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1.
Biol Psychol ; 172: 108385, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35777520

RESUMO

Sexual humor involves neural mechanisms related to both humor and sexual arousal. However, evidence on the role of the amygdala in processing sexual humor is lacking. Unlike erotic stimuli that directly involve a biological drive, sexual humor gains its value through learned associations. Processes related to responding to erotic versus monetary rewards have been identified in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) along a postero-anterior axis, but it is less clear whether these processes are also active during the appreciation of sexual humor. Results showed the processing of sexual humor appreciation in the amygdala. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis further identified functional connectivity in the amygdala-midbrain coupling during sexual humor versus monetary gains appreciation. The present study provides evidence demonstrating roles for the posterior OFC (pOFC) and anterior OFC (aOFC) in distinguishing between sexual (sexual humor and erotic) and non-sexual (monetary) rewards. The experience of sexual pleasure induced by erotic rewards involves phylogenetically and ontogenetically older regions in the pOFC, while the experience of receiving monetary gains involves the aOFC. This study also provides additional insights into sexual humor appreciation in the pOFC, with findings of a postero-anterior dissociation in the processing of sexual humor appreciation. PPI analysis revealed functional connectivity in the pOFC-amygdala coupling in response to both types of sexual rewards versus monetary rewards. Together, our results suggest that the amygdala serves as a reward hub, especially in processing sexual humor versus monetary gains appreciation. Functional connectivity analysis showed amygdala-midbrain and pOFC-amygdala coupling during the appreciation of sexual humor.


Assuntos
Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Recompensa , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Mapeamento Encefálico , Fenda Labial , Fissura Palatina , Humanos , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
2.
J Vis Exp ; (184)2022 06 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35848831

RESUMO

The amygdala is one of the most common origins of seizures, and the amygdala mouse model is essential for the illustration of epilepsy. However, few studies have described the experimental protocol in detail. This paper illustrates the whole process of amygdala electrical kindling epilepsy model making, with the introduction of a method of bipolar electrode fabrication. This electrode can both stimulate and record, reducing brain injury caused by implanting separate electrodes for stimulation and recording. For long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recording purposes, slip rings were used to eliminate the record interruption caused by cable tangles and falling off. After periodic stimulation (60 Hz, 1 s every 15 min) of the basolateral amygdala (AP: 1.67 mm, L: 2.7 mm, V: 4.9 mm) for 19.83 ± 5.742 times, full kindling was observed in six mice (defined as induction of three continuous grade V episodes classified by Racine's scale). An intracranial EEG was recorded throughout the entire kindling process, and an epileptic discharge in the amygdala lasting 20-70 s was observed after kindling. Therefore, this is a robust protocol for modeling epilepsy originating from the amygdala, and the method is suitable for revealing the role of the amygdala in temporal lobe epilepsy. This research contributes to future studies on the mechanisms of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and novel antiepileptogenic drugs.


Assuntos
Epilepsia do Lobo Temporal , Epilepsia , Excitação Neurológica , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Estimulação Elétrica/métodos , Eletrodos Implantados , Camundongos
3.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2515: 227-236, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35776355

RESUMO

The amygdala is central for social and emotional processing and has been implicated in various disorders including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Animal research and some limited research with humans has indicated that widespread alterations in neuronal development or neuronal loss in the basolateral and other amygdala subnuclei may be a contributing factor to variations in social behaviours. Yet, the basolateral amygdala is comprised of three subnuclei, each with a specialized role related to the coordination of emotional regulation. Due to their small size, the nuclei which comprise the basolateral amygdala remain understudied in humans in vivo. In this work, we describe methodology to examine the basolateral amygdala and other subnuclei in human ex vivo medial temporal lobe prosections using ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 9.4 T. Manual segmentations of the amygdala subnuclei on MR images, verified with immunohistochemical data, provide a robust three-dimensional atlas of the human amygdala. The goal is to apply the atlas to in vivo MRI scans to examine basolateral amygdala macrostructural development attributed to social cognitive dysfunction in ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Furthermore, the atlas can be used to examine MRI-based correlates of neuronal loss commonly seen in neurodegenerative disorders.


Assuntos
Doença de Alzheimer , Transtorno do Espectro Autista , Doença de Alzheimer/diagnóstico por imagem , Tonsila do Cerebelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/diagnóstico por imagem , Emoções/fisiologia , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/métodos
4.
Sci Data ; 9(1): 365, 2022 06 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35752635

RESUMO

The human amygdala and hippocampus have long been associated with face perception. Here, we present a dataset of single-neuron activity in the human amygdala and hippocampus during face perception. We recorded 2082 neurons from the human amygdala and hippocampus when neurosurgical patients with intractable epilepsy performed a one-back task using natural face stimuli, which mimics natural face perception. Specifically, our data include (1) single-neuron activity from the amygdala (996 neurons) and hippocampus (1086 neurons), (2) eye movements (gaze position and pupil), (3) psychological assessment of the patients, and (4) social trait judgment ratings from a subset of patients and a large sample of participants from the general population. Together, our comprehensive dataset with a large population of neurons can facilitate multifaceted investigation of face perception with the highest spatial and temporal resolution currently available in humans.


Assuntos
Reconhecimento Facial , Neurônios , Tonsila do Cerebelo/citologia , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Hipocampo/citologia , Hipocampo/fisiologia , Humanos , Neurônios/fisiologia , Análise de Célula Única , Percepção Visual/fisiologia
5.
J Neurosci ; 42(27): 5373-5388, 2022 07 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35667849

RESUMO

Pain and emotion are strongly regulated by neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a major output of the limbic system; yet, the neuronal signaling pathways underlying this modulation are incompletely understood. Here, we characterized a subpopulation of CeA neurons that express the CaMKIIα gene (CeACAM neurons) and project to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), a brainstem region known for its critical role in distributing nociceptive and other aversive signals throughout the brain. In male Sprague Dawley rats, we show that CeACAM-LPBN neurons are GABAergic and mostly express somatostatin. In anaesthetized rats, optogenetic stimulation of CeACAM-LPBN projections inhibited responses of LPBN neurons evoked by electrical activation of Aδ- and C-fiber primary afferents; this inhibition could be blocked by intra-LPBN application of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. CeACAM-LPBN stimulation also dampened LPBN responses to noxious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. In behaving rats, optogenetic stimulation of CeACAM-LPBN projections attenuated nocifensive responses to mechanical pressure and radiant heat, disrupted the ability of a noxious shock to drive aversive learning, reduced the defensive behaviors of thigmotaxis and freezing, induced place preference, and promoted food consumption in sated rats. Thus, we suggest that CeACAM-LPBN projections mediate a form of analgesia that is accompanied by a shift toward the positive-appetitive pole of the emotional-motivational continuum. Since the affective state of pain patients strongly influences their prognosis, we envision that recruitment of this pathway in a clinical setting could potentially promote pain resilience and recovery.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Pain and emotion interact on multiple levels of the nervous system. Both positive and negative emotion may have analgesic effects. However, while the neuronal mechanisms underlying "stress-induced analgesia" have been the focus of many studies, the neuronal substrates underlying analgesia accompanied by appetitive emotional-motivational states have received far less attention. The current study focuses on a subpopulation of amygdala neurons that form inhibitory synapses within the brainstem lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN). We show that activation of these amygdalo-parabrachial projections inhibits pain processing, while also reducing behaviors related to negative affect and enhancing behaviors related to positive affect. We propose that recruitment of this pathway would benefit pain patients, many of whom suffer from psychological comorbidities such as anxiety and depression.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Núcleos Parabraquiais , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Emoções , Masculino , Vias Neurais/fisiologia , Dor , Núcleos Parabraquiais/fisiologia , Ratos , Ratos Sprague-Dawley
6.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 10731, 2022 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35750718

RESUMO

Active avoidance behavior, in which an animal performs an action to avoid a stressor, is crucial for survival and may provide insight into avoidance behaviors seen in anxiety disorders. Active avoidance requires the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), which is thought to regulate avoidance via downstream projections to the striatum and amygdala. However, the endogenous activity of dmPFC projections during active avoidance learning has never been recorded. Here we utilized fiber photometry to record from the dmPFC and its axonal projections to the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during active avoidance learning in both male and female mice. We examined neural activity during conditioned stimulus (CS) presentations and during clinically relevant behaviors such as active avoidance or cued freezing. Both prefrontal projections showed learning-related increases in activity during CS onset throughout active avoidance training. The dmPFC as a whole showed increased and decreased patterns of activity during avoidance and cued freezing, respectively. Finally, dmPFC-DMS and dmPFC-BLA projections show divergent encoding of active avoidance behavior, with the dmPFC-DMS projection showing increased activity and the dmPFC-BLA projection showing decreased activity during active avoidance. Our results demonstrate task-relevant encoding of active avoidance in projection-specific dmPFC subpopulations that play distinct but complementary roles in active avoidance learning.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem da Esquiva , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Aprendizagem da Esquiva/fisiologia , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia , Condicionamento Operante , Feminino , Masculino , Camundongos , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
7.
Proc Biol Sci ; 289(1976): 20220799, 2022 06 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35703050

RESUMO

In nature, confrontations between conspecifics are recurrent and related, in general, due to the lack of resources such as food and territory. Adequate defence against a conspecific aggressor is essential for the individual's survival and the group integrity. However, repeated social defeat is a significant stressor promoting several behavioural changes, including social defence per se. What would be the neural basis of these behavioural changes? To build new hypotheses about this, we here investigate the effects of repeated social stress on the neural circuitry underlying motivated social defence behaviour in male mice. We observed that animals re-exposed to the aggressor three times spent more time in passive defence during the last exposure than in the first one. These animals also show less activation of the amygdalar and hypothalamic nuclei related to the processing of conspecific cues. In turn, we found no changes in the activation of the hypothalamic dorsal pre-mammillary nucleus (PMD) that is essential for passive defence. Therefore, our data suggest that the balance between the activity of circuits related to conspecific processing and the PMD determines the pattern of social defence behaviour. Changes in this balance may be the basis of the adaptations in social defence after repeated social defeat.


Assuntos
Comportamento Animal , Comportamento Social , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Comportamento Animal/fisiologia , Encéfalo , Hipotálamo , Masculino , Camundongos , Estresse Psicológico
8.
Sci Adv ; 8(25): eabn5803, 2022 06 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35731882

RESUMO

The amygdala processes valenced stimuli, influences emotion, and exhibits aberrant activity across anxiety disorders, depression, and PTSD. Interventions modulating amygdala activity hold promise as transdiagnostic psychiatric treatments. In 45 healthy participants, we investigated whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) elicits indirect changes in amygdala activity when applied to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), a region important for emotion regulation. Harnessing in-scanner interleaved TMS/functional MRI (fMRI), we reveal that vlPFC neurostimulation evoked acute and focal modulations of amygdala fMRI BOLD signal. Larger TMS-evoked changes in the amygdala were associated with higher fiber density in a vlPFC-amygdala white matter pathway when stimulating vlPFC but not an anatomical control, suggesting this pathway facilitated stimulation-induced communication between cortex and subcortex. This work provides evidence of amygdala engagement by TMS, highlighting stimulation of vlPFC-amygdala circuits as a candidate treatment for transdiagnostic psychopathology. More broadly, it indicates that targeting cortical-subcortical structural connections may enhance the impact of TMS on subcortical neural activity and, by extension, subcortex-subserved behaviors.


Assuntos
Córtex Pré-Frontal , Estimulação Magnética Transcraniana , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Emoções/fisiologia , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(11)2022 May 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35682767

RESUMO

The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is one of the key brain areas involved in aversive learning, especially fear memory formation. Studies of aversive learning in the BLA have largely focused on neuronal function, while the role of BLA astrocytes in aversive learning remains largely unknown. In this study, we manipulated the BLA astrocytes by expressing the Gq-coupled receptor hM3q and discovered that astrocytic Gq modulation during fear conditioning promoted auditorily cued fear memory but did not affect less stressful memory tasks or induce anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, chemogenetic activation of BLA astrocytes during memory retrieval had no effect on fear memory expression. In addition, astrocytic Gq activation increased c-Fos expression in the BLA and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during fear conditioning, but not in the home cage. Combining these results with retrograde virus tracing, we found that the activity of mPFC-projecting BLA neurons showed significant enhancement after astrocytic Gq activation during fear conditioning. Electrophysiology recordings showed that activating astrocytic Gq in the BLA promoted spike-field coherence and phase locking percentage, not only within the BLA but also between the BLA and the mPFC. Finally, direct chemogenetic activation of mPFC-projecting BLA neurons during fear conditioning enhanced cued fear memory. Taken together, our data suggest that astrocytes in the BLA may contribute to aversive learning by modulating amygdala-mPFC communication.


Assuntos
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Astrócitos , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia , Medo/fisiologia , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia
10.
Neuron ; 110(12): 1887-1888, 2022 06 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35709693

RESUMO

Social modulation of pain sensitivity is considered part of the empathic response. In this issue of Neuron, Zhang at al. (2022) uncover the neurobiological basis of observational pain in mice. They report increased synaptic transmission from the insular cortex to the basolateral amygdala and explore genes mediating this effect.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Medo/fisiologia , Camundongos , Dor , Irmãos
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(26): e2204066119, 2022 06 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35727981

RESUMO

Neural plasticity in subareas of the rodent amygdala is widely known to be essential for Pavlovian threat conditioning and safety learning. However, less consistent results have been observed in human neuroimaging studies. Here, we identify and test three important factors that may contribute to these discrepancies: the temporal profile of amygdala response in threat conditioning, the anatomical specificity of amygdala responses during threat conditioning and safety learning, and insufficient power to identify these responses. We combined data across multiple studies using a well-validated human threat conditioning paradigm to examine amygdala involvement during threat conditioning and safety learning. In 601 humans, we show that two amygdala subregions tracked the conditioned stimulus with aversive shock during early conditioning while only one demonstrated delayed responding to a stimulus not paired with shock. Our findings identify cross-species similarities in temporal- and anatomical-specific amygdala contributions to threat and safety learning, affirm human amygdala involvement in associative learning and highlight important factors for future associative learning research in humans.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Condicionamento Clássico , Medo , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia , Medo/fisiologia , Humanos , Plasticidade Neuronal
12.
J Neurosci ; 42(26): 5254-5267, 2022 06 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35613891

RESUMO

The brain areas that mediate the formation of auditory threat memory and perceptual decisions remain uncertain to date. Candidates include the primary (A1) and secondary (A2) auditory cortex, the medial division of the medial geniculate body (MGm), amygdala, and the temporal association cortex. We used chemogenetic and optogenetic manipulations with in vivo and in vitro patch-clamp recordings to assess the roles of these brain regions in threat memory learning in female mice. We found that conditioned sound (CS) frequency-dependent plasticity resulted in the formation of auditory threat memory in the temporal association cortex. This neural correlated auditory threat memory depended on CS frequency information from A1 glutamatergic subthreshold monosynaptic inputs, CS lateral inhibition from A2 glutamatergic disynaptic inputs, and non-frequency-specific facilitation from MGm glutamatergic monosynaptic inputs. These results indicate that the A2 and MGm work together in an inhibitory-facilitative role.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The ability to recognize specific sounds to avoid predators or seek prey is a useful survival tool. Improving this ability through experiential learning is an added advantage requiring neural plasticity. As an example, humans must learn to distinguish the sound of a car horn, and thus avoid oncoming traffic. Our research discovered that the temporal association cortex can encode this kind of auditory information through tonal receptive field plasticity. In addition, the results revealed the underlying synaptic mechanisms of this process. These results extended our understanding of how meaningful auditory information is processed in an animal's brain.


Assuntos
Córtex Auditivo , Estimulação Acústica , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Córtex Auditivo/fisiologia , Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia , Feminino , Corpos Geniculados/fisiologia , Camundongos , Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
13.
J Neurophysiol ; 127(6): 1535-1546, 2022 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507506

RESUMO

The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is an important brain area for executive functions. The OFC projects to both the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). These two pathways share some similar behavioral functions, but their anatomical and physiological properties have not been compared before. In this study, we first explored the connection of the lateral OFC (lOFC) to NAc core (NAcc) and/or BLA, especially the collateral projections (experiments 1 and 2) with rats. In experiment 1, fluorophore-conjugated retrograde tracers were locally infused into the NAcc and the BLA to sample neurons in the lOFC. Our results revealed that along the anterior-posterior axis of the lOFC, more NAcc- and/or BLA-projecting neurons were distributed toward the posterior end, but the average percentage of collateral projecting neurons at the four sampled lOFC levels remained fairly stable. In experiment 2, antidromic single units in the lOFC responsive to the NAcc and/or the BLA stimulation were identified in anesthetized rats. However, we found that collateral projections from the lOFC to NAcc and BLA were sparse. We next studied the physiological characteristics of these two pathways (experiment 3). In this experiment, orthodromic single units in the NAcc or the BLA responsive to the lOFC stimulation were located in anesthetized rats. Our results showed no difference in the evoked thresholds or the intensity-response probability curves between the two. Together, our results showed that these two pathways were similar in projecting neuron distribution and physiological characteristics.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using the double retrograde tracing and electrophysiological approach, we reported that among the sampled NAcc- or the BLA-projecting lOFC neurons, the percentage of collateral projections were fairly stable (about 20%-25%) along the lOFC anterior-posterior axis. Furthermore, among the neurons sampled in the NAcc and the BLA, there was no difference in physiological characteristics in response to lOFC stimulation between the two pathways.


Assuntos
Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Núcleo Accumbens , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia , Núcleo Accumbens/fisiologia , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia , Ratos , Ratos Sprague-Dawley
14.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev ; 138: 104694, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35623447

RESUMO

Amygdala NeuroFeedback (NF) have the potential of being a valuable non-invasive intervention tool in many psychiatric disporders. However, the feasibility and best practices of this method have not been systematically examined. The current article presents a review of amygdala-NF studies, an analytic summary of study design parameters, and examination of brain mechanisms related to successful amygdala-NF performance. A meta-analysis of 33 publications showed that real amygdala-NF facilitates learned modulation compared to control conditions. In addition, while variability in study dsign parameters is high, these design choices are implicitly organized by the targeted valence domain (positive or negative). However, in most cases the neuro-behavioral effects of targeting such domains were not directly assessed. Lastly, re-analyzing six data sets of amygdala-fMRI-NF revealed that successful amygdala down-modulation is coupled with deactivation of the posterior insula and nodes in the Default-Mode-Network. Our findings suggest that amygdala self-modulation can be acquired using NF. Yet, additional controlled studies, relevant behavioral tasks before and after NF intervention, and neural 'target engagement' measures are critically needed to establish efficacy and specificity. In addition, the fMRI analysis presented here suggest that common accounts regarding the brain network involved in amygdala NF might reflect unsuccessful modulation attempts rather than successful modulation.


Assuntos
Neurorretroalimentação , Tonsila do Cerebelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Mapeamento Encefálico , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Neurorretroalimentação/métodos
15.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev ; 138: 104708, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35636561

RESUMO

Expressive suppression refers to the inhibition of emotion-expressive behavior (e.g., facial expressions of emotion). Although it is a commonly used emotion regulation strategy with well-documented consequences for well-being, little is known about its underlying mechanisms. In this systematic review, we for the first time synthesize functional neuroimaging studies on the neural bases of expressive suppression in non-clinical populations. The 12 studies included in this review contrasted the use of expressive suppression to simply watching emotional stimuli. Results showed that expressive suppression consistently increased activation of frontoparietal regions, especially the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices and inferior parietal cortex, but decreased activation in temporo-occipital areas. Results regarding the involvement of the insula and amygdala were inconsistent with studies showing increased, decreased, or no changes in activation. These mixed findings underscore the importance of distinguishing expressive suppression from other forms of suppression and highlight the need to pay more attention to experimental design and neuroimaging data analysis procedures. We discuss these conceptual and methodological issues and provide suggestions for future research.


Assuntos
Mapeamento Encefálico , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Emoções/fisiologia , Neuroimagem Funcional , Humanos
16.
Elife ; 112022 05 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35580019

RESUMO

The medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala are involved in the regulation of social behavior and associated with psychiatric diseases but their detailed neurophysiological mechanisms at a network level remain unclear. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) while male mice engaged on social behavior. We found that in wild-type mice, both the dmPFC and BLA increased 4-7 Hz oscillation power and decreased 30-60 Hz power when they needed to attend to another target mouse. In mouse models with reduced social interactions, dmPFC 4-7 Hz power further increased especially when they exhibited social avoidance behavior. In contrast, dmPFC and BLA decreased 4-7 Hz power when wild-type mice socially approached a target mouse. Frequency-specific optogenetic manipulations replicating social approach-related LFP patterns restored social interaction behavior in socially deficient mice. These results demonstrate a neurophysiological substrate of the prefrontal cortex and amygdala related to social behavior and provide a unified pathophysiological understanding of neuronal population dynamics underlying social behavioral deficits.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Masculino , Camundongos , Neurônios/fisiologia , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia , Comportamento Social
17.
Prog Neurobiol ; 214: 102286, 2022 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35537572

RESUMO

There is a large unmet need for improved treatment for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); circuit-specific manipulation that disrupts the initiation and propagation of seizures is promising in this regard. The midline thalamus, including the mediodorsal nucleus (MD) is a critical distributor of seizure activity, but its afferent and efferent pathways that mediate seizure activity are unknown. Here, we used chemogenetics to silence input and output projections of the MD to discrete regions of the frontal cortex in the kindling model of TLE in rats. Chemogenetic inhibition of the projection from the amygdala to the MD abolished seizures, an effect that was replicated using optogenetic inhibition. Chemogenetic inhibition of projections from the MD to the prelimbic cortex likewise abolished seizures. By contrast, inhibition of projections from the MD to other frontal regions produced partial (orbitofrontal cortex, infralimbic cortex) or no (cingulate, insular cortex) attenuation of behavioral or electrographic seizure activity. These results highlight the particular importance of projections from MD to prelimbic cortex in the propagation of amygdala-kindled seizures.


Assuntos
Excitação Neurológica , Tálamo , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Lobo Frontal/fisiologia , Humanos , Excitação Neurológica/fisiologia , Ratos , Convulsões , Tálamo/fisiologia
18.
Neuron ; 110(13): 2183-2197.e7, 2022 07 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35545090

RESUMO

Social gaze interaction powerfully shapes interpersonal communication. However, compared with social perception, very little is known about the neuronal underpinnings of real-life social gaze interaction. Here, we studied a large number of neurons spanning four regions in primate prefrontal-amygdala networks and demonstrate robust single-cell foundations of interactive social gaze in the orbitofrontal, dorsomedial prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortices, in addition to the amygdala. Many neurons in these areas exhibited high temporal heterogeneity for social discriminability, with a selectivity bias for looking at a conspecific compared with an object. Notably, a large proportion of neurons in each brain region parametrically tracked the gaze of self or other, providing substrates for social gaze monitoring. Furthermore, several neurons displayed selective encoding of mutual eye contact in an agent-specific manner. These findings provide evidence of widespread implementations of interactive social gaze neurons in the primate prefrontal-amygdala networks during social gaze interaction.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Córtex Pré-Frontal , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Giro do Cíngulo , Neurônios/fisiologia , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia , Primatas
19.
Neuron ; 110(14): 2258-2267.e11, 2022 Jul 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35397211

RESUMO

The amygdala and prelimbic cortex (PL) communicate during fear discrimination retrieval, but how they coordinate discrimination of a non-threatening stimulus is unknown. Here, we show that somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) become active specifically during learned non-threatening cues and desynchronize cell firing by blocking phase reset of theta oscillations during the safe cue. Furthermore, we show that SOM activation and desynchronization of the BLA is PL-dependent and promotes discrimination of non-threat. Thus, fear discrimination engages PL-dependent coordination of BLA SOM responses to non-threatening stimuli.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Complexo Nuclear Basolateral da Amígdala/fisiologia , Medo/fisiologia , Interneurônios/metabolismo , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia , Somatostatina/metabolismo
20.
Science ; 376(6590): eabf7052, 2022 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35420958

RESUMO

Experience-dependent changes in behavior are mediated by long-term functional modifications in brain circuits. Activity-dependent plasticity of synaptic input is a major underlying cellular process. Although we have a detailed understanding of synaptic and dendritic plasticity in vitro, little is known about the functional and plastic properties of active dendrites in behaving animals. Using deep brain two-photon Ca2+ imaging, we investigated how sensory responses in amygdala principal neurons develop upon classical fear conditioning, a form of associative learning. Fear conditioning induced differential plasticity in dendrites and somas regulated by compartment-specific inhibition. Our results indicate that learning-induced plasticity can be uncoupled between soma and dendrites, reflecting distinct synaptic and microcircuit-level mechanisms that increase the computational capacity of amygdala circuits.


Assuntos
Tonsila do Cerebelo , Condicionamento Clássico , Tonsila do Cerebelo/fisiologia , Animais , Condicionamento Clássico/fisiologia , Medo/fisiologia , Aprendizagem/fisiologia , Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia , Neurônios/fisiologia
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