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1.
Workplace Health Saf ; 70(3): 136-147, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35301913

RESUMO

Background: The health care sector is one of the most rapidly growing industry sectors in the United States. This study examined differences in the rates and trends of violent occupational injuries among health care workers in the United States. Methods: This study used data about violent occupational injuries among health care workers in the United States collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII). The BLS SOII collects data about injuries that result in at least one lost workday. Violent injuries are defined as intentional injury by another person. Data were obtained for years 2011 to 2017. We examined injury rates and trends according to industry and occupation, as well as age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Results: Intentional injuries increased among health care workers between 2011 and 2017. Rates, expressed as injuries per 10,000 workers, were particularly elevated in residential care facilities (44.07) and among health practitioner support technologists and technicians (22.54); nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides (28.13); and occupational therapy and physical therapist assistants and aides (39.72). Black health care support and practitioners workers had injury rates three times higher than White workers. Conclusions/Application to practice: Efforts should be made to address the increasing rates of intentional occupational injuries among health care workers. These efforts should focus on comprehensive programs enforcing policies for prevention and management (including reporting and training) and employee engagement in such efforts. High-rate industries and occupations should receive particular attention.


Assuntos
Doenças Profissionais , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Indústrias , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Violência
2.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12326, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35338564

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Several studies have reported health or safety risk of temporary agency workers (TAW). Since most of the studies are just cross-sectional studies, we intended to identify the risk of occupational injury in TAW, using longitudinal study design. METHODS: The Korea Health Panel 2009-2018 data were used in the study. For the statistical analysis of this study, we used a panel logit model to identify the risk of occupational injury in TAW compared to direct contract workers (DCW). RESULTS: There was no significant difference in risk of occupational injury between TAW and DCW among the overall population (adjusted OR 0.920, 95% CI 0.600-1.411). However, there was a significant increase in occupational injury in women (adjusted OR 2.134, 95% CI 1.092-4.170) and the "19-34" age group (adjusted OR 2.744, 95% CI 1.103-6.825) of TAW. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence for vulnerable groups such as women and younger age groups in the relationship between TAW and occupational injury.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Estudos Longitudinais , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/etiologia , República da Coreia/epidemiologia
3.
J Safety Res ; 80: 67-77, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35249629

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: School districts employ a large number of employees who work in educational (e.g., teachers) or other support roles, including educational assistants, custodians, food service, bus drivers, and community and recreation workers. District employees perform a wide array of job tasks and experience a wide spectrum of work-related risks and injuries. METHODS: Workers' compensation data were coupled with Minnesota Department of Education district employee denominator data to evaluate risk factors for injury and severity. Variables included district location and type, employee job classification, age, and gender. Rates of injury and rate ratios were calculated to measure comparative injury risk using negative binomial regression and 95% confidence internals. Incidence and frequency of injury cause, nature, and body part we calculated. RESULTS: Saint Paul and Minneapolis metropolitan area (versus non-metro) districts had higher risk (RR = 1.35, 95%CI = 1.18-1.54) of employee injuries. All job classifications in support roles had increased risk of injury claims versus educators, however food service (RR = 5.14, 95%CI = 4.61-5.74), custodial (RR = 3.85, 95%CI = 3.41-4.34), and transportation (RR = 4.15, 95%CI = 3.38-5.10) exhibited the highest comparative risk to educators; significant risk of lost-time injury was also present in these workers. Males and females had similar risk of injury for all claims, however males had elevated risk of lost-time injury (RR = 1.46, 95%CI = 1.26-1.69) versus females. All age groups >41-years-old exhibited increased risk of injury as compared to 31-40-year-olds. The magnitude of lost-time injury risk also increased with age. Falls and slips (29.1%), strains/sprains/ruptures (45.2%), and upper extremities (31.3%) most frequent cause, nature, and body part injured, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Characteristics of districts, schools, workers, and their jobs tasks and hazards vary. Many categories of support staff in schools have elevated risk of injury, including lost-time injury, as compared to educators. Practical Applications: Injury prevention in schools should be approached by targeting job classifications; high risk jobs can be prioritized for prevention.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/etiologia , Ocupações , Fatores de Risco , Instituições Acadêmicas , Indenização aos Trabalhadores
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35329375

RESUMO

Occupational injuries disproportionately impact workers of the textile industry in low-income countries. The present study investigates the prevalence of non-occupational injury and its associated factors among workers in an integrated textile industry in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 17-26 May 2021. A total of 311 workers were eligible for participation. The information was collected through an interview-administered questionnaire. The findings were presented with descriptive statistics and the relationship among variables was assessed with multi-variable analyses. A total of 291 (93.6%) participants were interviewed. The prevalence of non-fatal occupational injury was 11% [95% CI: 7.7-15.5] in the past 12 months. The hands and fingers were the most affected body parts. Male gender [AOR: 3.40; 95% CI (1.13-10.5)], the age group of 18-29 years [AOR: 6.69; 95% CI (1.35-32.7)], sleeping less than seven hours in a night [AOR: 2.67; 95% CI (1.03-6.97)], machine-based jobs [AOR: 3.59; 95% CI (1.02-12.6)], the workplace housekeeping [AOR: 5.87; 95% CI (1.45-23.8)], and inadequate empowerment to prevent injury accident [AOR: 4.6; 95% CI (1.01-20.9)] were associated factors with occupational injury. The prevalence of non-fatal occupational injuries is lower than the previous studies among textile workers. As a result, improving workplace safety, changing sleeping habits, and empowering workers to participate in injury prevention should be a priority in intervention.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/prevenção & controle , Prevalência , Indústria Têxtil , Adulto Jovem
5.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12322, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35297542

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of hospital physicians' working hours and on-call shifts with the risk of occupational injuries. METHODS: In this nested cohort study of 556 Finnish hospital physicians, we linked electronic records from working-hour and on-call duty payroll data to occupational injury data obtained from the Finnish Workers' Compensation Center for the period 2005-2019. We used a case-crossover design with matched intervals for a 7-day 'case window' immediately prior to occupational injury and a 'control window' 7 days prior to the beginning of the case window, and analyzed their associations using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: We noted 556 occupational injuries, 281 at the workplace and 275 while commuting. Having three to four long (>12 h) work shifts on the preceding 7 days was associated with a higher probability of an occupational injury (odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11, 4.09), and the OR for three to four on-call shifts was 3.54 (95%CI 2.11, 5.92) in comparison to having none of these work shift types. A higher number of several consecutive working days was associated with a higher probability of injury in a dose-response manner. Moreover, increasing weekly working hours was associated with an increased likelihood of injury (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01, 1.04), whereas the number of normal (≤12 h) work shifts reduced this likelihood (OR 0.79, 95%CI 0.64, 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that accumulated working-hour load, as opposed to single, very long (>24 h) work shifts, may increase the risk of occupational injury among hospital physicians.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Médicos , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Cross-Over , Hospitais , Humanos , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/etiologia
6.
Am J Ind Med ; 65(4): 242-247, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35128690

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Latino/a workers may experience higher fatal occupational injury rates than non-Latino/a workers. In North Carolina, the Latino/a population more than doubled between 2000 and 2017. We examined fatal occupational injuries among Latino/a and non-Latino/a workers in North Carolina over this period. METHODS: Information on fatal occupational injuries was abstracted from records of the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner and the death certificate records held by the North Carolina Office of Vital Records. Estimates of the working population were derived from the decennial census and American Community Survey. Estimates of annual rates of fatal occupational injury for the period January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2017 were derived for Latino/a workers and compared to Black and White workers not identified as Latino/a. RESULTS: Over the study period, 1,783 fatal occupational injuries were identified among non-Latino/a workers and 259 fatal occupational injuries among Latino/a workers in North Carolina. The majority of fatal occupational injuries among Latino/a workers occurred among males employed in construction and agriculture. While the fatal occupational injury rate among Latino/a workers declined over the study period, the rate among Latino/a workers was higher than among non-Latino/a White and Black workers; moreover, fatal occupational injury rates for Latino/a workers trended upwards during the most recent years of the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Latino/a workers in North Carolina have the highest fatal occupational injury rate of any race/ethnicity group.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , North Carolina/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia
7.
J Sports Sci ; 40(7): 821-837, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35100935

RESUMO

We investigated work-related-musculoskeletal-injuries (WMSI) over 15-years in professional modern dancers to determine injury rate and pattern differences due to sex and professional-experience. Injuries were coded to allow analyses by tissue-type, body-region, severity, setting, mechanism, action-causation, and repertory-style. Injury prevalence (IP) was defined as average risk of injury/dancer. Injury incidence rate (IIR) was calculated per 1000-hrs exposure/block. Negative binomial logistic regression analyses were conducted with exposure-hrs to determine IIR, p < 0.05. Multinomial logistic regressions determined differences in tissue-type, body-region, action-causation and repertory-style; Poisson loglinear regressions determined differences in severity and mechanism, p < 0.05. Females were 15-times more likely to sustain bone-injuries, p = 0.016; males 8- and 15-times more likely to sustain muscle/tendon-injuries or lacerations/contusions, p ≤ 0.016. Females were more likely to sustain severe injury resulting in more lost-workdays and missed-performances, p < 0.001. In both sexes, more time-loss-injuries (TL-inj) occurred in performance , were traumatic in nature, with an action-causation of jumping/stomping/relevé. Dancers of moderate professional-experience were 1.3-times more likely to sustain TL-inj, p = 0.026;. Identifying context-specific activities and repertory-style relationships to injury can provide insight into casting and rehearsal scheduling. Comprehending sex-specific musculoskeletal health needs allows improved dancer health management and injury prevention planning.


Assuntos
Dança , Sistema Musculoesquelético , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Traumatismos dos Tendões , Dança/lesões , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Sistema Musculoesquelético/lesões , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia
8.
Am J Public Health ; 112(S1): S77-S87, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35143279

RESUMO

Objectives. To examine prescription opioid and nonopioid analgesic use among US construction workers and their associations with pain conditions and sociodemographic factors. Methods. We analyzed data for about 9000 (weighted 11.5 million per year) construction workers who responded to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2011 to 2018. We applied both descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression procedures in the analyses. Results. An estimated 1.2 million (10.0%) of construction workers used prescription opioid analgesics annually. The adjusted odds of prescription opioid use were significantly higher for workers suffering from work-related injuries (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.72, 5.37), non‒work-related injuries (AOR = 3.37; 95% CI = 2.54, 4.46), and musculoskeletal disorders (AOR = 2.31; 95% CI = 1.80, 2.95) after we controlled for potential confounders. Adjusted odds of prescription opioid use were also higher among workers with poorer physical health (AOR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.42, 2.69) or mental health disorders (AOR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.41, 2.68). Conclusions. Work- and non‒work-related injuries and musculoskeletal disorders significantly increased prescription opioid use among construction workers. To prevent opioid use disorders, multipronged strategies should be approached. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(S1):S77-S87. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306510).


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Indústria da Construção/estatística & dados numéricos , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/tratamento farmacológico , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/epidemiologia , Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/tratamento farmacológico , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35206242

RESUMO

Occupational health is a key priority for the horseracing industry, yet little research on occupational injuries exists. This study investigated the prevalence and the effect of injury in British horseracing staff during a 12-month period. An online retrospective survey was answered by 352 participants, identifying self-reported injury prevalence, injury management practices and attitudes towards workplace injury reporting. Chi Squared tests for independence were undertaken. A total of 310 (88.1%) staff reported injuries; risk factors for injury type included self-perceived job security, working hours, and perceived job control. Physical limitations, loss of confidence, workplace changes, and lifestyle implications were reported as consequences of injury. A total of 75.3% (n = 134) of staff were likely to seek time-off following fractures, but only 48.6% (n = 86) would take time-off for concussion. Attitudes towards injury management were influenced by financial circumstances, perceived staff shortages, previous injury experiences, and perceived employer expectations. The high self-reported injury prevalence could result in decreased workforce efficiency, poor physical health, and negative implications on retention and career longevity. The perception of invisible injuries, i.e., concussion, and subsequent management, should be of immediate concern to racing organizations. This paper identifies recommendations to enhance the safety and wellbeing of horseracing staff.


Assuntos
Saúde do Trabalhador , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Humanos , Indústrias , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Local de Trabalho
10.
Inj Prev ; 28(2): 175-184, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34972683

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Paramedics are frequently exposed to acute and/or chronic environmental, operational and patient-related factors that increase their risk of physical and psychological injury. However, there has been wide variation in reported paramedic injury rates. This systematic review aims to synthesise the evidence to examine the incidence and nature of occupational injury among paramedics. METHODS: This systematic review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines (PROSPERO 2020: CRD42020164556). A systematic search of four electronic databases was conducted for the years 2004-2019. Peer-reviewed studies examining the incidence and proportions of paramedic occupational injury within civilian emergency medical services (EMS) were included. Injury types, mechanisms, contributing factors and incidence of injury were synthesised narratively. RESULTS: Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. The incidence of injury ranged from 29.7 to 345.6 injuries per 1000 workers per year. Sprains and strains were the most reported injury types, and the trunk and upper limbs were the main sites. Body motion was the most frequently reported mechanism of injury, accounting for 35%-55% of all injuries. Female paramedics had a proportionally higher rate of injury compared with male paramedics. Paramedics aged 25-34 years accounted for the majority of fatal (mean 34.0%) and non-fatal (mean 51.7%) injuries. CONCLUSION: This review highlights the increased risk of occupational injury among paramedics and provides further insight into their overall injury profile.


Assuntos
Serviços Médicos de Emergência , Auxiliares de Emergência , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia
11.
Am J Ind Med ; 65(3): 214-227, 2022 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35092041

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the work-related injury and illness risk of out-of-province workers. This study examines whether there are differences in work-related injury and illness claim rates between within-province and out-of-province workers in British Columbia (BC), Canada. METHODS: Workers' compensation claim data for injuries and illnesses in BC from 2010 to 2017 were linked with denominator data from Statistics Canada. Multivariable negative binomial regression estimated the claim rate ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for out-of-province workers with all, health care-only (HCO), short-term disability, long-term disability, and fatality (SLF), and serious injury (SI) claims, compared to within-province workers. RESULTS: Compared to within-province workers, out-of-province workers had a lower total claim rate (RR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.52-0.57), adjusting for sex, age, industry sector, and year. Differences in rates differed by claim type, with the largest differences for HCO claims (RR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.47-0.52) and smallest differences for SI claims (RR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.78-0.92). Sex-stratified models showed larger differences for males than females, with older female out-of-province workers having elevated SI claim rates. Industry-specific models showed that, even in sectors with high proportions of out-of-province workers' claims, these workers have lower claim rates than within-province workers. CONCLUSIONS: Out-of-province workers generally have lower claim rates than within-province workers. The overall duration of work exposure, and underreporting or underclaiming, are factors that may explain these lower claim rates. Understanding the determinants and differences of these claim rates may improve the administration and adjudication of claims while also identifying where further prevention measures may be merited.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Colúmbia Britânica , Feminino , Humanos , Indústrias , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Indenização aos Trabalhadores
12.
Int J Occup Saf Ergon ; 28(2): 798-808, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33034256

RESUMO

Purpose. This study investigated self-reported occupational injuries among mothers in a large birth cohort study and the relation of their characteristics to different injury outcomes: occurrence, severity, temporal proximity and recurrence. Methods. We asked 4338 women whether they had been in 'an accident at work, even if it did not require medical treatment', and the number of accidents throughout their working life, type of injury and whether it occurred within the last 12 months. Results. Over one-fifth (21.8%) of working-age mothers reported having at least one occupational injury throughout their working life. Wounds and superficial injuries were the most frequently reported types of occupational injuries (11.0%), followed by dislocated bones and joints, sprains and strains (10.7%). Women who reported a history of occupational injuries also had a higher likelihood of reporting a work-related health problem (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] [2.27, 3.07]) and of having a partner who also reported an occupational injury throughout their working life (adjusted OR = 1.86; 95% CI [1.33, 2.62]). Associations remained fairly stable across all outcomes. Conclusions. Our findings point towards a broadened understanding of occupational injury consequences and research focusing on family-level factors that account for the embeddedness of workers in households.


Assuntos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Acidentes de Trabalho , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Mães , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Autorrelato
13.
Arch Environ Occup Health ; 77(1): 9-17, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33073742

RESUMO

The aim of this article was to review the current knowledge relating to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs) and non-fatal injuries in emergency medical technicians and paramedics (EMTs-Ps). A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Google Scholar, and Clinical Key. The annual prevalence of back pain ranged from 30% to 66%, and back injuries and contusions from 4% to 43%. Falls, slips, trips, and overexertion while lifting or carrying patients or instruments ranged from 10% to 56%, with overexertion being the most common injury. Risk factors were predominantly lifting, working in awkward postures, loading patients into the ambulance, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures. Lack of job satisfaction and social support was associated with WRMDs and injuries. EMTs-Ps had the highest rate of worker compensation claim rates compared to other healthcare professionals. Positive ergonomic intervention results included electrically powered stretchers, backboard wheeler, descent control system, and the transfer sling.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Emergência , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Humanos , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/economia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/economia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco
14.
J Epidemiol ; 32(1): 12-20, 2022 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33041319

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The long-term effects of occupational injury (OI) on psychiatric diseases are unclear. This study assessed and compared the effects of OI, no injury (control), and non-OI (NOI) on the development of psychiatric diseases. METHODS: We used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to investigate the incidence of psychiatric disorders in OI, NOI, and control groups. The subjects were aged 20-50 years, actively employed in 2000, and did not have history of injury or psychiatric disorders. All subjects were followed from 2000 and were classified into OI, NOI, and control groups according to occurrence of target injury later on. Individuals in each group were matched by age, sex, insurance premium before the index date, and year of the index date. Psychiatric disease-free days were compared among the groups using survival analysis and Cox regression. RESULTS: We included a total of 12,528 patients for final analysis, with 4,176 in each group. Compared with the control group, the OI group had an increased occurrence of trauma and stress-related disorder, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and alcohol and other substance dependence. These increases were similar to those in the NOI group. Elevated cumulative incidence rate of any psychiatric disorders was observed among those with OI or NOI up to 10 years after injury. CONCLUSION: We confirmed that OI and NOI induced psychiatric disorders. These findings highlight the need for workers' compensation mechanisms to consider long-term psychological care among injured workers.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Adulto , Humanos , Incidência , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Programas Nacionais de Saúde , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health ; 95(3): 723-735, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34674035

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify predictors of return to work, duration of time off work, and claim closure for first responders experiencing injuries or illnesses, and summarize the claim data. METHODS: First responder claims collected between January 2012 and July 2017 were obtained from a disability management company. Known predictors of return to work were extracted from the data including age, sex, diagnosis, years of service, claim lag, medical report lag, and the return-to-work duties. Survival analyses were performed to identify predictors of return to work and claim closure using the Cox proportional regression analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to identify predictors that affected the rate of return to work and claim closure. Summary statistics were performed for the injury and return-to-work data. RESULTS: 60 of the 67 (89.6%) identified first responders returned to work within the data collection period. Musculoskeletal injuries predicted an increased likelihood of returning to work (hazard ratio = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.14-3.60) and a shorter duration of time off work (37 days on average) compared to mental health issues. Everyday of claim lag and medical report lag predicted a 2% decrease in likelihood of return to work. Returning to work was the only predictor of claim closure. 45 (67.2%) first responders returned to their pre-absence duties. 22 (32.8%) mental health claims and 45 (67.2%) injury claims were identified. CONCLUSIONS: 89.6% of first responders returned to work, although only 67.2% returned to their pre-absence duties. Predictors of return to work included injury type, as first responders with musculoskeletal injuries returned to work sooner, and claim and medical lag delayed the return to work.


Assuntos
Socorristas , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Retorno ao Trabalho , Indenização aos Trabalhadores
16.
Am J Ind Med ; 65(1): 30-40, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34706100

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mining is a significant economic force in the United States but has historically had among the highest nonfatal injury rates across all industries. Several factors, including workplace hazards and psychosocial stressors, may increase injury and fatality risk. Mining is one of the noisiest industries; however, the association between injury risk and noise exposure has not been evaluated in this industry. In this ecological study, we assessed the association between noise exposure and nonfatal and fatal occupational injury rates among miners. METHODS: Federal US mining accident, injury, and illness data sets from 1983 to 2014 were combined with federal quarterly mining employment and production reports to quantify annual industry rates of nonfatal injuries and fatalities. An existing job-exposure matrix for occupational noise was used to estimate annual industry time-weighted average (TWA, dBA) exposures. Negative binomial models were used to assess relationships between noise, hearing conservation program (HCP) regulation changes in 2000, year, and mine type with incidence rates of injuries and fatalities. RESULTS: Noise, HCP regulation changes, and mine type were each independently associated with nonfatal injuries and fatalities. In multivariate analysis, each doubling (5 dB increase) of TWA was associated with 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.11) and 1.48 (1.23, 1.78) times higher rate of nonfatal injuries and fatalities, respectively. HCP regulation changes were associated with 0.61 (0.54, 0.70) and 0.49 (0.34, 0.71) times lower nonfatal injury and fatality rates, respectively. CONCLUSION: Noise may be a significant independent risk factor for injuries and fatalities in mining.


Assuntos
Mineradores , Ruído Ocupacional , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Humanos , Mineração , Ruído Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
17.
Occup Environ Med ; 79(5): 304-307, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34697222

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The contribution of hazardous noise-a ubiquitous exposure in workplaces-to occupational injury risk is often overlooked. In this ecological study, the fraction of US workplace acute injuries resulting in days away from work in 2019 attributable to hazardous occupational noise exposure was estimated. METHODS: Using the NoiseJEM, a job exposure matrix of occupational noise, and 2019 Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics data, the proportion of workers experiencing hazardous occupational noise (≥85 dBA) was estimated for every major US Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) group. Population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated for each major SOC group using the relative risk (RR) taken from a published 2017 meta-analysis on this relationship. RESULTS: About 20.3 million workers (13.8%) are exposed to hazardous levels of occupational noise. Nearly 3.4% of acute injuries resulting in days away from work in 2019 (95% CI 2.4% to 4.4%) were attributable to hazardous occupational noise, accounting for roughly 14 794 injuries (95% CI 10 367 to 18 994). The occupations with the highest and the lowest PAFs were production (11.9%) and office and administrative support (0.0%), respectively. DISCUSSION: Hazardous noise exposure at work is an important and modifiable factor associated with a substantial acute occupational injury burden.


Assuntos
Ruído Ocupacional , Doenças Profissionais , Exposição Ocupacional , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Humanos , Ruído Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Doenças Profissionais/epidemiologia , Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/etiologia , Ocupações
18.
J Burn Care Res ; 43(2): 399-402, 2022 03 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34562012

RESUMO

Electrical injuries are an uncommon but very destructive type of burn, with serious complications and disabilities for the victims. This study was conducted due to the importance of understanding the epidemiology of electrical accidents in planning to prevent their occurrence. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study that was performed on patients with electrical burns referred to Shahid Motahari Educational and Medical Center from 2017 to 2018. Patients' information was entered in the researcher-made information registration form, including demographic and accident-related information. In this study, most of the accidents occurred in the workplace with high-voltage electricity. Contact with overhead cables and wires was the most common cause of injury. Excision and graft surgeries were the most common type of surgery. The variables of sex, age, length of hospital stay, and type of job had a significant relationship with the type of voltage (P < .05). The difference between the ratio of men to women and the length of hospitalization in the group of injured with high-voltage electricity was greater and most of these patients were construction workers. The variables of sex, nationality, length of hospital stay, and cause of the accident had a significant relationship with the type of job (P < .05). Construction workers are the main group at risk of electrical damage in Iran. Therefore, it is recommended to conduct more extensive studies in the field of recognizing and implementing practical methods of preventing electrical injuries, especially in high-risk work environments.


Assuntos
Queimaduras , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Queimaduras/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Eletricidade , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
19.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): 212-217, 2022 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34873135

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine factors associated with return to work in US diplomats injured during a work assignment in Cuba. METHODS: In this case series work ability was determined at each visit. Questionnaires used included the Symptom Score Questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Quality-of-Life Inventory, and Patient Health Questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 45 employees referred to Occupational Medicine, the mean age was 42.5 years, 60% were men, 68% were never out of work, 22% were out of work for some period, and 15% remain out of work. Vestibular, cognitive, hearing, sleep, and visual symptoms, and a higher initial symptom score were significantly associated with work inability while psychiatric symptoms were not. CONCLUSIONS: This exposure resulted in prolonged illness with cognitive impairment and other clinical manifestations associated with work inability.


Assuntos
Empregados do Governo , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Adulto , Cuba , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Retorno ao Trabalho , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
20.
Am J Ind Med ; 65(2): 105-116, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34775629

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Minnesota Safe Patient Handling (MN SPH) Act requires health care facilities to implement comprehensive programs to protect their workers from musculoskeletal injuries caused by lifting and transferring patients. Nursing homes, hospitals, and outpatient facilities each face unique challenges implementing and maintaining SPH programs. The objective of the study was to compare patient handling injuries in these three health care settings and determine whether change in injury rate over time differed by setting following enactment of the law. METHODS: Workers' compensation data from a Minnesota-based insurer were used to describe worker and claim characteristics in nursing homes, hospitals, and outpatient facilities. Negative binomial models were used to compare claims and estimate mean annual patient handling claim rates by health care setting and time period following enactment of the law. RESULTS: Consistent with national data, the patient handling claim rate was highest in Minnesota nursing homes (168 claims/$100 million payroll [95% confidence interval: 163-174]) followed by hospitals (35/$100 million payroll [34-37]) and outpatient facilities (2/$100 million payroll [1.8-2.2]). Patient handling claims declined by 38% over 10 years following enactment of the law (vs. 27% for all other claims). The change in claims over time did not differ by health care setting. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-insurer sample, declines in workers' compensation claims for patient handling injuries were consistent across health care settings following enactment of a state SPH law. Though nursing homes experienced elevated claim rates overall, results suggest they are not lagging hospitals and outpatient facilities in reducing patient handling injuries.


Assuntos
Movimentação e Reposicionamento de Pacientes , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas , Traumatismos Ocupacionais , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Minnesota , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/epidemiologia , Traumatismos Ocupacionais/prevenção & controle , Indenização aos Trabalhadores
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