stems of all transgenic lines impaired in the SL, but not the KAR signaling pathway, overaccumulated anthocyanins, as did the stems of plants attacked by the larvae of weevil, which burrow into the RSJs to feed on the pith of N. attenuata stems. T. mucorea larvae grew larger in the plants silenced in the SL pathway, but again, not in the KAI2-silenced plants. These phenotypes were associated with elevated JA and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) levels and significant changes in the accumulation of defensive compounds, including phenolamides and nicotine. The overaccumulation of phenolamides and anthocyanins in the SL pathway-silenced plants likely resulted from antagonism between the SL and JA pathway in N. attenuata. We show that the repressors of SL signaling, suppressor of max2-like (NaSMXL6/7), and JA signaling, jasmonate zim-domain (NaJAZs), physically interact, promoting NaJAZb degradation and releasing JASMONATE INSENSITIVE 1 (JIN1/MYC2) (NaMYC2), a critical transcription factor promoting JA responses. However, the increased performance of T. mucorea larvae resulted from lower pith nicotine levels, which were inhibited by increased IAA levels in SL pathway-silenced plants. This inference was confirmed by decapitation and auxin transport inhibitor treatments that decreased pith IAA and increased nicotine levels. In summary, SL signaling tunes specific sectors of specialized metabolism in stems, such as phenylpropanoid and nicotine biosynthesis, by tailoring the cross talk among phytohormones, including JA and IAA, to mediate herbivore resistance of stems. The metabolic consequences of the interplay of SL, JA, and IAA signaling revealed here could provide a mechanism for the commonly observed pattern of herbivore tolerance/resistance trade-offs.


Assuntos
Herbivoria/fisiologia , Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita , Lactonas/metabolismo , Caules de Planta/metabolismo , Caules de Planta/parasitologia , Transdução de Sinais , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/parasitologia , Animais , Antocianinas/metabolismo , Ciclopentanos/metabolismo , Ácidos Indolacéticos/metabolismo , Larva , Metabolômica , Oxilipinas/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Interferência de RNA , Gorgulhos/fisiologia
6.
Nat Protoc ; 15(9): 3064-3087, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32807907

RESUMO

Targeted downregulation of select endogenous plant genes is known to confer disease or pest resistance in crops and is routinely accomplished via transgenic modification of plants for constitutive gene silencing. An attractive alternative to the use of transgenics or pesticides in agriculture is the use of a 'green' alternative known as RNAi, which involves the delivery of siRNAs that downregulate endogenous genes to confer resistance. However, siRNA is a molecule that is highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation and is difficult to deliver across the lignin-rich and multi-layered plant cell wall that poses the dominant physical barrier to biomolecule delivery in plants. We have demonstrated that DNA nanostructures can be utilized as a cargo carrier for direct siRNA delivery and gene silencing in mature plants. The size, shape, compactness and stiffness of the DNA nanostructure affect both internalization into plant cells and subsequent gene silencing efficiency. Herein, we provide a detailed protocol that can be readily adopted with standard biology benchtop equipment to generate geometrically optimized DNA nanostructures for transgene-free and force-independent siRNA delivery and gene silencing in mature plants. We further discuss how such DNA nanostructures can be rationally designed to efficiently enter plant cells and deliver cargoes to mature plants, and provide guidance for DNA nanostructure characterization, storage and use. The protocol described herein can be completed in 4 d.


Assuntos
DNA/química , Portadores de Fármacos/química , Engenharia , Nanoestruturas/química , RNA Interferente Pequeno/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , DNA/metabolismo , Portadores de Fármacos/metabolismo , RNA Interferente Pequeno/genética , Tabaco/genética
7.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 204: 111136, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32798755

RESUMO

High temperature can lead to increased production of excess light energy, thus reducing photosynthetic capacity in plants. Photosynthetic cyclic electron flow (CEF) in photosystem I (PSI) can effectively protect photosystems, but its physiological mechanism under high temperature is poorly understood. In this study, antimycin A (AA) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) were used to inhibit PGR5-and NDH-dependent CEF pathways, respectively, to reveal the photoprotective functions of CEF for PSII in tobacco leaves under high temperature stress (37 °C, HT). High temperatures caused decreases in maximal photochemistry efficiency (Fv/Fm) and damaged photosystem II (PSII) in tobacco leaves. Under AA inhibition of PGR5-dependent CEF, high temperature increased the fluorescence intensity of point O (Fo) in OJIP curves, i.e., the energy absorption per active reaction center (ABS/RC), the trapping rate of the reaction center (TRo/RC), and the electron transport efficiency per reaction center (ETo/RC) in tobacco leaves. High temperature induced an increase in the hydrogen peroxide content and a decrease in pigment content in tobacco leaves. Under the high temperature treatment, inhibition of PGR5-dependent CEF reduced the activities of the PSII reaction center significantly, destroyed the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), and impeded photosynthetic electron transfer from PSII to the plastoquinone (PQ) pool in tobacco leaves. The TTFA treatment inhibited the NDH-dependent pathway under high temperature conditions, with the relative fluorescence intensity of point I (VI) decreased significantly, and the content of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion increased significantly. Additionally, Fo and the redox degree of the PSII donor side (Wk) increased, and pigment content decreased compared to the control, but with little change compared to high temperature treatment, indicating that the inhibition of the NDH-dependent pathway directly weakened the capacity of the PQ pool to lead to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tobacco leaves. In conclusion, CEF alleviated damage to the photosynthetic apparatus in tobacco leaves by increasing PSII heat dissipation, reducing ROS production, and maintaining the stability of the PQ pool to accommodate photosynthetic electron flow.


Assuntos
Temperatura Alta , Fotossíntese/fisiologia , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema I/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , Clorofila/metabolismo , Transporte de Elétrons , Elétrons , Fluorescência , Oxirredução , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema II/metabolismo , Folhas de Planta/metabolismo , Temperatura , Tabaco/fisiologia
8.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 202: 110856, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32629202

RESUMO

To explore the mechanisms underlying the action of the heavy metals Cd and Zn on the photosynthetic function of plant leaves, the effects of 100 µmol L-1 Cd and 200 µmol L-1 Zn stress (the exposure concentrations of Cd and Zn in the culture medium were 2.24 mg kg-1 and 5.36 mg kg-1) on the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents as well as the photosynthetic function of tobacco leaves (Long Jiang 911) were studied. The key proteins in these physiological processes were quantitatively analyzed using a TMT-based proteomics approach. Cd stress was found to inhibit the expression of key enzymes during chlorophyll synthesis in leaves, resulting in a decrease of the Chl content. However, Zn stress did not significantly influence the chlorophyll content. Leaves adapted to Zn stress by upregulating CAO expression and increase the Chl b content. Although the Car content in leaves did not significantly change under either Cd or Zn stress, the expressions of ZE and VDE during Car metabolism decreased significantly under Cd stress. This was accompanied by damages to the xanthophyll cycle and the NPQ-dependent energy dissipation mechanism. In contrast, under Zn stress, leaves adapted to Zn stress by increasing the expression of VDE, thus improving NPQ. Under Cd stress, the expressions of three sets of proteins were significantly down-regulated, including PSII donor-side proteins (PPD3, PPD6, OEE1, OEE2-1, OEE2-2, OEE2-3, and OEE3-2), receptor-side proteins (D1, D2, CP43, CP47, Cyt b559α, Cyt b559ß, PsbL, PsbQ, PsbR, Psb27-H1, and Psb28), and core proteins of the PSI reaction center (psaA, psaB, psaC, psaD, psaE-A, PsaE-B, psaF, psaG, psaH-1, psaK, psaL, psaN, and psaOL). In comparison, only eight of the above proteins (PPD6, OEE3-2, PsbL, PsbQ, Psb27-H1, psaL, and psaOL) were significantly down-regulated by Zn stress. Under Cd stress, both the donor side and the receptor side of PSII were damaged, and PSII and PSI experienced severe photoinhibition. However, Zn stress did not decrease either PSII or PSI activities in tobacco leaves. In addition, the expression of electron transport-related proteins (cytb6/f complex, PC, Fd, and FNR), ATPase subunits, Rubisco subunits, and RCA decreased significantly in leaves under Cd stress. However, no significant changes were observed in any of these proteins under Zn stress. Although Cd stress was found to up-regulate the expressions of PGRL1A and PGRL1B and induce an increase of PGR5/PGRL1-CEF in tobacco leaves, NDH-CEF was significantly inhibited. Under Zn stress, the expressions of ndhH and PGRL1A in leaves were significantly up-regulated, but there were no significant changes in either NDH-CEF or PGR5/PGRL-CEF. Under Cd stress, the expressions of proteins related to Fd-dependent nitrogen metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging processes (e.g., FTR, Fd-NiR, and Fd-GOGAT) were significantly down-regulated in leaves. However, no significant changes of any of the above proteins were identified under Zn stress. In summary, Cd stress could inhibit the synthesis of chlorophyll in tobacco leaves, significantly down-regulate the expressions of photosynthesis-related proteins or subunits, and suppress both the xanthophyll cycle and NDH-CEF process. The expressions of proteins related to the Fd-dependent nitrogen metabolism and ROS scavenging were also significantly down-regulated, which blocked the photosynthetic electron transport, thus resulting in severe photoinhibition of both PSII and PSI. However, Zn stress had little effect on the photosynthetic function of tobacco leaves.


Assuntos
Cádmio/toxicidade , Carotenoides/metabolismo , Clorofila/metabolismo , Fotossíntese/efeitos dos fármacos , Tabaco/efeitos dos fármacos , Zinco/toxicidade , Cádmio/metabolismo , Transporte de Elétrons/efeitos dos fármacos , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema I/metabolismo , Complexo de Proteína do Fotossistema II/metabolismo , Folhas de Planta/metabolismo , Proteômica , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/fisiologia , Zinco/metabolismo
9.
Nature ; 584(7819): 148-153, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32699417

RESUMO

Few complete pathways have been established for the biosynthesis of medicinal compounds from plants. Accordingly, many plant-derived therapeutics are isolated directly from medicinal plants or plant cell culture1. A lead example is colchicine, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment for inflammatory disorders that is sourced from Colchicum and Gloriosa species2-5. Here we use a combination of transcriptomics, metabolic logic and pathway reconstitution to elucidate a near-complete biosynthetic pathway to colchicine without prior knowledge of biosynthetic genes, a sequenced genome or genetic tools in the native host. We uncovered eight genes from Gloriosa superba for the biosynthesis of N-formyldemecolcine, a colchicine precursor that contains the characteristic tropolone ring and pharmacophore of colchicine6. Notably, we identified a non-canonical cytochrome P450 that catalyses the remarkable ring expansion reaction that is required to produce the distinct carbon scaffold of colchicine. We further used the newly identified genes to engineer a biosynthetic pathway (comprising 16 enzymes in total) to N-formyldemecolcine in Nicotiana benthamiana starting from the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine. This study establishes a metabolic route to tropolone-containing colchicine alkaloids and provides insights into the unique chemistry that plants use to generate complex, bioactive metabolites from simple amino acids.


Assuntos
Vias Biossintéticas , Colchicina/biossíntese , Engenharia Metabólica , Vias Biossintéticas/genética , Colchicaceae/enzimologia , Colchicaceae/genética , Colchicaceae/metabolismo , Colchicina/química , Colchicina/metabolismo , Sistema Enzimático do Citocromo P-450/metabolismo , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas , Metabolômica , Fenilalanina/metabolismo , Tabaco/genética , Tabaco/metabolismo , Transcriptoma , Tirosina/metabolismo
10.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0235341, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32603354

RESUMO

Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNL's) belonging to the α/ß-hydrolase-fold superfamily evolved from esterases approximately 100 million years ago. Reconstruction of an ancestral hydroxynitrile lyase in the α/ß-hydrolase fold superfamily yielded a catalytically active hydroxynitrile lyase, HNL1. Several properties of HNL1 differ from the modern HNL from rubber tree (HbHNL). HNL1 favors larger substrates as compared to HbHNL, is two-fold more catalytically promiscuous for ester hydrolysis (p-nitrophenyl acetate) as compared to mandelonitrile cleavage, and resists irreversible heat inactivation to 35 °C higher than for HbHNL. We hypothesized that the x-ray crystal structure of HNL1 may reveal the molecular basis for the differences in these properties. The x-ray crystal structure solved to 1.96-Å resolution shows the expected α/ß-hydrolase fold, but a 60% larger active site as compared to HbHNL. This larger active site echoes its evolution from esterases since related esterase SABP2 from tobacco also has a 38% larger active site than HbHNL. The larger active site in HNL1 likely accounts for its ability to accept larger hydroxynitrile substrates. Site-directed mutagenesis of HbHNL to expand the active site increased its promiscuous esterase activity 50-fold, consistent with the larger active site in HNL1 being the primary cause of its promiscuous esterase activity. Urea-induced unfolding of HNL1 indicates that it unfolds less completely than HbHNL (m-value = 0.63 for HNL1 vs 0.93 kcal/mol·M for HbHNL), which may account for the ability of HNL1 to better resist irreversible inactivation upon heating. The structure of HNL1 shows changes in hydrogen bond networks that may stabilize regions of the folded structure.


Assuntos
Aldeído Liases/química , Aldeído Liases/genética , Domínio Catalítico , Cristalografia por Raios X/métodos , Esterases/química , Esterases/genética , Hevea/genética , Hevea/metabolismo , Modelos Moleculares , Estrutura Molecular , Mutagênese Sítio-Dirigida/métodos , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Dobramento de Proteína , Especificidade por Substrato , Tabaco/genética , Tabaco/metabolismo
11.
Gene ; 760: 144990, 2020 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32721476

RESUMO

The MYB transcription factors are involved in the regulation of plant secondary metabolism, cell development and morphogenesis, and stress response. Here, a full-length, 816-bp NtMYB4a cDNA, which encodes a protein comprising 271 amino acids, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that NtMYB4a is most similar to Nicotiana. attenuata MYB4, followed by Eriobotrya japonica MYB4, and NtMYB4a clustered with transcriptional activators rather than repressors. Subcellular localization assays showed that NtMYB4 localized in the nucleus, membrane, and cytoplasm. Expression analyses revealed differential expression of NtMYB4a among different tissues and organs and between different developmental stages, with most expression occurring in the stems and leaves during the full-bloom stage. Moreover, NtMYB4a expression was induced by cold, NaCl, PEG, abscisic acid, methyl jasmonate, and dark stressors, and the expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with the type of stress. Overexpression of NtMYB4a upregulated NtPAL, Nt4CL, NtCHS, NtCHI, NtF3H, NtDFR, NtANS, and NtUFGT, which resulted in increased anthocyanin content in the tobacco corolla and darker colors. However, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of NtMYB4a downregulated NtPAL, NtC4H, Nt4CL, NtCHS, NtCHI, NtF3H, NtANS, and NtUFGT, which resulted in reduced anthocyanin content, and lighter corolla colors. These results indicated that NtMYB4a positively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis and is involved in abiotic stress responses in tobacco plants.


Assuntos
Tabaco/metabolismo , Fatores de Transcrição/isolamento & purificação , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo , Ácido Abscísico/metabolismo , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Antocianinas/biossíntese , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas/genética , Filogenia , Folhas de Planta/genética , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas/genética , Estresse Fisiológico/genética , Tabaco/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Ativação Transcricional/genética
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(27): 16043-16054, 2020 07 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32571919

RESUMO

In the indeterminate nodules of a model legume Medicago truncatula, ∼700 nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides with conserved cysteine signature are expressed. NCR peptides are highly diverse in sequence, and some of these cationic peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding their structural architecture, antifungal activity, and modes of action against plant fungal pathogens. Here, the three-dimensional NMR structure of the 36-amino acid NCR044 peptide was solved. This unique structure was largely disordered and highly dynamic with one four-residue α-helix and one three-residue antiparallel ß-sheet stabilized by two disulfide bonds. NCR044 peptide also exhibited potent fungicidal activity against multiple plant fungal pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea and three Fusarium spp. It inhibited germination in quiescent spores of B. cinerea In germlings, it breached the fungal plasma membrane and induced reactive oxygen species. It bound to multiple bioactive phosphoinositides in vitro. Time-lapse confocal and superresolution microscopy revealed strong fungal cell wall binding, penetration of the cell membrane at discrete foci, followed by gradual loss of turgor, subsequent accumulation in the cytoplasm, and elevated levels in nucleoli of germlings. Spray-applied NCR044 significantly reduced gray mold disease symptoms caused by the fungal pathogen B. cinerea in tomato and tobacco plants, and postharvest products. Our work illustrates the antifungal activity of a structurally unique NCR peptide against plant fungal pathogens and paves the way for future development of this class of peptides as a spray-on fungistat/fungicide.


Assuntos
Antifúngicos/farmacologia , Peptídeos/metabolismo , Peptídeos/farmacologia , Doenças das Plantas/prevenção & controle , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/farmacologia , Simbiose , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Botrytis/metabolismo , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Parede Celular/metabolismo , Cisteína/química , Fusarium/metabolismo , Lycopersicon esculentum/metabolismo , Lycopersicon esculentum/microbiologia , Espectroscopia de Ressonância Magnética , Medicago truncatula/microbiologia , Pichia/metabolismo , Doenças das Plantas/microbiologia , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/microbiologia
13.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232986, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32407419

RESUMO

Here we focus on the highly conserved MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) transcriptional complex model in eggplant, which is pivotal in the transcriptional regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. Through a genome-wide approach performed on the recently released Eggplant Genome (cv. 67/3) previously identified, and reconfirmed by us, members belonging to the MBW complex (SmelANT1, SmelAN2, SmelJAF13, SmelAN1) were functionally characterized. Furthermore, a regulatory R3 MYB type repressor (SmelMYBL1), never reported before, was identified and characterized as well. Through a qPCR approach, we revealed specific transcriptional patterns of candidate genes in different plant tissue/organs at two stages of fruit development. Two strategies were adopted for investigating the interactions of bHLH partners (SmelAN1, SmelJAF13) with MYB counterparts (SmelANT1, SmelAN2 and SmelMYBL1): Yeast Two Hybrid (Y2H) and Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) in A. thaliana mesophylls protoplast. Agro-infiltration experiments highlighted that N. benthamiana leaves transiently expressing SmelANT1 and SmelAN2 showed an anthocyanin-pigmented phenotype, while their co-expression with SmelMYBL1 prevented anthocyanin accumulation. Our results suggest that SmelMYBL1 may inhibits the MBW complex via the competition with MYB activators for bHLH binding site, although this hypothesis requires further elucidation.


Assuntos
Antocianinas/biossíntese , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Proteínas Repressoras/genética , Proteínas Repressoras/metabolismo , Solanum melongena/genética , Solanum melongena/metabolismo , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/metabolismo , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas , Genes de Plantas , Genes Reguladores , Família Multigênica , Filogenia , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas , Proteínas Recombinantes/genética , Proteínas Recombinantes/metabolismo , Tabaco/genética , Tabaco/metabolismo
14.
Gene ; 751: 144776, 2020 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32428700

RESUMO

Rice false smut (RFS), caused by Ustilaginoidea virens, is one of the most detrimental rice fungal diseases and pose a severe threat to rice production and quality. Effectors in U. virens often act as a set of essential virulence factors that play crucial roles in the interaction between host and the pathogen. Thus, the functions of each effector in U. virens need to be further explored. Here, a conserved small secreted hypersensitive response-inducing protein (hrip) was named UvHrip1. Functional validation was investigated to prove that UvHrip1 suppressed cell death symptom and ROS accumulation in Nicotiana benthamiana triggered by Burkholderia glumae. We performed transgenic technology to demonstrate UvHrip1 remarkably inhibited pathogen-associated molecular pattern-induced defense responses in Arabidopsis seedlings and plants, including the expression of defense-response genes. Furthermore, disease progression caused by the type III secretion system-defective mutant from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 was strongly facilitated in transgenic Arabidopsis ectopic expressing UvHrip1. Our data demonstrated UvHrip1 suppresses plant innate immunity and promoting disease multiplication in Arabidopsis.


Assuntos
Arabidopsis/microbiologia , Proteínas Fúngicas/metabolismo , Hypocreales/patogenicidade , Doenças das Plantas/microbiologia , Arabidopsis/genética , Arabidopsis/imunologia , Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Burkholderia , Hypocreales/metabolismo , Imunidade Vegetal , Espécies Reativas de Oxigênio/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/microbiologia
15.
Plant Mol Biol ; 103(4-5): 561-580, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32405802

RESUMO

KEY MESSAGE: CmHKT1;1 selectively exports Na+ from plant cells. Upon NaCl stress, its expression increased in a salt-tolerant melon cultivar. Overexpression of CmHKT1;1 increased transgenic Arabidopsis salt tolerance through improved K+/Na+ balance. High-affinity K+ transporters (HKTs) are thought to be involved in reducing Na+ in plant shoots under salt stress and modulating salt tolerance, but their function in a moderately salt-tolerant species of melon (Cucumis melo L.) remains unclear. In this study, a Na+ transporter gene, CmHKT1;1 (GenBank accession number: MK986658), was isolated from melons based on genome data. The transcript of CmHKT1;1 was relatively more abundant in roots than in stems or leaves from melon seedlings. The tobacco transient expression system showed that CmHKT1;1 was plasma-membrane localized. Upon salt stress, CmHKT1;1 expression was more strongly upregulated in a salt-tolerant melon cultivar, 'Bingxuecui' (BXC) compared with a salt-sensitive cultivar, 'Yulu' (YL). Electrophysiological evidence demonstrated that CmHKT1;1 only transported Na+, rather than K+, when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Overexpression of CmHKT1;1 increased salt sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Under NaCl treatments, transgenic Arabidopsis plants accumulated significantly lower concentrations of Na+ in shoots than wild type plants and showed a better K+/Na+ balance, leading to better Fv/Fm, root length, biomass, and enhanced plant growth. The CmHKT1;1 gene may serve as a useful candidate for improving crop salt tolerance.


Assuntos
Arabidopsis/metabolismo , Cucumis melo/metabolismo , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/metabolismo , Plantas Geneticamente Modificadas/metabolismo , Potássio/metabolismo , Sódio/metabolismo , Arabidopsis/genética , Proteínas de Transporte de Cátions/genética , Proteínas de Transporte de Cátions/metabolismo , Clorofila/análise , Clonagem Molecular , Cucumis melo/genética , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/genética , Folhas de Planta/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Raízes de Plantas/metabolismo , Brotos de Planta/genética , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genética , Tolerância ao Sal , Plântula/genética , Plântula/metabolismo , Alinhamento de Sequência , Análise de Sequência de Proteína , Cloreto de Sódio/metabolismo , Estresse Fisiológico/genética , Estresse Fisiológico/fisiologia , Simportadores/genética , Simportadores/metabolismo , Tabaco/genética , Tabaco/metabolismo
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(17): 9613-9620, 2020 04 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32284406

RESUMO

In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are intracellular immune sensors that recognize and eliminate a wide range of invading pathogens. NLR-mediated immunity is known to be modulated by environmental factors. However, how pathogen recognition by NLRs is influenced by environmental factors such as light remains unclear. Here, we show that the agronomically important NLR Rpi-vnt1.1 requires light to confer disease resistance against races of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans that secrete the effector protein AVRvnt1. The activation of Rpi-vnt1.1 requires a nuclear-encoded chloroplast protein, glycerate 3-kinase (GLYK), implicated in energy production. The pathogen effector AVRvnt1 binds the full-length chloroplast-targeted GLYK isoform leading to activation of Rpi-vnt1.1. In the dark, Rpi-vnt1.1-mediated resistance is compromised because plants produce a shorter GLYK-lacking the intact chloroplast transit peptide-that is not bound by AVRvnt1. The transition between full-length and shorter plant GLYK transcripts is controlled by a light-dependent alternative promoter selection mechanism. In plants that lack Rpi-vnt1.1, the presence of AVRvnt1 reduces GLYK accumulation in chloroplasts counteracting GLYK contribution to basal immunity. Our findings revealed that pathogen manipulation of chloroplast functions has resulted in a light-dependent immune response.


Assuntos
Cloroplastos/microbiologia , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas/imunologia , Luz , Proteínas NLR/metabolismo , Phytophthora infestans/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Agrobacterium/metabolismo , Animais , Cloroplastos/metabolismo , Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Proteínas Fúngicas , Regulação Enzimológica da Expressão Gênica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica de Plantas/efeitos da radiação , Inativação Gênica , Microscopia Confocal , Proteínas NLR/genética , Fosfotransferases (Aceptor do Grupo Álcool)/genética , Fosfotransferases (Aceptor do Grupo Álcool)/metabolismo , Proteínas de Plantas/genética , Plântula , Solanum tuberosum/metabolismo , Solanum tuberosum/microbiologia , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/microbiologia , Técnicas do Sistema de Duplo-Híbrido
19.
Plant Mol Biol ; 103(3): 287-302, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32240472

RESUMO

Volatile components in fresh leaves are involved in the regulation of many stress responses, such as insect damage, fungal infection and high temperature. However, the potential function of volatile components in hyperosmotic response is largely unknown. Here, we found that 7-day hyperosmotic treatment specifically led to the accumulation of (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-hexenal and methyl salicylate. Transcriptome and qRT-PCR analyses suggested the activation of linolenic acid degradation and methyl salicylate processes. Importantly, exogenous (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol pretreatment dramatically enhanced the hyperosmotic stress tolerance of tea plants and decreased stomatal conductance, whereas (E)-2-hexenal and methyl salicylate pretreatments did not exhibit such a function. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that exogenous ABA induced the expressions of related enzyme genes, and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol could up-regulate the expressions of many DREB and RD genes. Moreover, exogenous (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol tremendously induced the expressions of specific LOX and ADH genes within 24 h. Taken together, hyperosmotic stress induced (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol accumulation in tea plant via the activation of most LOX, HPL and ADH genes, while (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol could dramatically enhance the hyperosmotic stress tolerance via the decrease of stomatal conductance and MDA, accumulation of ABA and proline, activation of DREB and RD gene expressions, and probably positive feedback regulation of LOXs and ADHs. KEY MESSAGE: Hyperosmotic stress induced (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol accumulation in Camellia sinensis via the up-regulation of most LOX, HPL and ADH genes, while (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol could dramatically enhance the hyperosmotic stress tolerance via the decrease of stomatal conductance, accumulation of proline, activation of DREB and RD gene expressions, and probably positive feedback regulation of LOXs and ADHs.


Assuntos
Camellia sinensis/efeitos dos fármacos , Camellia sinensis/metabolismo , Hexanóis/metabolismo , Estresse Fisiológico/fisiologia , Compostos Orgânicos Voláteis/metabolismo , Água , Aldeídos/farmacologia , Tabaco/efeitos dos fármacos , Tabaco/metabolismo
20.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(4): e1008475, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32339200

RESUMO

The nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) class of immune receptors of plants and animals recognize pathogen-encoded proteins and trigger host defenses. Although animal NLRs form oligomers upon pathogen recognition to activate downstream signaling, the mechanisms of plant NLR activation remain largely elusive. Tm-22 is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized coiled coil (CC)-type NLR and confers resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) by recognizing its viral movement protein (MP). In this study, we found that Tm-22 self-associates upon recognition of MP. The CC domain of Tm-22 is the signaling domain and its function requires PM localization and self-association. The nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) domain is important for Tm-22 self-interaction and regulates activation of the CC domain through its nucleotide-binding and self-association. (d)ATP binding may alter the NB-ARC conformation to release its suppression of Tm-22 CC domain-mediated cell death. Our findings provide the first example of signaling domain for PM-localized NLR and insight into PM-localized NLR activation.


Assuntos
Proteínas NLR/metabolismo , Doenças das Plantas/imunologia , Proteínas de Plantas/metabolismo , Receptores Imunológicos/metabolismo , Tabaco/metabolismo , Tabaco/virologia , Membrana Celular/metabolismo , Resistência à Doença , Proteínas NLR/imunologia , Doenças das Plantas/virologia , Imunidade Vegetal , Proteínas de Plantas/imunologia , Ligação Proteica , Domínios Proteicos , Receptores Imunológicos/imunologia , Transdução de Sinais , Tabaco/imunologia , Vírus do Mosaico do Tabaco/metabolismo , Vírus do Mosaico do Tabaco/patogenicidade
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