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1.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 472, 2020 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32272906

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To elucidate the populations and conditions where screen-based sedentary behaviors (SB) and internalizing symptoms are coupled, this review synthesized the evidence for factors that may moderate the associations between screen-based SB, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms among youth. METHODS: Two independent researchers conducted a systematic literature search of the Medline, psycINFO, and Scopus electronic databases in late 2018 for observational studies assessing moderators of the association between screen-based SB and depressive and anxiety symptoms. Studies among children and adolescents were eligible if moderation was assessed by statistical test (interaction) or stratification; and a narrative synthesis of eligible studies was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. RESULTS: Seventy empirical studies (46 cross-sectional, 19 longitudinal, and 5 both) of 13 different moderating variables of screen-based SB-internalizing symptom associations met the eligibility criteria. Of these, 40 studies were of depressive symptoms, 2 were of anxiety symptoms, and 28 studies assessed symptoms of both. The most consistent evidence of moderation was for screen-type, such that TV viewing was not as strongly associated with internalizing symptoms compared to other forms of screen-based SB. There was also inconsistent evidence for physical activity buffering screen-based SB-internalizing symptom associations and for female sex amplifying screen-based SB-internalizing symptom associations. In general, the body of evidence for anxiety symptoms was more limited than that for depressive symptoms, and were therefore more inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: Screen-type, physical activity, and sex may influence the magnitude of screen-based SB-internalizing symptom coupling; highlighting potential sources of heterogeneity of screen-based SB-internalizing symptom associations. Additional studies aimed at understanding potential mechanistic explanations for the above moderators are needed prior to the development of tailored intervention strategies designed to decouple screen-based SB and internalizing symptoms among youth.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/psicologia , Depressão/psicologia , Tempo de Tela , Comportamento Sedentário , Adolescente , Criança , Humanos , Fatores de Risco
2.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(691): 784-788, 2020 Apr 22.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32320154

RESUMO

Digital media are central in our modern society and, as such, have an impact not only on teenagers but on most of us. Adolescents are among the most observed and stigmatized in terms of screens use. The encounter between the crucial developmental phase they cross and the neurobiological changes in their brains can be relatively «â€…noisy ¼. Because of the pervasive nature of screens in our daily lives and the potential effect on adolescent health, it is essential for health professionals to offer a systematic assessment of media use when consulting with an adolescent. This article provides practical tools for screening the use of media in consultation with the -adolescent and illustrates with a clinical story what lies behind the screens.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Anamnese/métodos , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Tempo de Tela , Adolescente , Saúde do Adolescente , Humanos
3.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 7(4): 317-326, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32171431

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Childhood suicidal ideation and behaviours are poorly understood. We examined correlates of suicidality in a US population-based sample of children participating in the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. The ABCD study aims to examine trajectories of mental health from childhood to adulthood and collects information on multiple domains, including mental and physical wellbeing, brain imaging, behavioural and cognitive characteristics, and social and family environment. We sought to identify and rank risk and protective factors for childhood suicidal thoughts and behaviours across these multiple domains and evaluate their association with self-agreement and caregiver agreement in reporting suicidality. METHODS: The ABCD sample comprises a cohort of 11 875 children aged 9-10 years. The sociodemographic factors on which the sample was recruited were age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, and urbanicity. Participants were enrolled at 22 sites, the catchment area of which encompassed over 20% of the entire US population in this age group. Multistage sampling was used to ensure both local randomisation and representativeness of sociodemographic variation of the ABCD sample. The data used in this study were accessed from the ABCD Study Curated Annual Release 2.0. Suicidal thoughts and behaviours (suicidality) in each child were evaluated through independent child and caregiver reports based on the computerized Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for DSM-5 (KSADS-5). We used bootstrapped logistic regression to quantify the association between suicidal ideation and behaviours, with measures of mental and physical wellbeing, behaviour, cognition, and social and family environment in participants from the ABCD study. FINDINGS: Our study sample comprised 7994 unrelated children (mean age 9·9 years [SD 0·5]; 4234 [53%] male participants) with complete data on child-reported and caregiver-reported suicidal ideas and behaviours. Overall, 673 (8·4%) children reported any past or current suicidal ideation, 75 (0·9%) had any past or current suicidal plans, and 107 (1·3%) had any past or current suicidal attempts. According to caregivers, 650 (8·1%) of the children reported any past or current suicidal ideation, 46 (0·6%) reported any past or current suicidal plans, and 39 (0·5%) reported past or current suicidal attempts. However, inter-informant agreement was low (Cohen's κ range 0·0-0·2). Regardless of informant, child psychopathology (odds ratio [OR] 1·7-4·8, 95% CI 1·5-7·4) and child-reported family conflict (OR 1·4-1·8, 95% CI 1·1-2·5) were the most robust risk factors for suicidality. The risk of child-reported suicidality increased with higher weekend screen use time (OR 1·3, 95% CI 1·2-1·7) and reduced with greater parental supervision and positive school involvement (for both OR 0·8, 95% CI 0·7-0·9). Additionally, caregiver-reported suicidality was positively associated with caregiver educational level (OR 1·3, 95% CI 1·1-1·5) and male sex in children (1·5, 1·1-2·0), and inversely associated with the number of household cohabitants (0·8, 0·7-1·0). INTERPRETATION: We identified risk and protective factors that show robust and generalisable associations with childhood suicidality. These factors provide actionable targets for optimising prevention and intervention strategies, support the need to identify and treat psychopathology in school-age children, and underscore the importance of school and family interventions for childhood suicidality. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/psicologia , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Criança , Escolaridade , Família , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Fatores de Proteção , Fatores de Risco , Tempo de Tela , Meio Social , Estados Unidos
5.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 122, 2020 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31996192

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many young people form unhealthy behavioural habits, such as low intake of fruit and vegetables, high intake of energy-dense snack foods, and excessive sedentary screen-based behaviours. However, there is a shortage of parent-and home-focused interventions to change multiple health behaviours in children. METHODS: Kids FIRST was a 12-week, home- and school-based pilot randomised controlled trial to reduce screen-time and unhealthy snacking with assessments at pre- (baseline) and post-intervention. Four UK schools were randomised to control or one of three interventions targeting reductions in (1) screen-time and unhealthy snacking (ST + Sn), (2) screen-time (ST only), (3) unhealthy snacking (Sn only), and parents with children aged 9-11 years were recruited via schools. Intervention group parents received four online 'sessions' and four packages of resources tailored to each group. Children received four 30-min lessons during school time. Children and parents reported their own screen-time behaviours, children reported their own snacking behaviours. Descriptive analyses were undertaken using principles of intention to treat. RESULTS: Initial feasibility was shown in that this study successfully recruited schools and families into all four study arms and retained them over a period of 13 weeks (retention rate ≥ 74%). Seventy-five children and 64 parents provided full baseline questionnaire data. Reductions in children's school day and weekend day TV/DVD viewing and computer game use were found in the ST + Sn and ST groups, while self-reported smartphone use increased in these groups. Similar results were found for parents' TV/DVD, computer and smartphone use in these groups. Little to no changes were found in reports of the dietary variables assessed in any intervention group for children or parents. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary findings show some promise for the Kids FIRST intervention. Based on these findings, a future full trial should recruit a more diverse sample of families and optimise the intervention and intervention resources to more fully engage parents with the dietary-based components of the intervention programme, where fewer changes were seen. Although most parents reporting receiving the intervention resources, further development work is required to achieve higher levels of engagement. This might include greater parent and child engagement work early in the development of the project. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered in June 21st 2019 with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT03993652).


Assuntos
Comportamento Infantil/psicologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Serviços de Saúde Escolar , Tempo de Tela , Lanches/psicologia , Criança , Dieta/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Relações Pais-Filho , Projetos Piloto , Autorrelato , Fatores de Tempo , Reino Unido
7.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 92, 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31964356

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Latino fathers may play important roles in adolescents' physical activity and screen time. However, informant discrepancies regarding paternal activity parenting practices may challenge studies supporting evidence-based applications. This study examined Latino adolescent-father discrepancies in reporting paternal activity parenting practices, types of discrepancies by participant characteristics, and associations between discrepancy types and adolescents' physical activity and screen time. METHODS: The sample for this cross-sectional study included Latino early adolescents and their fathers (n = 138 dyads) from baseline data collected for a family-centered, healthy lifestyle intervention in a metropolitan area. In parallel measures, Latino adolescents and fathers reported paternal activity parenting practices related to expectation or allowance, behavioral modeling, and providing opportunities for physical activity or screen time. Level of agreement and discrepancies were examined using the percentage of agreement, weighted kappa statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients, and paired-sample t-tests. Undesirable discrepancy types included adolescents reporting lower scores for paternal physical activity parenting practices or higher scores for paternal screen time parenting practices than fathers. Participants' sociodemographic characteristics and weight status were compared by discrepancy type using between-group t-tests or Chi-square tests. Associations between discrepancy type and adolescents' physical activity and screen time were examined using multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: The study sample was low-income with a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. Adolescent and paternal reports of activity parenting practices had poor agreement (percentages of agreement: 22.2-34.3%, weighted kappa statistics: < 0.2, and correlation coefficients: 0.06-0.25). An undesirable discrepancy type for certain parenting practices was more likely to be observed among fathers without full-time employment, girls, older adolescents, and adolescents and fathers within overweight or obese BMI categories. Discrepancies in paternal expectation regarding physical activity and allowance of screen time had adverse associations with adolescents' physical activity (ß = - 0.18, p = 0.008) and screen time (ß = 0.51, p <  0.001). CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Discrepancies in reporting activity parenting practices were evident between Latino adolescents and their fathers, especially among certain sociodemographic and weight status groups. Adolescents' perceptions on paternal parenting practices tended to be better indicators of their activity levels than fathers' reports.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/psicologia , Pai/psicologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Poder Familiar/etnologia , Tempo de Tela , Autorrelato/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Pai/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Fatores de Tempo
9.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1524, 2019 Nov 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31727052

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of computers/TV has become increasingly common worldwide after entering the twenty-first century and depression represents a growing public health burden. Understanding the association between screen time-based sedentary behavior (ST-SB) and the risk of depression is important to the development of prevention and intervention strategies. METHODS: We searched the electronic databases of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library. The odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was adopted as the pooled measurement. Subgroup analyses were investigated by stratified meta-analyses based on age, gender and reference group (reference category of screen time, e.g. 2 h/day, 4 h/day). RESULTS: There were 12 cross-sectional studies and 7 longitudinal studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the pooled OR was 1.28 with high heterogeneity (I2 = 89%). Compared to those who reported less SB, persons reporting more SB had a significantly higher risk of depression. When the gender was stratified, the pooled OR was 1.18 in female groups while no significant association was observed in males. Among the 19 studies, 5 studies used a reference group with ST = 2 h/days (pooled OR = 1.46), 9 studies used ≥4 h as a reference group (pooled OR = 1.38), 2 studies used 1 h as a reference group (pooled OR = 1.07) and for the remaining 3 studies, hours of ST were calculated as a continuous variable (pooled OR = 1.04). CONCLUSIONS: ST-SB is associated with depression risk and the effects vary in different populations. In addition, valid objective measures of SB should be developed in future studies.


Assuntos
Computadores , Depressão/etiologia , Transtorno Depressivo/etiologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Tempo de Tela , Comportamento Sedentário , Televisão , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
10.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 16(1): 105, 2019 11 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31727084

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous research examining the relationship between screen time (ST) and psychological health outcomes have primarily focused on one type of ST (i.e., television), while little research has considered other types of screens (e.g., videos, movies, social media), screen content (e.g., violent video games), or potential mediating variables. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to assess ST types and content and their association with problem behaviors, and to determine whether these relationships were mediated by sleep duration. METHODS: Parents and children provided cross-sectional baseline data (2016-18) as part of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development study, a broadly US representative sample of 11,875 children aged 9 to 10 years. Parents self-reported their children's emotional and behavioral syndromes via the Child Behavior Checklist and sleep duration using one item from the Parent Sleep Disturbance Scale. Children self-reported their ST behavior, which comprised ST types (television/movies, videos, video games, and social media) and content (mature-rated video games and R-rated movies). RESULTS: Time spent in various ST types was positively associated with problem behaviors: watching television/movies was associated with a 5.9% increase in rule-breaking behavior (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.059), 5% increase in social problems (IRR = 1.050), 4% increase in aggressive behavior (IRR = 1.040), and 3.7% increase in thought problems (IRR = 1.037). Greater time spent playing mature-rated video games was associated with greater somatic complaints (IRR = 1.041), aggressive behavior (IRR = 1.039), and reduced sleep duration (IRR = .938). Sleep duration mediated the relationship between ST (type and content) and problem behaviors, albeit the effect sizes were small. The largest effects were observed between sleep duration and all problem behaviors, with greater sleep duration predicting an 8.8-16.6% decrease in problem behaviors (IRRs ranging from .834 to .905). CONCLUSION: Greater time spent in ST behavior was associated with greater problem behaviors among children. There was strong evidence that longer sleep duration was associated with reduced problem behaviors. While sleep duration mediated the effects of ST on problem behaviors, other potential mediating variables need to be investigated in future research.


Assuntos
Comportamento Problema , Tempo de Tela , Sono , Agressão , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 16(1): 100, 2019 11 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31685028

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most research on parenting and childhood obesity and obesity-related behaviours has focused on mothers while fathers have been underrepresented. Yet, recent literature has suggested that fathers uniquely influence their children's lifestyle behaviours, and hence could also affect their weight status, but this has not yet been scientifically proven. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether the association between fathers' weight status and their children's weight status is mediated by fathers' and children's movement behaviours (i.e. physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST)). METHODS: Cross-sectional data of 899 European fathers and their children were analyzed. Fathers/male caregivers (mean age = 43.79 ± 5.92 years, mean BMI = 27.08 ± 3.95) completed a questionnaire assessing their own and their children's (mean age = 8.19 ± 0.99 years, 50.90% boys, mean BMIzscore = 0.44 ± 1.07) movement behaviours. Body Mass Index (BMI, in kg/m2) was calculated based on self-reported (fathers) and objectively measured (children) height and weight. For children, BMI z-scores (SD scores) were calculated to obtain an optimal measure for their weight status. Serial mediation analyses were performed using IBM SPSS 25.0 Statistics for Windows to test whether the association between fathers' BMI and children's BMI is mediated by fathers' PA and children's PA (model 1) and fathers' ST and children's ST (model 2), respectively. RESULTS: The present study showed a (partial) mediation effect of fathers' PA and children's PA (but not father's ST and children's ST) on the association between fathers' BMI and children's BMI (model for PA; coefficient: 0.001, 95% CI: [0.0001, 0.002]; model for ST; coefficient: 0.001, 95% CI: [0.000, 0.002]). Furthermore, fathers' movement behaviours (PA and ST) were positively associated with their children's movement behaviours (PA and ST) (model for PA, coefficient: 0.281, SE: 0.023, p < 0.001; model for ST, coefficient: 0.345, SE: 0.025, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that the influence of fathers on their children's weight status partially occurs through the association between fathers' PA and children's PA (but not their ST). As such, intervening by focusing on PA of fathers but preferably of both members of the father-child dyad (e.g. engaging fathers and their children in co-PA) might be a novel and potentially effective strategy for interventions aiming to prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Longitudinal studies or intervention studies confirming these findings are however warranted to make meaningful recommendations for health intervention and policy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Feel4Diabetes-study is registered with the clinical trials registry http://clinicaltrials.gov , ID: 643708 .


Assuntos
Peso Corporal/fisiologia , Exercício Físico , Relações Pai-Filho , Pai/estatística & dados numéricos , Tempo de Tela , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
12.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1512, 2019 Nov 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31718605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Due to the high prevalence and adverse consequences, overweight and obesity in children continues to be a major public health concern worldwide. Socioeconomic background and health-related behaviours (such as diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviors) are important factors associated with weight status in children. Using a series of height and weight assessments from the Australian Capital Territory Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey (ACTPANS), trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity by socioeconomic status were examined in ACT Year 6 school children between 2006 and 2018. METHODS: The ACTPANS has been conducted every 3 years since 2006. A total of 6729 children were surveyed. Complete data on height and weight were available for 6384 (94.9%) participants. Trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity and associations between weight status and risk factors (such as socioeconomic status, physical activity, screen time and consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (SSD)) were examined using logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity remained stable in girls (from 22.5% in 2006 to 21.6% in 2018) but declined in boys (from 27.8 to 17.9%). During the same period, levels of physical activity increased slightly, while screen time and the consumption of fast food and SSD decreased. Socioeconomic gradient, based on the school-level Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA), was highly associated with prevalence of overweight and obesity. Since 2006, the estimated prevalence of overweight and obesity has remained high in the lowest SES groups, but a concurrent downward trend was observed in the highest SES group, leading to increasing disparity between SES groups. Children in the lowest ICSEA quintile were more likely to be overweight or obese compared to those in the moderate and highest ICSEA quintiles. Children in lower ICSEA quintiles also reported lower levels of physical activity, higher levels of screen time, and higher levels of fast food and SSD consumption compared to those in higher ICSEA quintiles. CONCLUSIONS: While recent trends in overweight and obesity in ACT children are encouraging, the prevalence remains unacceptably high, especially in those from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Additional prevention efforts are required to address the socioeconomic disparity.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Comportamento Infantil , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Obesidade Pediátrica/epidemiologia , Classe Social , Adolescente , Território da Capital Australiana/epidemiologia , Peso Corporal , Criança , Dieta , Exercício Físico , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/etiologia , Obesidade Pediátrica/etiologia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas , Tempo de Tela , Comportamento Sedentário , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Wei Sheng Yan Jiu ; 48(5): 765-771, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31601317

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of health literacy( HL), screen time and depressive symptoms in middle school students. METHODS: In December 2017, a convenient cluster sampling method was used to select all the students from Junior 1 to Senior 3 in a middle school in Shenyang City in the cooperation area as the subjects. And 1062 valid questionnaires were collected, with the use of the group's self-made questionnaire. The average age of the 1062 students was( 15. 38 ± 1. 74) years old, among which 576 boys and 486 girls were surveyed. Questionnaires survey was conducted to collect information on demographics, health literacy, screen time of study day and depressive symptoms. The Chi-square test was performed according to group differences, and multiple Logistic regression model was used to analyze the association of health literacy( including three dimensions of interpersonal relationship, stress management and mental growth) and screen time and their different combinations and depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The detection rate of depressive symptoms among middle school students was 26. 1%( 277/1062). The prevalence of depressive symptoms among students in high school students, low family income and longer screen time was significantly higher than their peers( χ~2 were 15. 090, 10. 510, 4. 832, P < 0. 05). Data from multiple logistic regression analyses showed that low health literacy, longer screen time and low mental growth were positively correlated with depressive symptoms in middle school students( P < 0. 05). In the same level of health literacy, with the increase of screen time, the higher the detection rate of depressive symptoms of middle school students, the highest detection rate of depressive symptoms of middle school students with longer screen time and low health literacy was 51. 7%( 30/58), and the OR value was 5. 741( 95% CI 2. 999-10. 999). CONCLUSION: Health literacy and screen time are related factors of depressive symptoms. The detection rate of depressive symptoms of middle school students with longer screen time and low health literacy is the highest.


Assuntos
Depressão/epidemiologia , Letramento em Saúde , Tempo de Tela , Cidades , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Estudantes , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1386, 2019 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31660931

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Screen time among adults represents a continuing and growing problem in relation to health behaviors and health outcomes. However, no instrument currently exists in the literature that quantifies the use of modern screen-based devices. The primary purpose of this study was to develop and assess the reliability of a new screen time questionnaire, an instrument designed to quantify use of multiple popular screen-based devices among the US population. METHODS: An 18-item screen-time questionnaire was created to quantify use of commonly used screen devices (e.g. television, smartphone, tablet) across different time points during the week (e.g. weekday, weeknight, weekend). Test-retest reliability was assessed through intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and standard error of measurement (SEM). The questionnaire was delivered online using Qualtrics and administered through Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). RESULTS: Eighty MTurk workers completed full study participation and were included in the final analyses. All items in the screen time questionnaire showed fair to excellent relative reliability (ICCs = 0.50-0.90; all < 0.000), except for the item inquiring about the use of smartphone during an average weekend day (ICC = 0.16, p = 0.069). The SEM values were large for all screen types across the different periods under study. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study suggest this self-administered questionnaire may be used to successfully classify individuals into different categories of screen time use (e.g. high vs. low); however, it is likely that objective measures are needed to increase precision of screen time assessment.


Assuntos
Tempo de Tela , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31470547

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and clustering of health-related behaviors in Spanish adolescents and to examine their association with sex, body mass index (BMI), different types of sedentary screen time, and adherence to 24-hour movement guidelines. A final sample of 173 students (M = 12.99 ± 0.51) participated in this study. Cluster analysis was conducted based on five health-related behaviors: PA and sedentary time derived from accelerometers, as well as healthy diet, sedentary screen time, and sleep duration derived from self-reported scales. Recommendations for 24-hour movement guidelines (i.e., physical activity (PA), screen time, and sleep duration) were analyzed both independently and combined. A total of 8.9% of the sample did not meet any of the guidelines, whereas 72.3%, 17.3%, and 1.7% of the sample met 1, 2, or all 3 guidelines, respectively. Six distinct profiles were identified, most of them showing the co-occurrence of healthy- and unhealthy-related behaviors. Given that most of the adolescents failed to meet the combination of PA, screen time, and sleep duration guidelines, these findings suggest the necessity to implement school-based interventions that target multiple health behaviors, especially because (un)healthy behaviors do not always cluster in the same direction.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Adolescente , Índice de Massa Corporal , Análise por Conglomerados , Exercício Físico , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Tempo de Tela , Comportamento Sedentário , Fatores Sexuais , Sono , Espanha
16.
J Behav Addict ; 8(3): 586-602, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31537085

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Binge-watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of a TV series in one session) has recently become standard practice among TV series viewers; this expansion generates concerns regarding the potential negative outcomes associated with this habit. However, the investigation of its psychological correlates remains fragmentary, with few initial studies a priori conceptualizing this behavior as a new addictive disorder. This study explored these psychological correlates using cluster analysis of binge-watching behavior based on three key psychological factors: motivations, impulsivity, and emotional reactivity. METHODS: An online survey was completed by 4,039 TV series viewers. Data were analyzed using hierarchical and non-hierarchical cluster analyses, the validity of the clusters being finally determined through mutual comparisons with a selection of external correlates. RESULTS: Four clusters were identified: recreational TV series viewers (presenting low involvement in binge-watching), regulated binge-watchers (moderately involved), avid binge-watchers (presenting elevated but non-problematic involvement), and unregulated binge-watchers (presenting potentially problematic involvement associated with negative outcomes). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: This study underlines the heterogeneous and multidetermined nature of binge-watching. Our findings suggest that high engagement in binge-watching is distinct from problematic binge-watching, thus reinforcing the notion that conceptualizing binge-watching as an addictive disorder is of low relevance and might actually lead to the overpathologization of this highly popular leisure activity.


Assuntos
Comportamento Aditivo/fisiopatologia , Atividades de Lazer , Filmes Cinematográficos , Tempo de Tela , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Comportamento Aditivo/classificação , Análise por Conglomerados , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Televisão , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Behav Addict ; 8(3): 537-553, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31537087

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a prevention intervention on French adolescents' Internet and video games use and on their beliefs concerning gaming and Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD), in order to adjust prevention programs further. METHODS: The study comprised a prevention intervention group (PIG) and a control group assessed at three times - baseline, post-test, and 4-month follow-up. At baseline, a total of 434 junior high adolescents from five secondary schools were assessed (Mage = 13.2 years; SD = 0.5). The main outcome measures were adolescents' gaming and Internet use (amount of time spent during the week and the weekend), the number of adolescents with IGD, and beliefs about gaming and IGD. RESULTS: The results showed significant effects of the prevention intervention on Internet and gaming use (at T2, time spent was significantly lower in the PIG), an important increase of IGD prevalence between baseline and follow-up in the control group, and decreased rates of IGD among adolescents in the PIG between post-intervention and follow-up. Between baseline and follow-up, the control group showed a more significant increase of minutes per day during the week and the weekend on Internet versus during the week on video games. The impact of the prevention intervention on adolescents' beliefs varied according to gender. Girls had a better understanding generally of the potential dangers of and reasons for IGD. DISCUSSION: Implications for future research and prevention approaches are discussed in this study.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Comportamento Aditivo/prevenção & controle , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Internet , Psicoterapia de Grupo/métodos , Tempo de Tela , Jogos de Vídeo , Adolescente , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
Pediatrics ; 144(3)2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31413180

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to examine individual and concurrent associations between meeting the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (9-11 hours of sleep per night, ≤2 hours of recreational screen time (ST) per day, and at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day) and dimensions of impulsivity. METHODS: Data from this cross-sectional observational study were part of the first annual curated release of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study. Participants included 4524 children between the ages of 8 and 11 years. RESULTS: In analyses, it was shown that adherence to individual movement behavior recommendations as well as combinations of adherence to movement behavior recommendations were associated with each dimension of impulsivity. Meeting all 3 movement behavior recommendations was associated with lower positive urgency (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.12 to -0.05), negative urgency (95% CI: -0.04 to -0.08), Behavioral Inhibition System (95% CI: -0.08 to -0.01), greater perseverance (95% CI: 0.09 to 0.15), and better scores on delay-discounting (95% CI: 0.57 to 0.94). Meeting the ST and sleep recommendations was associated with less impulsive behaviors on all dimensions of impulsivity: negative urgency (95% CI: -0.20 to -0.10), positive urgency (95% CI: -0.16 to -0.08), perseverance (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.15), Behavioral Inhibition System (95% CI: -0.15 to -0.03), Behavioral Activation System (BAS) reward responsiveness (95% CI: -0.04 to -0.05), BAS drive (95% CI: -0.14 to -0.06), BAS fun-seeking (95% CI: -0.15 to -0.17), and delay-discounting task (95% CI: 0.68 to 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: Findings support efforts to determine if limiting recreational ST while promoting adequate sleep enhances the treatment and prevention of impulsivity-related disorders.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/psicologia , Comportamento Impulsivo/fisiologia , Tempo de Tela , Comportamento Sedentário , Sono , Canadá , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Fidelidade a Diretrizes , Guias como Assunto , Humanos , Masculino , Movimento
19.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 13(4): 2565-2569, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405677

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Both screen time and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with health outcomes. However, limited data exist on the association between screen time and MetS among expatriate adolescents living in United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional school-based study on 473 expatriate adolescents (47% girls) aged 12-18 years in Al-Ain district of Abu Dhabi Emirates in the UAE. Data was collected with the expertise of trained nurses & IDF criteria was used to define MetS. Information on screen time (computer, television, and video game use combined) during a regular day was self-reported, and divided into two categories: <2, or ≥2 h per day. Using logistic regression analyses, adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for the association between screen time and MetS. RESULTS: A high proportion of adolescents (75.3%) spent ≥2 h daily on screen. The prevalence of MetS was 8.5% in those with <2 h per day of screen time compared with 13.5% in those who reported ≥2 h per day. There was a graded positive association between screen time and MetS (P-trend = 0.01). Each hour increase in screen time was associated with 21% (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.35) greater likelihood of having MetS. The adjusted OR value associated with ≥2 h of daily screen time was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.04-4.67), compared with adolescents who spent less than 2 h of daily screen time. CONCLUSION: Higher screen time by expatriate adolescents was associated with increased likelihood of having MetS.


Assuntos
Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Atividade Motora/fisiologia , Instituições Acadêmicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Tempo de Tela , Televisão/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Prognóstico , Fatores de Risco , Emirados Árabes Unidos/epidemiologia
20.
Nord J Psychiatry ; 73(8): 482-489, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31419392

RESUMO

Purpose: To examine gender-specific associations between multiple lifestyle-related risk factors, appearance satisfaction and depressive symptoms in a sample of Norwegian adolescents (13-16 years of age), and to study the role of appearance satisfaction as a possible confounder in the associations between lifestyle and depressive symptoms. Materials and methods: Data were obtained from Ungdata, a cross-sectional national survey of adolescents in Norway. In total 4379 subjects were included in the study. We constructed a lifestyle risk index and used multiple logistic regressions to examine the associations between lifestyle-related risk factors, appearance satisfaction, and depressive symptoms. Results: High screen time and use of alcohol were significantly associated with depressive symptoms among girls, while high screen time, tobacco and cannabis use were significantly associated with depressive symptoms among boys. An additive relationship was observed between the lifestyle risk index scores and the likelihood of depressive symptoms for both genders, the relationship being strongest among boys. Low appearance satisfaction was strongly associated with depressive symptoms, especially among boys, and identified as an important confounder in the associations between lifestyle and depressive symptoms, particularly among girls. Conclusions: High screen time was the most prevalent lifestyle risk behavior independently associated with depressive symptoms. Multiple lifestyle changes and improvement of appearance satisfaction should be included in measures targeting adolescents for the prevention and treatment of depressive symptoms. Future studies should elaborate on the gender differences in other adolescent age groups. Appearance satisfaction should be acknowledged as an important confounder in future studies of lifestyle and depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Estilo de Vida , Satisfação Pessoal , Aparência Física , Tempo de Tela , Adolescente , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Noruega/epidemiologia , Aparência Física/fisiologia , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/diagnóstico , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia
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